Docstoc

Lesson Plan 2 What is Development

Document Sample
Lesson Plan 2 What is Development Powered By Docstoc
					Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Lesson: Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion
Civics, Grade 10, Open
Three Periods (225 min) + Student Assembly

Rationale
In our ever increasingly globalised world, citizens within North America are connected to people
across the globe in many different ways. One such global connection is based upon the very
clothes we wear on our backs. Major brand-name companies rely heavily on producing clothing
at the lowest possible costs for themselves. As a result, sweatshop abuses are a common
reality in many countries around the world, including Canada. This lesson is designed to
encourage students to become active global citizens. Through the presentation of a Sweatshop
Fashion Show students will become more aware of their connections to the issue of sweatshop
labour, as well as their civic responsibility in stopping it.


 Expectations
 By the end of this lesson students will:
   Analyse contemporary crises or issues of international significance (e.g. sweatshop
      labour) in the context of the global community.
   Describe how their own and other’s beliefs and values can be connected to a sense of
      civic purpose and preferred types of participation.
   Demonstrate an ability to formulate questions; locate information from different
      sources; and identify main ideas, supporting evidence, points of view, and biases in
      these materials.
   Demonstrate an ability to work collaboratively and productively with others when
      researching civics topics in their community.
   Participate effectively in a civil action or project of interest to them and of importance
      to the community.


Teaching Strategies
    Think-Pair-Share
    Brainstorm
    Direct Instruction
    Co-operative Small Group Work
    Inquiry-Based Research
    Sweatshop Fashion Show




Oxfam – Canada                                           Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Lesson Outline

Period One
1.   Introduce the outline of the lesson and set the agenda for the class period.
2.   Write the word “SWEATSHOPS” on the black board. Ask students to think-pair-share with a
     partner as to any and all key words they associate with the term “SWEATSHOPS.” Call on
     random pairs to offer their perspective and record the information on the blackboard.
     Students are to copy the information down in their notebooks.
     Ask students in their pairs to discuss the following questions and record their answers in
     their notebooks.
           Where do sweatshops exist?
           Who works in sweatshops and why?
           What companies or brands use sweatshops to produce their clothing?
     As a class, enter into a guided discussion around the above three questions, ensuring that
     all pairs have the opportunity to express their opinions. Record all students’ answers on
     the blackboard.
3.   Introduce The Label Check Activity. Ask students to pair up with their neighbour and
     examine the label attached to her/his shirt. Each student is to check the brand name and
     the country where the item was made. Ask them to look for other information on the label,
     such as fabric content, washing instructions, size, and the “CA number.”
     Together as a class brainstorm answers to the following questions, with teacher acting as
     the recorder in the creation of a class board note.
           What are the well-known brands?
           What countries do our clothes come from?
           What other information did you find on the labels?
           Is there any information about the factory where the clothes were made?
           Is there any information about wages and working conditions?
     Compare the lists of the well-known brands and countries where students’ clothes were
     made from this activity with the responses of the students from the previous activity. What
     are the similarities and differences? Next, using the lists from this activity, rate each
     according to how often the brands and countries are mentioned. Following from this, enter
     into a guided discussion around the reasons as to why students think they did not find any
     information regarding the later two questions. Ask students whether they think access to
     this information is important and why.
4.   Introduce the Sweatshop Fashion Show Assignment by first providing a background to the
     issue of how our clothes are made by presenting students with the information provided on
     TIS 1. Next, formally introduce the Assignment by distributing HO 1 to each student. Read
     through HO 1 with the class. Distribute the Sweatshop Fashion Show Script (HO 2), the
     Sweatshop Fashion Show Checklist (HO 3) and the Self-Evaluation Rubric (HO 4) to the
     students.
     Students work on Task #1 (HO 1) and organise themselves into three equal number
     research groups in order to complete Task #2 (HO 1) for homework.




Oxfam – Canada                                            Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



5.   Bring closure to class and assign student homework. Within their research groups students
     are to complete the required investigation as described on HO 1. Due the next class
     period.


Period Two
1. Introduce the agenda for the class period.
2. Divide students into three working groups: Script Writing Working Group (Task #3 and #4);
   Media/School Outreach Working Group (Task #6, #7, and #12); and Wardrobe and Music
   Working Group (Task # 8, # 9, and #10).
     Within their respective groups, students work collectively on the assigned tasks. Ensure
     that each group understands their assigned tasks and answer any questions that arise
     during the work period.
     Reserve the school cafeteria, auditorium, or gymnasium and schedule a student assembly
     with the Vice-Principal (Task #5).
3. Bring closure to class and assign student homework. Students are to complete their
   assigned tasks and come prepared for a dress rehearsal during the following class period.


Period Three
1. Introduce the agenda for the class period.
2. As a class, students are to run through a dress rehearsal of the Sweatshop Fashion Show
   (Task # 11). Ensure that all aspects of the fashion show are present and work with the
   students in trouble-shooting any issues and problems that may arise.
     Confirm with the students the date, time, and location of the student assembly. Ensure that
     each working group has completed their assigned tasks or is in the process of revising any
     last minute details.
3. Distribute copies of the Reflection Paper Assignment (HO 5), as well as the Reflection Paper
   Checklist (HO 6) to students. Following the presentation of the Sweatshop Fashion Show,
   students are to write a reflection paper using the criteria outlined in the checklist.

4. Bring closure to class and assign student homework. Students are to complete the
   Reflection Paper Assignment (HO 5), as well as the Self-Evaluation Rubric (HO 4) for
   homework. Due the second class period after the Student Assembly and Sweatshop
   Fashion Show presentation.


Student Assembly
1. Class assembles 15 minutes prior to the student assembly. Review and clarify final issues
   and concerns with students.
2. Students introduce the Sweatshop Fashion Show by welcoming the audience to the show.
     Students present the Sweatshop Fashion Show. Students work through their script adding
     music and theatrics to the presentation.


Oxfam – Canada                                           Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



    Students close the Sweatshop Fashion Show with a brief review of the concrete actions
    audience members can take to challenge the practices described in the show.
3. Before students leave, remind them that their homework assignments (Reflection Paper and
   Self-Evaluation Rubric) are due the class period after next.


Assessment and Evaluation

Student learning will be assessed and evaluated through the use of the following:
 Expectations                                              Class Period /         Assessment /
                                                           Activity               Evaluation Tool
 1. Analyse contemporary crises or issues of               Period One:            Formative
    international significance (e.g. sweatshop             Sweatshop              Teacher
    labour) in the context of the global community.        Brainstorm and The     Assessed
                                                           Label Check            Observation
 2. Describe how their own and other’s beliefs and         Student Assembly:      Summative
    values can be connected to a sense of civic            Reflection Paper       Teacher
    purpose and preferred types of participation.          Assignment             Evaluated
                                                                                  Checklist
 3. Demonstrate an ability to formulate questions;         Period Two and         Summative
    locate information from different sources; and         Period Three:          Teacher
    identify main ideas, supporting evidence, points       Sweatshop Fashion      Evaluated
    of view, and biases in these materials.                Show Preparation       Checklist
 4. Demonstrate an ability to work collaboratively         Period Two and         Summative
    and productively with others when researching          Period Three:          Student
    civics topics in their community.                      Sweatshop Fashion      Evaluated
                                                           Show Preparation       Rubric
 5. Participate effectively in a civil action or project   Student Assembly:      Summative
    of interest to them and of importance to the           Sweatshop Fashion      Teacher
    community.                                             Show Presentation      Evaluated
                                                                                  Checklist


Resources
 Period One
   TIS 1
   Sweatshop Fashion Show Assignment (HO 1)
   Sample Fashion Show Script (HO 2)
     <http://www.maquilasolidarity.org/tools/campaign/sfsscript.htm>
   Sweatshop Fashion Show Checklist (HO 3)
   Self-Evaluation Rubric (HO 4)

 Period Three
   Reflection Paper Assignment (HO 5)
   Reflection Paper Checklist (HO 6)




Oxfam – Canada                                               Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Lessons at a Glance
Period One
  Time                               Activity                          Assessment          Resources
  5 min    Introduction/Agenda (T)
 20 min    Sweatshop Brainstorm Activity                                 Formative
                Think-Pair-Share key words re. sweatshops (S)          Assessment
                Pair answers to the five questions (S)                 Expectation
                Class discussion and creation of board note (S/T)        #1 (T)
 25 min    The Label Check Activity                                      Formative
                Examine labels on partners clothing (S)                Assessment
                Brainstorm answers to questions (S/T)                  Expectation
                Creation of rating list and guided discussion (S/T)      #1 (T)
 20 min    Sweatshop Fashion Show Introduction                                         -   TIS 1
                Direct instruction re. how our clothes are made (T)                   -   HO 1
                Introduce Sweatshop Fashion Show Activity (T)                         -   HO 2
                Distribute materials (T)                                              -   HO 3
                Research group organisation (S)                                       -   HO 4
  5 min    Closure
                Assign student homework (T)
                Research group investigation (S)


Period Two
  Time                               Activity                          Assessment          Resources
  5 min    Introduction/Agenda (T)
 65 min    Sweatshop Fashion Show Preparation
                Divide into working groups (S/T)
                Working group completion of assigned tasks (S)
                Reserve school auditorium, cafeteria, or
                 gymnasium (T)
 5 min     Closure
                Assign student homework (T)
                Prepare for dress rehearsal (S)




Oxfam – Canada                                             Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Period Three
  Time                           Activity                             Assessment       Resources
  5 min    Introduction/Agenda (T)
 50 min    Sweatshop Fashion Show Preparation
                Dress rehearsal (S)
                Confirmation of student assembly (S/T)
 15 min    Sweatshop Fashion Show Reflection Assignment                               - HO 5
                Distribute copies of assignment (T)                                  - HO 6
                Distribute copies of rubric (T)
 5 min     Closure                                                                    - HO 5
                Bring closure to lesson and assign student                           - HO 4
                 homework (T)
                Complete Reflection Assignment and Personal
                 Evaluation Form (S)


Student Assembly
  Time                               Activity                         Assessment       Resources
 15 min    Class Assembly
                Final questions/clarifications (S/T)
 40 min    Sweatshop Fashion Show Presentation                         Summative      - HO 3
                Introduction of Sweatshop Fashion Show (S)             Evaluation
                Presentation of script, music, and wardrobe (S)       Expectation
                Review of alternatives and promoting action (S)       #3, #5 (T)
 5 min     Homework                                                    Summative      - HO 6
                Remind student of their homework assignment            Evaluation    - HO 4
                 from last class period (T)                            Expectation
                Complete Reflection Assignment and Personal             #2 (T)
                 Evaluation Form (S)                                   Summative
                                                                        Evaluation
                                                                       Expectation
                                                                         #4 (S)




Oxfam – Canada                                            Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Teacher Resources

Teacher Information Sheet One (TIS 1)
Taken and adapted from “The Labour Behind the Label: How our clothes are made.”       The Maquila
Solidarity Network.

Shopping for clothes today can be quite a geography lesson. A label check around the
classroom reveals that we are all wearing sweaters and shirts from Korea, Madagascar, Hong
Kong, Sri Lanka, China, Honduras, and El Salvador; as well as jeans from Canada, Mexico, and
Hong Kong. Check out any department or retail store – The Bay, Zellers, The Gap, Wal-Mart,
Roots, Club Monaco, or Eddie Bauer – and you’ll find clothes from countries around the world.

A huge percentage will probably come form China and Hong Kong. On a trip to a Gap Kids
Store in Toronto, The Maquila Solidarity Network identified labels from more than 35 countries.

And just as quickly as styles change, so do the countries where our clothes are made. In the
globalised economy, retailers and super-labels are constantly searching for new opportunities to
have their clothes made at a lower cost. Countries such as Canada, China, and El Salvador are
forced to compete over who will accept the poorest wages and working conditions and the
weakest labour, health, safety, and environmental standards. The lowest bidder gets the jobs.



Sweatshop Fashion Show Assignment (HO 1)
Taken and adapted from “Designing a Sweatshop Fashion Show.” The Maquila Solidarity Network.

Rationale
A Sweatshop Fashion Show is an easy, fun, and creative educational tool to inform ourselves
and people in our schools about the sweatshop abuses behind the labels of the major brands.
Mocking the traditional fashion show, announcers and models subvert the familiar sales pitch
and brand images with humour and facts to expose the stories of the women who make our
clothes and sportshoes.

Purpose
Working collectively as a class you are to design a Sweatshop Fashion Show. In the design of
this Fashion Show you will be involved in the collection of brand-name clothes made in
countries around the world. You will also be responsible for compiling information on prices,
wages, and working conditions through researching websites and visiting department stores.
Based on this research, you will create a script, choose music, rehearse, publicise the event,
prepare campaign material, and contact the media. Throughout this process, you will learn
about workers’ issues and the actions you can take to support them.




Oxfam – Canada                                            Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Tasks
1. Identifying your Objectives and Audience
    Design the fashion show to raise awareness among fellow students and focus on brands
    that have been identified in The Label Check Activity.

2. Researching Companies and Brand Names
    Search for up-to-date information and attention-grabbing facts about companies and their
    practices. Divide into tree equal number groups with each group researching one particular
    area listed below:
        i. Visit company websites and check out annual reports for information on world-wide
        sales, profits, CEO salaries, and expenditures on advertising and promotion.
                 Websites for Major Canadian Retailers
                 - Hudson’s Bay Company: www.hbc.com
                 - Sears Canada: www.sears.ca
                 - Roots: www.roots.com
                 - Club Monaco: www.clubmonaco.com
                 - Dylex: www.dylex.com
        ii. Visit websites of campaigning organisations for information on wages, working
        conditions, and to identify specific cases of labour rights violations.
                 Websites for Campaigning Organisations
                 - Oxfam Canada: www.oxfam.ca
                 - Maquila Solidarity Network: www.web.net/~msn
                 - No Sweat Campaign: www.maquilasolidarity.org
        iii. Visit stores and check magazine and newspaper ads for information on prices and
        the images and messages associated with the brands.

3. Designing the Production
    To be effective and entertaining, a fashion show needs to be choreographed like a stage
    show. Think about how the models and announcers will interact, how to keep up the pace
    and with it the audience’s interest, and how to finish on a high note.
        i. Announcers
        One graphic way to contrast labour practices and brand images is to use two
        announcers. The first announcer describes the clothing being modelled. The second
        describes the working conditions.
        ii. Models, Brands, and Music
        Decide on how many models are needed, the order they and their clothing brands will
        appear, and when you will use music. To keep the show a reasonable length, use
        around 8 – 10 models or if there are more students, model in pairs.
        iii. Finale
        For an effective finale, you might want to invite all models back on stage while the
        announcers reiterate key messages and offer suggestions on how audience members
        can get involved in local Stop Sweatshops Campaigns.




Oxfam – Canada                                          Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



4. Preparing the Script
       The script is made up of a series of scenes. It should be informative, but also attention-
        grabbing and funny. The more personal the stories, the more people will identify them.
       Keep each scene and brief to the point.
       Try not to repeat information – use different clothing brands to highlight different
        problems in different parts of the world.
       Don’t forget to include stories of sweatshop abuses in Canada.
       If possible include stories of small victories.
       See the Sample Fashion Show Script (HO 2) attached.

5. Choosing a Venue
    In consultation with your teacher, reserve the school cafeteria, auditorium, or gymnasium
    as an appropriate venue. Improvise a “catwalk” and organise the seating to allow sufficient
    room for the models to perform and interact with the audience.

6. Promoting the Show
    It is your responsibility to invite your fellow students to the Sweatshop Fashion Show during
    a Student Assembly at the lunch break. In order to promote your show, you need to make
    flyers and posters that are entertaining as you hope your show will be. A mock fashion
    show deserves a mock poster. Use and manipulate the images and logos associated with
    the major brands.

7. Inviting the Media
    Prepare a Press Release to invite the media to the event. Have copies of the script available
    to distribute to the media after the event. This will make their job of covering the story
    much easier.

8. Collecting Costumes
    Rule #1: You do not need to buy new clothes for your fashion show. Borrow, borrow,
    borrow. If you have to buy something, check first at local second-hand stores.
    Rule #2: If possible, try to find the brand-name clothing made in the countries highlighted
    in your script.
    Rule #3: Improvise.

9. Choosing the Music
    Try to pick music that lends itself to your message, and/or music that will attract your
    audience. Your choice of music can add energy, humour, and irony to the show.

10. Testing the Sound System
    Reserve the school’s sound system through your teacher and have an experienced person
    run it. Check that the music does not drown out the announcers’ voices.




Oxfam – Canada                                            Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



11. Rehearsing the Show
     It is essential to have at least one rehearsal before the show and to appoint one or two
     stage managers to make sure that everything goes smoothly and to “trouble-shoot” when
     small problems arise.

     If at all possible, rehearse with the sound system and music.       This will allow you to
     anticipate possible technical problems.

     Ensure that all models know the order of the presentation and have read the script. Most
     importantly, each model needs to know their cues for exiting and entering the runway.

12. Promoting Action
     Consider closing the fashion show with a brief review of the concrete actions audience
     members can take to challenge the practices described in the show. Be prepared with
     campaign sign-up sheets, petitions, sample letters, or background materials.


Roles and Responsibilities
     Announcers (2 students)
     Models (8-10 students)
     Stage Managers (2-3 students)
     Technical Support (School Technician)
     Research Groups (Task #2)
     Script Writing Working Group (Task #3 and #4)
     Media/School Outreach Working Group (Task #6 and #7)
     Wardrobe and Music Working Group (Task #8, #9, and #10)


Evaluation
The evaluation for this activity will based upon a teacher-evaluated Sweatshop Fashion Show
Checklist (HO 3), as well as a Self-Evaluation Rubric (HO 4). As such, your overall grade for the
assignment will be divided equally between the group mark for the fashion show and your own
personal evaluation of your participation within the group.




Oxfam – Canada                                           Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Sweatshop Fashion Show Checklist (HO 3)

Expectations
 Demonstrate an ability to formulate questions; locate information from different sources; and identify main ideas, supporting
  evidence, points of view, and biases in these materials.
 Participate effectively in a civil action or project of interest to them and of importance to the community.


Criteria
The Sweatshop Fashion Show ...
                                                                          Achieves Standard                          Does not yet
                                                                          With Distinction                           Achieve the
                                                                                                                       Standard

Includes a high degree of understanding of facts and information                  4                 3        2              1
regarding sweatshops

Depicts the issue of sweatshops in a thoroughly accurate and                      4                 3        2              1
Unbiased manner

Makes connections to sweatshop practices in Canada

Demonstrates extensive use of highly effective creative thinking skills           4                 3        2              1

Presents each scene in a succinct and purposeful manner                           4                 3        2              1

Utilises effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills                     4                 3        2              1
in its presentation

Employs music and wardrobe in a highly accurate and effective manner              4                 3        2              1

Includes an effective and engaging finale                                         4                 3        2              1

Promotes the idea of alternatives and action to sweatshops                        4                 3        2              1



Oxfam – Canada                                            Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Self-Evaluation Rubric (HO 4)

Name:


Expectations
 Demonstrate an ability to work collaboratively and productively with others when researching civics topics in their community.

   Criteria                     Level 4                               Level 3                       Level 2                         Level 1
                      Achieves the Standard with              Achieves the Standard          Close to Achieving the        Has not yet Achieved the
                             Distinction                                                            Standard                      Standard
 On Task          I had no problems meeting time            I had little problem meeting   I had some problems            I had problems meeting
                  commitments for my individual             time commitments for my        meeting time commitments       time commitments for my
                  tasks                                     individual tasks causing no    for my individual tasks        individual tasks causing
                                                            problem for the group          causing minor difficulties     considerable difficulties for
                                                                                           for the group                  the group
                  I willingly took on a little extra work   I did an equal share of the    I was able to complete         I was unable to complete
                  to ease the load on others and            work and saw all my tasks      most of my assigned share      my assigned share of the
                  provided leadership in the                through to completion          of the work and saw most       work and was unable to see
                  completion of tasks                                                      of my tasks through to         my tasks through to
                                                                                           completion                     completion
 Listening        I actively listened to others,            I listened to others, and      I listened to others some of   I had difficulty listening to
                  encouraging and building on their         often built on their ideas     the time and occasionally      others and building on their
                  ideas                                                                    built on their ideas           ideas
 Questioning      I asked timely and insightful             I posed timely and             I posed some questions         I rarely asked questions
                  questions while working in my             appropriate questions while    while working in my group      while working in my group
                  group                                     working in my group
 Sharing          I was generous and enthusiastic           I shared information,          I shared information,          I was reluctant to share
                  about sharing information,                resources, and ideas           resources, and ideas when      information, resources, and
                  resources, and ideas                                                     asked                          ideas
                  I provided leadership in reaching         I sought consensus in          I accepted a consensus         I sometimes resisted the
                  consensus group decisions                 decision-making                group decision                 development of group
                                                                                                                          consensus decisions
                                                                                                                          preferring my own ideas




Oxfam – Canada                                                    Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Lesson: Global Connections - Sweatshop Labour




   Criteria                   Level 4                            Level 3                       Level 2                          Level 1
                     Achieves the Standard with           Achieves the Standard         Close to Achieving the         Has not yet Achieved the
                            Distinction                                                        Standard                       Standard
 Acting on       I made effective use of constructive   I offered and accepted        I had some difficulty           I had considerable difficulty
 Suggestions     suggestions and offered specific       constructive suggestions      offering and accepting          offering and accepting
                 suggestions to others in the group                                   constructive suggestions        constructive suggestions
 Reflection      I reflected continuously on the task   I reflected on the task and   I did some limited reflection   I did not reflect on the task
                 throughout the group process           the group process upon its    on the task and the group       or the group process
                                                        completion                    process upon its completion




Oxfam – Canada                                                                        Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Reflection Paper Assignment (HO 5)

Purpose
 To reflect upon the learning gained throughout the lesson, and in particular from the
  production of the Sweatshop Fashion Show.


Expectation
 Describe how their own and other’s beliefs and values can be connected to a sense of civic
  purpose and preferred types of participation.


Task
Write a 250 – 500 word-processed (1 – 2 pages) reflection paper outlining what you have
learned from the lesson and the Sweatshop Fashion Show. Be sure to also reflect upon how
your beliefs and values are connected to a sense of civic purpose regarding sweatshops and
what types of participation you would suggest to resolve the problem. (Refer the Questions for
Consideration below).


Questions for Consideration
1. What do you know about sweatshops that you did not know before? (Name at least five
   things).
2. How do you think you are connected to the issue of sweatshops?
3. What did you learn from the production of the Sweatshop Fashion Show?
4. Is the Sweatshop Fashion Show an effective means of educating students about
   sweatshops? Why or why not?
5. What part do you think you could play in affecting change to the problem of sweatshops?




Oxfam – Canada                                         Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern
Sweatshops – Exploitation is Never in Fashion



Reflection Paper Checklist (HO 6)

Name:


Expectation
 Describe how their own and other’s beliefs and values can be connected to a sense of civic purpose and preferred types of
  participation.

Criteria
The Reflection …


                                                                        Achieves Standard                          Does not yet
                                                                        With Distinction                           Achieve the
                                                                                                                   Standard

Eloquently articulates what you know about sweatshops now that                  4                 3         2             1
you did not know before (Names at least five things)
Effectively describes how you think you are connected to the                    4                 3         2             1
issue of sweatshops
Succinctly analyses what you learned from the production of                     4                 3         2             1
the Sweatshop Fashion Show
Discusses whether or not the Sweatshop Fashion Show is an                       4                 3         2             1
effective means of educating students about sweatshops
Eloquently describes what part you think you could play in                      4                 3         2             1
affecting change to the problem of sweatshops?

Effectively describes how your beliefs and values are connected                 4                 3         2             1
to a sense of civic purpose regarding sweatshops




Oxfam – Canada                                          Developed by David Ast – OISE/UT Intern

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:17
posted:2/27/2010
language:English
pages:15