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					                           Nutrition in Clinical Care II
                                    FCNS 416
                                   Spring 2006

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Discussion of current research of the role of nutrition during
clinical care with emphasis on acute conditions requiring alternate nutrient delivery
routes.

CLASS TIME:           Tues 9:30-12:15 p.m. Wirtz 103B
CLOCK HOURS:          1 (~3 hour lecture per week)
CREDIT HOURS:         3 credits

INSTRUCTOR:         Judith M. Lukaszuk, Ph.D, RD, LDN.
OFFICE:             122 C Wirtz Hall
PHONE:              Work: 815-753-6352
E MAIL:             jmlukaszuk@niu.edu (judy_lukaszuk@yahoo.com)
OFFICE HOURS:       Open hours: Th 2-3 p.m.
                    Advisement hours: Mon 2:30-3:30 p.m.; Wed 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Although above are my stated office hours you are welcome to stop in anytime

GSA:                  TBA

PREREQUISITES:        FCNS 415

REQUIRED TEXT: KRAUSE’S FOOD NUTRITION AND DIET THERAPY
                      Mahan, K.L., Escott-Stump, S., W.B Saunders 11h Edition, 2004

                      Exchange Lists for Meal Planning, American Dietetic Association,
                      2003

                      Powers and Moore’s Food Medication Interactions Pronsky, Z.M.,
                      Food-Medication Interactions 13th Edition, 2004

                      A basic calculator is required for this course and it may be used on
                      exams.
                      Day     Date      Reading Topics/Assignments
                      Tues    1/17      Ch 30       Intro to class/Elimination diet
                                                    exercise/Lower GI introduction
                      Tues    1/24      Ch 31       Lower GI/Celiac Disease
                      Tues    1/31      Ch 23       Enteral (TF) formula selection
                      Tues    2/7       Ch 42       Exam #1 (9:30-10:45am)
                              2/7       Ch 42       Tube feeding (10:45-12:15)
                      Tues    2/14      Ch 42       Tube feeding/Parenteral (TPN)
                      Tues     2/21      23 & 42  Parenteral (TPN)/Transitional feeding
                               2/28               Exam #2 (9:30-10:45am)
                      Tues     2/28       23 & 42 Transitional feeding/Metabolic Stress
                      Tues     3/7       Ch 20    Herbal Medicine
                      Tues     3/14               Spring Break
                      Tues     3/21       Ch 19   Alternative/Complementary Medicine
                      Tues     3/28      31 &19 Hepatic Disease
                                                  Drug & Nutrient Interactions
                      Tues     4/4                Exam #3 (9:30-10:45am)
                               4/4       Ch 39    Renal Disease ARF & CRF
                      Tues     4/11      39 & 16 Renal /Genetic Fundamentals
                      Tues     4/18      32 & 42 Immune System/ Food Allergies
                      Tues     4/18      Ch 38    Pulmonary Disease
                      Tues     4/25      Ch 12 & Oncology
                                         40       Prevention/Treatment/Recovery
                      Tues     5/2       Ch 40    Oncology/ Review for Final Exam
                      Thurs    5/11               Final Exam 10:00-11:50 am


ATTENDANCE:

Time spent is better spent answering questions and explaining material, thus, formal
attendance is not taken, with the first day being the only exception. The student is
however, completely responsible for all academic material, special announcements,
changes in the course outline or exam dates, whether present or not.

STUDY:
It is unrealistic for anyone to expect to thoroughly understand a topic from lectures alone
or from reading the text without attending lecture. It is best to read a topic in the text
before coming to class, and then review the lecture notes and text after class. Questions
about the topic are strongly encouraged in or out of class. When in doubt, ask!

GRADING:
Your assignment grade will be affected if it is late (see late assignment section),
illegible or incomplete. Submit all work on time using the format specified. Always
submit assignments in pen unless otherwise specified

All exams must be taken when scheduled. The only exception will be students providing
evidence for missing exams (e.g. medical excuse, obituary notice etc). Only these
students will be provided a make-up exam.
EXAMS:
       Exam #1
       Exam #2
       Exam #3
       Final Exam (cumulative from FCNS 415 and FCNS 416)

GRADING SCALE:
A      90% and above
B      80-89%
C      70-79%
D      60-69%
F      <59.5%

TENTATIVE ASSIGNMENTS:
Specific details for each assignment will be given at the appropriate time.
   I. Diet planning points value to be announced (TBA)
   II. Case studies---point value TBA
   III. SOAP notes and other assignments as given--point value TBA
   IV. Elimination diet exercise


GRADES WILL BE DETERMINED BY AVERAGING % OBTAINED ON               TESTS AND
ASSIGNMENTS

LATE ASSIGNMENTS:

Assignments are due in class on the day as listed in syllabus. Assignments one day to
one week late will have 10% deducted from the grade. Assignments will not be accepted
if more than one week late. You will not be penalized for submitting work early ☺☺

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT:

Any student who, because of a disability may require some special arrangements in order
to meet course requirements should contact the instructor within the first 2 weeks of the
semester to ensure the implementation of necessary accommodations.

CLASS BEHAVIOR:
Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated. The following would be considered disruptive
if done during class time: gum chewing, reading the newspaper, sleeping and tardiness.
ATTIRE:

Hat wearing in the classroom is prohibited on exam days.

<<The use of cell phones or beepers in class is strictly prohibited>>.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:
Will not be tolerated. Those caught cheating will be given a zero for the test and be
asked to report to the judicial committee for further action.

PLAGIARISM MEANS:

1) Copying some or all of another students work.

2) Direct quote of more than 4 words written by another individual without giving credit
to that individual.

3) Paraphrasing material written by another individual without giving credit to that
individual.

4) Students who plagiarize will be penalized to the full extent allowable by the student
judicial code. Generally this will mean, at minimum, expulsion from the course and an
earned “F” grade for the course.

LIMITED RETENTION POLICY

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in FCNS prerequisite courses before they can
enroll in any successive FCNS course to meet the requirements for an NDHA major
GENERAL OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE NUTRITION IN CLINICAL CARE II
The overall objective of the course is to understand the dietary management of all age
individuals during various disease states.

The student should be able to perform the following objectives upon completion of this
course:

Identify patients at nutritional risk and recommend and implement nutrition care
strategies.

Describe the etiology of the disease.

Define basic genetic terminology (i.e. DNA, chromosome, gene, SNP & nutragenomics).

Discuss how nutragenomics will change nutrition counseling now and in the future.

Define the special medical terminology and acronyms associated with each disease state.

Describe the pathological and biochemical changes associated with diseases.

Identify the nutritional and psychological needs of a hospitalized patient.

Understand the medical and surgical management of each disease and effect of treatment
on nutritional status.

Plan general and therapeutic diets requiring qualitative and quantitative modifications in
Calorie, carbohydrate, protein and fat, sodium, potassium, calcium, and other nutrients
whenever necessary.

Translate dietary prescriptions to practical diets for individual patients.

List the foods permitted or not permitted for each dietary modification.

Identify the problems in selecting, buying, preparing, and acceptability of foods in
planning modified diets.

Plan diet instructions for patients with different disease states and varied socioeconomic,
cultural and racial backgrounds.

Identify the problems of adherence to such diets for prolonged periods by the patients.

List the sources of special foods and the sources of their nutritional composition

List the source of new advances in dietary management of diseases.
Define the best mode of nutritional support for a patient i.e. p.o., enteral or parenteral

Understand the legal rights and responsibilities of the dietitian and understand the ethical
issues involved in managing the nutritional care of patients

				
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