International Political Economy - DOC by tyndale

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									                                  International Political Economy
                                            POL 320-A
                                         Meredith College
                                            Spring 2005
                          Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays – 11:00-11:50 PM
                                             Joyner 105

Instructor:     Dr. Peter M. Volpe
E-mail:         volpepet@meredith.edu
Office:         Joyner 122B
Phone:          760-8555
Office hours:   Tuesdays, Thursdays, & Fridays – 3:00-5:00 PM

There are at least two dynamics at the heart of international political economy. The first is the balance
between the market and the state. As we will see throughout the course, various countries have dealt with
the “proper” relationship between these two forces in a variety of ways. The second is the dynamic
interplay between the pursuit of wealth and the pursuit of power. This pursuit has created a number of
winners and losers in the international political economy with important implications for every country
and person in the world. In addition, the forces of technology and financial integration have bound states
together to an extent and in a way that differs from the interdependence of the past. Over the course of
the semester we will examine the workings of these processes through a variety of topics including the
globalization of finance and trade, competitiveness, challenges of development, foreign aid and trade, and
multinational corporations.


Catalog Description of Course

This course examines the politics of international economic relations between countries and in the world
as a whole. The course orients students with the basic underpinnings of international economic
policymaking and the basic theoretical paradigms of the field of international political economy. Specific
topics of discussion include the politics of international trade, the effect of globalization on the U.S.
economy and political system, the role of multinational corporations and non-governmental organizations
in global politics, relations between the developed and developing worlds, and the rise of regional
economic blocs.


Course Objectives

The objectives of the course include:
1. Understanding the main components of the international economy including international trade and
   investment and international regulatory regimes.
2. Understanding the role of politics (political actors, interests, systems) in shaping both national and
   international economic policy.
3. Acquiring knowledge of the cannon of political-economic theory including Mercantilism, Classical
   Liberalism, Marxism, Keynesianism, Dependency Theory, Neoliberalism and Strategic Trade theory.
4. Conducting research in the field of international political economy through the completion of a
   substantial research paper




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Course Requirements:

Your grade for the course is made up of the following:

2 Take-home Exams                        40%
Research Paper                           40%
Attendance and Participation             20%


Take-home Exams

Over the course of the semester there will be two take-home exams scheduled below under the course
outline. The emphases of these exams is on increasing an understanding of the dynamics of international
political economy and involve applying some of the concepts/theories discussed to real-world examples
(and may involve a bit of outside research).


Research Paper

Students will write a significant research paper (12-15 pages) on an issue of international political
economy. The emphasis here is on research – papers must be well-conceived, well-organized, and well-
written, but they must also demonstrate familiarity with the sources relevant to the student‟s chosen topic.
Accordingly, there must be a full bibliography and footnote citations in all papers. The research paper is
due 13 May by 11:00 AM.


Attendance

In terms of attendance, it is expected that you come to all classes. Your attendance grade will be reduced
5 points for each unexcused absence. For an excused absence, please turn in a note at the next class with
the date and reason for missing class. In terms of participation, you are expected to do the assigned
reading prior to each class. I encourage you to participate actively in class. Since the class is small it
lends itself excellently to student-led group discussions on the various topics covered. Often I will ask a
student to lead off our class discussions by making a brief presentation on the reading; this will be a
portion of your participation grade.


Grading Scale:

The following grading scale is used for determining the final course grade:
A = 90 - 100
B = 80 - 89
C = 70 - 79
D = 60 - 69
F = below 59




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Honor Code

The Meredith College Statement of Honor applies to all work and conduct in this class. Any sort of
ethical violations such as plagiarism, cheating or dishonest representation of your work or performance in
class will result in an immediate “F” for the course and a report of your infraction to the Honors Council.
Plagiarism is any attempt – intentional or unintentional – to pass off another‟s work as your own. Please
consult an established manual of style (MLA, Turabian, etc.) if you have questions about proper citation.
For your information, the Honor Code reads as follows:

        We, the Meredith Community, are committed to developing and affirming in each student a sense
        of personal honor and responsibility. Uncompromising honesty and forthrightness are essential
        elements of this commitment. The Honor System is a method by which individual honors are
        protected and maintained. Any dishonorable action will be regarded as a violation of this
        commitment, and corrective action will be taken. If I am in violation of the Honor Code, to
        prevent jeopardizing the Honor System or weakening our system of self-government, I have an
        obligation to report myself to the proper authorities. If I am aware of a violation of the Honor
        System by another student, I shall call this matter to the attention of that student as a violation of
        responsibility to the community. In choosing Meredith College, I am accepting the Honor System
        as a way of life. As a Meredith student, I am responsible for insuring that the Honor System is at
        all times carried out.


Students with Disabilities
Reasonable accommodations will be made for students with documented disabilities. In order to receive
accommodations, students must go through the Counseling Center/Disability Services Office. Disability
Services is located in 106 Carroll Hall and can be reached at 760-8427 or
disabilityservices@meredith.edu. For additional information see the website at
http://www.meredith.edu/students/counsel/disability.


Inclement Weather Policy

In the event of inclement weather, please check the college announcement for cancellations. You can call
(919) 832-8878 for information. In general, the class will meet if the college is open.


Text

There is one required text for the class, which is listed below. In addition, there are readings from a
variety of sources placed on reserve or available through the library‟s webpage. All of the reading listed
below is required.

Thomas D. Lairson and David Skidmore (2003) International Political Economy.

Note: The readings listed below need to be read by the time class meets. The course outline is subject to
slight modifications according to the needs of the class.

Course Outline:

Introduction
1/12             Introduction


                                                          3
Power and Wealth: An Introduction
1/14         Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 1
1/19         Read Robert Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations, “Chapter One:
             The Nature of Political Economy” (on reserve)
1/21         Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 2

Theories of the International Political Economy
1/24            Read Robert Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations, “Chapter Two:
                Three Ideologies of Political Economy” (on reserve)
1/26            Read Robert Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations, “Chapter Three:
                The Dynamics of the International Political Economy,” only pp. 65-92 (on reserve)
1/28            Read Robert Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations, “Chapter Three:
                The Dynamics of the International Political Economy,” only pp. 92-117 (on reserve)

The Evolution of the World Economy
1/31          Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 3
2/2           Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 4
2/4           Read Robert Gilpin, The Challenge of Global Capitalism: The World Economy in the 21st
              Century, “Chapter Two: The Second Great Age of Capitalism” (on reserve)

Globalization and the World Economy
2/7            Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 5
2/9             Read Jeffrey Sachs, “International Economic: Unlocking the Mysteries of
               Globalization,” Foreign Policy Spring 1998, and Dani Rodrik, Sense and Nonsense in the
               Globalization Debate,” Foreign Policy Summer 1997 (both available on-line through the
               library‟s webpage)
2/11           Read Thomas L. Friedman and Ignacio Ramonet, “Dueling Globalizations,” Foreign
               Policy Fall 1999 (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)

Cooperation in the International Political Economy
2/14          Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 6
2/16          Read Donald J. Puchala, “Building Peace in Pieces: The Promise of European Unity,” in
              The Global Agenda: Issues and Perspectives, edited by Charles W. Kegley, Jr. and
              Eugene R. Wittkopf (on reserve)
2/18          Read Kenneth A. Oye, “Explaining Cooperation Under Anarchy: Hypotheses and
              Strategies,” in Cooperation Under Anarchy, edited by Kenneth A. Oye (on reserve)

Competition and Conflict in the International Political Economy
2/21          Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 7
2/23          Read Paul Krugman, “Competitiveness: A Dangerous Obsession,” in The Global
              Agenda: Issues and Perspectives, edited by Charles W. Kegley, Jr. and Eugene R.
              Wittkopf (on reserve)
2/25          Read Ethan B. Kapstein, “Workers and the World Economy,” Foreign Affairs May/June
              1996 (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)
              First take-home exam distributed in class




                                                   4
Development: An Overview
2/28         Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 8
3/2          Read Nancy Birdsall, “Life is Unfair: Inequality in the World,” Foreign Policy Summer
             1998 (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)
3/4          First take-home exam due in class

Strategies of Development
3/14            Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 9
3/16            Read Gary Gereffi, “The International Economy and Economic Development,” in The
                Handbook of Economic Sociology, edited by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg (on
                reserve)
3/18            Read Arturo Escobar, “The Invention of Development,” Current History November 1999,
                and Edward Goldsmith, “Development as Colonialism,” The Ecologist March/April 1997
                (both available on-line through the library‟s webpage)

Foreign Aid
3/21           Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 10
3/23           Read Arthur A. Goldsmith, “Foreign Aid and Statehood in Africa,” International
               Organization Winter 2001 (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)

Multinational Corporations in the Developing World
3/30           Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 11
4/1            Read John Stopford, “Multinational Corporations,” Foreign Policy Winter 1998/99
               (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)

Debt & Finance
4/4          Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 12
4/6          Read Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents, “Chapter 4: The East Asia
             Crisis: How IMF Policies Brought the World to the Verge of a Global Meltdown” (on
             reserve)
4/8          Read Martin Feldstein, “Refocusing the IMF,” Foreign Affairs March/April 1998
             (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)
             Second take-home exam distributed in class

Hunger, Population, and Sustainable Development
4/11          Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 13
4/13          Read Klaus M. Leisinger and Miguel A. Altieri, “Can Biotechnology End Hunger?”
              Foreign Policy Summer 2000 (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)
4/15          Read Bill Emmott and Vandana Shiva, “Is „Development‟ Good for the Third World?”
              The Ecologist April 2000 (available on-line through the library‟s webpage)
              Second take-home exam due in class

The Future, Act I
4/18          Read Lairson and Skidmore, Chapter 14
4/20          Read Bruce R. Scott, “The Great Divide in the Global Village,” in International Politics:
              Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, edited by Robert J. Art and Robert Jervis
              (on reserve)
4/22          Read Jeffrey Frankel, “Globalization of the International Economy,” in International
              Politics: Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, edited by Robert J. Art and Robert
              Jervis (on reserve)



                                                   5
The Future, Act II
4/25          Read Peter F. Drucker, “The Changed World Economy,” in International Politics:
              Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, edited by Robert J. Art and Robert Jervis
              (on reserve)
4/27          Read Dani Rodrik, “Trading in Illusions,” in International Politics: Enduring Concepts
              and Contemporary Issues, edited by Robert J. Art and Robert Jervis (on reserve)
4/29          Read John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, “Why the Globalization Backlash is
              Stupid,” in International Politics: Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, edited by
              Robert J. Art and Robert Jervis (on reserve)
5/2           Read William Finnegan, “The Economic of Empire,” in International Politics: Enduring
              Concepts and Contemporary Issues, edited by Robert J. Art and Robert Jervis (on
              reserve)*


* Research paper is due 13 May by 11:00 AM.




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