PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM how to - PDF

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					UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND

 PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM




      STUDENT HANDBOOK




                          Revised May 30, 2007
                                                       TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................... 4
UNIVERSITY POLICIES ............................................................................................................. 4
MISSION STATEMENT .............................................................................................................. 4
PROGRAM EXPECTED GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES..................... 5
I. GENERAL PROGRAM INFORMATION…………………………………………………..5
SCHOOL CANCELLATION OR DELAYS................................................................................ 5
FACULTY/STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION ....................................................................... 6
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ............................................................................................. 7
DIDACTIC YEAR SCHEDULE................................................................................................... 8
COURSE TITLE ........................................................................................................................... 8
CREDITS ....................................................................................................................................... 8
Summer 2007……………………………………………………………………………………8
Fall 2007………………………………………………………………………………………….8
Spring 2008………………………………………………………………………………………8
CLINICAL ROTATION SCHEDULE.......................................................................................... 8
II. GENERAL PROGRAM POLICIES……………………………………………………….9
CHANGE OF ADDRESS POLICY............................................................................................. 9
STUDENT HEALTH..................................................................................................................... 9
Health Insurance .......................................................................................................................... 9
Physical Exam/Immunization Requirements ........................................................................... 9
Immunization Requirements for All College of Health Professions Students…………...10
COMMUNICATION POLICY .................................................................................................... 10
VACATION .................................................................................................................................. 10
POLICY ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT................................................................................ 10
POLICY ON ADVANCED PLACEMENT................................................................................ 11
POLICY ON EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ............................................................................. 11
TRANSFER CREDIT ................................................................................................................. 11
GRADING POLICY .................................................................................................................... 11
POLICY ON INCOMPLETE GRADES.................................................................................... 11
STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE (SAC)............................................................................. 12
STUDENT REPRESENTATION AT THE SAC MEETING .................................................. 12
POLICY ON FAILURE OF DIDACTIC EXAMS OR COURSES ......................................... 12
POLICY ON FAILURE OF CLINICAL ROTATIONS............................................................. 13
PROBATION ............................................................................................................................... 14
ETHICAL AND BEHAVIORAL STANDARDS........................................................................ 14
NOTIFICATION OF ACTIONS BY THE STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE .................. 14
APPEALS .................................................................................................................................... 15
PROMOTION POLICY .............................................................................................................. 15
GRADUATION/ACADEMIC STANDARDS ............................................................................ 15
DISMISSAL ................................................................................................................................. 15
LEAVE OF ABSENCE AND WITHDRAWAL......................................................................... 15
TECHNICAL STANDARDS ...................................................................................................... 16
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT .................................................................................................. 17

                                                                          2
GUIDELINES FOR ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR THE PA PROFESSION ......................... 19
PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT COMPETENCIES (adopted by PAEA Jan 2007)................... 19
PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS ..................................................................................... 23
III. DIDACTIC YEAR INFORMATION AND POLICIES…………………………………..23
TEXTBOOKS/COURSE SYLABII............................................................................................ 23
EQUIPMENT............................................................................................................................... 23
ATTENDANCE ........................................................................................................................... 24
COURSE / LECTURER EVALUATION FORMS................................................................... 24
IV. CLINICAL YEAR INFORMATION AND POLICIES……………………………………24
Out of System Rotation Sites ................................................................................................... 25
STUDENT INVOLVEMENT ON CLINICAL ROTATIONS ................................................... 25
PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY .................................................................................................... 25
HEALTH INSURANCE .............................................................................................................. 26
LATEX ALLERGY ...................................................................................................................... 26
INJURY REPORTING ............................................................................................................... 26
WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE........................................................................ 26
GRADES FOR CLINICAL ROTATIONS................................................................................. 27
RECORDING OF ROTATION GRADES................................................................................ 27
ROTATION SITE EVALUATIONS........................................................................................... 27
PATIENT/PROCEDURE LOGS............................................................................................... 27
ATTENDANCE POLICY............................................................................................................ 28
ABSENCES................................................................................................................................. 28
HOUSING POLICY .................................................................................................................... 28
TRANSPORTATION POLICY.................................................................................................. 29
GRADUATION WEEK ............................................................................................................... 29




                                                                        3
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of the Physician Assistant Program (PAP) is to prepare individuals to practice
as physician assistants. The University of New England (UNE) grants a Master of Science
degree and the Program bestows a Certificate of Completion for successful completion of
the two year Program.

This handbook contains all of the specific policies and procedures pertinent to both the
didactic and clinical years of the program. It is should be used in conjunction with the
University of New England Student Handbook. All students should be familiar with both
documents.

The policies and procedures in this handbook are revised annually and will take effect at the
start of the next academic year. The policies and procedures contained herein will take
effect on May 30, 2007.

UNIVERSITY POLICIES
The Physician Assistant Program requires that all matriculating students abide by the
University of New England Policies. These are included with the Student Planner and
available at the PAP office. All policies involving safety, security, residential life,
discrimination/harassment, misconduct, alcohol and drug use and conduct should
particularly be followed.

MISSION STATEMENT

       The mission of the University of New England Physician Assistant Program is to prepare
       masters level primary care Physician Assistants who will practice with physicians and
       other members of the health care team. The Program is committed to developing
       practitioners who are educated in all aspects of healthcare including geriatrics, health
       promotion and disease prevention, and public health practice. Special emphasis is
       placed on training clinicians who will provide primary healthcare to rural and urban
       underserved populations.

The Physician Assistant Program is a rigorous and intense program that places specific
requirements and demands on the students enrolled in the program. An objective of this
program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render
healthcare to a wide spectrum of individuals. The technical standards set forth by the Program
establish the essential qualities considered necessary for students admitted to this program to
achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies of a practicing Physician Assistant, as well as
meet the expectations of the program's accrediting agency (Accreditation Review Commission
on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc [ARC-PA]). Compliance with the program's
technical standards does not guarantee a student's eligibility for the PANCE certification exam.

The subject matter in PA education can be of a very sensitive and sometimes disturbing
nature. Students are reminded that the purpose of the educational sessions is to prepare
students to provide physician-supervised primary health care to all persons and in all
environments without regard to the student's own personal beliefs and biases.
                                                  4
  PROGRAM EXPECTED GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES
  Graduates of the Physician Assistant Program will:

     Understand the basic sciences of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology and be able to
     utilize this knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
     Understand the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and to apply them in the treatment of
     patients.
     Elicit a detailed, accurate history and perform a thorough physical examination
     Understand how to order and interpret appropriate diagnostic tests in a cost efficient
     manner.
     Present patient data and document it appropriately in the medical record.
     Provide quality acute and ongoing patient care by appropriately delineating patient problems
     and by formulating and implementing patient management plans, including referrals to other
     healthcare providers and agencies.
     Perform or assist in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and manage
     or assist in the management of medical and surgical conditions, particularly in life
     threatening situations.
     Understand the principles of public health and incorporate health promotion and disease
     prevention into a patient care practice.
     Use information technology in the provision of quality healthcare and clinical decision-
     making.
     Evaluate the medical literature critically and apply this knowledge and the principles of
     evidence-based medicine to clinical practice.
     Provide compassionate and competent healthcare to patients of all ages and backgrounds.
     Understand the medical and social issues that affect the geriatric patient and provide
     appropriate management of these problems.
     Counsel patients, their families and their caregivers regarding issues of health, illness and
     medical care.
     Understand the historical and contemporary role of the physician assistant in the healthcare
     system.
     Participate effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team.
     Understand the principles of patient oriented healthcare and to communicate clearly with
     patients.
     Identify the special dynamics of providing healthcare to rural or underserved populations.
     Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior by following the American Academy of
     Physician Assistants- CODE OF ETHICS OF THE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT
     PROFESSION.


I. GENERAL PROGRAM INFORMATION

  SCHOOL CANCELLATION OR DELAYS
  The University usually makes a decision to close or delay school because of
  inclement weather by 6:30 a.m. Check the following TV or radio stations for these
  announcements or call the UNE CANCELLATION BULLETIN BOARD at 602-2211
  for a recorded announcement about cancellations or delays.
                                                 5
PROGRAM CALENDAR

Class of 2008
May 29, 2007                             Clinical Rotations begin
August 16-17, 2007                       Rotation Seminar # 1
November 7-9, 2007                       Rotation Seminar #2
Dec.22-Jan 2, 2008                       Christmas vacation
February 6-8, 2008                       Rotation Seminar #3
May 6-10, 2008                           Graduation Week
May 11, 2008                             CHP Graduation Ceremony

Class of 2009
June 4-5, 2007                           Orientation
June 6, 2007                             Summer classes begin
August 17, 2007                          Summer semester ends
August 20-August 24, 2007                Summer break
August 27, 2007                          Fall Semester begins
September 3, 2007                        Labor Day Holiday
October 6-8, 2007                        Long Weekend
November 21-25,2007                      Thanksgiving break
December 20, 2007                        Fall semester ends
December 21-Jan. 6, 2008                 Christmas break
January 7, 2008                          Spring classes begin
January 14, 2008                         Martin Luther King Holiday
March 11-15, 2008                        Spring break
May 10, 2008                             Didactic Year ends

FACULTY/STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION
Name              Position                        Phone               Email address
John Beneck       Faculty                                     jbeneck@une.edu
Brenda Beckett    Faculty                                     bbeckett@une.edu
Liz Cavallaro     Administrative Assistant        221-4528    lcavallaro@une.edu
Jim Cyr           Program Adm Asst                221-4529    Jcyr@une.edu
Sylvana D’Alfonso Clinical Placement Coord        221-4526    sdalfonso@une.edu
Tory Davis        Assistant Professor             221-4552    tdavis@une.edu
Patrick Enking    Clinical Coordinator            221-4524    penking@une.edu
Erich Fogg        Program Director                221-4527    efogg@une.edu
Jeff Handler      Medical Director                221-4530    jhandler@une.edu
Lisa Southwick    Academic Coordinator            221-4525    lsouthwick@une.edu
Carl Toney        Program Faculty                 221-4266    ctoney@une.edu
Melissa Tsomides Assistant Professor              221- 4533    mtsomides@une.edu
Joseph Wolfberg IGEP instructor                   221-4465    JWolfberg@une.edu

ACADEMIC ADVISING
All students will be assigned a faculty advisor. Students must meet with their faculty advisor
at least once each semester during their first year and may meet with them at each Rotation
                                              6
Seminar during their second year. The purpose of the meeting is to review the student’s
progress and to discuss any problems the student may be experiencing. Students are
encouraged to meet with their advisor more frequently if they are having academic
problems. The Program Director will not be assigned advisees.

CHAIN OF COMMAND
The following is an example of the process of contacting the faculty with questions or
concerns that are general in nature.
       1. Contact your academic advisor for general guidance in:
             a. Your progress in the program
             b. Issues in the classroom that are disruptive or distracting
             c. Issues with other faculty members or staff

      2. Contact the administrative assistant in the PA Office for:
           a. Appointments with the Program Director
           b. Any informational changes the program should know about
           c. Any other administrative components of your education
      3. Contact the secretary of the clinical year for:
           a. Information pertaining to the clinical year documentation including H&Ps,
               site evaluations and grades
      4. Contact the Clinical Placement Coordinator
           a. Information regarding setting up rotations
           b. Rotation administrative details
           c. Housing assistance/contacts during the clinical year
      5. Contact the Academic Coordinator for:
           a. Any academic issue during the didactic phase of the program such as
               scheduling, examinations, workshops, absences
      6. Contact the Clinical coordinator for:
           a. educational issues pertaining to clinical rotations including relationships
               with staff, preceptors, learning objectives, examinations
           b. issues pertaining to rotation seminars
           c. issues pertaining to summative evaluations
           d. questions about rotation examinations
      7. Contact the Program Director for:
           a. issues not able to be adequately handled by the most appropriate first
               contact
           b. issues involving the university administration
           c. issues involving student affairs
           d. issues involving completion of program criteria
      8. Contact the IGEP Coordinator for:
           a. Educational issues pertaining to IGEP

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
The University provides reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.
See the UNE Student Handbook for specific information on the subject of students with
disabilities. See also requirements for Technical Standards, page 15.



                                              7
DIDACTIC YEAR SCHEDULE
                               Course List 2007-2008
                                First Year Students

  COURSE
              COURSE TITLE                                   CREDITS
  NUMBER
Summer 2007
PAC 500       Anatomy                                             4
PAC 520       Behavioral Science                                  2
PAC 503       Clinical Assessment I                                2
PAC 505       Professional Seminar                                 1
PAC 506       Integrating Seminar I                                1
PAC 509       Integrated Clinical Medicine I                       1
PAC 511       Health Promotion Disease Prevention                 2
                                                                  13
Fall 2007
PAC 541       Epidemiology                                        1
PAC 513       Clinical Assessment II                               1
PAC 516       Integrating Seminar II                               1
PAC 517       Microbiology                                        3
PAC 518       Pharmacology I                                       3
PAC 519       Integrated Clinical Medicine II                     8
PAC 522       Integrated Geriatric Practicum I                    1
                                                                  18
Spring 2008
PAC 534       Application of Research in Clinical Practice        3
PAC 510       Professional & Ethical Issues                       2
PAC 533       Clinical Assessment III                             2
PAC 536       Integrating Seminar III                             1
PAC 537       Emergency Medicine and Surgery                     4
PAC 538       Pharmacology II                                     2
PAC 539       Integrated Clinical Medicine III                   10
PAC 540       Integrated Geriatric Practicum II                   1
                                                                 25
                                                             TOTAL: 56
CLINICAL ROTATION SCHEDULE

Rotation                May 06 – May 07                      Credit Hours
PAC 600                Internal Medicine I                   6 credits
PAC 601                 Internal Medicine II                 6 credits
PAC 602                 Emergency Medicine                   6 credits
PAC 603                 General Surgery                      6 credits
                                           8
      PAC 607                     Family Medicine I                          6 credits
      PAC 608                     Family Medicine II                         6 credits
      PAC 612                     Primary Care Selective                     6 credits
      PAC 613                     Specialty Elective                         6 credits
                                                                            48 Credits

      Additional Curriculum requirements during the clinical year:
      PAC 611 Rotation Seminar                                              2 Credit
      PAC 620 Preparation for Clinical Practice                             1 Credit
      PAC 624 Application of Research in Clinical Practice III              1 Credit
      Total Credit Hours for clinical year                                  52 Credits

II.   GENERAL PROGRAM POLICIES

      CHANGE OF ADDRESS POLICY
      Students are required to notify the Program when there is a change in their address or
      phone number. The Program will not be responsible for lost mail or late notification when a
      student does not provide notification of a change.

      STUDENT HEALTH

      Health Insurance
      All students must have health insurance coverage while enrolled in the UNE Physician
      assistant Program. Students are responsible for any costs entailed in treating injuries during
      matriculation in the PA Program (See Injury Policy).

      Physical Exam/Immunization Requirements
      Students are absolutely required to have the health care exams and immunizations listed
      below before enrollment, and during the Program.

          1. A physical examination with appropriate lab work prior to starting the PA Program
             and just prior to the start of clinical rotations. Results of the exam must be submitted
             on the approved university form to the Health Center.

      Immunization Requirements for UNE Students (University Policy 2007)

            These recommendations are based on CDC (Centers for Disease Control and
            Prevention), ACHA (American College Health Association), and ACIP (Advisory
            Committee on Immunization Practices).

         1. All UNE students are MANDATED by the State of Maine to have one MMR and
            recommended to have two. UNE presently requires all students to have a second
            measles (Rubeola). Based on the guidelines we’re recommending all students have
            two MMRs within the students’ lifetime. Students with laboratory evidence of disease
            immunity (i.e., serologic test results indicating immunity) are counted as appropriately
            vaccinated.
         2. Tetanus/Diphtheria is the second vaccine MANDATED by the State of Maine and has
            to be administered within the last 10 years.
                                                      9
All students attending UNE will have the above vaccines.




Immunization Requirements for All College of Health Professions Students
  1. Hepatitis B -series of three injections; titer required 6-8 weeks after third shot given.
     If has negative titer then repeat series of three shots or give a booster and check
     immunity. If has a second negative titer then the patient is a non-responder. The
     titer will only be checked if within one year of full series of three shots.
  2. Varicella- titer required. If has a negative titer, then have series of two doses, four to
     eight weeks apart. No additional titer is required.
  3. PPD - required annually and has to be read within 48-72 hours. Chest X-ray required
     if has positive PPD.
  4. Polio - Primary series as a child. If no primary series: two doses IPV four to eight
     weeks apart, third dose is six to twelve months after the second dose. Routine polio
     vaccine is not recommended for persons 18 years of age and older.

Recommended Immunizations for CHP students:
  1. Meningococcal Tetravalent Conjugate or Tetravalent Polysaccharide if Conjugate is
     not available-one dose.
  2. Influenza vaccine on an annual basis

COMMUNICATION POLICY
E-mail is the primary mechanism used by the Program to notify students of important
information. Both first and second year students are required to check their university e-
mail on a daily basis. The Program will not be responsible if a student has inaccurate
information because the student does not routinely use his/her e-mail.

VACATION
During the didactic phase, students will follow the MSPA schedule by the program. Holidays
and vacation times may differ from the University Schedule. During the clinical year,
students will only have a vacation during the December Holiday Break.

POLICY ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
The Program discourages students from having outside employment while in the Program.
If a student feels that it is necessary to work while in the Program, it is advisable that the
student informs his/her faculty advisor of this need. Program expectations, assignments,
deadlines and responsibilities will not be altered or adjusted to accommodate working
students and it is expected that his/her employment will not interfere with his/her learning
experience. Should a conflict arise concerning outside employment the issue may be
brought to the Student Affairs Committee.

POLICY ON STUDENT WORK TO BENEFIT THE PA PROGRAM
Students will not be required to perform any clerical or administrative work on behalf of the
PA Program. On occasion the faculty or staff of the program may make a request for a
student to perform volunteer activity for the program. Students will not be obligated to
                                               10
volunteer and shall not be financially compensated for this activity. Student employment
through the university work-study program will be governed by university policies.

POLICY ON ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Admitted students who have taken basic science graduate or undergraduate courses may
qualify for advanced placement (advanced standing). To obtain credit for a course, the
student must request an Advanced Placement Form from the Program. An official copy of
his/her transcript must be attached to the form, along with the course description from the
other institution’s catalog. This form must then be submitted to the Academic Coordinator,
who will then refer it to the appropriate instructor. Once the request has been approved, the
student must return it to the Program for documentation. The student is also responsible for
submitting the approved request to the Registrar’s office.

The decision to approve a request is based on the fact that the substitute course is
equivalent to the course offered by the Program. Advanced placement credit decisions will
be made on a case-by-case basis, considering the individual course content and how it
relates to the Program curriculum. Students may be asked to take a challenge examination
to qualify for advance placement credit. Tuition is based on an annual fee. Advanced
placement will not result in tuition savings.

POLICY ON EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

TRANSFER CREDIT
Transfer credits may be awarded to students who transfer from another physician assistant
program. The program director will award transfer credits on a case-by-case basis.

GRADING POLICY
The Physician Assistant Program is designed to integrate didactic and clinical learning
experiences to optimize competency as a healthcare provider. Therefore successful
completion of every course and clinical rotation is necessary to progress through the
Program. Grades for both the didactic and clinical years are based on the following

GRADING SCALE:

 High Pass       Above 90%        Demonstrate excellent work and performs above
                                  expectations.
 Pass            70-90%           Consistently performs at a satisfactory level.
 Fail            Below 70%        Does not perform at a satisfactory level.

POLICY ON INCOMPLETE GRADES
All required courses or rotation assignments must be completed by the end of the
semester/rotation or he/she will receive an “Incomplete” for the course/rotation grade. All
course or rotation work must be successfully completed within six weeks of the end of a
semester for the didactic year. Failure to complete the required work during the time limit
results in an assignment of a “Failure” for the course. (see the UNE Student Handbook,
p.43) The course requirements for the clinical rotations are outlined in the Instructional

                                              11
Objectives for the specific rotation. Any missing evaluations, logs or examinations will result
in an “incomplete” until submitted and reviewed by faculty.

STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE (SAC)
The Committee may consist of representatives from the Physician Assistant Program,
College of Medicine, College of Health Professions or adjunct clinical faculty. The
Committee will consist of at least five members, one of who will be from outside the PA
Program. The PA Program director will appoint the chair of the committee. A quorum of at
least four members must be present at a meeting before the Committee can make any
decisions. Although not required, it is desirable to have a member from outside the PA
Program present when decisions are made. A majority vote of the Committee members
present is necessary to act on disciplinary sanctions or to promote a student.

The committee chair may, at his/her discretion, use electronic communication to request the
committee to act in promoting students if there are no issues requiring discussion on
disciplinary proceedings.

The Committee is responsible for regularly evaluating the progress of each student and for
making the determination of an appropriate course of action when a student experiences
academic or behavioral conduct issues. The Committee will meet at the end of each
semester and when necessary to investigate academic or behavioral issues.

The Student Affairs Committee may be convened at the request of any PA Program faculty
member, or any didactic or clinical year student. It may review student records and may
interview students, staff, faculty members and preceptors.

Since decisions are not based entirely on academic grades, the Committee will consider
relevant information from faculty, staff and preceptors, as well as prior academic
performance, attendance, professional conduct and extenuating circumstances

STUDENT REPRESENTATION AT THE SAC MEETING
The student may be present at the meeting. The student may have an advisor with him/her
at the meeting but may not have an attorney present.

POLICY ON FAILURE OF DIDACTIC EXAMS OR COURSES
Any student failing one examination will receive an exam failure notice from the Academic
Coordinator by e-mail. A copy of this notice will also be sent to the student’s advisor. The
student will be required to make an appointment with his/her advisor within two weeks of
receipt of the e-mail to discuss the student’s performance on the examination.

Any student failing two exams in the same semester will receive a letter of concern from the
Academic Coordinator, which will be placed in the student’s file, and a copy will be sent to
the student’s advisor. The student will be required to meet with his/her advisor within two
weeks of receipt of the letter to discuss the student’s academic performance.

The Student Affairs Committee (SAC) will review the academic performance of any student
who fails three exams in one semester. The Academic Coordinator shall send a notification
of failure of three exams to the student and the chair of the SAC. A letter either by email
                                              12
(with receipt of notice) or a written copy will be sent to the student by the chair of the SAC
notifying the student that a meeting to discuss his/her progress will take place. A copy will
be placed in the student’s academic file. The student may be asked to appear before the
SAC. Any student failing three or more exams in a single semester may be put on probation.

If a student fails greater than 50% of the tests in a given course, s/he may be placed on
academic probation even if s/he passes the course. The SAC will meet to discuss the
circumstances and determine any course of action. This may include a remediation plan, the
need to repeat the course, continued academic probation or dismissal from the program. If
a remediation plan is decided, the Academic Coordinator and/or the course coordinator and
input from any other faculty member as requested by the Program Director will develop a
remediation plan for the student. This plan may include a comprehensive exam for the
course or any other action deemed necessary to ensure the student is prepared to progress
in the program.

The Student Affairs Committee automatically places any student who fails a didactic
course on probation. The Academic Coordinator and/or the course coordinator as well as
any other faculty requested by the Program Director will develop a remediation plan for the
student. This plan may include a comprehensive exam for the course. The student will
remain on probation for the next semester even if he/she successfully completes the
remediation plan. If the student does not successfully complete all aspects of the
remediation plan, he/she will receive a grade of “F” for the course and may be dismissed.

The SAC may offer the student the opportunity to repeat the course if it is felt there are
extenuating circumstances. The student will be placed on probation and will not be allowed
to progress in the program until he/she has successfully completed the course. Upon
returning into the program, the student shall be on Academic Probation until the student has
completed the course he/she initially failed. A student who fails more than one course at
any time during matriculation, will be dismissed from the Program. If a student is required to
repeat a course, the new grade shall be entered on their transcript following completion of
the course a second time. The original grade shall not be removed from the transcript.

Any appeal to the SAC decisions will be made to the Program Director. (See page 14)

The Student Affairs Committee may make modifications to the process described above
because of extenuating circumstances at any time.

POLICY ON FAILURE OF CLINICAL ROTATIONS
The student must meet with the SAC to discuss the reasons for the failure. A student who
fails a clinical rotation may be required to do any of the following at the discretion of the SAC:
1) complete an additional rotation in the same discipline or a discipline chosen by the SAC;
2) be placed on probation with an independent project to be completed; 3) dismissed from
the program. He/she must repeat the failed rotation at a different site. Failure of more than
one clinical rotation will result in dismissal from the Program.

Students may not participate in clinical rotations while on probation.

The original grade for the rotation will be entered on the student’s transcript. After
                                               13
completion of the repeated rotation, the new grade will also be entered on the student’s
transcript. The original grade shall not be removed from the transcript. The SAC may make
modifications to the process described above because of extenuating circumstances.

PROBATION
The SAC may place a student on probation for academic failure or because of a
behavioral/ethical concerns. Documentation of the probationary status will be permanently
documented in the student’s academic file retained by the program. This is not necessarily
an University sanctioned probation.

If a student is placed on probation he/she must meet with his/her academic advisor for
academic counseling. The SAC will recommend the schedule for these meetings initially. It
is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her advisor to schedule meetings. Failure to do
so may be considered a violation of the terms of probation. Additional recommendations of
the committee may be included in the probationary requirements on an individual basis.

The Student Affairs Committee will review the probationary status at the end of the following
semester or sooner. The probationary status will then be withdrawn if, in the view of the
SAC, the student has successfully completed all probationary conditions imposed upon
him/her. A student who does not successfully complete remediation will continue on
probation for a second semester or period of time determined by the SAC. Failure to satisfy
probationary conditions at the end of the second probationary term will result in dismissal
from the Program.

A student who is placed on probation during the didactic year may not start on clinical
rotations until the SAC terminates the probationary status. The SAC may decide to remove
probationary status at any time based on new information or a majority agreement that the
probationary criteria have been met.

ETHICAL AND BEHAVIORAL STANDARDS
Failure to adhere to the Standards of Conduct and the AAPA Code of Ethics (page 19) may
result in a disciplinary sanction. Under these circumstances, the SAC may do any or all of
the following:
            1. recommend issuing a letter of concern or reprimand
            2. recommend academic probation
            3. recommend repetition of a class or clinical rotation
            4. recommend dismissal from the Program

The SAC may consider any other behaviors in reaching a decision to take action. This
includes activities or behaviors outside the classroom or in the clinical rotation, which do not
reflect well on the Program, profession or the individual.

NOTIFICATION OF ACTIONS BY THE STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
The Chair shall notify the student of any action taken by the SAC in writing. A copy will be
sent to the Program Director and student’s advisor. The student shall sign the letter and it
will be placed in the educational file.



                                               14
APPEALS
Decisions made by the SAC, which a student believes to be unfair, may be appealed to the
Program Director. The Program Director may overturn any findings of the committee or ask
the committee to review any new materials that may be relevant to the situation. The
Committee will meet to discuss the issue brought forth by the Program Director on behalf of
the student. The SAC Chair will submit any findings or recommendations in writing to the
Program Director should a rare second review be requested.

Appeals that are not resolved to the student’s satisfaction at the Program level may be
appealed to the Dean of the College of Health Professions. To do so, the student should
follow the review process set forth in the UNE Student Handbook.

PROMOTION POLICY
The Student Affairs Committee will review student performance at the end of each
semester. Students must receive a “Pass” in all courses or rotations to progress to the next
semester. If a student does not pass all courses in the didactic year he/she will not be able
to progress to the clinical year. Students who fail to progress will be placed on probation or
dismissed as outlined in previous chapters. A letter of promotion shall be given to each
student after each semester. (See POLICY ON FAILURE OF DIDACTIC EXAMS OR
COURSES).

GRADUATION/ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Students must complete all Program requirements prior to the issuance of their Master of
Science degree and the Certificate of Completion. The Core Faculty Committee will be
responsible for notifying the program director when students have completed all of the
requirements for graduation.

DISMISSAL
Students dismissed from the Physician Assistant Program, for any reason, will not be
readmitted to the Program under ordinary circumstances. In very unusual circumstances,
dismissed students would be considered for readmission. These students must request the
opportunity to reapply in writing to the Physician Assistant Program Director. Upon approval,
the student would then reapply to the Office of Admissions following the usual admission
procedures. The letter of approval shall be forwarded to the admission office.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE AND WITHDRAWAL
Students requesting to take a leave of absence or withdrawal from the Program must make
the request in writing to the Program Director. They must also follow all procedures as
outlined in the University of New England Student Handbook. The PA Program will not
support or grant a Leave of Absence solely for poor academic performance. A leave may be
granted if a required course is not available.

In the event that a student is granted a medical or personal leave of absence, he or she will
be responsible for additional costs related to living and other personal expenses, in the
absence of financial aid eligibility. You will be referred to the Office of Financial Aid and
Enrollment Management for specifics details.


                                              15
TECHNICAL STANDARDS
A candidate for the Physician Assistant Program must have abilities and skills in five
categories: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, and behavioral/social. All
students admitted to the program must meet the following abilities and expectations. In the
event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable
accommodation, the student will be subject to dismissal after admission.

Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities will be considered on
an individual basis. However a candidate must be able to perform these skills in an
independent manner. The following skills are required, with or without reasonable
accommodation:

Observation:
Candidates must have sufficient sensory capacity to observe in the lecture hall, the
laboratory, the outpatient setting, and the patient's bedside. Sensory skills adequate to
perform a physical examination are required. The ability to acquire sensory input using vision,
hearing and tactile sensation must be adequate to observe a patient's condition and to elicit
information through procedures regularly required in a physical examination, such as
inspection, auscultation, percussion and palpation.

In any case where a candidate’s ability to observe or acquire information through these
sensory modalities is compromised, the candidate must demonstrate alternative means
and/or abilities to acquire and demonstrate the essential information without reliance upon
another person’s interpretation of the information. It is expected that obtaining and using
such alternative means and/or abilities shall be the responsibility of the student. The
university will reasonably assist the student where necessary.

Communication:
The candidate must be able to effectively and efficiently communicate using verbal, written
and reading skills, in a manner that demonstrates sensitivity to patients, their families and all
members of the health care team.

A candidate must be able to accurately elicit information, describe a patient’s change in
mood, thought, activity and posture. Students must demonstrate established communication
skills using traditional or alternative reasonable means.

Motor:
The ability to participate in basic diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers and procedures (e.g.
palpation, auscultation) is required. Candidates must have sufficient motor function to safely
execute movements required to provide care to patients. Candidates must be able to
negotiate patient care environments and must be able to move between settings, such as
clinic, classroom building, and hospital. Physical stamina sufficient to complete the rigorous
course of didactic and clinical study is required. Long periods of sitting, standing, or moving
are required in the classroom, laboratory, and during clinical experiences.

The candidate must be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide
general and emergency diagnosis and medical care such as airway management, placement
                                               16
of intravenous catheters, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and suturing of wounds. At all times
the ability to administer care to patients in a safe manner is paramount.

Intellectual.
Candidates must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize information
effectively in a precisely limited time as would be appropriate for the individual’s level of
training in a given clinical setting, while under stress, and in an environment in which other
distractions may be present. Problem solving, one of the critical skills demanded of Physician
Assistants, requires all of these intellectual abilities. In addition, candidates should be able to
comprehend three-dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of
structures.

Candidates must be able to read and understand medical literature. The Candidate must be
able to demonstrate mastery of these skills and the ability to use them together in a timely
fashion in medical problem-solving and patient care.

The candidate must be able, with or without the use of assistive devices, but without reliance
on another person, to interpret x-ray and other graphic images and digital or analog
representations of physiologic phenomenon (such as EKGs).

Behavioral and Social Attributes:
Candidates must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual
abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all academic and
patient care responsibilities. The development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships
with patients and other members of the health care team are essential. Flexibility,
compassion, integrity, motivation, interpersonal skills and the ability to function in the face of
uncertainties inherent in clinical practice are all required.

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
Success in the Physician Assistant Profession requires certain behavioral attributes
including: empathy, discipline, honesty, integrity, the ability to work effectively with others in
a team environment, and the ability to address a crisis or emergency situation in a
composed manner.

The program will not tolerate incivility by any member of the PA community. Examples of
incivility include rude, sarcastic, obscene, disruptive or disrespectful remarks or behavior,
verbal or physical threats, or damage to property. The Student Affairs Committee will review
all reported violations of this policy and make a recommendation to the Director regarding
disposition. The Committee's possible sanctions and the student's right to due process are
discussed in the conduct code and competencies listed below as well as the section on the
Student Affairs Committee responsibilities.

The Accreditation Standards for Physician Assistant Education state: “The role of the
Physician Assistant demands intelligence, sound judgment, intellectual honesty, appropriate
interpersonal skills, and the capacity to react to emergencies in a calm and reasoned
manner. An attitude of respect for self and others, adherence to the concepts of privilege
and confidentiality in communicating with patients, and a commitment to the patient’s
welfare are essential attributes for the graduate PA.”
                                                17
Adherence to these attributes requires that Physician Assistants and Physician Assistant
Students exhibit a high level of maturity and self-control even in highly stressful situations.
In keeping with these precepts, Physician Assistant students must conduct themselves in a
highly professional manner consistent with the patient care responsibilities with which they
will be entrusted during their training in the Program. Students must adhere to the following
standards. Failure to do so will necessitate that the student appear before the Student
Affairs Committee and may result in disciplinary sanction or dismissal from the Program.

Behavior: Students are expected to behave in a responsible, reliable and dependable
manner. The student must project a professional image in manner, dress, grooming, speech
and interpersonal relationships that is consistent with the medical profession’s accepted
contemporary community standards. The student should recognize his/her personal
limitations and biases, whether they are intellectual, physical or emotional and strive to
correct them. He/she must demonstrate the professional and emotional maturity to manage
tensions and conflicts and should seek professional help when necessary.

Respect: Students are expected to treat all patients, faculty, program staff, clinical
preceptors, and fellow students with dignity and respect. Conflicts should be resolved in a
diplomatic reasoned manner. Students should be sensitive and tolerant with regard to
diversity in the student and patient population. Physician Assistant training involves a close
working environment with other students and includes physical examination of fellow
students and discussion groups that may reveal information of a personal nature. These
situations must be approached with respect for the privacy, confidentiality, and feelings of
fellow students.

Flexibility: Physician Assistant training involves instruction from practicing clinicians with
unpredictable schedules. At times lectures or clinical sessions may need to be adjusted
with short notice. We believe the advantages of utilizing practicing clinicians outweigh this
inconvenience, and ask students to be flexible and tolerant of changes.

Integrity: Students are expected to follow all policies in the Student Code of Conduct
section of the University of New England Student Handbook including those pertaining to
academic dishonesty. Unethical behavior such as academic dishonesty, plagiarism,
cheating and falsifying logs or medical records is considered a violation of the Program’s
Standards of Conduct. Possible violations will be referred to the Student Affairs Committee
for investigation and may result in dismissal from the PA Program.

Physician Assistant Students are also expected to display the highest ethical standards
commensurate with work as a health care professional. Some of these are outlined in the
Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession published by the
American Academy of Physician Assistants and listed below.

Identification: Physician Assistant Students must always identify themselves as Physician
Assistant students to patients and site staff, and never present themselves as physicians,
residents, medical students, or graduate Physician Assistants. Students must wear a short
clinical jacket while at all clinical sites unless instructed not to do so by the clinical site or the
Program. Students must always wear their official nametag while at clinical sites. While in
                                                 18
the Program students may not use previously earned titles (i.e. RN, DC, Ph.D., etc.) for
identification purposes.

Confidentiality: Students must respect the confidentiality of patients and fellow students
and are not permitted to discuss any patients by name outside the clinical encounter
situation. Adherence to HIPAA regulations is mandatory. Students should not discuss other
students with preceptors. For academic presentations and history and physical
assignments, all identifying data, including name, initials, date of birth, and facility where
seen will not be included.

GUIDELINES FOR ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR THE PA PROFESSION

The following is the Statement of Values of the Physician Assistant Profession
developed by American Academy of Physician Assistants and adopted in May 2000 and
Amended in June 2004. The AAPA Guidelines for Ethical Conduct is a lengthy document
and may be viewed in its entirety on the AAPA web page at
http://www.aapa.org/gandp/ethical-guidelines.pdf. It is also available in printed form at the
PA Program offices.

Statement of Values of the Physician Assistant Profession
   • Physician assistants hold as their primary responsibility the health, safety, welfare,
      and dignity of all human beings.
   • Physician assistants uphold the tenets of patient autonomy, beneficence,
      nonmaleficence, and justice.
   • Physician assistants recognize and promote the value of diversity.
   • Physician assistants treat equally all persons who seek their care.
   • Physician assistants hold in confidence the information shared in the course of
      practicing medicine.
   • Physician assistants assess their personal capabilities and limitations, striving always
      to improve their medical practice.
   • Physician assistants actively seek to expand their knowledge and skills, keeping
      abreast of advances in medicine.
   • Physician assistants work with other members of the health care team to provide
      compassionate and effective care of patients.
   • Physician assistants use their knowledge and experience to contribute to an
      improved community.
   • Physician assistants respect their professional relationship with physicians.
   • Physician assistants share and expand knowledge within the profession.

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT COMPETENCIES (adopted by PAEA Jan 2007)
Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession, is a foundation from which four
organizations (NCCPA, AAPA, ARC-PA, PAEA), other physician assistant organizations
and individual physician assistants themselves can chart a course for advancing the
competencies of the PA profession.

The purpose of this section is to communicate to the PA Students and members of the
profession and the public, a set of competencies that all physician assistants regardless of
                                              19
specialty or setting are expected to acquire and maintain throughout their careers.

The PA profession defines the specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as the
required educational experiences needed in order for physician assistants to acquire and
demonstrate these competencies.

MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE includes an understanding of pathophysiology, patient
presentation, differential diagnosis, patient management, surgical principles, health
promotion and disease prevention. Physician assistants must demonstrate core knowledge
about established and evolving biomedical and clinical sciences and the application of this
knowledge to patient care in their area of practice. In addition, physician assistants are
expected to demonstrate an investigatory and analytic thinking approach to clinical
situations. Physician assistants are expected to:

      • understand etiologies, risk factors, underlying pathologic process, and epidemiology
      for medical conditions
       • identify signs and symptoms of medical conditions
      • select and interpret appropriate diagnostic or lab studies
      • manage general medical and surgical conditions to include understanding the
      indications, contraindications, side effects, interactions and adverse reactions of
      pharmacologic agents and other relevant treatment modalities
      • identify the appropriate site of care for presenting conditions, including identifying
      emergent cases and those requiring referral or admission
      • identify appropriate interventions for prevention of conditions
      • identify the appropriate methods to detect conditions in an asymptomatic individual
      • differentiate between the normal and the abnormal in anatomic, physiological,
      laboratory findings and other diagnostic data
      • appropriately use history and physical findings and diagnostic studies to formulate a
      differential diagnosis
      • provide appropriate care to patients with chronic conditions

INTERPERSONAL & COMMUNICATION SKILLS encompass verbal, nonverbal and
written exchange of information. Physician assistants must demonstrate interpersonal and
communication skills that result in effective information exchange with patients, their
patients’ families, physicians, professional associates, and the health care system.
Physician assistants are expected to:
      • create and sustain a therapeutic and ethically sound relationship with patients
      • use effective listening, nonverbal, explanatory, questioning, and writing skills to elicit
          and provide information
      • appropriately adapt communication style and messages to the context of the
          individual patient interaction
      • work effectively with physicians and other health care professionals as a member or
          leader of a health care team or other professional group
       • apply an understanding of human behavior
                                               20
   • demonstrate emotional resilience and stability, adaptability, flexibility and
   tolerance of ambiguity and anxiety
   • accurately and adequately document and record information regarding the care
   process for medical, legal, quality and financial purposes


PATIENT CARE includes age-appropriate assessment, evaluation and
management. Physician assistants must demonstrate care that is effective, patient-
centered, timely, efficient and equitable for the treatment of health problems and the
promotion of wellness. Physician assistants are expected to:
    • work effectively with physicians and other health care professionals to provide
    patient-centered care
    • demonstrate caring and respectful behaviors when interacting with patients
    and their families
    • gather essential and accurate information about their patients
    • make informed decisions about diagnostic and therapeutic interventions
    based on patient information and preferences, up-to-date scientific evidence,
    and clinical judgment
    • develop and carry out patient management plans
    • counsel and educate patients and their families
    • competently perform medical and surgical procedures considered essential in
    the area of practice
    • provide health care services and education aimed at preventing health
       problems or maintaining health

PROFESSIONALISM is the expression of positive values and ideals as care is
delivered. Foremost, it involves prioritizing the interests of those being served above
one’s own. Physician assistants must know their professional and personal
limitations. Professionalism also requires that PAs practice without impairment from
substance abuse, cognitive deficiency or mental illness. Physician assistants must
demonstrate a high level of responsibility, ethical practice, sensitivity to a diverse
patient population and adherence to legal and regulatory requirements. Physician
assistants are expected to demonstrate:
       • understanding of legal and regulatory requirements, as well as the
       appropriate role of the physician assistant
       • professional relationships with physician supervisors and other health care
       providers
       • respect, compassion, and integrity

                                       21
      • responsiveness to the needs of patients and society
      • accountability to patients, society, and the profession
      • commitment to excellence and on-going professional development
      • commitment to ethical principles pertaining to provision or withholding of
      clinical care, confidentiality of patient information, informed consent, and
      business practices
      • sensitivity and responsiveness to patients’ culture, age, gender, and
      disabilities
      • self-reflection, critical curiosity and initiative
PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT includes the processes
through which clinicians engage in critical analysis of their own practice experience,
medical literature and other information resources for the purpose of self-
improvement. Physician assistants must be able to assess, evaluate and improve
their patient care practices. Physician assistants are expected to:
      • analyze practice experience and perform practice-based improvement
      activities using a systematic methodology in concert with other members of
      the health care delivery team
      • locate, appraise, and integrate evidence from scientific studies related to
      their patients’ health problems
      • obtain and apply information about their own population of patients and the
      larger population from which their patients are drawn
      • apply knowledge of study designs and statistical methods to the appraisal
      of clinical studies and other information on diagnostic and therapeutic
      effectiveness
      • apply information technology to manage information, access on-line
      medical information, and support their own education
      • facilitate the learning of students and/or other health care professionals
      • recognize and appropriately address gender, cultural, cognitive, emotional
      and other biases; gaps in medical knowledge; and physical limitations in
      themselves and others

SYSTEMS-BASED PRACTICE encompasses the societal, organizational and
economic environments in which health care is delivered. Physician assistants must
demonstrate an awareness of and responsiveness to the larger system of health
care to provide patient care that is of optimal value. PAs should work to improve the
larger health care system of which their practices are a part. Physician assistants
are expected to:
      • use information technology to support patient care decisions and patient
                                     22
              education
              • effectively interact with different types of medical practice and delivery
              systems
              • understand the funding sources and payment systems that provide
              coverage for patient care
              • practice cost-effective health care and resource allocation that does not
              compromise quality of care
              • advocate for quality patient care and assist patients in dealing with system
              complexities
              • partner with supervising physicians, health care managers and other health
              care providers to assess, coordinate, and improve the delivery of health care
              and patient outcomes
              • accept responsibility for promoting a safe environment and recognizing and
              correcting systems-based factors that negatively impact patient care
              • apply medical information and clinical data systems to provide more
              effective, efficient patient care
              • use the systems responsible for the appropriate payment of services

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
The Program recommends that students join the Student Academy of the American
Academy of Physician Assistants (SAAAPA), which is the Student Chapter of the AAPA.
Students are also strongly encouraged to join the state Physician Assistant chapter. This
helps keep students informed of important issues that affect Physician Assistant education
and practice. Students may also wish to join specialty societies if they have an interest in
those areas. Attendance at the national SAAPA meetings may be approved to attend by
the Program.

III. DIDACTIC YEAR INFORMATION AND POLICIES

TEXTBOOKS/COURSE SYLABII
Students in the Didactic Phase can plan on spending approximately $1,200 to $1,500 on
required textbooks. Students must purchase all required textbooks. The Program book list
also includes recommended books which students are not required to purchase, but may wish
to have as important reference materials.

Course syllabi are available for each didactic and clinical course. They will be sent to all
students via myUNE campus email. They may also be available by internet access.

EQUIPMENT
Students in the Didactic Phase will be required to obtain certain medical equipment. A list
of required equipment is included with pre-matriculation materials. During the first week of
                                              23
class the Program will bring vendors to the school to demonstrate various brands of
equipment. The vendors will give the students a group discount, but students are not
obligated to purchase the equipment from these vendors. Estimated cost to the student
is $550.00 - $775.00. Price is dependent on type, brand and quality of equipment. The
University assumes no financial responsibility for this equipment.

ATTENDANCE
Students are required to attend all scheduled classes and labs, and to come to class on
time. In certain classes, attendance and participation may be a part of the grading criteria.
Students must notify the Academic Coordinator when any class or lab is missed.
Students are responsible for the material covered in any class from which they were
absent. Students must notify the course coordinator or academic coordinator if they will be
absent from classes for any period of time. The student is required to provide a statement
from his/her medical provider for absences due to illness of more than one week.

EXAMINATION POLICY
Students must contact the Academic Coordinator in advance if they will miss a scheduled
examination to arrange for a rescheduled exam. Failure to do so will result in a grade of
zero (0) for the exam unless there is a significant extenuating circumstance. Any deviation
from this practice may be brought to the Student Affairs Committee for review.

COURSE / LECTURER EVALUATION FORMS
Evaluation of Courses and Lecturers will be to the students at the end of each module or
course. Students are encouraged to give productive feedback about lecturers and courses
to the Academic Coordinator. This information is extremely valuable when decisions are
made about course content and structure.

IV.    CLINICAL YEAR INFORMATION AND POLICIES

This section provides general information and policies covering the clinical year. Students
should contact the PA Program office if any questions or problems arise while on rotations.
 Use the contact information below to reach PA faculty and staff.

For administrative issues such as forms, housing, or any other placement issues students
should contact the Clinical Placement Coordinator:

Sylvana Alfonso at (207) 221-4526 email: sdalfonso@une.edu. fax #: (207) 878-4711

Students should contact the Clinical Coordinators for issues involving the educational
experience of clinical rotations such as grades, relationship with preceptors, incidents at
your sites, exams, or evaluations.

       Clinical Coordinator                             Clinical Coordinator
       Patrick J. Enking, PA-C, MS                      Laura Corbett, PA-C, MPAS
       (207) 221-4524                                   (207) 221-4440
       Email: penking@une.edu.                          lcorbett@une.edu

                                             24
Clinical Rotation Sites
Clinical rotations consist of six Core, one elective and one Selective rotations designed to
provide the Physician Assistant student with the opportunity to observe and participate in
the delivery of health care services. The emphasis is on clinical skills development and
application of the didactic material presented during Phase I of the Program to real-life
clinical situations.

All clinical rotations sites will be located within the New England states, unless the clinical
coordinator team approves any exceptions. Students are allowed to develop sites within
New England with approval from the Clinical Coordinators. There is no limit on the number
of new sites a student may develop within New England.

Out of System Rotation Sites
1. A student may apply for up to two, six-week rotations at sites that are not considered
   established or core PA Program sites outside of New England.
2. The student is responsible for gathering information about the site. Students must use
   a Student Request Sheet and follow the instructions listed. The sheet must then be
   returned to the Clinical Coordinators for review and approval.
3. In reviewing and approving the proposed rotation, the Clinical Coordinators will
   consider the educational opportunity presented, the location, the potential for further
   development of the site, the resources needed to approve the site and other
   information as needed. The Clinical Coordinators have final say on approving the site
   for training or not.
4. Students requesting consideration for more than two rotations outside New England
   must submit the request in writing to the Clinical Coordinators with the perceived
   extenuating circumstances.

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT ON CLINICAL ROTATIONS
A student of the University of New England Physician Assistant Program is not a licensed
medical provider and, therefore, is legally and ethically not permitted to perform medical
acts unless under the direct supervision of a licensed professional. All patients must be
presented to the preceptor prior to the implementation of any diagnostic/therapeutic plans
or discharge of the patient. The student will not write a prescription for any medication at
any time without the direct supervision and the signature of the preceptor. The preceptor
is responsible for medical care of the patient and for countersigning all orders, chart
documentation, etc., written by the student. Responsibilities of the preceptor are outlined in
the Preceptor Handbook.

A LICENSED PROVIDER MUST BE PRESENT IN THE FACILITY WHENEVER
STUDENTS ARE INTERACTING WITH PATIENTS.

Because of legal ramifications, any violation of this policy should be reported immediately
to the Clinical Coordinator of the University of New England Physician Assistant Program.

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY
The University provides professional liability coverage for each student on a rotation
                                              25
assigned or approved by the Clinical Coordinator of the Physician Assistant Program. This
coverage is only in effect during the time frame of the assigned rotation. The clinical
coordinator provides proof of this coverage to each of the rotation sites. Only institutional
affiliates identified by the preceptor and the clinical coordinator will be considered covered
sites. If you go to an unapproved site with your preceptor you must not have patient
contact. In the event that you become involved in any situation which you believe may
result in a professional liability action, whether groundless or not, you must IMMEDIATELY
report the incident first verbally, and then in writing to the Clinical Coordinator or, if not
available, to the Program Director of the University of New England Physician Assistant
Program.

HEALTH INSURANCEStudents are expected to have personal health and medical insurance while on
clinical rotations. Neither the college nor the host medical facility is responsible for the medical
expenses incurred by you during your rotations.

LATEX ALLERGY
Latex products are extremely common in the medical environment. Students with a history
of latex allergy are at risk for future severe reactions upon exposure to latex products.
These include: local reaction, eye/nose itching or watering eyes, gastro-intestinal
symptoms (pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea), constricted sensation in the throat, dyspnea
(difficulty breathing), generalized urticaria with angioedema (tissue swelling) and/or
anaphylaxis (cardiovascular collapse).

Any student with a known latex allergy, or having or describing symptoms consistent with
latex allergy, is advised to consult a qualified allergist for evaluation. Such evaluation is at
the student’s expense. Any student found to be latex allergic must determine whether or
not to continue with clinical training, acknowledging the risk of becoming ill even if after
reasonable precautions are taken and accommodations are made.

If such a student elects to continue in training, the student must realize that he/she
assumes any responsibility and risk posed by allergic reactions, which can range from mild
symptoms to anaphylaxis and death. In the event such an allergy is present, either
intentional or inadvertent exposure to latex and related products may lead to these
consequences.

INJURY REPORTING
Any major injury incurred while on clinical rotations should be reported to the clinical
preceptor or designee and to the clinical coordinator. In the event of contamination of
bodily fluids occurs, the student should follow the protocols of the facility they are currently
training in to test for exposure.

WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE
Workers compensation only covers employees of the facilities where you are training.
Students are not employees and therefore are not eligible for coverage under the facility’s
plan. Students, unless they are employees of the University, are not covered by the
University’s workers compensation plan.

                                                26
GRADES FOR CLINICAL ROTATIONS
Grades for rotations are based on the following:
   1. Preceptor evaluation of the student – 60%
   2. Rotation examination – 30%
   3. Clinical Coordinator grade for professionalism and work submissions – 10%

RECORDING OF ROTATION GRADES
Before a rotation grade can be recorded and reported to the Registrar, the following conditions
must be fulfilled for each rotation (See below for further explanation):
    1. The student performance evaluation must be completed by the preceptor and
       returned to the Physician Assistant Program by the Preceptor either online or by
       paper copy.
    2. Student evaluation of the rotation site must be completed and returned to the
       Physician Assistant Program.
    3. Completion of patient logs in the Procedure Logger system. All students should
       make a copy for their records prior to submitting to the program.

Persistent or recurrent problems with submission of materials will be brought to the attention
of the Clinical Coordinator and may result in disciplinary action.

ROTATION SITE EVALUATIONS
Physician Assistant Students must complete one Site Evaluation for each training site
attended during the clinical year. Evaluations are intended to be a learning mechanism for
the students, preceptors and the Program. They offer the students the opportunity to
reflect on new learning and provide feedback to the preceptor on teaching skills. This form
is to be returned the Program Office within (5) five business days after the end of the
rotation.

PATIENT/PROCEDURE LOGS
Each student is responsible for completing the rotation patient/procedure log located on
the internet at https://www.typhongroup.net/past/data/login.asp?facility=7530 within 5
business days after the end of the rotation. Students are encouraged to enter patient
contacts on a daily basis. Students are also encouraged to print a copy of the rotation log
prior to submitting the final copy to the program. Paper submissions are not required.

All patients must be entered into the procedure logging system. Documentation of each
encounter shall include the major diagnoses and the procedures that the student
observed, assisted with or performed. Compliance with HIPAA regulations on de-
identifying patient information is mandatory. These are important documents, which
record the student’s progress and will be reviewed by the clinical coordinators.

 Students must not carry information with patient names or any identifying information
away from their training site. This is a major infraction not just from a program standpoint
but a national law pertaining to confidential access to medical information (HIPPA).


                                              27
ATTENDANCE POLICY
All clinical rotations are six weeks in length. Attendance at all rotation assignments is
MANDATORY for the entire time that the student is scheduled. The preceptor will
determine the exact schedule at the beginning of the rotation, but it should be based on a
minimum of 36 to 40 hour per week schedule. The Clinical Coordinator must approve
any exceptions to attendance in writing. Normally time for job interviews or attending
conferences is not granted during clinical rotations Students may anticipate taking call, in
addition to their week day hours, according to the preceptor's schedule.

ABSENCES
Physician Assistant students are expected to keep absences to a strict minimum. Any
absence must be reported to the Clinical Placement Coordinator immediately.
Significant absences can result in the delay of completion of the Program.

Anticipated absence
The preceptor and the Clinical Coordinator must approve any absences in advance.
Students who notify the preceptor and the clinical coordinator in advance of an assignment
date (at least one month prior, preferably more) with a valid reason may be excused from
the assignment.

Emergency absence
Students must report emergency absences to the Preceptor and to the Program Clinical
Coordinator as soon as possible. The emergency absence must be reported to both
departments within one school day or it becomes an unexcused absence. Reasons for
emergency absence might include family or personal emergency, etc.

Unexcused absences
These absences are considered a breach of professional behavior. They may be judged as
a MAJOR INFRACTION and may be brought to the attention of the Student Affairs
Committee and the Program Director. They may result in a rotation failure. Reasons, for
unexcused absences might include, forgetting or not informing the appropriate people of
the absence(s). Students with unexcused absences may be required to:
a) Make-up assignments within one week
b) Spend additional time at a rotation site
c) Apologize to the preceptor if the site was not notified

A student shall not participate in any activity such as employment, which would interfere
with his/her attendance at lectures, laboratories and clinical rotations. Attending
conferences or job interviews are not excused absences. Students violating the Attendance
Policy will be referred to the Program Director and/or the Student Affairs Committee.

HOUSING POLICY
Students are responsible for their own housing during the clinical year. The Program will
attempt to identify housing for students for rotation sites that are greater than one hour
commuting from the PA Program office at the Westbrook College campus of UNE or the
student’s identified housing options. If a student requires housing during a particular
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rotation, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the person indicated in the Letter of
Confirmation under the HOUSING heading. The clinical placement coordinator will assist in
areas outside of Maine as needed.

Any student assigned housing and canceling within two weeks of the rotation will be required to
pay $50 for cancellation to the host unless otherwise agreed upon by the hosts. The student
will not receive a Certificate of Completion from the PA Program if this has not been paid.

TRANSPORTATION POLICY
Physician Assistant students are required to have appropriate transportation available for their
use while on clinical rotations. Lack of a functioning vehicle is not an acceptable excuse for
missing a clinical assignment.

GRADUATION WEEK
Students will return to campus during the last week of the program. During graduation
week, students will participate in activities relating to the completion of PAC 624-Application
of Research in Clinical Practice II.




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