Landri-RulesOfTheGame by LandriTheGame

VIEWS: 103 PAGES: 11

More Info
									Landri
Rules of the Game
1
Islands and Resources
Islands produce resources. The larger the island, the more resources are available.
Each island on the map is numbered and lettered. The numbers are used to keep track
of who has claim on the island, and the letter displays the resource count that is
available for gathering. T-tiny. Players can gather 1 gold at the beginning of each of
their turns from every civilian settler gathering resources. S-small. Players can gather 2
gold at the beginning of each of their turns from every civilian settler gathering
resources. M-medium. Players can gather 3 gold at the beginning of each of their turns
from every civilian settler gathering resources. L-large. Players can gather 4 gold at the
beginning of each of their turns from every civilian settler gathering resources. H-huge.
Players can gather 5 gold at the beginning of each of their turns from every civilian
settler gathering resources.

 Players can verbally claim as many islands as they want, however this has no real
effect. An island isn't officially claimed unless the player has either a colony or
settlement established on the island that he/she is claiming. When players make a claim
on any land they must declare it out loud so all the other players can hear and know. If a
player has claim on an island he/she will receive an additional 500 gold bonus at the
beginning of each of his/her turns for every settlement* that has 500 settled* civilian
settlers or more, and 1000 gold for every colony* with 1000 settlers or more. Only one
colony per player is allowed on the same island. If players wish to establish new
colonies they must establish them on other islands where they don't already have a
colony [See 2-3*]. Players who have claim on an island and allow other players to also
gather resources from their island will lose their gold bonus. Players who are gathering
resources and do not have claim on the island they are on will gather 1 less gold at the
beginning of each turn for every other player on the same island, however the gold
income cannot be reduced below 1 gold each turn.

 Example: Player A has claim on Island 12 which is a L-large size island, meaning 4
gold can be gathered at the beginning of each turn for every civilian settler. Player B
and C also have settlements on this island. Player A loses whatever his/her per turn
gold bonus is and Player B and C's total gold available for gathering per civilian settler
each turn is reduced by 2 points, meaning they can only gather 2 gold at the beginning
of each turn per civilian settler.

2
Establishing New Colonies
Players can establish colonies on any piece of land for the cost of 10,000 gold. A player
without a colony cannot receive shipments from the mainland [See 9*]. Civilian settlers
that are located in colonies do not have to be settled* in order to gather resources [See
3*]. Players establishing colonies must specify in the smaller map brackets ( )*
section of their Player Statistics Sheet* whether it is an inland* colony or a coastal* port
colony by abbreviating either an I*-inland or a C*-coastal [See 16*]. Players may move
their units, supplies, and goods from ships directly into coastal port colonies. A coastal
port colony can only be established in a grid square where there is both accessible land
and sea [See 4*]. The sea* space of a coastal port colony is referred to as the port
waters* of that colony. When moving units, supplies, and goods from a ship to an inland
colony, players must first move their units onto land and then move an additional space
into the inland colony. When a player establishes a new colony he/she must have 500
civilian settlers in the area of establishment. Players must also declare this action out
loud* and specify what island the colony is on. Colonies are always an area of interest*
whether or not players ask where they are located [See 5*].

3
Establishing New Settlements
Players can establish settlements on any piece of land for the cost of 1 gold for every
civilian settler. The Settled( )* box must be checked on the Player Statistics Sheet*
[See 16*]. Civilian settlers that are located in settlements must be settled* in order to
gather resources. If a player’s settled civilian settlers are moved from the settlement
they are no longer settled and the Settled( )* box must be un-checked. Civilian
settlers with an un-checked Settled( ) Box can no longer gather resources unless
re-settled* in a new area or move back to another settlement or colony. If they are
moved back to another settlement the cost to re-settle* is not required and the Settled(
)* box may be re-checked. Once players establish settlements they must specify in the
smaller map brackets ( )* section of their Player Statistics Sheet* whether the
settlement is an inland* settlement or a coastal port* settlement by abbreviating either
an I*-inland or a C*-coastal [See 16*]. Players may move their units, supplies, and
goods from ships directly into coastal port settlements. A coastal port settlement can
only be established in a grid square where there is both accessible land and sea [See
4*]. The sea* space of a port settlement is referred to as the port waters* of that
settlement. When moving units, supplies, and goods from a ship into an inland
settlement, players must first move their units onto land, and then move an additional
space into the inland settlement. Settlements are always an area of interest* whether
players ask about where they are located or not [See 5*].

4
Grid Squares, Spaces, and Unit Movement
The map has 100 grid squares* lettered and numbered from A-J vertically and 1-10
horizontally. Within each of these grid squares there may be additional spaces* where
players may position their units. Units include civilian settlers, militia forces, regular
military forces, and battleships. Seas, islands, colonies, and settlements all count as
separate spaces*.

 Example: Imagine square E5, it's mostly sea but there is also an island. The sea and
the island within square E5 each count as separate individual spaces within that grid
square. Players can only move their units 1 grid square or 1 space within a square each
turn, excluding battleships [See 13-14-15*]. When a player moves a battleship, any
units inside of the ship technically haven't moved yet since the ship was the unit that
moved. When a player establishes a new colony or settlement, even though no player
can actually see them on the map, it does not mean that they aren't there or that they
don't count as a separate space within the grid square where they were established
[See 2-3*]. Players keep track of where their newly established colonies and
settlements are on their Player Statistics Sheet* [See 16*]. Other players will also be
able to know where these colonies and settlements are located on the map using their
Player Tracking Sheets [See 17*]. Some grid squares will have several islands or seas
in them. Islands are distinguished as separate spaces by the black number* that is near
them. If there are several seas in one square, they will be separated as individual
spaces with black lettering* from A-B-and so on. Players cannot move their units more
than 1 space each turn, the only exception to this rule is that battleships can move 2
spaces each turn, or if a player is retreating his/her forces [See 20*]. When players
move their forces from one grid square to another, or one space within a grid square to
another, they must declare this action verbally so other players may hear them.

 Example: When Player A moves his/her battleship(s) from square E5 to F6, he must
declare what he is moving, whether it be battleships or land units, plural or singular. "I
move battleship(s) to a new square*."Or: "I move land unit(s) to a new square*." This
lets the other players know when units are being moved around the map, except they
don't know the specific location because Player A does not have to say which grid
square his/her units are located in, or to what grid square they are being moved to [See
5*]. When moving units to a new space within a grid square, Player A must also declare
this out loud*: "I move battleship(s) to a new space*." Or "I move land unit(s) to a new
space*." Any player who moves ships along a trade route must declare verbally the
quantity of ships being moved, and to what grid square they are being moved to.

 Example: Player A moves 3 battleships along a trade route from C4 to G7. He/she
must declare this verbally: "I move 3 battleships from square C4 to G7." [See 5 and
7-8*].

5
Areas of Interest
Each player's units are invisible on the map and their locations are unknown to each
other. However there are methods to discover the general or exact locations of other
player's units. Colored game markers* are used for every player with their own team
colors. The colored game markers* are used so other players can know the general
locations of each other's units. In the game, the colored game markers* are referred to
as areas of interest* since the locations of other player's units will be of interest to
everyone who is playing.

 In order to discover whether or not other players have units in a certain grid square you
must reveal that you have units in that grid square by placing a game marker of your
team color in that square. With any grid square where units have been revealed,
anyone else who has units within any of the spaces of the same grid square must also
reveal that they have units in the same square. After you have discovered that another
player has units within a grid square, in order to find out exactly where that player's units
are located you must ask specifics. You cannot ask another player if he/she has units in
a specific space within a grid square unless you also have units in the same space that
you are inquiring about. Once you discover the exact location of the other player's units
he/she must tell you what type of units they are, whether they are military units or
civilian settlers [See 6*].

 A player being asked what type of units he/she has in a certain space may tell the
inquiring player that his/her militia forces are civilian settlers [See 11*]. Reminder: grid
squares are the black boxes* that encompass smaller spaces* through-out the map.
There are 100 grid squares lettered and numbered from A-J vertically and 1-10
horizontally [See 4*].

6
Unit search and Inspection
Players may search units and inspect each others colonies and settlements after
they've been revealed. Before a player can search another player's units, inspect
his/her colonies or settlements he/she must first have the other players permission.
After a player's colony, settlement, or units have been searched, the player who has
performed the search/inspection may inquire about any details he/she wishes to know
of the colony, settlement, or units he/she has searched. The player who was
searched/inspected is obliged to answer truthfully to any questions about the details of
his/her units after being searched.

7
Trade Routes, Naval Blockades, and Checkpoints
The trade routes are the dashed lines* leading through the map. When traveling along a
trade route with battleships players may move their ships as many spaces as they want
as long as they stay on the path of the trade route. When traveling on a trade route
players cannot merge their battleships onto another route until the beginning of their
next turn. If a player is moving his/her ships across a trade route, and his/her ships
move into the same square where another player's ships are, and are intended to keep
moving, the player currently not having their turn can force the traveling player to stop
his/her ships in that square. Players may set up naval blockades and checkpoints to
stop each other while traveling on trade routes. Naval blockades and checkpoints can
be used for any number of reasons, but they are usually there to search ships passing
into a player's territory to make sure they aren't too heavily armed [See 13-14-15 and
6*].

8
Commerce
Trade between players is a profitable way to earn gold in this game. If good relations
are established with other players there shouldn't be any problems whilst trying to trade
with them, but you must first have their permission. In order to trade, a player has to get
some civilian settlers inside of another player's colony for 1 turn to earn trade supply.
The amount of trade supply each civilian settler can earn while in another player's
colony varies significantly. In order to determine the available trade supply you must first
count the number of grid squares* that separate each player's colony.

 Example: Player A wants to trade with Player B. Player A must count from the grid
square where his/her colony is located across the map to where Player B's colony is
located. The more grid squares that separate each player's colony, the more trade
supply their civilian settlers can earn. Imagine Player A's colony is separated by Player
B's colony by 13 grid squares. This means each of player A's civilian settlers located in
player B's colony will earn 13 trade supply points each. Player A's civilian settlers must
then return with the trade supply back to his own colony to convert into gold. This
process can be very slow unless the trade routes are used to speed up the process.
1 trade supply can be redeemed for 5 gold. A player's civilian settlers out on trading
expeditions cannot exceed over 1/4th of his/her total civilian settler population. Trade
supply can be returned to any colony, except the colony from where it originally came.

9
Shipments
When a player purchases shipments from the mainland the shipments will arrive on the
edge of the game map* on the trade route he/she chooses at the beginning of his/her
next turn. In order to purchase shipments from the mainland, a player must have a
battleship to deliver the goods. A player may purchase a battleship and crew to deliver
the goods on the turn that the ship arrives. If a player already has a battleship he/she
can move the ship out of the map using the trade routes to load the ship with purchased
goods and supplies. The ship must be returned on the player’s next turn.

 Whenever a shipment comes to a player from the mainland along with the shipment
once per turn also comes 500 civilian settlers. When waiting for a shipment it's best to
simply put an arrow (--->)* in the Map(          )* box [See 16*].

10
Colonial Settlers
Colonial settlers, also referred to as civilians, when located in colonies* or settled* in
settlements* provide a source of gold income through work and taxes for the needs of
government. Civilian settlers can be trained into militia forces, the only cost to do this is
to equip them with war supply* [See 11 and 19*]. Colonial Settlers have 1 hit point and 0
attack points.

11
Militia Forces
Militia forces are unique; they can launch surprise attacks by disguising themselves as
civilian settlers. When players ask* what kind of units you have in a specific space, you
may tell them that your militia forces are civilian settlers, unless the player asking also
searches* your units [See 6*].
 A player may train civilian settlers into militia forces, the only cost to do this is to equip
them with war supply* [See 19*]. If militia forces are unequipped with war supply they
revert back to civilian settler status. A player's militia forces cannot exceed over 1/4th of
his/her total settler population. After civilian settlers have been trained into a militia force
they can no longer provide gold resources. Militia forces have 1 hit point and 1 attack
point. The amount of war supply cost to attack and defend during military engagements
is 1 point [See 19-20*].

12
Regular Military Forces
Military forces are used to defend your civilian settlers and capture new territory.
Regular military forces have 1 hit point and 1 attack point. The amount of war supply
cost to attack and defend during military engagements is 1 point [See 19-20*]. The cost
to ship regular military forces from the mainland is 10 gold [See 9*].

13
Light Class Battleships
Battleships are used to defend, capture, and transport goods across the sea.
Battleships cannot attack if the crew of the ship consists of civilian settlers. Light class
battleships cannot be moved if the crew count of the ship is 10 or under. Maximum crew
count 50. Ships can move up to 2 spaces each turn. Light class battleships have 50 hit
points and 50 attack points. The amount of war supply cost to attack and defend during
military engagements is 50 points [See 19-20*]. The cost to purchase a light class
battleship from the mainland is 10,000 gold [See 9*].

13
Medium Class Battleships
Battleships are used to defend, capture, and transport goods across the sea.
Battleships cannot attack if the crew of the ship consists of civilian settlers. Medium
class battleships cannot be moved if the crew count of the ship is 20 or under.
Maximum crew count 100. Ships can move up to 2 spaces each turn. Medium class
battleships have 100 hit points and 100 attack points. The amount of war supply cost to
attack and defend during military engagements is 100 points [See 19-20*]. The cost to
purchase a Medium class battleship from the mainland is 15,000 gold [See 9*].

13
Heavy Class Battleships
Battleships are used to defend, capture, and transport goods across the sea.
Battleships cannot attack if the crew of the ship consists of civilian settlers. Heavy class
battleships cannot be moved if the crew count of the ship is 40 or under. Maximum crew
count 200. Ships can move up to 2 spaces each turn. Heavy class battleships have 200
hit points and 200 attack points. The amount of war supply cost to attack and defend
during military engagements is 200 points [See 19-20*]. The cost to purchase a heavy
class battleship from the mainland is 20,000 gold [See 9*].

16
Player Statistics Sheet
The only way players can keep track of their unit's details, positions, and save their
progress in the game is for them to write these things down on paper. The Player
Statistics Sheet* makes this process a whole lot easier. The Player Statistics Sheet for
the most part is pretty self explanatory. At the top of each player's statistics sheet are
the team colors: Red( ), Blue( ), Green( ), Yellow( ), Orange( ), Pink, and
Other( ). Each player will check the box of his/her own team color. The team Other(
) refers to the unofficial player* and his/her team color is brown [See 30*]. In the Name(
)* box players would sign their names, so if the game is paused and picked up at a later
time they will still be able to use their same sheet and pick up where they left off if the
game was unfinished. Next are the diplomatic positions. Next to each team color are the
boxes Neutral( ), War( ), and Ally( ). Whatever the neutrality with each individual
player is, it will be listed in these boxes.

 The next six rows are the number of battleships each player can have. At the
beginning of each row you will see the Class( ) box. There are 3 classes of
battleships and in this box you specify the class of your battleship. L-light class
battleship, M-medium class battleship, and H-heavy class battleship [See 13-14-15*].
Next is the Crew( )(              )* box. In the smaller* box next to the larger one
abbreviate the type of crew that is sailing your battleship. C-civilian crew, small m-militia
crew, and capital M-regular military crew. The HP(                )* box is used to specify the
hit points of your battleship. The Settlers(            )* box is used to specify the number
of civilian settlers aboard your battleship. The Military Forces(              )* box is used to
specify the number of military passengers aboard your battleship. If you also have
militia forces just write the number in the notes* section directly below the Military
Forces(              ) box. The WS(            )* box is used to specify the amount of war
supply that the ship has in it's hold. The Trade Supply(               )* box is used to
specify the amount of trade supply that is stored in the ship's hold. The Map(                 )*
box is used to specify exactly where your ship is located on the map.

 Example: Imagine Player A has a battleship in grid E7 sea # B. He/she would simply
abbreviate this in the Map box (E7-B.)* After explaining how the ship slots work you'll
have no problem figuring out how the rest of the Player Statistics Sheet works. Players
cannot have any more units than his/her Player Statistics Sheet will allow and each unit
type must be specified in their own categories.

17
Player Tracking Sheet
The Player Tracking Sheet is used to keep track of your own, and other player's claimed
territories, and their unit's general locations. The general locations of units are also kept
track of using the colored game markers* that come with the game. The game markers*
do not give specific locations of where a player has units, only that they may be located
in any of the spaces within a grid square.

18
Round It Down
Whenever adding or subtracting numbers that would result in 1/2* round them down to
the nearest whole number.

 Example: Player A has a 13 strong military force and player B has a 20 strong force,
Player A attacks Player B's forces and Player B's forces are reduced by 6 1/2 which isn't
possible so round it down to an even 6.

19
War Supply
War supply is used to fuel a player's military forces with fighting materials such as
weapons and ammunition. Without war supply a player's military forces cannot attack
and are open to direct attack without defense from enemy forces [See 20*].

 Example: Player A has a 500 strong military force and Player B has a 700 strong
military force. Player A attacks Player B but Player B has no war supply to defend his
troops, so his forces are reduced by 500 and Player A's forces take no casualties. When
a player's forces do not have the amount of war supply needed to attack or defend
his/her forces attack or defense power will be reduced to whatever amount of war
supply is available. 1 point of war supply can be shipped from the mainlands for a cost
of 1 gold [See 9*]. This rule applies in both land and naval battles.

20
Land and Naval Battles
When a player declares an attack with his/her military forces on another player's army,
the number of attacking forces that exceed the number of the defending player's forces
are subtracted and the attacking player’s forces take half the damage of the player who
was attacked.

 Example: Player A's military forces are 500 strong and he/she attacks Player B's 400
strong force. Player B's forces are reduced by 100 points, and Player A's forces are
reduced by 50 points. After damage calculation player A may either retreat or let player
B have his/her attack/retreat phase. If player A does not retreat then Player B now has
the option to either attack or retreat. If he/she chooses to retreat he/she may retreat
his/her forces 1 space away. If Player B chooses to attack, then the appropriate
subtractions must be taken to each player's forces, and then Player B will once again
have the option to retreat or he/she can let Player A have his/her attack/retreat phase.
Player A will then have the option to either attack or retreat. This changing of turns is
continued until a player's forces are defeated, surrender, or retreat. If a player attacks
and the defending player's forces outnumber the attacking player, the attacking player's
forces only take half the usual damage, and the defending player's forces take half the
damage that the attacking player's forces take. When two forces are drawn into battle
with an equal attack power on both sides, each side is reduced by 1/5th of it's total
numbers.

 Example: Player A has a military force of 500 and so does Player B. Player A attacks
Player B's forces. Player A and B's forces are both reduced by 100 points. If a player
has mixed forces and is drawn into a battle he/she can choose which units take the
damage first.

 Example: Player A has a 700 strong force, but he/she also has 300 civilian settlers
mixed with his force. Player B attacks Player A with a 1000 strong force. Player A's
forces are reduced by 300 points. Player A may choose which units take the 300 points
of damage whether it is his/her 300 civilian settlers or his/her military forces. If Player A
chooses to commit war crimes by placing his civilian settlers on the front lines, Player B
may choose to halt the attack [See 25*].
When attacking, players may also choose to reduce the attack damage they are
inflicting. Naval battles are fought almost exactly like land battles except when in battle
each player takes a turn attacking with 1 battleship on whatever target he/she chooses.
When in battle, ships take direct damage split in half. Half the damage to their hit points
and the other half to the crew of the ship.

 Example: Player A attacks Player B's light class battleship with his/her medium class
battleship. Player B's light class battleship's hit points and crew are both reduced by 50
points and Player A's medium class battleship's hit points and crew are reduced by 25
points. If two players have an equal attack force before battle begins, the two players
can agree on both rolling a 6 sided dice on the initial attack to increase their forces
attack and defense power. For land based warfare each dot on the dice counts as a +
10 attack and defense bonus, and + 5 attack and defense bonus for naval based
warfare.

21
Managing Captured Colonies and Settlements
After capturing a colony or settlement, the player who originally had control of the
colony or settlement must also continue to manage the details of that colony or
settlement on his/her Player Statistics Sheet. He/she must keep you informed of it's
details and progress whenever you inquire about it.

22
Capturing Prisoners
A player can capture and imprison another player's civilian settlers and military forces
as long as there is no military opposition to keep them from doing this. Prisoners must
be guarded with no fewer than 10 guards for every 100 prisoners to keep them from
escaping. The guards must either be militia or regular military forces. When a player
takes prisoners into his/her colonies or settlements they do not need guards.

23
Capturing Battleships
A Battleship can be boarded when the crew count of the ship drops below the minimum.
In order to capture an enemy battleship the enemy crew must surrender or be killed by
the other player's boarding party. A boarding party can only consist of another player's
crew from his/her own battleship, and military passengers are excluded from fighting
while aboard battleships.
24
Repairing Battleships
The hit points of a battleship can be repaired in 1 turn, so long as the ship is within
friendly port waters of a coastal colony or settlement [See 2-3*].

25
The Rules of War
Players should avoid such things as forcing civilian prisoners of war to work, killing
prisoners of war, attacking civilian settlers for any reason, forcing their troops to battle
impossible opposition, and attacking neutral or allied players without first declaring a
state of war. Any player who behaves this way might as well welcome becoming a
public enemy. Civilian prisoners of war do not have to have the Settled( )* box
checked to gather resources, however the maximum amount of gold per turn available
from forced labor is 1 point.

26
Realism
If there is a realistic action a payer would like to make while playing the game and it
does not conflict with the written rules, ask the other players and take a vote whether or
not it should be allowed. This can make for very interesting game-play.

27
In-Game Agreements
In-game agreements and negotiations can and will always be changing, arguments will
arise and wars will be imminent. As a tip to all players it is probably best to have players
sign their name on a note of paper where you specify the rules of your in-game
agreements so when arguments arise you can rightfully prove your case without looking
like a tyrant.

28
You the Governor
Each player plays as the governor of his/her own colony. If a player's governor is
assassinated, that player loses the game. The governor is no different than any 1
civilian settler, his/her location must be carefully kept track of at all times using the
notes* of the Player Statistics Sheet*. A player cannot capture or assassinate another
player's governor if there is any form of military resistance keeping him/her from killing
or taking him/her prisoner [See 20-22*].

29
Starting the Game
At the beginning of the game each player chooses his/her team colored Island. Any
team colored islands not chosen by a player will remain neutral and cannot be traveled
on for the duration of the game. Each player's fixed starting coastal colony* starts out
with 800 civilian settlers, a 500 strong military force, and 1000 points of war supply. In
the port waters of the coastal colony is 1 light class battleship with 50 military crew (not
militia)* and 200 points of war supply. The fixed starting coastal settlements* start out
with 100 settled* civilian settlers. Red player may have the first turn followed by
Blue-Green-Yellow-Orange, and then finally Pink. If there is an unofficial player in the
game he/she will take his/her turn last [See 30*]. At the beginning of the game each
player's diplomatic positions start out as neutral* with each other, although players may
change their neutrality at any time during the game.

30
The Unofficial Player
Landri is a 6 player board game with teams Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange, and
Pink. A 7th player may join the game without being on any of these teams, although this
player will be at a major disadvantage. The unofficial player may start with 1 coastal
settlement* with 200 settlers. This settlement must be placed on any T-S (tiny or small)*
sized island, so long as it's not a team colored Island. The unofficial player also starts
with 1 light class battleship with 10 military crew (not militia)* and 50 points of war
supply. The unofficial player cannot purchase shipments from the mainland [See 9*].

31
How to Win the Game
There are three ways a player can win the game. One way is to defeat all enemy
opposition through military conquest. The second way would be to assassinate the
other player's governor. The third and final way is to have the most victory points at the
conclusion of all players declaring peace at the end of the game. Victory points are
earned for having control over land.

 Example: Player A has island 22, 12, and 13 in his possession at the end of the game.
Island 22 is a L-large sized island which is 4 victory points. Island 12 is a S-small sized
island which is 2 victory points. Island 13 is a M-medium sized island which is 3 victory
points. Add them all together and Player A has 9 victory points. The player with the
most victory points at the end of the game wins! [See 1*].

 Reminder: A player cannot claim control over an island unless he/she has a colony or
settlement on that island.

32
Playing Without Game Markers*
The game can be played without the colored game markers* to make the game-play a
little bit harder and more strategic. Instead of placing colored game markers on the
map, players can keep track of the areas of interest* by using and checking the grid
positions on their Player Tracking Sheets* [See 5 and 17*].




Landri The Game 2010

								
To top