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NOLA Recycles 2010

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									                            NOLA Recycles 2010
                 Mayoral Candidate Statement on Recycling
I pledge that my administration will develop a comprehensive waste management
program that minimizes the health and environmental impacts of waste disposal, as
well as taps the value of waste materials to build a local recycling economy.

I support the recommendations of NOLA Recycles 2010, and I pledge to take the
following actions to better manage our waste during my administration.
   1. Resume curbside recycling
      My administration will commence a pilot study or issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for
      curbside recycling services within six months, with the goal of returning curbside recycling
      within one year of taking office. Residential collection of yard waste for composting will be
      considered in the study or included as an alternate in the RFP.

   2. Prevent illegal dumping
      Illegal dumping continues spoil the quality of life in many neighborhoods, particularly in New
      Orleans East and the Lower Ninth ward. My administration will work closely with the
      Department of Environmental Quality to continue existing programs and to implement new
      solutions to this long-standing problem. I will be a visible and vocal advocate against illegal
      dumping and provide city staff with the support and resources they need to implement
      effective programs.

   3. Provide safe disposal options for household hazardous waste
      Under my administration, the Department of Sanitation will provide an educational program
      about household hazardous waste and a program for safe collection of household chemicals.

   4. Require the recycling of construction and demolition waste in city projects
      To build local capacity for construction and demolition debris recycling, all City of New Orleans
      new construction and major renovations will achieve at least 50% recycling of non-hazardous
      demolition and construction waste, as defined by the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED New
      Construction and Major Renovation standard.

   5. Charge the Department of Sanitation with the promotion and expansion of recycling
      The responsibilities of the Department of Sanitation must be broadened from the supervision
      of garbage collection to include the development of programs that will reduce waste and
      expand recycling in New Orleans. Under my administration, the evaluation the Director of the
      Department of Sanitation will consider how he or she has worked with residents, businesses
      and institutions to increase our city’s overall rate of recycling.

   6. Begin a recycling program and recycled products purchasing policy in City Hall
      Under my administration, recycling will be available in city hall offices and guidance will be
      developed to encourage city offices to purchase products made with recycled materials, such
      as recycled paper.
NOLA Recycles 2010

Background on Mayoral Statement
1.      Resume curbside recycling in New Orleans
With the opening of a materials recovery facility (MRF) by Republic Services/Allied Waste in
  September 2009, “single stream” recycling is now available in the New Orleans area. All household
  recyclables--paper, cardboard, plastic bottles and metal cans—are collected together. Recyclables
  are collected using the rolling carts, dumpsters, and trucks used for collecting garbage, but they are
  delivered to the MRF instead of a landfill, where they are sorted, baled and sold, largely to
  manufacturing facilities in our region. With the simplicity of single stream and effective education
  programs, the tonnage of recyclables collected can rival garbage collection. The value remaining in
  these materials will support local jobs in processing and transportation.

Prices for recycled materials are shaped by the overall economy and particularly fuel prices. Prices
  were extremely low in early 2009, as manufacturing dropped with the poor economy. However,
  prices are recovering and will be highest in times of high fuel prices. Contracts must be structured
  carefully so that the city will at a minimum save landfill tipping fees and share in profits from the
  sale of recovered materials when prices are high. A request for proposals for recycling services
  should not exclude companies from submitting proposals, but rather invite a broad range of
  companies and encourage innovation in reducing waste and increasing recycling in New Orleans.

Recycling yard waste has perhaps the greatest environmental “bang for your buck.” Over a third of
 the city’s waste could be composted. Waste figures from neighboring Texas show that yard waste
 comprises about 20% of household trash, food waste 9%, and wood waste 6%. When landfilled,
 yard waste and other organics, such as paper and cardboard, are sources of methane, a potent
 greenhouse gas. When composted, yard waste and other organics are converted to a locally-
 produced, marketable material. Baton Rouge and Lafayette both have residential yard waste
 collection for composting. In Houston, the Clinton Climate Initiative is developing a pilot privately-
 based composting system. With the intense affection for green space and gardening in New
 Orleans, a city-contracted yard waste recycling program would be positively received.

2.       Prevent illegal dumping
Illegal dumping continues to spoil the quality of life in many neighborhoods, particularly in New
   Orleans East and the Lower Nine. Illegal dumping is hazardous to health and the environment if
   these materials contain fuels or chemicals. Since Hurricane Katrina, the Louisiana Department of
   Environmental Quality has launched two major enforcement efforts, ordinances and penalties have
   been strengthened, and a city Illegal Dumping Task Force was initiated. These efforts and
   collaborations must be continued and strengthened under the next administration. High-level
   attention to illegal dumping by the Mayor is necessary to finally bring an end to this problem.

The city can increase patrols by sanitation officials and police, and coordinate community education
 programs. The city should also explore policies that have been implemented in other cities to hold
 waste generators and haulers to proper disposal practices. For example, in Foster City, California,
 contractors are required to pay a bond when receiving a building permit that will not be refunded
 unless they can prove that they properly handled the waste. This gives the contractors a financial
 incentive and cuts down on illegal dumping. Additionally, providing recycling and proper disposal
 opportunities for materials such as concrete, cardboard, sheetrock, and chemicals could help give
 haulers a less expensive option for disposal, decreasing the incentive to dump materials in
 neighborhoods, roadsides and wetlands.
3.      Provide safe disposal options for household hazardous waste

 After Katrina, the presence of many pesticides, paints and chemicals stored in homes added to
 health concerns as the flood waters receded. When placed in a landfill, they will eventually
 contaminate local soil and waters. While the EPA collected these materials from hurricane debris
 for safe disposal, the city has not since provided safe disposal options or even information about
 proper handling of these materials. Household Hazardous Waste collection days, one type of
 program that could be offered, were held in New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina. A potential
 source of funding is available through the Louisiana DEQ, which launched a program supporting
 household hazardous waste collection projects in 2007. A safe disposal program should also be
 developed for household electronics, which often contain hazardous heavy metals.

4.      Require the recycling of construction and demolition waste in city projects

Landfills for construction and demolition waste are subject to less stringent requirements than
  landfills for municipal solid waste. Construction and demolition (C & D)landfills have threatened
  community health in the past and in the present. The Agriculture Street landfill, reopened in 1965
  for waste from Hurricane Betsy, became a Superfund site. After Hurricane Katrina, two landfills in
  eastern New Orleans were opened to C&D waste, posing a threat to nearby communities.

The participation of the City of New Orleans in construction and demolition recycling will build our
 local capacity to reuse, repair, remanufacture, and process construction materials. The U.S. Green
 Building Council’s LEED Green Building standard provides guidelines for documenting construction
 and demolition recycling rates. A number of local large construction projects have achieved
 recycling rates over 50%. If included in construction bid documents, this standard can be achieved
 with little additional cost or city effort.



5.     Charge the Department of Sanitation with the promotion and expansion of recycling.

To ensure community health and environmental protection, the responsibilities of the Department of
 Sanitation must be broadened from the supervision of garbage collection and recycling contracts to
 actively working to reduce waste and expand recycling in New Orleans. The Department of
 Sanitation should ensure that there is effective education about proper waste disposal and how to
 recycle. The Department should ensure that a trained staff is available to answer questions about
 the program by telephone and internet. The Department of Sanitation should also work with
 businesses, schools and non-profits to develop commercial and school recycling programs. The
 Director of Sanitation should be evaluated in part by the success of these efforts, including the city’s
 recycling diversion rate--the percentage of all waste that is diverted to recycling citywide.

6.      Begin a recycling program and recycled products purchasing policy in City Hall.

Offices, institutions and businesses produce large quantities of waste that can be recycled, such as
 paper and cardboard. A recycling program in City Hall will reduce waste and give city employees
 experience with recycling systems and local recycling providers.

Recycling keeps materials out of landfills. It also help move us towards a more energy-efficient, less
 polluting economy, as manufacturing that relies on recovered materials uses less energy than
 manufacturing that relies on raw materials. City purchasing can help provide markets for recycled
 materials by choosing products with recycled content, such as paper. The U.S. Green Building
 Council LEED for Existing Building program provides guidelines for developing a sustainable
 purchasing policy for city offices.
   NOLA Recycles 2010
Join a partnership of concerned citizens who will work together to make recycling a
reality in New Orleans in 2010. Our goal is to influence the mayoral race and elect
a mayor who will develop a comprehensive waste management program that
minimizes the health and environmental impact of waste disposal, as well as taps
the value of waste materials to build a local recycling economy.




Join us and get involved!


      Follow Us: http://twitter.com/NOLARecycles
      Fan Us: http://www.facebook.com/NOLARecycles
      Call us: Sierra Club New Orleans Office 504-861-4836

								
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