Parents___Teachers_as_Allies--D.Gruttadard by shimeiyan4

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									     Parents and Teachers as Allies
  Partnering with Schools to Improve the
             Lives of Students
       Living with Mental Illnesses
 Darcy Gruttadaro, Director, NAMI National Child & Adolescent Action Center
Donna Pollard, Program Director & Parents and Teachers as Allies Trainer, NAMI
                                 Orange County
Donna Wallis, Executive Director & Parents and Teachers as Allies Trainer, NAMI
                                  Orange County


                           NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA             1
The Vital Need for Early Identification of
           Mental Illnesses…
The overwhelming majority of children and
  adolescents with mental illnesses fail to be
  identified and linked with services.
There are often tragic and avoidable consequences.
Many school professionals lack an understanding of
 early onset mental illnesses.

                 NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   2
Research Supports Early Identification
 NIMH researchers found that half of all lifetime
   cases of mental illness begin by age 14, and that
   despite effective treatments, there are long delays
   — sometimes decades — between first onset of
   symptoms and when people seek and receive
   treatment. Untreated mental illnesses can lead to a
   more severe, more difficult to treat illness, and to
   the development of co-occurring mental illnesses.
 NIMH Funded Research, Released in June 2005.
                             NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   3
      The Role of Schools in Early
             Identification
NAMI recognized the tremendous value of having
 parents and school professionals working together
 as allies…
which led to the development of the Parents and
 Teachers as Allies publication in 1999 (updated in
 2003).
                 NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   4
 Parents and Teachers as Allies…
The P&T as Allies publication covers the following:
• Keys to early recognition and links to appropriate
   evaluation and services (teachers are never asked to
   diagnose children or to recommend medications);
• Understanding family reactions to mental illnesses
   and guidelines for helping families;
• Navigating the referral process and linking to
   services as allies;
• Strengthening the alliance between parents and
   school professionals and lists resources for both.
                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   5
 President Bush’s NFC Recommends
   Schools Play a Bigger Role …
Goal 4 of President Bush’s New Freedom Commission
  Report on Mental Health, issued in July 2003, calls for
  schools to play a larger role in the early identification
  of mental health treatment needs in children and in
  linking them to appropriate services.

This is just what NAMI’s P&T as Allies program targets.

                    NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   6
     The Words of the NFC …
“The mission of public schools is to educate all
  students. However, children with serious
  emotional disturbances have the highest rates
  of school failure. Fifty percent of these
  students drop out of high school, compared to
  30% of all students with disabilities. Schools
  are where children spend most of each day …

                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   7
             The Words of the NFC …
…While schools are primarily concerned with
 education, mental health is essential to learning
 as well as to social and emotional development …
 Schools must be partners in the mental health
 care of our children.”
 NFC Report, 2003




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                     Why Schools …
Schools are in a unique and key position to identify
  mental health concerns early and to link students
  with appropriate services.
Strong school mental health programs can help to
  address the needs of students, reduce unnecessary
  suffering, and help to ensure academic
  achievement.
Goal 4 of The President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health

                            NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   9
   The Success of the Publication
NAMI leaders recognized the value in sharing the
 publication with schools and began to use it to
 better inform school professionals about early
 onset mental illnesses.
Innovative NAMI leaders in a number of states
  developed an in-service presentation program
  based on the publication.

               NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   10
          The Focus of NAMI’s
           In-Service Program
Helping schools to better understand the early
 warning signs of mental health treatment needs in
 students and how best to intervene so that youth
 with treatment needs are linked with services.




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The In-Service Early Pilot Program
The In-Service presentation follows the content of
  the P&T as Allies publication, with the lived
  experience representing a critical component.
The In-Service presentation was launched in Orange
  County, FL (12th largest school district in the
  country) and has been delivered in multiple pilot
  sites in states around the country, including CA,
  IL, VA, WA, MN, CT, and others.

                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   12
 The In-Service Early Pilot Program
School professionals give extremely high grades to
  the early pilot program.
School professionals often admit feeling ill
  equipped to address the needs of these students
  and how best to work with families.
NAMI national received a four-year foundation
 grant to expand the early pilot program.
                 NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   13
     Expansion of the Pilot Program

The Pilot Program expansion targets public schools
  in urban, suburban, rural, and culturally diverse
  communities.
NAMI continues to focus on cultural competence in
 the program. It will be available in Spanish in
 2007-08.

                 NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   14
   Expansion of the Pilot Program
The foundation grant has allowed NAMI to expand the
  scope and reach of the program.
Two additional modules added:
  – Module to instruct grassroots family leaders about
    effective outreach to schools;
  – Module to include a presentation on early warning
    signs for parents and caregivers and effective
    outreach to families within the school community.
                 NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   15
  Overview of Parents & Teachers as
  Allies In-Service Education Program
• Two-hour in-service education program.
• Most schools require school professionals to have
  in-service training/education.
• The Program includes a team of four presenters:
  educator/family member, facilitator/F2F teacher,
  parent of a child, and consumer that had early
  onset MI.
• The Publication is provided to all participants.
                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   16
 Content of the In-Service Program
Welcome and Introductions
  Lead by: Educator/Family Member
  Speaks from personal experience, warms up the
   room, connects with the audience as a credible
   education professional.
  Focuses on stigma and different perspectives we
   all have about MI.
               NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   17
Some Suggestions for Welcome and
         Introductions
• Make the objectives for the presentation clear,
• Be sure to introduce NAMI to the audience.
• Provide NAMI’s definition of mental illness: ―Mental
  illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s
  thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others, and
  daily functioning. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the
  pancreas, mental illnesses are medical conditions that
  often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the
  ordinary demands of life.”
                    NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   18
  Content of the In-Service Program
Early Warning Signs of Mental Illness
  Lead by: Facilitator/Family Member
  Directs group to publication.
  Reviews the early warning signs.
  Reinforces that teachers are not diagnosticians
   but can certainly recognize early warning signs
   if they know what to look for.
                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   19
               Suggestions
• We want the audience to become familiar with
  the monograph.
• We have asked members of the audience to
  read portions for a change of pace.
• Stress listening to families.



                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   20
  Content of the In-Service Program
Family Response: Predictable Stages of Emotional
  Reactions Among Family Members
  Lead by: Parent/Family Member
   Reviews stages from the publication (pg. 21-22).
   Parent recounts their personal journey with their child
     (infusing the lived experience).
   Talks about where things are now and steps a school
     took that were helpful.
                     NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   21
    Content of the In-Service Program
Living with Mental Illnesses: A View from the Inside
   Lead by: Consumer
   Consumer shares his/her experiences as a child living
    with mental illness.
   Focus is on the struggles, especially in school, teachers
     that helped, what was harmful, what was needed and
     how bad experiences can be turned around.
   Professionals are interested in knowing how to properly
     handle classroom circumstances that they have not
     been trained to address.
                     NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   22
       Living with Mental Illness

• The consumer presentation captures the heart
  of the audience.
• Just having some understanding of the feelings
  a child is experiencing helps teachers cope
  with difficult behaviors.


                 NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   23
  Content of the In-Service Program
Group Discussion
   Lead by: Educator/Family Member
  Everyone on the presenting team fields questions from
   in-service participants.
  Presenters are trained to know about the FAQ
    (differentiating between bad behavior and early
    warning signs, who do I refer a child to, isn’t
    medicating a child controversial, how does all this
    help with classroom management, etc.)
                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   24
    Content of the In-Service Program
Closing
   Lead by: Facilitator/Family Member
   Thanks participants and those who arranged the in-
    service training.
   Evaluations for program completed (satisfaction survey
    and pre- and post-test).
   We have found that school professionals want much more
    information (effective behavior interventions,
    classroom based EBPs, etc.).
                    NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   25
   Effective Outreach to Schools
• Many schools have not engaged in the MH
  agenda yet and some resist it.
• It may not be a priority for schools.
• School professionals are stretched very thin.
• Many school-based MH professionals are over-
  extended, working at multiple schools with huge
  case loads and some fail to understand early onset
  MI.
                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   26
          Outreach to Schools …
• The key to success is to go in to schools knowing
  the challenges that they face.
• We see this task as akin to cultural and social
  anthropologists – we put ourselves in their shoes.
• This program is a beginning to help schools
  understand the pressing need to recognize the
  early warning signs of mental illnesses and to link
  students with services.

                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   27
                  Outreach …
We know that there are many successful ways to
 conduct outreach with schools.
An outreach strategy that works wonders in one
 district may not work at all in another.
A thread of common importance – establish a firm
  connection with the targeted school and build a
  relationship of trust.
                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   28
                Outreach …
Some basic suggestions:
• Start where you are most likely to succeed
  (capitalize on early success, the ripple effect and
  benefits of the grapevine).
• Find your strongest school-based allies.
• Find your strongest community allies (other
  advocacy groups, the PTA, etc.).

                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   29
                 Outreach …
• The advantages and dangers of starting at the top.
• Craft your message carefully -- what matters most
  to this school?
• In our experience, school districts are hungry for
  this information but it can be difficult to make it a
  priority for them.


                   NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   30
   How the Program Fits Within an
     Overall Advocacy Agenda
The education community is key to reaching the
  NAMI goal of reducing stigma and
  discrimination. Given the early onset of mental
  illness and the advantage of early identification
  we must find ways to reach educators.


                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   31
    Our Orange County Experience
Orange county is a large county with 31 school districts
  and 500,000 students.
• We have been providing lessons in education system.
• schools for 10 years.
• We have done some teacher in-services before the
  present PTasA program.
• We have made some friends in the county education
  department.
                   NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   32
         The Snowball Effect
• Our first presentation after the our training in
  St. Louis was at the Orange County department of
  Education which was arranged by a NAMI member
  there. Personnel from the Orange county Health Care
  Agency attended.
• After that meeting five more presentations were
  scheduled.
• Because county personnel attended, we have been
  asked to present at the school nurse convention in
  August.
                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   33
     The Snowball Effect, cont’d
• From the original five presentations, two more
  are scheduled for the future with a couple more
  possibilities.
• We have been asked to speak at two church
  groups, too.
• We did another presentation at OCDE in April.
• The more we do, the more we will be asked to
  do.
                NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   34
            Building Your Team
•   Go for the gold!
•   Find a well credentialed educator.
•   The family member and consumer are key!
•   Consumer presenters are the more difficult to find.
•   The training day is from 8-5.
•   We recommend training at least 3 teams.
•   Make sure each team member understands the
    requirements.
                    NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   35
      Securing Team Commitment
• On training day, determine the role of each
  participant.
• Stress the importance of meeting before a
  presentation to practice.
• Each participant needs to come to practice prepared.
• If there is not a program coordinator, one of the team
  members needs to be a leader.
• Our evaluations have been very motivating to our
  teams. (See handout)
                   NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   36
         Training Opportunities
Kingston Jr. High in Kingston WA needed a
  presentation for their faculty following two suicides.
  We were asked to do this and we asked to be able to
  train NAMI WA in the program. This was financed
  by a memorial fund for one of the victims.
We have also gone to San Luis Obispo, CA to train
 folks there.
This is an excellent program with the capability of
  helping in the prevention and early intervention of
  mental illness!
                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   37
     Comment from Kingston, WA
Email received from Eric Kvistad, father of
 student at Kingston Junior High:
 “I am the one who should be thanking you. This
  never would have been possible without you
  and Donna helping. My wife and I are
  gratified this subject has received so much
  attention in our local area. It may be the ray of
  hope that a troubled youth needs in order to
  get help.”
                  NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   38
                      Next Steps
Our first national train-the-trainers meeting for this program was
  held in March 2006 in St. Louis.
NAMI and CHADD leaders from 14 states participated (CA, CT,
  FL, ID, IL, MD, TX, MN, MI, NC, OH, PA, TN, UT).
  Numerous schools in these states have received the PTasA
  Program and evaluations from these sites are currently being
  analyzed to create an evidence base for this Program.
The expanded program will continue to be rolled out as additional
  states become trained during the next two years of the
  foundation grant.
                       NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   39
                  The Roll-Out
Family advocacy leaders participating in the program are
  receiving ongoing technical assistance from the NAMI
  national office.
This interaction between the field and NAMI national provides us
  with direct feedback on the program’s effectiveness.
The evaluation component of the program allows us to measure
  its ongoing success to help ensure continuous program
  improvement.
NAMI continues to focus on cultural competence in the program.
  It will be available in Spanish in 2007-08.
                     NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   40
         NAMI Believes That …
…together families, school professionals and mental
 health providers can make a tremendous difference in
 the lives of children and families.
NAMI is pleased to see so many schools opening their
 doors to family advocates working to raise awareness
 about early onset mental illnesses.
We look forward to continuing to build our partnerships
 and alliances with the school and mental health
 advocacy and provider communities.

                   NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   41
        Contact Information
               Darcy Gruttadaro
Director, NAMI Child & Adolescent Action Center
             Phone: 703.516.0698
            Email: darcy@nami.org

                 Donna Pollard
    Program Director, NAMI Orange County
            Phone: 714.544.8488
          Email: dpollard@namioc.org

               NAMI Convention, June 2007, San Diego, CA   42

								
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