Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services by dfhercbml

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									Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services

New Law Sets Stricter Standards For Private Security Industry


First Significant Change To Private Security Industry In Ontario Since
1966

TORONTO, Aug. 23 /CNW/ - New legislation comes into effect today that
will make Ontarians safer through stricter regulation of the private
security industry, Community Safety and Correctional Services Minister
Monte Kwinter said. "We need to make sure that security personnel have
the resources and training they need to help make communities safer,"
Kwinter said. "The law sets out new and stricter standards to better
protect the public while improving professionalism within this
important industry."

The Private Security and Investigative Services Act, 2005, requires all
private security practitioners to be licensed, including in-house
security staff, such as those working for retailers and bars. In-house
security staff were exempt from licensing under the old law. These
individuals will have until August 23, 2008, to obtain their licences.
As well, businesses that employ in-house security staff must register
with the ministry's Private Security and Investigative Services Branch
by August 23, 2008.
The new licences will be portable, allowing individuals to change jobs
within the industry without having to reapply for a licence.
The act also sets out new training requirements and regulates the type
of uniforms, equipment and vehicles that can be used by private
security personnel.
"We will continue to work with the security industry to implement
changes in a fair and open way," Kwinter said. "These measures will
increase the professionalism of the industry and reflect the growing
role it plays in Ontario."
For more information on the act, as well as licence and registration
forms, visit the ministry's website at www.ontario.ca/private-security
or contact the Private Security and Investigative Services Branch at
416-212-1650 or 1-866-767-7454.

Backgrounder
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      STRENGTHENING PROFESSIONALISM IN ONTARIO'S SECURITY INDUSTRY

The Private Security and Investigative Services Act (PSISA), 2005, is
the first significant legislative change governing the industry since
1966. The changes will better protect Ontarians and better reflect the
roles and growing numbers of security personnel in our communities.

Mandatory Licensing

PSISA makes licensing and training mandatory for all security
personnel, including in-house security staff, such as those working for
retailers, bars and the Corps of Commissionaires. In-house security
staff were exempt from licensing under the old law. These individuals
will have until August 23, 2008, to obtain their licences. As well,
businesses that employ in-house security staff must register with the
ministry's Private Security and Investigative Services Branch by August
23, 2008.

Licence Portability

The legislative changes allow an individual to change jobs within the
industry without having to reapply for a licence. There are
approximately 50,000 new licence or renewal applications that come to
the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services every year
and only 33,000 licence holders. The difference in the number of
licensed personnel and the number of applications reflects the high
turnover rate in the industry.

Training and Testing Standards

New training and testing standards will come into force on November 30,
2008. These new standards will set out competencies and examinations
for applicants and current licence holders. Once the training and
testing regulation comes into effect, current licence holders will have
to complete a standardized test to renew their licence.
The basic training standard will be available in fall 2007 and will
include:
    -    Knowledge of relevant legislation (i.e., PSISA, the Trespass to
         Property Act and relevant sections of the Criminal Code)
    -    Powers of arrest
    -    Communications and public relations skills
    -    First aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    -    On-the-job skills (report writing, note taking and diversity
         sensitivity).

    Uniforms, Equipment and Vehicles

The legislation and its regulations set out new standards for uniforms,
insignia and equipment used by security personnel. These new standards
identify colours, markings and wording that may appear on vehicles used
by security personnel. This will help reduce possible confusion between
security vehicles and cars used by police services in Ontario.
While the standards for equipment come into effect immediately,
licensees will have until August 23, 2009, to comply with the standards
for uniforms and vehicles.

    Consulting the Security Industry

This legislation was adopted after extensive consultation with industry
associations, firms employing security personnel and police services.
An advisory group made up of industry representatives worked with the
ministry to develop regulations under the new legislation.

    For More Information

Visit the ministry's website at www.ontario.ca/private-security or
contact the Private Security and Investigative Services Branch at (416)
212-1650 or 1-866-767-7454.

Contact: Anthony Brown, Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional
Services, 416-314-7772.

								
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