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Chapter-7 - PIFRA

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					Chapter 7

Performance Audit
Performance auditing is an independent examination of the efficiency and
effectiveness of government undertakings, programs or organizations, with due
regard to economy, and the aim of leading to improvements.

The purpose of performance audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor
General is to help parliament to oversee and evaluate program operations and
program results. The basic questions these audits answer are:

Is program being run as efficiently as it could be?
Is a program meeting the needs of the public?
Is program serving as the government intended?


Performance audit falls into three categories:
Operational Audits: determining if program is operating at the least possible
cost i.e. economic and efficient use of resources.
Program Audits: determining if programs are meeting their objectives.
Compliance Audits: determining if management is following what the
government intended.


Mandate of the Audit:

Section 8 of the auditor general ordinance 2001, empowers the auditor general
to audit,

   -    All expenditure from the Consolidated Funds of the Federation and of
       each Province;
   -   All transactions of the Federation and of the Provinces relating to Public
       Account;




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   -   All trading, manufacturing, profit & loss accounts, balance sheets and
       other subsidiary accounts kept by order of the President or of the
       Governor of the province in any Federal or Provincial Department; and
   -   The accounts of any authority or body established by the Federation or a
       province, and in each case report on the expenditure, transactions or
       accounts so audited by him.

Importance of Planning

   -   Planning of the performance audit is the basis for the selection of topics
       and possible pre studies.

   -   Planning helps the auditor in identifying the resources required to
       achieve the goals of the audit in the most efficient way.

   -   Planning an audit properly gives important signals to the auditor. They
       get an opportunity to decide about the continuance of the audit, based
       on certain factor, which may include;

          -   Further examination may not give significant result
          -   Data may not be available
          -   Cost of audit may be prohibitive

   -   It may serve as a mechanism for selecting future audit themes, and a
       basis for detailed planning.

   -   It may serve as an instrument for the development of the future audit
       program providing a brief account of the provisional problems, questions,
       and other arguments supporting each one of them.


Determining the Potential Audit Areas:

A lot of care has been taken while determining the potential audit areas due to
the constraint within the DG Audit – Federal Government due to limited
resources in terms of time and manpower.

The potential audit areas for the purposes of the performance audit are
selected from the entities of the ministries that are covered under the preview
of audit and are discussed in detail in an annual audit plan. The potential


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audit areas identified by the Directorate General Audit – Federal Government
are the areas that result;

   1. In the modernization of the government administration ( such as,
      machine readable passports and e-government directorate)
   2. In reforms within public sectors (such as, privatization and debt
      management)
   3. In Improvement of service delivery to public ( such as, in providing basic
      education and health facilities and supply of water)
   4. In change in constitutional and legal conditions and established
      traditions,(such as devolution)
   5. Due to change in political realities
   6. In material effectiveness problems in government programs/entities
   7. In political decisions in particular and goals of parliament in general.



Criteria for the Selection of Entities/Programs

The criteria for the selection of projects for performance audit include;

   -   Significance: the project selected should be significant in any or all of the
       following aspects:

         1. Money value
         2. Visibility in the media
         3. Sensitivity of the subject in the social and economic life

   -   Added value: the projects that have not been audited before and where
       adequate capacity is possessed by DG Audit – Federal Government that
       might contribute significantly in providing valuable inputs.

   -   Potential risks/risk analysis: The selection of a project in potential areas
       may be based on risk analysis or analysis of indications of existing or
       potential problems. The stronger the public interest involved where there
       is reason to suspect inefficiency, the greater the risks (the less the
       knowledge), and the greater the uncertainty. Factors that may indicate
       higher risk (or uncertainty) could be the following:

          -   The financial or budgetary amounts involved are substantial, or
              there have been significant changes in the amounts involved.


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          -   Areas traditionally prone to risk (procurement, technology,
              environment issues, health, etc, or areas of unacceptable risk) are
              involved.
          -   New or urgent activities or changes in conditions (requirements,
              demands) are involved.
          -   Management structures are complex, and there might be some
              confusion about responsibilities.
          -   There is no reliable, independent, and updated information on the
              efficiency or the effectiveness of a government program.


Planned Audits

Based on the potential areas mentioned in following projects are planned for
performance audit in the current audit year.

a) The Modernization of the Government Administration:

The project selected in the current audit year under the following head
includes,

                 1. Project for machine readable passport
                 2. E - Office


b) Reforms within public sectors

The project selected in the current audit year under the following head
includes,

                 3. Debt Management
                 4. Privatization
                 5. Visit Pakistan


c) Improvement of service delivery to public

   The project selected in the current audit year under the following head
   includes,

                 6. Basic Education Community Schools Program
                 7. Madrassah reforms project
                 8. National Internship Program

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                  9. National Program for Improvement in watercourses

d) Material effectiveness problems in government programs/entities

   The project selected in the current audit year under the following head
   includes,

                 10. National Institute of Health

e) Political decisions in particular and goals of parliament in general.

   The project selected in the current audit year under the following head
   includes,

                  11. Hepatitis Program
                  12. Construction of National Monument

Audit Criteria

Primary sources of audit criteria include the controls, standards, measures,
results, commitments and targets adopted by the entity itself or imposed by
legislative bodies. The auditor should review these criteria to assess their
relevance to the audit to ensure that they are reasonable and complete. Where
the entity‟s own measures are found to be suitable, they can be adopted as
audit criteria. Where the entity does not have well-established standards for
measuring performance, acceptable criteria may be obtained from the law,
regulations, standards developed by professional bodies and from the
performance data of other similar organizations. Audit criteria should be
relevant, reasonable and attainable.

Approach for Performance Audit

INTOSAI guidelines for performance auditing will be adhered to for conducting
performance audits; however the generalized approach has been produced
below;

The approach and methodology comprise the techniques that will be used by
the auditor in gathering evidence and conducting the analysis.

Examples of gathering evidence include review of the entity‟s documentation
and files, reports and studies, conducting surveys, field visits to project sites
and interviews with entity staff or other experts.


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Analytical methods include sampling, year-to-year comparisons, comparison
with budgets, trend analysis and comparisons with other similar entities.

However Reasonable assurance on the quality of information should be
obtained and the institutions concerned should be properly informed.

Audit approach for the key performance areas;

   •   Economy
         – Is about keeping the cost low
         – Minimising the cost of resources used or required
               • Is means chosen most economical use of resources?
               • Have human, financial and material resources been used
                 economically?
               • Are management of programme in line with sound admin
                 and management?
         – Spending less

   •   Efficiency
          – Relationship between outputs and the goods, services and
              resources used to produce them
          – Can we produce more from given resources; can we use fewer
              resources for a level of outputs?
          – In practice often difficult to distinguish from economy
          – Spending well

   •   Effectiveness

          –   Relationship between intended and achieved results of public
              spending

                •   Are aims being met by the means employed, outputs
                    produced and impacts?

                •   Are the impacts really resulting of policy rather than other
                    circumstances?

          –   Spending wisely



Brief Overview of Projects/ Activities

Brief overviews of the selected programs are as follows:

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Hepatitis Program (Ministry of Health)

Prime Minister of Pakistan launched the program on 29th August 2005; the
“Prime Minister‟s Program for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis in Pakistan”;
in order to abide the national commitment of communicable disease reduction
as laid down in the National Health Policy. The total cost of the program is Rs.
2.594 billion for a period of five years; exclusively financed by the Government
of Pakistan and budget for the year 2006-07 is Rs. 500 million.

In addition to various intervention aimed at prevention of viral hepatitis, the
National Hepatitis Control Program is also extending free of charge diagnostic
facilities to everyone and treatment to more than13,000 deserving patients of
hepatitis B&C every year.

Contrary to various other public sector programs, the program is aimed at
utilization and strengthening of the existing health infrastructure which would
ensure the sustainability of the national efforts. District health departments
are the prime implementers of the program.

Although the program is exclusively funded by the Government of Pakistan, the
leadership to all interventions is provided by the provincial health departments
through respective Director General Health Services (DGHS); an arrangement
which ensures the ownership of all activities undertaken therein. The program
is implemented in all the four provinces, AJK, FANA & FATA headed by the
provincial coordinators who facilitate the program implementation.

Our audit will focus on measures to improve the;

   -   The rate of spread
   -   Is budget in line with spread
   -   What is the need of time
   -   Where we can save in the existing program
   -   How much supply to Opposition areas?
   -   How much hepatitis is in rural areas
   -   expected expense to hep c patient
   -   expected expense to hep B patient
   -   Mass media statistics
   -   Statistics of hcv positive patients treated

Comparison of investment made to highly prone areas as per data available

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National Institute of Health (Ministry of Health)

The project has been selected for audit due to disruption in its operating
procedures. Biological production division of NIH has been producing vaccines
which were stopped in 2004 due to the production of sub-standard vaccines,
since then the production staff is sitting idle in their offices.



Basic Education Community Schools Program (Ministry of Education)

“Achieve universal primary education by the year 2015” is one of the
Millennium Development Goals. In this regard, the federal government has
taken an initiative through enhanced Project „Basic Education Community
(BEC) Schools‟. This revitalized project has taken a lead from the lessons learnt
during the first period (1995-2006 under the name “82,000 Non-formal Basic
Education Schools”) of the project. The approved cost of the project is Rs 7,000
Million for a period of three years (2006-09) ending on June 30, 2009.

Budgeted cost for the first year 2006-07 activity is Rs 705 Million.

Main features of the project are:

 Program is female oriented (95% teachers and 70% students are female).
 Flexible timings and uniform. Books & learning material are free of cost.
 Multi-grade teaching methodology is being adopted by a single teacher
  under the supervision of NGOs.
 Rural areas and urban slums where formal schools are non-existent.
 Second chance for dropout/ miss-outs.
 Best schools will be converted into two rooms regular schools – incentive for
  community.
 Community/ teacher provides one room free of cost for the establishment of
  BEC schools.
 Incentives through salary package for teachers to improve qualifications.
 In BEC schools learners are taught formal primary school curricula.
  Students appear in formal 5th class examination through District Education
  Directorates. These Children can then re-enter formal schools.
 Duration of primary education will be 40 instead of 60 months for children
  of age group 10-14 years.



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Madrassah Reforms Project (Ministry of Education)

Madrassah Reforms project was approved at a capital cost of Rs 5,759.395
Million for 5 years for the whole of Pakistan. The endeavor of the project is to
facilitate 8,000 registered and willing Denni Madaris through teaching of
English, Mathematics, Pakistan studies, Social studies and General Science for
Primary to Secondary level and English, Economics, Pakistan studies and
Computer Sciences at Intermediate level so as to integrate religious Education
with formal education system.

Budgeted cost for the year 2006-07 activity is Rs 500 Million.



Visit Pakistan Year 2007 (Ministry of Tourism)

The government has decided to celebrate the year 2007 as „Visit Pakistan Year„.

Tourism is one of the biggest industries in the world. It can bring employment,
opportunities and recognition. Pakistan is one of the best kept secrets of the
tourism industry. Various hidden tourist gems, our history, our culture and
heritage, etc. - are examples of all that Pakistan has to offer

This year, embrace the true essence of beauty and experience adventure like
never before. From white water rafting in the mighty Indus, and
mountaineering in the highest mountains of the world to desert safaris through
the Thar and Cholistan deserts, Pakistan takes adventure to the extreme.

Ministry of Tourism budgeted cost for the year 2006-07 activity is Rs 249.3
Million.



Construction of National Monument (Ministry of Culture)

Construction of a National Monument at Islamabad has been under
consideration by the Government since Islamabad was made the Capital of
Pakistan. A number of committees studied the proposals for concept, design
and location of the National. The long-awaited decision to construct a National
Monument with a clear concept and design was taken by President General
Pervez Musharraf. The Ministry of Culture was given the task of planning and
executing the Project. Considerable preparatory work was undertaken by the
ministry over one year for planning and seeking approval. The Pakistan Council
of Architects and Town Planners (PCATP) was tasked to organize a National

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Competition to transform the theme and basic framework signifying strength,
unity and dedication of the people of Pakistan into an icon representing an
independent and free nation. It was envisaged for the National Monument to
serve as a beacon representing the past, present and heralding a bright future
for all Pakistanis to whom the Monument will stand dedicated.

Budgeted cost for the year 2006-07 activity is Rs 150.3 Million.



National Internship Program (Establishment Division)

The National Internship Program is designed for the benefit of young
unemployed postgraduates and graduates all over the country, who have
completed sixteen years of education from recognized universities or degree
awarding institutions during the calendar years 2005 and 2006. The scheme is
intended to provide financial relief to fresh graduates and also to keep them
engaged and interested in acquiring additional knowledge and real work life
experiences, thereby facilitating their employability in the country. The
programme will be also advantages to the government organizations having
shortage of officials in various cadres.

Budgeted cost for the year 2006-07 activity is Rs 200 Million.



Debt Management (Debt Management Office, Finance Division & EAD)

Following a review of the Pakistan Government debt obligations stemming from
persistent fiscal deficits and the role of performance audit, for assuring the
effective and efficient use of funds raised through government borrowing, the
main objectives of the performance audit are:

(i)     to review the trend in public debt composition, debt financing sources
        and its implications,
(ii)    to analyze debt sustainability in terms of debt service payment ability,
        and
(iii)   to assess the quality of financial as well as performance accountability
        and transparency for debt funds in Pakistan and identify weaknesses for
        improvement.




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With respect to public funds, it compares the financial management standards
and practices of agencies using such funds against an international or 'best
practice' standard, and also the standards and practices of the external
'oversight' agencies. In doing so, the performance audit is devoted to the
assessment of risk that public financial resources raised through government
borrowing in Pakistan may be used illegitimately, inefficiently or ineffectively
and eventually it requires an assessment of the internal controls exercised by
the executive on itself, and of the external controls exercised by oversight
agencies.

Public debt management must be based on a set of laws and administrative
norms with a general scope, which regulate operations and activities. This legal
framework must clearly establish the competence to contract loans, to issue
new instruments, to invest or allocate resources derived from debt, to grant
endorsement or guarantees and in general to carry out any kind of
transactions required for debt management. The legal and normative
framework must ensure an adequate mandate and functions in all entities that
look after the management of public debt. There are various options of
assigning functions in debt management, but in every case the institutional
framework must specify the faculties of each participating entity, the
coordination among them, and the required exchange of information in order to
make decisions and determine the threshold of contingent liabilities.

It can be asserted that most political constitutions around the world provide
general guidelines that should be abided by with regard to the endorsement,
acquirement and management of sovereign public debt. Generally speaking,
the administrative and constitutional laws of each country include provisions
on definitions, responsibilities, coordination schemes of budget and extra-
budget activities, government‟s relations with other entities, such as the
Central Bank and public financial and non-financial firms, etc. Off budget
expenditures should be encompassed by law, since they might become
collectable as debt, thus representing a problem as it is likely that budgetary
provisions had not been made. Generally speaking, the approval of debt
contracts is responsibility of the congress.

The acquirement, management and reporting obligation are overseen by the
Executive Branch. Responsibilities must be clearly stated; otherwise,
communication and coordination within the government, and the decision-
making process and accountability may be affected.


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It is necessary for every country to have a legal framework, which determines
and outlines, at least, the following aspects:

   Formulation of policies and strategies on public debt.
   Explicit definition of objectives and debt allocation.
   Entity or federal agency designed to acquire credits on behalf of the Nation
    and to order the payments for the acquired debt.
   Entity responsible for the approval of debt contracts.
   Entities authorized to sign contracts for debt.
   Establishment of the entity in charge of recording and managing the public
    debt, responsible of carrying out and authorizing all transactions involving
    public credit, and providing guarantees in credit transactions.
   Cases and conditions in which the government acts as guarantor.
   Obligations regarding publication of reports on the debt status and, in
    general, on the public access to information.


Debt management can be defined as the necessary operations to obtain
financial resources in the amount and time required, and to fulfill the debt
service at the lowest possible cost. Debt management comprises the design of
contracts for credit starting from a medium and long-term plan, which must
establish four concepts: the debt structure in accordance with the currencies,
holders, rates, terms, instruments and contractor entities; the risks
evaluations involved in the contract; the prudent management practices; and
all the recording, control, and monitoring process.

The debt plan consists of establishing and executing a strategy to manage debt
in order to obtain the agreed financing, to reach the risk and cost goals, the
compliance of payments obligations, and to satisfy any other debt management
goal established by the contracting government. The adopted strategy must
assure the meeting of the government‟s financial requirements and the
fulfillment of its payment obligations in the short, medium and long terms at
the lowest possible cost, considering the corresponding risk degree. From this
perspective, a debt management plan must comprise activities oriented to the
accomplishment of the following objectives:

   To guarantee liquidity of the government‟s treasury
   To maintain equilibrium between costs, rates and terms, considering
    associated risks with the lowest cost.
   To establish an adequate coordination with external markets.

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   To establish and maintain an effective internal capital market.
   To have an adequate recording system based on a rigorous and clear
    methodology that allows for accountability.

An operational program consistent with objectives and strategies must be
established in order to execute a public debt plan, which must include bond-
selling procedures, maintain relations with the creditor and establish control
systems to inform about debt levels and its risks. The first step towards making
the public debt management operational is to make sure that debt is
structured in such a way that the payment of its service is guaranteed and
smooth throughout time.

Risk assessment

The strategy for debt management is controlled and evaluated on the basis of
different indicators of inherent risks derived from public debt structure as well
as form different evaluation techniques.

Risk assessment is the process whereby situations and events that might
prevent the debt management authorities from meeting their obligations are
defined, as well as the probability that such contingencies occur.


The more frequent risks public debt management might face are the following

   Market risk. Refers to the risks associated with changes in market prices,
    such as interest rates, exchange rates, commodity prices, etc, that have an
    impact on debt servicing costs.
   Rollover risk. The risk that debt will have to be rolled over at an unusually
    high cost or, in extreme cases, cannot be rolled over at all.
   Liquidity Risk. There are two types of liquidity risk: the one that refers to
    the penalization to which the debt issuers are exposed when they try to
    allocate stocks when there is no demand. The other form of risk is faced by
    the borrowers and it refers to a situation where the volume of liquidity of
    assets can diminish quickly in the face of unanticipated cash obligations
    and/or a possible difficulty in raising cash through borrowing in a short
    period of time.
   Risk of not attaining desired fiscal revenue goals (tax and non-tax
    revenues). The risk of having an unsustainable debt depends not only on
    factors that directly affect the existing debt, like interest rates or exchange

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    rates, but also on the risk that the revenue collecting system does not
    attain the foreseen goals. If they are not accomplished, debt might not be
    honored.
   Credit risk. The risk of non performance by borrowers on loans or other
    financial assets or by a counterparty on financial contracts. It also refers to
    that case in which bonds issued by a government are not accepted in the
    credit market.
   Settlement risk. Refers to the potential loss that the government, as a
    counter party, could suffer as a result of failure to settle, for whatever
    reason other than default, by the counterparty.
   Risk of natural disasters or adversities produced by social anomies that
    force the reallocation of resources.
   Operational risks. The risks related to the management of debt transactions
    that take place in the debt offices. The operative risks are the following:

    o      Lack of clarity on the functions and responsibilities scope belonging to
        each administrative unit.
    o      Staff with not enough training, for instance, to handle complex debt
        instruments, the related technology or the evaluation of risks.
    o      Risks related to procedures. They arise whenever characteristic
        functions of debt management have not been formally regulated through
        established written procedures, and the workflow has not been
        structured in a predictable way and in accordance with an adequate
        design.
    o      Documentation risks. These risks arise whenever debt transactions
        are not put in proper form through agreements that comply with ideal
        and legally regulated models, or when those contracts are not executed
        in all its terms. This type of risk also takes place whenever operations are
        not timely supported through proper confirmations.
    o      The auditor must verify that the legal areas as well as that of
        supporting personnel count on agreement and confirmation models.
    o      Fraud risks. Those existing in the lack of internal controls and due to
        management opacity.

Prudent practices on debt management

All governments face multiple choices to set debt management objectives,
acceptable risk, ways to deal with contingent liabilities, and criteria to channel



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lent resources. The auditor must prove the existence of prudent practices on
debt management:

   A legal and normative framework that clearly establishes the attributions of
    those who are allowed to contract debt, issue new instruments, invest or
    make transactions on behalf of the government. It should also be verified
    whether public debt management offices have a strong operational
    structure that includes the delegation and clear and specific assignation of
    responsibilities to every participating public entity.
   Comparing risks and costs. A framework must be established, so that debt
    managers can identify and weigh the tradeoffs between costs and risks of
    the debt portfolio. In order to assess the risk, debt managers must regularly
    conduct strain tests to the debt portfolio. These test are generally based on
    models that interrelate the disturbances the government or the whole
    country are exposed to, such as rollover risks or high volatility of domestic
    and foreign financial markets. Costs and risks analysis also include the
    appraisal of interest rates and terms.
   Lastly, it is necessary to corroborate from a micro-administrative dimension
    that debt management is linked to a clear macroeconomic framework, so
    that governments guarantee that both the level and the rate of growth of
    the public debt are sustainable. Auditors must evaluate if authorities are
    paying enough attention to the elaboration of a strategy that includes
    prudent debt management measures articulated with a solid
    macroeconomic framework.


Privatisation Commission (Ministry of Privatization & Investment)

Within the overall Government policy of strengthening the private sector‟s role
in the provision of goods and services and with the approval of Cabinet, the
Privatisation Commission (PC) is entrusted with selling federal government
property, such as its shares in banks, industrial units, public utilities, oil and
gas companies, transport companies, and infrastructure service providers, in
an open and transparent manner. In addition to the sale of shares or assets, it
may also offer concessions or the right to operate publicly owned assets,
without selling the assets themselves.

On September 28, 2000, the Government promulgated the PC Ordinance 2000,
which strengthened the PC‟s legal authority as a corporate body for
implementing the government‟s privatisation policy. The measure increased


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PC‟s accountability and independence and is expected to provide greater
comfort to investors. It also specified that 90 percent of net privatization
proceeds would be allocated to debt retirement and 10 percent to poverty
alleviation programs.

In November 2000, with a view to enhancing the stature of privatization and
facilitating transactions, a Ministry of Privatization was created. The Chairman
of the PC was appointed as Minister for Privatization, while the Secretary of the
PC became the ex-officio Secretary of the Ministry of Privatization.

Budgeted cost for the year 2006-07 activity is Rs 51.262 Million.




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TIME SCHEDULE FOR PERFORMANCE AUDITS

National Program for Improvement in watercourses
                                              Start             Finish
Particulars                          Duration Date              Date
TOTAL                                71 days       11-Feb-08    2-May-08
Planning                              6 days       11-Feb-08    16-Feb-08
Execution                            30 days       18-Feb-08    22-Mar-08
Reporting                             7 days       24-Mar-08    31-Mar-08
Prepare performance audit report      3 days       24-Mar-08    26-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report     3 days       27-Mar-08    29-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                     1 day       31-Mar-08    31-Mar-08
DAC                                  28 days        1-Apr-08    2-May-08
Hold DAC meeting                     21 days        1-Apr-08    24-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                1 day       25-Apr-08    25-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers               2 days       26-Apr-08    28-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                      2 days       29-Apr-08    30-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                 2 days       1-May-08     2-May-08


National Internship Program
                                                  Start         Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date          Date
TOTAL                                    61 days    11-Feb-08    21-Apr-08
Planning                                 6 days     11-Feb-08    16-Feb-08
Execution                                20 days    18-Feb-08    11-Mar-08
Reporting                                7 days     12-Mar-08    19-Mar-08
Prepare perf audit report                3 days     12-Mar-08    14-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report        3 days     15-Mar-08    18-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                       1 day      19-Mar-08    19-Mar-08
DAC                                      28 days    20-Mar-08    21-Apr-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days    20-Mar-08    12-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                  1 day      14-Apr-08    14-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers                  2 days     15-Apr-08    16-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                         2 days     17-Apr-08    18-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                    2 days     19-Apr-08    21-Apr-08




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Visit Pakistan
                                                  Start        Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date         Date
TOTAL                                    61 days   11-Feb-08   21-Apr-08
Planning                                  6 days   11-Feb-08   16-Feb-08
Execution                                20 days   18-Feb-08   11-Mar-08
Reporting                                 7 days   12-Mar-08   19-Mar-08
Prepare performance audit report          3 days   12-Mar-08   14-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report         3 days   15-Mar-08   18-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                         1 day   19-Mar-08   19-Mar-08
DAC                                      28 days   20-Mar-08   21-Apr-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days   20-Mar-08   12-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                    1 day   14-Apr-08   14-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers                   2 days   15-Apr-08   16-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                          2 days   17-Apr-08   18-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                     2 days   19-Apr-08   21-Apr-08


Privatisation
                                                  Start        Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date         Date
TOTAL                                    64 days    4-Feb-08   17-Apr-08
Planning                                  6 days    4-Feb-08    9-Feb-08
Execution                                24 days   11-Feb-08   8-Mar-08
Reporting                                 7 days   10-Mar-08   17-Mar-08
Prepare performance audit report          3 days   10-Mar-08   12-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report         3 days   13-Mar-08   15-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                         1 day   17-Mar-08   17-Mar-08
DAC                                      27 days   18-Mar-08   17-Apr-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days   18-Mar-08   10-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                    1 day   11-Apr-08   11-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers                   2 days   12-Apr-08   14-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                           1 day   15-Apr-08   15-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                     2 days   16-Apr-08   17-Apr-08




                                    66
Chapter 7: Performance Audit




Debt management
                                                  Start        Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date         Date
TOTAL                                    64 days    4-Feb-08   17-Apr-08
Planning                                  6 days    4-Feb-08    9-Feb-08
Execution                                24 days   11-Feb-08   8-Mar-08
Reporting                                 7 days   10-Mar-08   17-Mar-08
Prepare performance audit report          3 days   10-Mar-08   12-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report         3 days   13-Mar-08   15-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                         1 day   17-Mar-08   17-Mar-08
DAC                                      27 days   18-Mar-08   17-Apr-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days   18-Mar-08   10-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                    1 day   11-Apr-08   11-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers                   2 days   12-Apr-08   14-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                           1 day   15-Apr-08   15-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                     2 days   16-Apr-08   17-Apr-08




E-office
                                                  Start        Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date         Date
TOTAL                                    46 days    4-Feb-08   27-Mar-08
Planning                                  2 days    4-Feb-08    5-Feb-08
Execution                                10 days    6-Feb-08   16-Feb-08
Reporting                                 7 days   18-Feb-08   25-Feb-08
Prepare performance audit report          3 days   18-Feb-08   20-Feb-08
Review and finalization of report         3 days   21-Feb-08   23-Feb-08
Send report to PAO                         1 day   25-Feb-08   25-Feb-08
DAC                                      27 days   26-Feb-08   27-Mar-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days   26-Feb-08   20-Mar-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                    1 day   21-Mar-08   21-Mar-08
Complete Working Papers                   2 days   22-Mar-08   24-Mar-08
Scan WP Evidence                           1 day   25-Mar-08   25-Mar-08
Finalize Audit Report                     2 days   26-Mar-08   27-Mar-08




                                    67
DG Audit – Federal Government
Audit Plan 2007 - 08




Machine Readable Passport
                                                  Start        Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date         Date
TOTAL                                    57 days    4-Feb-08    9-Apr-08
Planning                                  4 days    4-Feb-08    7-Feb-08
Execution                                18 days    8-Feb-08   28-Feb-08
Reporting                                 7 days   29-Feb-08   7-Mar-08
Prepare performance audit report          3 days   29-Feb-08   3-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report         3 days   4-Mar-08    6-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                         1 day   7-Mar-08    7-Mar-08
DAC                                      28 days   8-Mar-08     9-Apr-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days   8-Mar-08     1-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                    1 day    2-Apr-08    2-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers                   2 days    3-Apr-08    4-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                          2 days    5-Apr-08    7-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                     2 days    8-Apr-08    9-Apr-08




Basic Education Community Schools
                                                  Start        Finish
Particulars                              Duration Date         Date
TOTAL                                    59 days   11-Feb-08   18-Apr-08
Planning                                  4 days   11-Feb-08   14-Feb-08
Execution                                20 days   15-Feb-08   8-Mar-08
Reporting                                 7 days   10-Mar-08   17-Mar-08
Prepare performance audit report          3 days   10-Mar-08   12-Mar-08
Review and finalization of report         3 days   13-Mar-08   15-Mar-08
Send report to PAO                         1 day   17-Mar-08   17-Mar-08
DAC                                      28 days   18-Mar-08   18-Apr-08
Hold DAC meeting                         21 days   18-Mar-08   10-Apr-08
Sign Minutes of meeting                    1 day   11-Apr-08   11-Apr-08
Complete Working Papers                   2 days   12-Apr-08   14-Apr-08
Scan WP Evidence                          2 days   15-Apr-08   16-Apr-08
Finalize Audit Report                     2 days   17-Apr-08   18-Apr-08




                                    68

				
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