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STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN

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					STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN
HIGHER EDUCATION

Mary Helen Walker, MA, NCC, NCLPC
Chair, NCAHEAD Educational Outreach Committee Director, Disability Support
Services
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke

LEGAL ASPECTS OF
POST-SECONDARY ACCOMMODATIONS
OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


Differences between Secondary
and Post-Secondary
Administering Services
Agreement for Services
Advocacy
Parental Contact
Confidentiality
Entitlement Law
Assessment/Testing
Free Appropriate Public Education vs. Access
Meeting Admissions Criteria

Differences between Secondary
and Post-Secondary
Americans with Disabilities Act
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

Differences between Secondary
and Post-Secondary
Who is protected?
Who does the enforcement?
Where does funding come from?
Who provides services?

Reasonable Accommodations in Higher Education
Essential Components of the Curriculum/Class May Not be Altered
Case Law
Level the Playing Field
Access to All Programs, Curriculums, and Services
Code of Conduct Enforced
Reasonable Accommodations in Higher Education
Association of Higher Education and Disabilities
Nexus between the Disability and Requested Accommodation
Does the Accommodation Give an Unfair Advantage?

Reasonable Accommodations in Higher Education
Student Must Identify and Request Services
Specialist in Disability Area Documents Disability
Specialist Recommends Accommodation
Institution Approves Accommodation and Recommends to Instructor

Reasonable Accommodations in Higher Education
Institution Provides Physical, Academic, and Program Access
Related Services Responsibility of the Family

Reasonable Accommodations in Higher Education
Institution Provides Access to Classroom and Classwork
Student Responsible for Access to Homework

Typical Accommodations
Note takers
Scribe
Alternative Testing
Separate testing room
E-text
Voice Activated Software
Lab assistants
Assistive Listening Devices
Sign language and oral interpreters
Zoomtext
Schedule modification
Flexible attendance requirements, if possible


       accommodations are not automatic. Each student must qualify for each
**These
accommodation.

How High-School Service Providers Can Prepare Students with Disabilities to
Successfully Make the College Transition
Does the student know his/her rights under the ADA and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973?
Does the student know how to ask for help?
Can the student articulate impact of disability on course subject matter?
Does the student feel comfortable talking about his/her disability?
Does the student know how to approach instructors for requested
accommodations?
How High-School Service Providers Can Prepare Students with Disabilities to
Successfully Make the College Transition
Is the student’s documentation/assessment data
      current?
 Can the student tell you his/her diagnosis?
 Does the student know what his/her strengths or
      weaknesses are as a result of the diagnosis?
 Is the student able to tell others about the disability
     as it impacts the academic environment?
 Does the student understand the cyclic nature of the
     disability?

How High-School Service Providers Can Prepare Students with Disabilities to
Successfully Make the College Transition
Does the student know which accommodations have worked in the past and which
were not a success?
Is the student aware of the myriad accommodations that are available?
Is the student aware of appropriate Assistive Technology programs?


How High-School Service Providers Can Prepare Students with Disabilities to
Successfully Make the College Transition
Has the student met with Vocational Rehabilitation, Division of Services for the
Blind, and Division of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing?
Has the student met with the Disabled Students representative at the post-
secondary institution?

				
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