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					ETSI TISPAN STF 291                                                                                                                                                              TD
Sophia Antipolis
Title                                 Some interesting EURESCOM projects
Source                                Pietro Schicker, Tatiana Kovacikova
Contact                               mailto:<schicker@scicon.ch>, Tatiana.kovacikova@etsi.org
To                                    STF291
WI Ref. (if any)                      TISPAN 01023, 01024


Document for:                         Decision                                                                                      Late submission
                                      Discussion
                                      Information                    X




Contents

Contents .............................................................................................................................................................................. 1
1         P1101 Always on - Device Unified Services (DUS) ............................................................................................... 2
1.1          What is this Project about? ................................................................................................................................ 2
1.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................... 2
1.3          What are the key results fo this Project? ............................................................................................................ 2
2         P1201 ERNIE - Entertainment and new interactive services via DSL .................................................................... 5
2.1          What is this Project about? ................................................................................................................................ 5
2.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................... 5
2.3          What are the key results for this Project? .......................................................................................................... 5
3         P1208 Location Awareness (LOCAWA) .............................................................................................................. 11
3.1          What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 11
3.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 11
3.3          What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 11
4         P1301 E-TRACS - E-Commerce Trading of Connectivity Services ..................................................................... 14
4.1          What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 14
4.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 15
5     P1302 PROFIT: Potential pRofit Opportunities in the future ambient InTelligence world ................................. 18
5.1      What was this Project about? ........................................................................................................................... 18
5.1.1       Roles and identities in an AmI world ......................................................................................................... 18
5.1.2       Socio-economic analysis of AmI ............................................................................................................... 19
5.2      What were the main objectives of this Project? ............................................................................................... 19
5.3      What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 19
5.4      How was the project organised? ...................................................................................................................... 19
6         P1304 CENTS - Cost Effective migration to FTTx-Networks for Tomorrow's Services ..................................... 20
6.1          What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 20
6.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 20
7         P1308 FRAPESA - Framework for personalisation of services and applications in next generation services ...... 21
7.1          What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 21
7.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 21
7.3          What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 21
8         P1341 NGN Service Concepts .............................................................................................................................. 23
8.1          What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 23
8.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 23
8.3          What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 23
9         P1448 Opportunities offered by Carrier Grade Multipoint Services ..................................................................... 26
9.1          What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 26
9.2          What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 26
                                                                                                                                           TD — Page 2 of 34

10     P1401 OSIAN - Operators Strategy, business models and demonstrations for using Innovative home
       services to increase the ARPU in the fixed Network ............................................................................................. 27
10.1       What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 27
10.1.1        Why should the proposed work be done by EURESCOM now? ............................................................... 27
10.1.2        What is the focus of the work? ................................................................................................................... 27
10.2       What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 27
10.3       What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 28
11        P1442 New market opportunities by Galileo satellite services (NEMOGS) ......................................................... 28
11.1         What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 28
11.2         What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 28
11.3         What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 28
12        P1551 Applications and services for ADSL2+ and beyond .................................................................................. 34
12.1         What is this Project about? .............................................................................................................................. 34
12.2         What are the main objectives of this Project? .................................................................................................. 34
12.3         What are the key results for this Project? ........................................................................................................ 34



1                  P1101
                   Always on - Device Unified Services (DUS)

1.1                What is this Project about?

The Project is focusing on concepts for adding value to future broadband Always-On (AO) mass-market services - with
particular focus on how these new services can be delivered to multiple heterogeneous devices. The project tries to
understand the characteristics of these services (building on previous EURESCOM projects such as P1003) and will
design and develop a prototype for a DUS (Device Unify Service). The DUS will aim to exploit the characteristics of
AO and provide access to online services from multiple devices (e.g. phone, PDA, PC, TV, etc) and from any location.
DUS unifies all the user's devices such that they together constitute a big "virtual" terminal, so that a session may begin
on one terminal and continue on another. This prototype will then be examined in user trials to understand the
commercial and usability implications

1.2                What are the main objectives of this Project?

            Identify new mass-market device-independent AO services

            Prototype innovative AO applications with a DUS as interface to the user

            Identifying the requirements for realizing DUS - focusing on the AO characteristic of the new network
             services and devices

            Identifying the technology issues and gaps that need to be resolved

            Provide an overall architecture and models for DUS

            Develop a DUS prototype

            Trial these service in a number of different market segments

            Produce usability guidelines for device independent portal services

            Identify the business implications for Telcos

            Address the issue of providing continuity and consistency when switching from one device to another.

            Study the problematic of avoiding the tromboning between homogeneous domains

1.3                What are the key-results for this Project?

The key-results from the project will be the development of design guidelines for new AO device independent portal
services based on a series of trials in different countries and on top of a DUS prototype. This will enable the Eurescom
partners to better compete in the competitive broadband marketplace by exploiting the characteristics of these networks.
                                                                                                     TD — Page 3 of 34

It is predicted that Multi-service bundles will boost Telco revenue by more than 400% - exploiting AO and multiple
devices will be a key part in defining these multi-service bundles. The added value of the project will therefore be in the
areas of competitive advantage and market share (in the long term).

1.4        Services identified within the project

The Device Unify Service (DUS) has been defined within the project. It represents a commercial service that will
provide value and revenue potential to different types of operators and service providers. For Mobile operators or
Mobile Service providers it will provide a very user-friendly interface for their customers. For fixed network operators
or service providers it will generate a bridge between fixed and mobile devices.
From the technological point of view, DUS has immeasurable value since it provides an opportunity to experiment with
service delivery over an integrated set of major technologies, such as IP, wireless communications, agent concepts and
short-range radio link technology.

1.4.1    Main features (Editor’s note: capabilities?) of DUS

1.4.1.1 Unifying different devices

DUS helps the user unify all his/her computing and communication devices in such a way that they can behave as one
device with multiple input and output capabilities. This, for example, can provide the user with an optimal multimedia
session using only a number of simple single-media devices. These devices should be co-ordinated and have the
possibility to be used together in the same session even if they are connected to different types of networks. The
unification of the devices into a single virtual terminal is depicted in Figure 1.




                  Figure 1. The Unification of Different Terminals into a Single Virtual Terminal

1.4.1.2 Unique User Profile

The DUS will handle the management of the different devices and the different terminal profiles. For example, if a user
updates the address-book on one device, it will automatically be updated on all other devices he/she has access to. The
DUS will likewise allow the user to set up and modify preferences for all devices from any terminal that can support a
DUS user interface.

1.4.1.3 Communication Service Customisation

DUS allows the end user to customise their communication service (such as when they want to be called, on what
device, under what condition, by whom etc.). It also allows both the caller and callee to control how the service will be
served. With customisable redirection of incoming services, a user may, for example, specify that all calls during
                                                                                                      TD — Page 4 of 34

daytime should be redirected to the office phone and thus be handled through a secretary. Based on user preference
profiles, a specific conference call could be redirected, to the desktop beside his/her fixed phone. At night a user may
wish to receive all calls as voice-mail - except for urgent calls such as from his/her boss. Or in the evening, all incoming
calls could be received at his/her home phone. Alternatively, a particular conference call that includes video could be
directed to the home PC, while all voice services received while travelling could be delivered at his/her cellular phone.

1.4.1.4 Static, dynamic or automatic configuration and reconfiguration

There are different alternatives to how the user can configure his/her virtual terminal. It can be a static configuration
where; for example; all devices that are to be used in future sessions are predefined and; therefore; known by the DUS.
A static configuration can also include a timetable or location-table that decides; which devices should be used where
and when. The configuration can also be dynamic, allowing new, unknown devices to be added to the DUS as they are
needed. Finally, it can be done automatically, this would require a service discovery mechanism that would be able to
recognise nearby services and devices and report them to the DUS.

1.4.1.5 User centric

This is an important feature of DUS. The situation today is that one can contact a person by selecting to communicate
with a single device. We could say that today‟s telephony service is device centric. One might try to reach a person by
successively dialling a home telephone, an office telephone, a cellular phone or whatever other phones/devices might be
associated with the person you want to contact. Success is completely depended on whether or not the right telephone is
dialled. Very often one will unintentionally disturb other people e.g. husband/wife, colleagues etc, before the desired
person is reached. On the contrary, the DUS will offer a service that is truly user centric in that one will be able to
address a person directly.

1.4.1.6 Using Stationary Services at Visiting Sites

DUS will make it easy and straightforward to borrow stationary devices at visiting sites, which may offer better input
and output capabilities than the mobile devices the user is carrying. This would depend on the owner of the stationary
devices allowing such use.

1.4.1.7 Total Mobility

DUS should support personal and session mobility in addition to the terminal mobility, which is supported by the
underlying network like GSM, UMTS, etc. By combining these three types of mobility one could provide more flexible
communication services for the user. With personal mobility it is meant that communication services treat people rather
than devices as communication endpoints. Personal mobility should give the callee the total control over how he can be
reached. While session mobility is the mobility across different devices in the middle of a service session (for example
seamless switching from a cell-phone to an IP-Phone in the middle of a conversation). With total mobility the user will
have more flexibility while using communication services and the user can make use of his/her mobile devices and also
stationary devices at visiting sites. The user could also move the input and output of a session from a set of devices to
another one. For example, he can move visual output from a mobile device with small display to a larger and better
stationary screen. In other words the user may manage his/her own and available devices in a more flexible way than
what the existing networks is offering.

1.4.1.8 Dynamic Multi-party Communication

Both caller and callee may add or remove one or more new devices/parties to the ongoing service session independent
of the kind of access networks they are connected to.

1.4.1.9 Using services on multiple devices successively

DUS provides the possibility for the user to dynamically redirect both communication and data sessions and hence use
multiple devices during one and the same session. For instance a user could receive a mobile phone call while driving to
the office. As he/she arrives at the office and walks towards the desk the session could be transferred to the users fixed
phone.
                                                                                                     TD — Page 5 of 34

1.4.1.10 Using Services on Multiple Devices Simultaneously

DUS also provides the opportunity for the user to split and multiply streams and hence use multiple devices at the same
time. New devices should always be able to be added to the service session in a dynamic way, and released likewise.

1.4.1.11 User Activity-Driven Service

DUS could support a new kind of communication service based on user activity. This type of service generalises the
location-based services that have appeared in many other systems. Instead of customising the communication service
based on the current user location alone, DUS should allow the current user behaviour (such as "I am talking to an
important person") to be tracked and used for customisation. The users control what behaviours are tracked as a way to
control privacy. DUS should allow users to control privacy policies, such as, which information is tracked and to whom
the information can be released.

2              P1201
               ERNIE - Entertainment and new interactive services via DSL

2.1            What is this Project about?

The transmission of broadband entertainment services (like traditional TV and upcoming Interactive TV services) via
DSL access networks will be a hot topic, having in mind the desired separation of cable operators from TelCos.

In the framework of this project, the feasibility of provisioning TV and iTV services via IP-based networks (especially
over xDSL access) will be examined and demonstrated. The project will choose an user-centric approach focussing on
acceptability and quality aspects compared to traditional DVB-based or analog TV services.

Customer requirements will be collected and assessed. These requirements will form the basis for the concept of a
showcase demonstrator. This demonstrator will prove the feasibility of TV via DSL as well as current limitations. An
extensive study and comparison of available codecs, DSL-STB implementations and middleware will be made.

Interviews with users and an extensive market analysis will give answers on the expected economic success and user
acceptance of TV via DSL.

The project will examine and evaluate the mass-market suitability as well as the economic perspectives.

2.2            What are the main objectives of this Project?

         Gather the user requirements (both end-users and content provider) and the market perspectives for residential
          broadband entertainment services via DSL

         Show how TelCos can create additional revenues from their existing infrastructure by introducing business
          models for broadband entertainment services over DSL

         Evaluate and assess access network configurations for different applications and services (e.g. at different
          quality levels, unicast and multicast, on-demand and real-time)

         Evaluate the expected economic success and user acceptance of such interactive services via DSL

2.3            What are the key-results for this Project?

The key-results will focus on optimising the interactive service delivery platform by choosing the right delivery
mechanism and middleware will enable the Telcom Operator to generate higher revenue sooner and secure greater
return on investment. Assessment of required features and functionality for the delivery of interactive services, as well
as cost and complexity of the various options related to the service delivery platform, should facilitate such
optimisation.

2.4            Services identified within the project

The provision of residential broadband entertainment and new interactive services (like traditional TV, upcoming
Interactive TV services) via IP-based networks (especially over DSL access) is in the centre of the Deliverable D1
study, focussing on acceptability and quality aspects compared to traditional TV services.
                                                                                                  TD — Page 6 of 34

Within the group of services identified above the following services are under consideration:

        Broadcast TV and radio

        On demand services (video and music) with PVR functionalities, online storage and archive function

        (whereas life events, linear broadcast TV and radio are still important in comparison to on-demand content)

        Near Video on demand services as Time shifted TV

        Interactive information services

        Video communication services

        Internet access

        Transaction services and E-commerce functionalities

        A navigation system and EPG (Electronic Programming Guide)

        Individually tailored service and content bundles according to:

             o    the users interests and

             o    time flexible access.

As far as regards content provided by the services, the examples include:

        A broad spectrum of quality content

        News

        Movies / TV

        Sport

        Entertainment

        Music.

The following comprehensive portfolio of services has been identified, to overview and point at the manyfoldness of
possible services to choose from.
The services in table 1 can be offered to and used by the customer not only as single services but also as individually
combined modules. This hierarchy takes also into account the interrelation among the different services.
                             Table 1 Portfolio of services, functions and characteristics

  Section                  Services            Subcategories                  Short Description

  TV/ Video 1              Video – on - Demand                               The ability to start
                                                                             delivering a movie or other
                                                                             video program to an
                                                                             individual Web browser or
                                                                             TV set whenever the user
                                                                             requests it.
                                             enhanced Broadband/TV 2
                                             Movies 3
                                             Sports
                                             News
                                             Documentaries
                                             Kids
                                             Adult
                                             Shows
                                                                      TD — Page 7 of 34

           Near Video-on-Demand 4                 The ability to start
                                                  delivering a movie or other
                                                  video program to an
                                                  individual Web browser or
                                                  TV set at a special fixed
                                                  time.
                        Movies 3
                        Sports
                        News
                        Documentaries
                        Kids
                        Adult
                        Shows
           Interactive Video                      Two-way communications
                                                  between the TV viewer and
                                                  service providers.
                        interviews with VIPs
                         Chat with VIPs - live
                       broadcast

Music      Music-on-Demand                        The ability to start
                                                  delivering music to an
                                                  individual Web browser or
                                                  TV set whenever the user
                                                  requests it.
                        video clips
                        hit lists
                        party mix
                        kinds of music 5
           Interactive karaoke
                        single karaoke
                        multi party


Shopping   interactive e-commerce 6               Doing business online,
                                                  typically via the Web. It is
                                                  also called "e-business," "e-
                                                  tailing" and "I-commerce."
                        event booking 7
                        ordering Service 8
                        shopping
                        banking
                        travelling
           Auctions
                        multi party


Gaming     Interactive/Multi-player Gaming        Playing entertainment
                                                  games. It typically refers to
                                                  electronic games.
                        downloading video games
                        multi player games 9
                        interactive game shows
                        online betting
                        Gambling
                                                                          TD — Page 8 of 34

                             Avatare


Communication   Chatting
                             chat rooms
                             chat with VIPs
                             closed user group
                             buddy list 10
                Video/Multimedia Conferencing         A video communications
                                                      session among three or
                                                      more people who are
                                                      geographically separated.
                             two party
                             multi party
                Telephony                             VoIP or VoDSL with more
                                                      advanced features than
                                                      POTS or ISDN.
                             mobile
                             fixed line
                Unified Messaging                     Having access to e-mail,
                                                      voice mail and faxes via a
                                                      common interface on the
                                                      computer or by telephone.
                                                      Computer-based unified
                                                      messaging displays e-mail
                                                      and faxes on screen and
                                                      plays back voice mail over
                                                      the speaker. Audio-based
                                                      systems convert text to
                                                      speech to deliver messages
                                                      to any remote user at a desk
                                                      phone or cellphone.
                             eMail
                             SMS
                             Video-Mail
                             Voice-Mail
                               Multimedia Message
                               System
                Avatare                               Ability to create your own
                                                      virtual person to use into
                                                      virtual chatting rooms (e.g.
                                                      Robert T-Online)

Hosting         On-line-Storage 11                    The ability to build your own
                                                      video-tape library either of
                                                      personal video streams or
                                                      public movies. A network
                                                      centric Personal Video
                                                      Recorder (PVR) service
                                                      enables the user to preselect
                                                      services of interest or live
                                                      channels and record it in a
                                                      preallocated memory on a
                                                      network server.
                             Electronic programming
                             guide (EPG) 12
                             personal videos
                                                                            TD — Page 9 of 34

                            movies
                            Sports
                            News
                            Documentaries
                            Kids
                            Adult
              Web                                        Placing a customer's Web
              Hosting                                    page or Web site on a
                                                         commercial Web server.
                                                         Web hosting organizations
                                                         can provide full service,
                                                         including site design and
                                                         programming as well as all
                                                         e-commerce facilities.
                            family homepage
                            shared files
              Applications on demand                     Rent an application when
                                                         you need it and for as long
                                                         as you need it.
                            Painting
                            Video streaming appl.
                             Video/audio post
                           production 13

Security      Live Surveillance 14                       The ability to use a Webcam
                                                         to send periodic images or
                                                         continuous frames to a Web
                                                         site for display.
                            Summer Place
                            Office
                            Home 15
                            Garden


Training      e-learning                                 An umbrella term for
                                                         providing computer
                                                         instruction (courseware)
                                                         online over the public
                                                         Internet, private distance
                                                         learning networks or
                                                         inhouse via an intranet.
                            Computer-Based Training
                            Distance Learning
                            Collaborative Presentation
                             collaborative web
                           browsing 16
                             Virtual Classroom


Information   Premium Information Service                The ability to use a Webcam
                                                         to send periodic images or
                                                         continuous frames to a Web
                                                         site for display.
                            personal financial data 17
                             banking information
                           service
                             online directory service
                                                                                                 TD — Page 10 of 34

                                             entertainment and life style
                                             weather


    Complementary          Interactive Voting
    Services
                           Internet Access                                   The ability to enter the
                                                                             internet whenever the user
                                                                             requests it.
                                             Dial In
                                             On demand /per use
                           Home Automation




    Basic Functions
    and
    characteristics
                           User
                           Interface
                                             touch screen
                                             online activation
                                             on line subscription
                           Personalization
                                             personal virtual reality        An artificial reality that
                                                                             projects you into a 3-D
                                                                             space. Virtual reality (VR)
                                                                             can be used to create an
                                                                             illusion of reality or
                                                                             imagined reality and is used
                                                                             both for entertainment and
                                                                             training.
                                             Distributed Virtual Reality
                                             Multi Media Prime–rate
                                             "walled garden"                 TV-based portals, that offer
                                                                             access to selected
                                                                             commerce, communication,
                                                                             gaming etc..
                                                                             Application on a system
                                                                             controlled by the provider


Explanation
1    Background: Video- and TV-streaming = Video transmission over a data network. It is widely used on
     the Web to deliver video on demand or a video broadcast at a set time. In streaming video, both the
     client and server software cooperate for uninterrupted motion. The client side buffers a few seconds of
     video data before it starts sending it to the screen, which compensates for momentary delays in packet
     delivery. Streaming video implies a one-way transmission and tolerates erratic networks.
2    live broadcast channels with an Electronic programming guide;
     application that can offer advertisement, retail and fee-based revenue streams
3    Classic, old favourites, new releases
4    = time shifted TV; shifted video
5    e.g. Oldies, Pop, Europeans, Top40
6    clickable objects; e-business
7    e.g. Pizza or food ordering service = local based
8    e.g. books, leisure, software, clothes...
                                                                                                     TD — Page 11 of 34

 9 e.g. strategic, role playing, sports, shoot-em out
10 a list of colleagues, workgroup members, friends, etc., that you might wish to communicate with via
   instant messaging.
11 = Storage-on-Demand
12 application that enables user to review schedule of available (video) content
13 e.g. cutting
14 = Home Control
15 e.g. baby
16 Synchronizing browser access to the same sites. As one user browses the Web, the other users trail
   along automatically and link to and view the same pages from their browsers.
17 e.g. account checking




3              P1208
               Location Awareness (LOCAWA)

3.1            What is this Project about?

Location Awareness denotes a group of services that can calculate the current position of mobile devices, this in turn
presenting the location information of mobile users. This project will start with a short, segmented market analysis to
evaluate emerging location based services (LBS) and implement the most feasible ones in a trial phase. One of the key
aspects on this project is to analyse how location-based information can be presented to the user and how the user can
be assured privacy.

The results of this will be evaluated in the final phase of prototype development and testing. Available positioning
technologies such as CELL-ID, GPS and new emerging technologies will be studied in order to consider their
performance and QoS into the design of both user interface and LBS

3.2            What are the main objectives of this Project?

         Identify and analyse existing and future mass market location-based services

         Identify the requirements for realizing location awareness (privacy issues etc.)

         Identify the technology issues of positioning and their QoS-related capabilities and their impact on location-
          based-services

         Identify how to best present location-based information to the user (taking into account individual user
          profiles, preferences and devices)

         Provide an architecture and interfaces for the further use for location-aware services: Interfaces towards
          mobile service providers/operators and positioning systems, for providers of location related data, user
          Interfaces with the features of different end-devices

         Develop a prototype and carry out a field trial with representative users and analyse the results

         Define best practice and usability guidelines for dealing with location awareness in new location based
          services

3.3            What are the key-results for this Project?

Expected key-results are in-depth knowledge about the future design of user-friendly location based services and
recommendations for future concepts of LBS.

This will be evaluated in a field trial to test the concepts developed in the project. In addition, expected user acceptance
barriers concerning privacy and security of data in LBS will be closely analyzed. The knowledge gained from this
project will help EURESCOM members to prepare the roll-out of next generation location based services geared for the
                                                                                                    TD — Page 12 of 34

promising user market. Properly designed LBS will certainly increase acceptance of the new offered services, especially
if offered in multi-service bundles.

3.4       Services identified by the project.

The project focus is on location-based services as information services accessible through mobile phones, PDA and
other mobile appliances, that revolve around the known position of a user in space, which is either provided by a
telecom operator or by a GPS enabled handset. Applications include emergency services, location of emergency calls,
navigation information, location sensitive information screening, lost traveller support, track and trace of
people/objects, mobile workers support and schedule, and many others.

The project identifies 4 categories of Location-based services: [http://www.mobileIN.com]:
           Safety
           Billing
           Information
           Tracking.

                                                     SAFETY
                                                 Emergency services
                                                 Roadside assistance

                                                        BILLING
                                                Location sensitive billing
                                                    Wireless office
                                                    Residential use
                                                     Event billing

                        INFORMATION                                                 TRACKING
                        Lifestyle information                                 Fleet management
                        Event information                                         Asset tracking
                        Traffic information                                      People tracking

[1]       Figure 1 - Four major categories of LBS and their application [http://www.mobilePositioning.com]



3.4.1       Safety

This category includes public and private emergency services for both pedestrians and drivers. These services may
perhaps be of profit for operators if customers are private insurance companies. Public emergency services for calling
out fire fighters, medical teams, etc, are currently being regulated in the United States by the Federal Communication
Commission (FCC) and Europe. These services do not require a subscription and can be accessed by any mobile
subscriber, in accordance with the regulations governing the rights of individuals to emergency assistance. They
generally do not generate a profit for the operators, and can be classified as follows:
        Roadside Emergency – for the driver needing assistance for his car that broke down
        Accident Emergency – the user can use this service to request medical and police support due to an accident, be it
        a roadside accident or any generic emergency where urgent assistance is needed
        Fire Fighting – this type of service could be to locate nearby inflammables or explosives depots in order to avoid
        disasters in case of fires.
        Public Safety Vehicle Management – this is a kind of fleet management system that optimises the answer of
        emergency services to requests based on proximity and availability analysis

3.4.2       Billing

This type of service allows the user to take advantage of special billing conditions depending on his whereabouts. For
example, the user can establish personal zones such as home or work zone and take the benefit of lower rates for the
                                                                                                          TD — Page 13 of 34

services used. This type of application can be especially useful when used in conjunction with other mobile applications
such as prepaid wireless.

3.4.3      Information

The market for information services is considered to be one of the most promising in terms of global revenue
(operators, developers, providers). By the year 2005, the European market for information services should represent a
total revenue of $13.5 billion [7]. These information based services cover a wide array of services, from generic to more
specific information (traffic news, locating a nearby restaurant or hotel, how to go from A to B, etc). These services can
be grouped as “Business to Consumer” (where subscriber location information enables companies to target users who
subscribe to this service option, by launching local product promotions or advertising campaigns); “Consumer to
Business” (where the subscriber actually requests his location to be determined in order to gain access to precise
information relating to his nearby environment); “Consumer to Consumer” (where the subscriber can locate friends,
family members, or more generally members of a community to which he belongs).
These information-based services can be of different types:
        Geo-coding - these services consist generically in representing in a spatial context (a map) the location of a
        specific entity (an address or a shop, for example). The opposite process is reverse geo-coding, which is the
        provision of information in text format from a location in a map.
        Geo-parsing - this is the process of parsing a string, such as a street address, into its components in preparation for
        geo-coding.
        Routing Service – this is a service to guide the user on how to go from A to B, using user defined constraints
        (shortest or fastest route, by car or by foot, etc) and this information can be provided in graphical format (maps),
        written instructions or voice-based instructions.
        Mapping – map based services allow the visualisation and rendering of interactive maps that display spatial
        information and navigation such as routes and directions. The generated maps are dynamic and interactive,
        allowing users to manipulate information by panning and zooming.
        Subscription & Event Notification – location based subscriptions store information that describe conditions that
        are met in order for the subscriber to receive notification of a particular location-sensitive event‟s occurrence. For
        example, this type of service can notify a subscriber when another accepted subscriber moves within a proximity
        area; or notify a subscriber if he is within a certain proximity to a particular point of interest along his travel route;
        or notify a business whether a potential subscriber is within walking distance of their storefront.
        Dynamic Content Management – this allows the management of dynamic contents being displayed to the
        subscriber from third-party providers.

3.4.4      Tracking

This is a vast category of service that ranges from fleet management applications to enabling mobile commerce. For
example, a mobile user could be tracked and, provided some predetermined information was introduced in the system,
he can be notified of a sale on men‟s suits at a store in the neighbourhoods. But monitoring mainly covers “Business to
Business” services, operating fleet management applications, and tracking the location of external resources to optimise
their use and control or ensure their safety. Some of the services belonging to this category are:
        Fleet tracking - tracking vehicles or vessels by means of mobile positioning systems, generally satellite based.
        Package and Asset Tracking - keeping track of assets, their location, movements as well as (optionally) the
        identity of the individual who tampers with a tagged asset; monitoring high value items and producing the
        necessary alarms should they move beyond the planned.
        Public Transport Schedules and Tracking – these services provide the monitoring of buses both for security
        reasons and to provide real time scheduling information to the user, allowing the service to notify the subscriber of
        the eminent arrival of bus at the selected bus stop.
        Vehicle Theft Detection and Recovery – this is a security minded service whereby the subscriber can pin point the
        location of his stolen car, making its recovery possible.
        People Tracking – this is an interesting service that allows dependent people to be followed and located, such as is
        the case with the elderly and young children, whereby the responsible person(s) can track their whereabouts. It
        may include tracking of prisoners under alternative regimes.
        Animal Tracking - recent outbreaks of animal disease in various parts of the world have highlighted the
        importance of monitoring animal movements. For example, keeping track the exact movement history of the
        previous 30 days of some specific cows can dramatically improve the control of animal health and public safety
                                                                                                     TD — Page 14 of 34


Another possibility to cluster current LBS is by comparing the different display methods. These methods are often
related to the type of terminal used to access the service. In addition, most services are able to detect the used end
terminal and offer the appropriate content depending on the device capabilities (e.g. b/w or coloured display, full screen,
PDA screen (320x240), WAP screen (101x80), colour depth 32 bit, PDA: 4096 - 65.536 colours, WAP: 256 colours
(fixed coloured palette), etc.). Besides of the constraints due to the terminal characteristics, the information presentation
also depends on the contents and the wireless support used. For instance, if GSM-SMS is used, mainly text-based
information can be used.
Data presentation can be performed in one of the following formats or even combined between them: text, graphics or
voice.


      Text-based data presentation - Looking into the LBS products already on the market, one can see that WAP
      services play an important role. These services use mainly text-based presentation in a black/white mode. The user
      receives spatial information such as streets, addresses of point of interest, e.g. restaurants, hotels, etc, mostly in
      text format. Text-based information allows adding of click-able links as well as forward of the information
      towards other users via SMS.


      Graphical presentation - This format of data presentation is very fast becoming more and more popular due to
      recent technology developments of particular relevance to this goal. Therefore, graphical presentation of
      information is a must for future LBS services and the user already is able to receive 2D or 3D (pseudo) data
      presenting maps, real time routing information and, in the near future, even real time video. For this, important
      technological developments such as the following are crucial:
               the broadening range of different network technologies that support high-speed broadband data
                transmission and an increasing variety of different network devices (e.g. feature phones, smart phones,
                PDA, wearable computers, car equipment, etc.) with add-on network capabilities
               a rapidly expanding range of multimedia tools, applications and formats, with content formats currently
                being enhanced by the Internet community for better support of display capabilities of mobile devices
               new input devices (digital cameras for image and video, audio, video, gesture recognition, motion
                sensors, etc), and output devices (audio, video, VR headsets)


      Voice-based presentation - Voice-based presentation of LBS data is often used in cases where the user is not able
      to view a display with the output of the service. Typical scenarios include all communications within a car, such as
      navigation or emergency services, but also communication via a fixed phone or services especially targeted
      towards disabled and elderly people. Furthermore, one can distinguish between fully automated services (digital
      voice assistants) or services using a call centre (such as emergency service).
      But voice based information presentation still has to overcome some limitations, such as voice recognition (limited
      vocabulary and recognition using automated services), adaptation to environment conditions (background noise)
      and customisation aspects (support of different languages). However, in the light of upcoming new mobile
      terminals with enhanced capabilities and broadband networks such as 3G, these services will generate lower
      revenues compared to services with graphical representation towards the user. In addition, the graphical
      representation can be supported by speech and audio.
It is expectable that the success of data presentation will be a combination of different presentation methods, depending
on the user profile and preferences.


4              P1301
               E-TRACS - E-Commerce Trading of Connectivity Services

4.1            What is this Project about?

Constructed correctly, an e-marketplace for connectivity services will create a more flexible means of purchasing and
selling compared to conventional bilateral agreements. The effective pooling of resources in the market place should
lead to their more efficient use, benefiting all concerned from an economic point of view. Network expansion could be
more effectively and efficiently managed. The ability to buy additional capacity at short notice may enable participants
to accept business they normally would have turned away. New markets could be created with applications that require
significant amounts of bandwidth over relatively short periods of time such as video conferencing, large database
                                                                                                     TD — Page 15 of 34

backups etc. The market, in theory, could be extended to include derivative products such as options and more exotic
contractual arrangements such as swaps. These additions would improve flexibility and control over risk management
in network investments. In order to achieve these benefits, a good understanding of the technical and economic issues
surrounding a market in connectivity services is required. Gaining this understanding is the aim of this project.

4.2             What are the main objectives of this Project?

The project aims to advance the state-of-the-art in electronic trading of complex connectivity services by designing,
specifying, implementing and testing advanced functions for an innovative e-marketplace for commoditised
connectivity services.

First an overview of connectivity services, of existing markets for them and mechanisms for their trading will be given.
Existing services that are already traded and additional ones that could be suitable for trading on e-marketplaces will be
identified. From this, a scheme for their categorisation and commoditisation will be developed.

Existing trading mechanisms will be analysed and new ones developed. Market players will be examined and potential
market scenarios conceived. The possibility of the development and use of derivative instruments, based on tradable
commoditised connectivity services, will be investigated.

Based on the analysis of existing e-marketplaces, additional functionalities and interfaces will be specified that enable
advanced trading of sophisticated connectivity service, involving the services and trading mechanisms mentioned
above. The feasibility of implementing the new functionalities and potential technical constraints will also be
considered. After the implementation of some enabling e-marketplace functionality for the trading of connectivity
services the platform will be tested. The trial scenarios will be defined from the results of the analysis of market players,
trading mechanisms and scenarios from earlier in the project.

4.3              Services identified by the project

The project focus is on the connectivity services. The generic term connectivity services covers telecommunication
products and services, ranging from low level products like dark fibre and bandwidth to more elaborated and complex
products like voice traffic and IP-transit. This term includes more or less all the bandwidth and voice products and
services and can also be referred to as telecommunication capacity.
As no uniform scheme for the categorisation of connectivity services and bandwidth products exists, we will present
two complementary approaches. One that looks at the products and services from a purely technological angle and
another that puts the emphasis on the splitting of the responsibility between buyer and seller of a service and the added
value the buyer gets beyond plain connectivity. As products and services are closely linked – connectivity services
make use of bandwidth products and bandwidth products can be upgraded to connectivity services and there is no
clearly defined separation anyway – we will use these categorisations in parallel in the project.

4.3.1            Categorisation schemes for bandwidth products and connectivity services

In their study “Trading Telecoms as a Commodity” [Trading telecoms as a commodity, Ovum 2001], Ovum proposes a
classification (visualised in Figure 3) for connectivity services mainly according to the added value the customer gets
and the division of management tasks between buyer and provider.
They categorise connectivity services as
       unmanaged BW – for example dark fibre and duct space. The buyer has to provide its own management and
        transmission capability to use this BW (summarised as “Capacity” in Figure 23)
       managed BW – BW provided with a degree of management and transmission capability, under the control of the
        seller (“Access”, “Frame Relay / ATM”, “SDH / Sonet” and “Wavelengths” in Figure 23)
       packed BW – BW packed together with a degree of added value, such as switched voice minutes or wholesale IP
        services (“Circuit-switched voice”, “IP Transit” and “Managed IP Services” in Figure 2 3)
       retail value-added services – which consume underlying „hidden‟ BW (“E-Services” in Figure 23).
                                                                                                 TD — Page 16 of 34


                                                          Distribution
                                                        Content-hosting
                       E-Services
                                                          Web-hosting
                                                          Data centres

                    Circuit- switched              Packaged Voice Services
                          voice                    Switched Voice Minutes
                                                     Managed IP services
                                                           IP Transit
                        Transport                     Frame relay / ATM
                                                          SDH / Sonet
                                                          Wavelengths
                                                           Local fibre
                          Access                      Wireless local loop
                                                              xDSL
                                                           Dark fibre
                         Capacity
                                                             Ducts


                    Figure 2: Classification scheme for connectivity services (source: Ovum 0)


In contrast to the service-oriented approach stated above, in their paper “Taxonomy of Traded Bandwidth” Mindel and
Sirbu     [Mindel,      Joshua      L    and     Marvin       A.    Sirbu:   Taxonomy       of     Traded     Bandwidth
Engineering and Public Policy Department, Carnegie Mellon University, May 2001] sort bandwidth products and
connectivity services according to the technological infrastructure required for their physical delivery. They propose a
scheme of six distinct classes, five of which are visualised in Figure 4:
                                                                                                   TD — Page 17 of 34




                Figure 4: Classification scheme for bandwidth products (source: Mindel / Sirbu 0)


Class 1 – Physical Plant Bandwidth refers to dark fibre (i.e. optical fibre infrastructure that is currently installed but
not being used) or electromagnetic spectrum over which electronics or photonics provide usable bandwidth between a
pair of pooling points. The buyer of physical plant bandwidth has to employ his own equipment to light the fibre and
thus enable transmission.
Class 2 – Wavelength Channel refers to lit fibre. Class 2 is an all optical communications channel, for example a
specific wavelength between a pair of pooling points, that is sold without a pre-defined transmission bit rate or frame
format. Thus the equipment the buyer connects to the channel determines throughput and format of the data
transmission.
Class 3 – Clear Channel is a digital communications channel between a pair of pooling points. It is sold at an explicit
throughput rate and frame format that is determined by the seller‟s equipment that sets up the digital circuit. The
bandwidth channel may have hard or statistical performance guarantees that are specified in a Service Level Agreement
(SLA) between the seller and the buyer. There are three subclasses of Class 3: Hard guarantee channels (e.g. DS-3, OC-
12), providing a fixed data rate. The buyer can be sure that he will not have to share the channel with any other user. For
statistical guarantee channels (e.g. MPLS or DiffServ flows) the seller of the channel commits himself to provide the
negotiated Service Level with a fixed probability. On best-effort channels (e.g. shared Gigabit Ethernet) several users
share capacity. Most of the time this works smoothly. However in times of high traffic when many users want to send
high amounts of data over the channel, quality of service can suffer significantly.
Class 4 - Switched Telephony Minutes refer to minutes of circuit-switched telephony that will be routed through the
seller‟s network to the destination city/location, via a single pooling point. The seller‟s network provides a circuit-
switched interface to the pooling point, regardless of the transport technology that the seller may use within its network.
It is quite possible that the buyer or seller network will use ATM, IP, or another packet-switching transport technology.
                                                                                                  TD — Page 18 of 34

VoIP services fit into Class 4 – Switched Telephony Minutes if the seller (or the pooling point) provides VoIP-PSTN
gateway/gatekeeper services.
Class 5 – Internet Access refers to best-effort (see definition of Class 3) IP access to the Internet that will be routed
through the seller‟s network, via a pooling point.
The sixth class of the taxonomy is Class 0 – Enabling Bandwidth. Class 0 refers to entities that enable the provision of
bandwidth. Examples are cable ducts (empty pipes that connect locations and can be filled with cables), rights-of-way
(the legal right to access land owned by another party and to dig trenches and plant poles for cable systems) and
collocation facilities.
An inherent feature of Classes 0 through 3 of the bandwidth taxonomy is that the classes build on each other in terms of
technological function. For example, a Class 2 wavelength can be used to provision a Class 3 clear channel. Or, Class 1
physical plant can be used to provision either Class 2 or Class 3 bandwidth. In this sense, Classes 2 and 3 are bandwidth
products based on Class 1.




5             P1302
              PROFIT: Potential pRofit Opportunities in the future ambient InTelligence world

5.1           What was this Project about?

The radical changes of the Information Society driven by the boost in information and communication technologies and
its adoption has opened a fast path towards the vision of "Ambient Intelligence" (AmI). This offers tremendous business
opportunities and challenges to telecommunications operators and service providers. Also the user roles and identities
are changing dramatically. It is important to analyse the new scenarios, roles and identities, and to identify the
opportunities and challenges for Telcos arising from this.

The concept of Ambient Intelligence (AmI) provides a vision of the Information Society where the emphasis is on
greater user-friendliness, more efficient services support, user-empowerment, and support for human interactions.
People are surrounded by intelligent intuitive interfaces that are embedded in all kinds of objects and an environment
that is capable of recognising and responding to the presence of different individuals in a seamless, unobtrusive and
often invisible way.

During the last years the Information Society has changed dramatically. We are fast moving towards the vision of
"Ambient Intelligence" (AmI). Mobile telephony had its great breakthrough and Internet has become a commodity to
most people. Broadband access is widely available though not very widely used. In the next few years we are expecting
a big boost in the Information Society mainly based on the following facts:

         Deployment of mobile systems of the third generation and beyond (UMTS, wireless LAN, Bluetooth, etc.)
          provide ubiquitous access to multimedia services anytime from anywhere.

         Broadband access will become a commodity.

         Internet access has reached its critical mass and electronic commerce will become a normal way of doing
          business. Appropriate security systems will soon be available.

         Progress in Information Technology (processors, storage, displays, etc.) will provide pervasive computing.
          Through networking ever present computing devices we will see a revolution of Ambient Intelligence around
          us.

This project has tackled socio-economic and business issues related to AmI through two approaches:

         Roles and Identities in an AmI world through fieldwork (focus on work/home boundaries)

         Socio-economic and business analysis of AmI scenarios

5.1.1         Roles and identities in an AmI world

Europeans have a multiplicity of different social identities they want to create, support and communicate. The more
mobile people get, the more complex their social relations become and the more they use communication technologies
to create and support their social identities. People build and maintain more and more relationships through information
and communication applications and devices. It is necessary to investigate the relationships between people's social
identities and the adoption of ICT services to be able to maximie the offer and use of modern Information Society
                                                                                                     TD — Page 19 of 34

Technology. To achieve this goal, PROFIT has performed fieldwork, i.e. it interviewed real users in UK, Finland,
Norway and Hungary to find out wishes, unmet requirements, concerns and barriers related to AmI services. The focus
of the fieldwork was on work/home boundaries.

5.1.2          Socio-economic analysis of AmI

The IST Advisory Group (ISTAG) has developed a vision of Ambient Intelligence (AmI, Pervasive Computing,
ubiquitous computing). This vision of pervasive intelligent objects and seamless communication between themselves
and people has enormous implications for all involved in the ICT industry, but particularly those providing
infrastructure and services. The AmI concept has promoted a great deal of interest and activity on the underlying
technologies, but other, potentially complex issues surrounding the adoption of these technologies remain unexplored. It
is important to examine the social and economic issues that will arise as the AmI vision develops. PROFIT has analysed
14 scenarios from various sources to find out the relevant socio-economic issues in an AmI environment.

5.2            What were the main objectives of this Project?

         Quick review and identification of the state of the art of value creation concepts, Information Society business
          models, Ambient Intelligence scenarios and identities & roles in the Information Society.

         Fieldwork preparation and analysis to compare and contrast the 'identity/role management' behaviour,
          practices and needs of selected groups in an AmI environment.

         Selecting appropriate scenarios for describing the emergence of AmI.

         Deconstructing these scenarios to cover the most important AmI issues and to analyse their socio-economic
          effects including migration paths.

         Investigation of business models underpinning the Ambient Intelligence vision.

         Identification of risks and benefits in investing in an infrastructure to support Ambient Intelligence, including
          the emerging business models.

         Recommendations concerning the AmI vision and the migration paths to Eurescom members, industry,
          regulators and government

5.3            What are the key-results for this Project?

         Thorough knowledge of roles and identities in an AmI environment

         Fieldwork analysis on work/home boundaries as practical input to a new grounded scenario and service &
          business recommendations (see rationale for fieldwork)

         Business models underpinning the scenarios and migration paths

         A new grounded scenario describing the most relevant issues in an AmI environment around the year 2010

         Recommendations for actions to be taken by telcos, industry, regulators, government to achieve the identified
          goals

5.4            How was the project organised?
                                                                                                     TD — Page 20 of 34




6              P1304
               CENTS - Cost Effective migration to FTTx-Networks for Tomorrow's Services

6.1            What is this Project about?

Currently operators offer broadband services via DSL, mainly ADSL. The deployment of these systems represents a
natural evolution of the copper access plant, but it is certain that these technologies represent an intermediate step only,
because of the serious transmission limitation of copper lines that restrict the range of broadband services that can be
supported. It is beyond question that "true" broadband access requires a fibre based infrastructure in order to overcome
the bandwidth bottleneck.

EURESCOM Project P1117 FAN has shown that with the emergence of IP and associated concepts the traditional
access network view needs to be revised in terms of topology, architecture and functions. Network flexibility is an
important aspect and driver, and unlike in the past, routing and/or switching will become a function of the access
network and there will be "intelligent" active nodes in the access. Furthermore, network topologies like mesh and ring
will be used in the access network to provide the cost effective flexible connections needed, and fibre is a key enabling
factor of this access network evolution. In summary, functions and architectures originally developed for core networks
will appear in next generation access networks. This process will be accompanied and supported by a cost reduction of
the technologies in question.

This evolution and change means that established access network design and engineering rules have to be changed, and
new ways have to be explored that allow next generation access network concepts. Cost effective optical solutions
represent the main challenge.

No services identitfied

6.2            What are the main objectives of this Project?

The main objective of this project is to help operators further develop their access network into Next Generation Optical
Access Networks, by

         Analysing the cost structure in today‟s access networks and assessing the cost optimisation potential;

         Identifying novel system concepts and network component/equipment alternatives for hybrid fibre
          architectures;

         Demonstrating the new concepts and technologies in laboratory and field tests;

         Providing a techno-economic evaluation of the novel access network concepts in realistic deployment
          scenarios.
                                                                                                   TD — Page 21 of 34

What are the key-results for this Project?

         New access network concepts that combine several cost saving potentials;

         Evaluation and analysis of new deployment techniques, alternative components, installation methods and
          technologies in laboratory and field test environments;

         Techno-economic evaluation of novel access network concepts applied in realistic deployment scenarios;

         Deployment and migration strategies for Next Generation Access Networks including recommendations and
          guidelines.


7              P1308
               FRAPESA - Framework for personalisation of services and applications in next generation
               services

7.1            What is this Project about?

The number of new services that combine several forms of media increases day bay day. Mobile terminal vendors are
improving mobile devices by enriching functionalities that can present textual, audiovisual and linguistic information.
Mobile terminal vendors are improving mobile devices by enriching functionality. The latest achievement is built-in
cameras. Service providers follow that by enabling a variety of SMS, MMS and Internet based services for mobile use.
Mobile e-mail is also used more frequently to send business information to users and is more and more often related to
hectic working environment.

The current problem of the user is to access rapidly the information and the service she/he is interested in. Surfing
through the service (using mobile or smart phones) to get the information is costly, and very often inconvenient. The
assistance is needed for crucial business activities, as travelling, booking, payment etc. Besides nomadism means that
the user might be in a foreign country and does not know the service environment, so the services need to be presented
in a self-explaining way.

For the service provider it is important to analyze and to classify the content inside a flexible production and
distribution environment that supports the automatic acquisition of content, its content-adapted preparation and its
enrichment by metadata.

By using more advanced querying techniques, various profiles and personalization mechanisms, ontological analysis of
the query, we can improve the precision of the information service and the ease of use of the service.

7.2            What are the main objectives of this Project?

Objectives are the following:

         Study of personalization methods and techniques.

         Study of information retrieval techniques for new generation multimedia services.

         Practical evaluation of available technology and dissemination of the information to Eurescom members.

         Design and implementation of the architecture for intuitive-to-use, context-based, personalized information
          services.

         Contribution to research and standardization efforts, aimed to improving the interaction among all the actors in
          business cases with the user in the central role.

7.3            What are the key-results for this Project?

The main result is the Framework for personalization of services and applications in next generation information
services. This framework will take into account the provision of precise and situation-based information and its easy
and intuitive access while considering the personal wishes of the service users.

Except practical results, which are materialised in the platform, new knowledge about technological model and business
model, as well as about user aspects (personalization and privacy) will be generated.
                                                                                                    TD — Page 22 of 34

By continual considerations of the business model, the roles of actors and processes of their interaction in next
generation networks will be analysed. Knowledge on such processes will be obtained and will be an input for
improvement of the collaboration between the different actors.

At the same time the personalization process and the content preparation process will be considered to find out the
mechanisms, which give the most to the user and at the same time protect her/his privacy (and minimise the chances for
misuse).

7.4           Services identified by the project

The focus is on services that combine several forms of media increases every day, e.g., textual, audiovisual and
linguistic information. All these new services deal with a mixture of textual and audiovisual content while multimodal
systems and applications are going to support the intuitive usage of these services (TI1 of the project).
Nevertheless, these new services can be improved with respect to two aspects. In the first place the workflow for the
deployment of such services is still strongly dominated by the type of media to be used as well as by the characteristics
of the underlying network. This means that the content is prepared several times for several applications, it is stored in
several locations and its reuse for the development of new services is hampered. This makes the development of new
services for a service provider costly and time-consuming.
The second aspect corresponds to the increasing number of rich media services, and to the time it takes to the user to
realize what information these services can offer. Surfing through the services to get this information is costly and very
often inconvenient. Especially the mobile use is often related to a shortage of time and the need of getting the right
information right now, sometimes in a hectic working environment. If the user feels unsatisfied he or she will not use
this service in the future and is a lost customer for the service provider.
For the information retrieval in text , there are semantically annotated and free-format texts. Information can be
tagged semantically by a description language like OWL (Web Ontology Language) and the process of information
retrieval is then reduced to matching keywords against descriptions. But as most texts are not written to be interpreted
by machines, the overwhelming majority of textual data is untagged. The problem of automated search, classification
and summarisation of yet unknown texts can be met with classical approaches from machine learning like classification
and regression trees, vector similarity or artificial neural nets. Based on this technology, numerous bidders offer text-
mining software. Some provide turnkey products, others suites of software modules that can be integrated into an
application. Input can be given as local files, Web-URLs, databases, e-mail or news-feed servers.
For the information retrieval in audiovisual content, schemes and tools developed on the basis of MPEG-7 are
proposed by the several MPEG-7 working groups. These functionalities currently find their way into products, very
often with respect to retrieval in audio material. For the search in images and movies commercial products for usage in
the studio environment are available that rely on proprietary solutions without giving the user the possibility to export in
a standardized way appropriate results into other applications for further processing. MPEG-7-based schemes have been
shown in the form of prototypes published by academic institutions.
Unrestricted information retrieval in a voice dialog system is still a problem due to the fact that for user-independent
speech recognition the possible input must be known to the recogniser beforehand in form of a grammar. Approaches to
solve this fundamental problem are outlined in this report and possible dialog strategies are discussed.

For the user-friendly usage of new services combining several types of media for presentation on several devices the
layout of the user interface plays a very important role. Those advanced services should still be easy to use and should
lead quickly to results that satisfy the user. Therefore it seems appropriate to use multimodal dialog systems where the
execution flow is controlled by various input and output modality components. Decisions on the best choice depend on
the actual context the user is in. For speech applications development tools are available. The combination of visual and
voice interaction is part of an open standard under development through W3C.

The integration of the components described in this study into a system architecture for Next Generation Services must
be guaranteed. The modular realisation of high-level components for new services helps in fulfilling this requirement.
Underlying technologies can be e.g. Parlay/OSA, Web Services, or their combination, depending on the already
existing service environment and the main application area.
                                                                                                   TD — Page 23 of 34

8              P1341
               NGN Service Concepts

8.1            What is this Project about?

Current Eurescom shareholders are facing similar challenges due to heavy financing loans and market instability. New
investments on network infrastructure like NGN/3G have to be carefully justified. So far, only rationales based on
infrastructure costs saving have been used. However, the growth of network traffic and number of users is reaching its
saturation levels. In some cases is even decreasing. In such context cost savings rationales are not sufficient. New
revenues coming from new and innovative applications are becoming more business mission critical. However,
persuasive studies on such subject are still missing. The current study aims to fill this gap in a collaborative way by
joining together different capabilities from Eurescom shareholders to develop significant results.

8.2            What are the main objectives of this Project?

This study aims to analyze new service concepts, here called Next Generation Service Concepts (NGSC), which may
only be provided by NGN/OSA networks enabling the emergence of new revenues for Service Providers. The study
evaluates how new NGN/OSA characteristics, like access independence, convergence and openness, can promote the
emergence of new NGSC concepts, and lead to new business opportunities and models and so new revenue streams.

One NGSC example is the ability for the user to make business by providing his/her own applications, i.e., the user may
develop and sell her/his own NGN/OSA Applications. In this case the Service Provider would play a kind of Brokering
role.

The study should take into account some constraints including business environment, market segmentation and social
impacts.

Possible drawbacks from current technologies for the implementation of the service concepts are identified. Some
business cases illustrating the service concepts use are given. At the end, an experimental validation of such concepts is
discussed for future work.

8.3            What are the key-results for this Project?

The current study aims to provide some:

         Guidelines to help on the decision to invest on NGN/3G infrastructure?

         Analysis of enabling unique NGN/3G characteristics for the generation of revenues from new applications;

         Analysis of current major business constraints and users requirements to be fulfilled by Next Generation
          applications;

         Identification of catalysing concepts and principles (NGSP) to generate new revenues from Next Generation
          applications.

         Analysis of business models and business cases enabled by NGSC.

8.4            Services identified by the project

Several service concepts are defined within the Deliverable D1 of the project: the minimum necessary to cover the
requirements and user scenarios.

8.4.1     Meet Me: Meet the Right Person at the Right Time

The Meet Me Service Concept should enable the encounter between two or more persons sharing similar and/or
compatible interests. This Service Concept would take advantage on service components as Context Awareness
(including Presence, Status and Localization) and User Profiles. It may be applied on different areas, like:
         Individual Relationships including friendships and dating (a la “boy/girl seek girl/boy”);
         Individual – Enterprise Relationships in situations such as the management of Broken Cars, and Domestic
          Disasters;
         Enterprise Relationships in situations such as Human Resource management and Outsourcing;
                                                                                                  TD — Page 24 of 34

8.4.2       Sweet Home: Security, Confidence and Comfort at Home

The Sweet Home Service Concept aims to leverage security and confidence feelings about home with home networking
technologies (i.e., residential gateways) as an extension of network services including personal data storage, unified
mailboxes, cameras, etc.;

8.4.3       Fashion, Emotion, Art

The Fashion, Emotion and Art Service Concept are about making Next Generation Services fashionable, emotional and
attractive. The conceptions of today‟s Mobile Terminals are already following these concepts.
In this sense, fashionable NGS would be used to reach / maintain a certain Social Status and / or Social Pattern. A
fashionable NGS subscriber would enable social effects like:
            To be accepted / invited to be part of a certain Social Community;
            To get entrance to an exclusive Social Place;
            To help to impose a distinct position in the Community;
On the other hand, services usage (e.g., access to unified message box) should provide to users an emotional experience
like an every day life gaming, introducing unexpected interactions with users causing surprise, raising adrenaline.
Fashionable NG Services should look attractive to clients, i.e., they should be designed and developed in cooperation
with Artists from different fields like plastic artists, theatre players, musicians and writers. More sophisticated and
master Next Generation Services applications that result from such a mix of technological science, arts and humanities
would become subject to cult and considered “pieces of art”.
Following the same rational, Technicians, Artists and Humanists should cooperate for the design, development and
provision of Emotional Services.

8.4.4       Community Cooperation

The Community Cooperation Service Concept should be applied to enhance collaboration between different people for
work, for education, for leisure and for inter-social relationships.
This concept should provide support to Communities, i.e., people with similar interests, identities, commitment to ideals
and beliefs. Communities can be geographically defined (like the Community Communication Networks, City Nets or
Digital Cities), or can be Virtual Communities like the Internet Communities. Community Cooperation should provide
the means to share resources and information within communities by enabling a more effective way that people can:
            Work together;
            Play together;
            Help each other;
            Teach each other;
            Worship together;
            Do business together;
            Campaign together;
            Argue together;
            Debate with one other;

8.4.5       Give Me Money: Promote Business opportunities to Clients

The Give Me Money Service Concept should be applied to promote business opportunities to application subscribers.
For example, the subscriber can provide his/her own applications by taking advantage of NGS openness and its
programmable interfaces. In such case, subscribers would be able to apply her/his creativity to develop and sell her/his
own Applications. In this case the Service Provider would play a kind of Brokering role.

8.4.6       Personal Assistance (Family, Enterprise, Community)

The Personal Assistance (PA) Service Concept should go after the Virtual Personal Assistant metaphor where each
subscriber is the owner of a Virtual Entity – its Personal Assistant – living somewhere in the network. Such Assistant is
                                                                                                      TD — Page 25 of 34

            Accessible from any terminal;
            Any time;
            Anywhere;
            Always available to satisfy the client needs according to his profile.
The Personal Assistant should act on behalf of the client in an autonomous way to:
            Manage communications;
            Manage the user‟s agenda and contact list;
            Manage the user‟s electronic shopping;
            Etc.
The Personal Assistant Concept may be applied to non-individual entities, e.g., Families, Enterprises and Social
Communities. In these cases:
            Family Assistant would be always available to satisfy the Family needs according to its profile;
            Enterprise Assistant would be always available to satisfy the Enterprise needs according to its profile;
            Community Assistant would be always available to satisfy the Community needs according to its profile;

8.4.7       Financial Assistance

The Financial Assistant would be a more specific Personal Assistant that would give the user assistance in financial
matters. It could be extremely varied and we can only give some examples of what possible features could be:



            Using fixed or mobile terminals to check accounts, transfer money and pay for goods and services;
            Supporting Authentication, Authorization and Accounting (AAA) features and signing transactions;
            Support or links into software for buying and selling stocks;
            Obtaining statistics and/or professional advice concerning whether to bind the loan interest rate or not, when
             to buy or sell stocks etc.



8.4.8       Virtual Presence

Virtual Presence enables the user to be virtually present at another location, or receive information that is presented in a
way augmenting the perception of the situation the user is in or the task the user is performing.
Scenarios where the user is virtually present at another location may have a one-way or two-way direction, and the
other location may be in the real world or in the virtual world. In one-way scenarios the user may see or get other sense
impressions from the other location, and may navigate and “move around” to do inspections etc. In two-way scenarios
the user in addition may cause changes in the other location.
Scenarios where the users perception is augmented may be implemented with computer graphics superimposed with the
real world. In this way it seems to the user that the real and virtual objects coexist.
Concepts known from the Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality areas are included in the Virtual presence service
concept, and examples of use may be:
       Videoconferences
       Telemedicine. For instance specialists following an operation, or performing real-time actions using remotely
        controlled equipment
       Inspection of installations hardly accessible, for instance subsea oil installations
       Advanced games
       Real-time multimedia intelligence briefings
       Command and control communications
                                                                                                     TD — Page 26 of 34

         Theatre meetings
         Training
         Distance learning
         Information dissemination for real-time emergency management preparedness
         Command, control and coordination for real-time emergency management response
         Other federal, state and local government collaborative work




9                    P1448
                     Opportunities offered by Carrier Grade Multipoint Services

9.1                  What is this Project about?

A multipoint technology allows a user to reach multiple destinations through a single physical or logical connection.
The definition of a multipoint network service is one that allows each customer edge (CE) end point or node to
communicate directly and independently to all other CE nodes.

Multipoint Services (e.g. Transparent LAN Services or Virtual Private LAN Services) provide a functionality, which is
virtually identical to a corporate LAN. With Multipoint Services a customer domain can be extended across an operator
backbone, and corporate users are able to benefit from the simplicity and familiarity of a LAN regardless of the physical
location of their sites.

Currently many providers are offering L3 Multipoint Services (L3 VPN) which are used by a large number of
customers. This solution has some limitations (e.g. scalable support for IP-Multicast transport, control of customer
routing) which has to be addressed and solved in the future to provide even more attractive services.

A Multipoint Service is attractive because fewer physical connections are required to achieve full connectivity between
multiple points. An equivalent level of connectivity based on a point-to-point technology requires a much larger number
of connections or the use of non-optimal packet forwarding.

With IP multicast support over layer 2/3 Multipoint Services an operator can provide the customer with support for
running IP multicast services inside the VPN network in an efficient and scalable manner. This requires scalable
mechanisms for set-up of multicast replication trees inside the core network.

The study will analyse Multipoint Services from the operator's perspective. It will assess existing solutions and new
technologies. The study focuses on IP-Multicast as one service on top of different Multipoint solutions and will analyse
the pros and cons. It will also propose a roadmap for the deployment of Multipoint Services.

9.2                  What are the main objectives of this Project?

            Describe characteristics of Multipoint Services which are important to customers and summarise what changes
             they bring to the traditional data services model.

            Compare new emerging approaches for realising Multipoint services (e.g. Virtual Private LAN Services) with
             existing solutions (e.g. layer 3 multipoint solutions that are already implemented) and take the approaches of
             the different standardisation bodies (IEEE, ITU, IETF, MEF) into account.

            Identify the main obstacles to provide Multipoint Services in a scalable and reliable way and how to avoid or
             overcome existing problems, whenever possible. Characterise the available technical solutions (802.1ad,
             MACinMAC, VPLS, etc.) and compare the respective strengths and shortcomings.

            Evaluate IP-Multicast as one service example on top of different Multipoint solutions. Compare the pros and
             cons regarding to the underlying Multipoint technologies and take new approaches as e.g. RSVP-TE
             extensions for P2MP LSP into account.

            Suggest a roadmap for the deployment of these services and recommend directions to operators in this area.

            Give input to the corresponding IETF working groups (l3vpn, l2vpn) to provide an ISPs/carriers point of view.
             This should help the IETF to come up with solution fulfilling the service requirements of an ISP or carrier.
                                                                                                    TD — Page 27 of 34

     No information about the project available.


10             P1401
               OSIAN - Operators Strategy, business models and demonstrations for using Innovative home
               services to increase the ARPU in the fixed Network

10.1           What is this Project about?

The background for this project

Operators are experiencing the following trends: decreased ARPU in the fixed network, part of fixed telephony services
moved to mobile, data traffic moves over to ADSL and shared ADSL connections are taking the profit from Telcos. In
order to increase revenue from the fixed network again, new services have to be introduced in the private homes.

Previously new services were always connected to new infrastructure, e.g. the ISDN or ADSL modem. Customers are
not longer willing to invest in new infrastructure, if they don't see the value from services coming through it. Examples
of smart houses have been established across the world, and (remote) control of home devices is available now.
Advanced energy management has reached the market, and is implemented in new building blocks already. Wireless
technology is mature to enable interworking of home equipment without new wires.

Time has come for operators to define their role: "Up to the door or under the blanket? To which extend shall we
involve ourselves in the private homes?"

The study addresses the home market, products and developments going on, and it will suggest a roadmap when certain
products will arrive in the market. The study will analyse the needs of customers for a system integrator or a service
aggregator, suggest potential roles of Telecom operators, and provides a strategy for operators entering the private
home.

10.1.1         Why should the proposed work be done by EURESCOM now?

This work will enable both EURESCOM and thus the shareholders to be proactive with respect to investments in the
home market. It will address the different starting points of bringing services into the home, from PSTN, ISDN, xDSL,
Broadcast, Cable TV or other networks. Eurescom is the unique place where operators can discuss openly their
strategies, and match their arguments with qualified colleagues all around Europe.

10.1.2         What is the focus of the work?

The focus is on the analysis of finding "the best way" for service delivery into the private homes. Different strategies
might be necessary in order to satisfy the specific requirements of the various user groups. Example: A teenager has
other expectations to the home infrastructure and the services in the home ("I only need my mobile phone and the
broadband Internet connection"), while technology-lost people will prefer an easy service provision. There are three
major aspects to be taken into account: The user needs of the different users in the home, the infrastructure and the
potential services.

10.2           What are the main objectives of this Project?

The main objectives of this proposal are to:

         Identify the upcoming (potential) home infrastructure, e.g. wireless, media adapter, interconnectivity, gateway,
          ...

         Identify the users and the user needs, e.g. early adapters, technology-lost people

         Analyse Telecoms situation today, e.g.: What are conditions for return on investment? What is the willingness
          to risk?

         Treat the home as a collection of "service modules", e.g. entertainment, communication and find appropriate
          infrastructure to satisfy service provisioning

         Analyse experiences and results from trials/future homes

         Develop a strategy for Operators, depending on the position in the market, e.g. fixed, mobile, ISP, incumbant
                                                                                                      TD — Page 28 of 34

        Establish roll-out scenarios to ensure service provision for the different service modules

        Identify the business potential of the roll-out scenarios

10.3          What are the key-results for this Project?

Results of the project will address

        A systematic approach on user requirements in the future home

        A state-of-the-art overview on potential infrastructure to supply home services

        An analysis of user requirements for the various user-groups in the future home

        An summary of experiences and results from future-home trials

        Guidelines for operators how to approach the different home market segments.

No information about the project available


11            P1442
              New market opportunities by Galileo satellite services (NEMOGS)

11.1          What is this Project about?

The European Satellite Navigation system GALILEO is under development and will be fully operational in 2008. The
system represents an investment of 3.5 billion Euro. It may work in conjunction with GPS and adds some important
features not available by the latter. Studies from EC and ESA state a push of 100.000 jobs and economic spin offs worth
9 billion Euro/year for the next 10 years after the system roll-out.

This Galileo European program has two major tasks: one is the design and construction of the system itself, the other is
to exploit the system Europe- and world-wide to gain the highest technological and economical benefit out of it.

"Building Galileo" is a midterm activity: the development will be finished in 2006 and the deployment of the 30
satellites will be completed until 2008. From this moment, the system may be used commercially.

For companies that are willing to develop innovative and attractive new services, as well as new applications or even
devices, this schedule is tight. It is necessary to start now to be prepared and ready to fully use the new opportunities
when the system is ready and thus meeting the users expectations.

11.2          What are the main objectives of this Project?

The main objectives of this Study are to:

        Identify Galileo characteristics that are key factors for Telco opportunities

        Identify potential applications and service areas

        Draft business opportunities

        Give recommendations for further activities.

11.3          What are the key-results for this Project?

        Technological analysis of Galileo and its relevance for Telcos

        New and enhanced applications using Galileo

        Draft business cases for promising services

        Roadmap and recommendations for Galileo usage by Telcos.
                                                                                                      TD — Page 29 of 34

11.4             Services identified by the project

Based on different sources (GJU, EU, Studies from F&S and PWC, projects of partners involved) four main areas have
been identified as the most promising ones. The applications described in this chapter will not be in every detail the
ones that will be realized in the future. But in general, they cover most aspects of Galileo enriched location aware
services. Most existing or planned services have been analysed to see in which area they belong or if more areas are
required. In the next part, these areas and some sample services are explained.

11.4.1             Mobility

The category of location-based services with the best expectancy of revenue is in the field of personal mobility.
Services for the mass marked requiring communication, group oriented services and “internet like” services are
expected to be attractive for both the professional and private market. Basically, they offer value added information
based on the context and location of the respective user. Position, date, time and profile data are the basis on which
these services are built on. These services deal with individuals and their interest in social interaction. (Communities,
location based activities appointments, work and leisure)
Examples:
           Location based services for finding and tracking users. Security and alarm services for parents and children
            and buddy applications based on themes like: “Where is my buddy?” “Come over to this spot . .”, “Here is
            the party”
           Services will be based on the idea of “Place Memos”, where users may place information at a certain
            geographic location, only visible for a defined group of people. As an example people may leave virtual
            graffiti as; “ I was here on Wednesday, look at this picture” or “This shop is really bad, don‟t enter!” These
            services require communication and central database solutions. User may also communicates details of his
            daily life: like path, speed, preferences, consumption formation (preferred shops, travel detail public
            transportation habits, hints for friends (“good pub here”) questions (“Where was the closest movie rental,
            Thai food?”). Services may also be implemented with protected, private user databases or public available
            databases. Databases may again interact with other information sources like ad systems, shop systems, public
            and private information systems for additional service offerings.
           Cost of communications may relate to the location of the user. GALILEO can allow for new communications
            billing scenarios whereby the users location is involved. Operators are in the position to handle both billing
            and location. Billing for one subscription may be directed to different actors depending on the location. For
            example: phone calls made from the office will be billed to the company while calls from your private home
            will be billed to you or a store may have a promotion of free calls from their shops. Services may also be
            delivered at a fixed price within a certain area. A tourist attraction or a fun park has the possibility of making
            services that are specific to its premises. The operator can deliver this service at a fixed price by use of
            location and billing systems.
           Push services based on GALILEO location data. There is a large range of services from businesses usage to
            private people usage, based on the merger of location with some other data. The services are mainly triggered
            from combining some static or dynamic data, with location information, like the users vicinity of a location
            like a museum or shop, other terminals of friends and buddies. The triggers can be influenced by user
            preferences and/or profiles. The promoting entities in this case can be shops, galleries, museums, and
            restaurants that want to draw the end-users attention.
                                                                                                    TD — Page 30 of 34

Item                        Value
Communication               Messaging, broadcast
Mass market                 Yes
Customers                   Individuals and commercial end user
GALILEO advantage           Higher accuracy; better coverage in urban areas, use of back channel in rural areas
Existing     Projects   /   Youngster, Always-on navigation games in Japan and Korea
Products
                            First tourist information systems, POI systems
                            Navigation info system for premium hotel guests (by Deutsche Telekom). The
                            guest gets for free a PDA to help and assist the hotel guest in the local urban areas
                            and to find museums, pubs and entertainment locations.
Invest Time / Budget        Differs according to service complexity. As mass market is addressed (amount of
                            data, privacy, scaling...), the budget needs to be remarkable
Growth Profile              High
Addressed Needs             The user needs to be informed. Information is the most important value and item in
                            the information society. The user should receive personalized information and data.
                            The Users most used services are communication, for example Chats, Email-,
                            SMS-sending.
                            Information for foreign visitors in cities (tourism)
                            Location based billing can be used differently according to services and user
                            profiles
                             Table 1: Parameters / overview for personal mobility services



11.4.2     Transport Telematics

Within the field of transport it is important to have live and updated data regarding the road, traffic and vehicle. To
achieve this vehicles are used as a “meta sensors” and transmits live data through the mobile network of its related
location, speed, direction, etc. to a central server.
Examples:
           Drivers may take advantage of services that make use of collected data to be warned about traffic conditions
            based on their destination. Services may suggest alternatives to avoid traffic jams, accidents, works on the
            road, etc. and provide the related navigation (possible integration with third party services) as well as to
            support the driver in case of necessity (accident, breakdown).
           Public authorities can use the collected information to implement city access restrictions for motor vehicles
            through the implementation of automatic tolls for certain urban areas. Service related to park and highway
            tolling and traffic planning may also be offered.
           Insurance companies can calculate their insurance price based on an analysis of location and time For
            example, insurance would be cheaper for drivers who use low traffic routes or avoid driving at peak hours.
            This way, the insurance value would be modelled to the user behaviour and driving habits.
                                                                                                     TD — Page 31 of 34

Item                        Value
Communication               Messaging, broadcast
Mass market                 Yes
Customers                   The private user as both data provider and information user
                            The entities responsible for road network, insurance companies, city municipalities
GALILEO advantage           Higher precision and availability
Existing    Projects    /   Vehicle manufacturers built-in systems; commercial fleets applications
Products
Invest Time / Budget        Implementation not easy due to the need to coordinate different entities, set up of
                            adequate standards
Growth Profile              Slow beginning (due to the need to implement infrastructures) but steady growth in the
                            medium term
Addressed Needs             Need the eventual coordination of an European wide public authority; adoption of
                            common standards; effective cooperation between industry, system developers, mobile
                            operators, service and contents providers
                             Table 2: Overview and parameters for automotive telematics



11.4.3     Gaming

Location based gaming services use mobile phone as a terminals or objects in a gaming scenario. These will make it
possible to include the user's or another object‟s location in the context of a game, making the individual's physical
environment part of the scenario. The high accuracy and the urban coverage of GALILEO will make new opportunities
for game producers.
Examples:
           “Treasure hunting games” are types of services where the final objective is to find a treasure. Treasures may
            be virtual or gadgets constructed of GALILEO receiver and a mobile phone. Treasures may be bought from
            telecommunication operators and have a limited lifetime. Gadgets acting as treasures can make use of the
            authentication functionality so that the location cannot be tampered with. When a “Treasure” is found it is the
            property of the finder and he/she may start a new game by hiding the “Treasure”. Hiding places may be fixed
            or mobile positions (i.e. in a tree, on a bus, on a person, etc). The process of finding these treasures requires
            online communication with all participants of the game. Pictures sent could be used as extra information or
            clues.


           “Quiz Games” may be constructed on the basis of players answering questions and finding locations in a
            geographical limited area. As an example when families visit new cities during their vacation parents often
            want to see historical buildings and other sights. Some kids think these activities are boring, and the whole
            family could then benefit of a City Quest game. The player registers for the current day, and receives a
            personal keyword. Now the player has a map of the city, more local maps of buildings, pictures of the sights
            etc. on the terminal, and the task is to collect as many points as possible. The map shows where the player is
            located at any time, as well as dots indicating other players. Answering questions and identifying locations
            collects points. Tourist offices, restaurants and other establishments may sponsor the game for advertisement
            purposes and may give out prizes for the winner(s) of today‟s game.
Item                        Value
Communication               Messaging, Broadcasting
Mass market                 Yes
Customers                   Everybody interested in games; tourists, youths
GALILEO advantage           Higher accuracy; better coverage in urban areas
Existing    Projects    /   Always-on navigation games in Japan and Korea
Products
                                                                                                         TD — Page 32 of 34

Invest Time / Budget       Time investment: the service is liable for the early period of GALILEO‟s
                           implementation. Budget: Service implementation necessary both for server and
                           clients, and configuration must be made for each city. No “rocket science”, but
                           medium to high development cost.
Growth Profile             In general, analysts see a great potential for mobile gaming. The first mobile
                           gaming device with GPS included has already entered the market.
                           Growth depending on number of cities offering the game, and the offer may depend
                           on the number of existing users. But as long a “critical mass” is obtained the
                           growth may be steady in the medium term
Addressed Needs            Intuitive usage, full availability of position info, quick fix (first position)
                                     Table 3: Parameters / overview for “Gaming”



11.4.4   Other Services

New GALILEO services take the advantage of the higher precision, integrity information, up-link channel, satellite
availability and increased indoor capabilities. Many of these new services are an evolution of today‟s location based
services. Telecom operators also have an opportunity in enabling services in closer relation to GALILEO initiative. This
may be related to different ways of access and payment of GALILEO services. This is usually not the core business of
satellite operators or GALILEO enriched services provider. Telco operators may play an important role in this field of
support services.
Examples:
           Public sector „synchronisation“. Public employees carry a mobile, GALILEO enabled device whilst moving
            through town. They remotely enter all relevant issues in a central database and can as well access it for
            requests. Co-ordination of moving resources in public sector and management of public assets. Usage of
            synergies and decrease of information overlap. Examples: Traffic lights, street lights, cables, road conditions,
            transport of dangerous products, police cars, fireman cars, ambulance, public transport, situation related
            overlays (traffic jams, riots, accidents, broken pipes,) Goal: Better ways to control, co-ordinate and monitor
            management activities on civil or technological accidents and disasters.
           GALILEO OAAA (Overarching AAA) Support Service. For a flexible access to commercial services,
            different ways to access and pay for services need to be supported. Telcos could offer service portals with
            functionalities like: Trust centre for key management, customer management, accounting, billing, service
            brokerage and communication links (GSM, GPRS, UMTS, Internet, ...) Example scenario: A construction
            company needs high accuracy location data for a week at a site in Berlin. It addresses this request to the
            GOASE (GALILEO OAaa Support service). After the financial details have been agreed they receive a
            licence key. This key allows the company to use the GALILEO commercial service in a certain area for a
            certain time. The validity of the key may be enhanced upon request if necessary. The portal handles all
            billing issues.
           The “I‟m in order” is an alerting service that makes use of the integrity mechanisms in the GALILEO system.
            The service provides notifications to subscribers that depend on this information in real time. Examples may
            be navigation and anti-collision systems where the integrity of the location is critical. When the GALILEO
            ground station reports problems with its own operation or with a satellite, they will issue this to the network
            operator. The network operator uses the status from the GALILEO receivers in their network to determine
            the areas of coverage now affected by this malfunction.
           Services making use of the integrity up-link channels. The up-link makes a low bandwidth broadcast channel
            for all handsets within a region, i.e. handsets within the reach of one or several specific satellites. All
            handsets in the area will receive broadcasted messages, but the handset may filter out the intended content,
            like                   the                    “old”                    pager                   functionality.
            This channel may for instance be used to send important messages to handsets outside the reach of GSM
            networks. It could also be used to wake up sleeping GSM senders/receivers that are inactive to save power.
            For example pets or valuables could have a combined GALILEO/ GSM equipment attached. To save the
            battery only the GALILEO receiver is active at any time. But if they are lost or stolen a message is sent to
            activate the GSM sender/ receiver, asking the equipment to report its own position via a GSM message.
           Support for high precision location services. Combining the satellite signals (both GALILEO and GPS) with
            correction information via the mobile network increases the accuracy. Additionally the receiver could be
            equipped with radar that may further enhance the precision. The mobile communication link can also give
            assisted information to effectively shorten the time to first fix. In addition to offer this value added
                                                                                                  TD — Page 33 of 34

           information, service providers may offer applications for reception and storing of sampled location
           information. One example of use is land surveys. High precision land survey will have many areas of
           application, like local authorities documenting the boundaries of a site, construction companies documenting
           the measures of a building, network providers documenting their physical installations etc.


Item                        Value
Communication               Messaging, broadcast
Mass market                 Yes
Customers                   All user of commercial services, and providers of GALILEO enriched commercial
                            services
                            Public municipals, cities, regions, …
                            High availability applications
GALILEO advantage           Commercial services available, support for dedicated usage
                            Higher accuracy; better coverage in urban areas
                            Indoor availability
Existing    Projects    /   Fleet management systems. Advanced GNNS receivers making use of both GPS,
Products                    GLONASS and augmentation systems
Invest Time / Budget        Needs advanced GALILEO functions, specific hardware-development and a
                            supporting organisation for offering the service. This probably gives high values
                            both for time and budget.
                            Time investment: the services may be liable for the early period of GALILEO‟s
                            implementation. Budget: very much dependent on the business model and
                            relationship with third parties
Growth Profile              Slow beginning (due to the need to implement infrastructures) but steady growth in
                            the medium term
Addressed Needs             Need the eventual coordination of an European wide public authority; adoption of
                            common standards; effective cooperation between industry, system developers,
                            mobile operators, service and contents providers
                       Table 4: Overview and Parameters for GALILEO OAAA Support Service
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12            P1551
              Applications and services for ADSL2+ and beyond

12.1          What is this Project about?

Most DSL providers in Europe will soon implement ADSL2 and ADSL2+ in their access networks, allowing them to
offer higher bandwidth to their customers, larger distance between customer and the ADSL access node, and also lower
energy consumption.

Telcos need to decide soon if there is in the near future a need for DSL-bandwidth beyond what will be offered by
ADSL2 and ADSL2+.

This study will identify advanced applications and services, which will make use of such features, and might even
require higher bandwidth and better QoS than that offered by ADSL2 and ADSL2+ in order to increase the revenue
flow of network operators and service providers. The resulting requirements to enhance the access and core networks of
telcos will be analyzed, as well as the potential impact on service platforms.

Potential applications and services will be analyzed concerning their revenue and profit potential. Initial business
models will also be developed and a roadmap to describe an evolutionary way from today's situation to the near future.

12.2          What are the main objectives of this Project?

The main objectives of this Study are to:

        Analyze which applications and services have a need for the bandwidth of ADSL2/ADSL2+ and
         VDSL/VDSL2 and beyond that (bandwidths higher than 20 Mbps, and maybe even FTTH);

        Investigate the need for higher uplink data rates, i.e. more symmetric services;

        Derive for such applications and services their needs concerning bandwidth and QoS;

        Analyze how do the access and core networks of telcos need to be enhanced to cope with these requirements;

        Check the means to integrate such services into the existing service platforms (investigate the impact on APIs
         and their standardization, and middleware requirements);

        Find initial business models for such advanced applications and services;

        Develop a roadmap.

12.3          What are the key-results for this Project?

The project is expected to support operators in the roll-out of new, higher bandwidth and real time services.

The project outputs are scheduled for August 2005.

				
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