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					Artworks Children’s Art Day 2003
Report on the galleries and museums
grants programme managed by engage
on behalf of the Clore Duffield Foundation




‘A worthwhile and rich learning experience’

‘You have inspired me to be more of an artist’

‘It changed pupils’ expectations of visiting an art gallery’
Contents


Executive Summary                    2

Quotes from the Projects             4

List of Funded Projects              6

Summary of Funded Projects           10

Appendix:
Images from the Projects

Grant Management Documentation




                                 1
Executive Summary

Aim

Artworks Children’s Art Day encourages and inspires children to encounter and
engage with art in galleries, museums, schools and homes. The aim of the grants
programme was to enable galleries and museums to reach out to local schools and
educational groups, to initiate and organise exciting and innovative first-hand
experiences of art and artists.

Outcomes

Fifty-one exciting new projects were organised by galleries and museums for
Children’s Art Day 2003, which targeted children from a variety of backgrounds in
England, Scotland and Wales. Projects included:
 contact with practising artists
 direct contact with art works
 development of links between galleries, museums and schools
 links to classroom work and the curriculum
 experience of visiting museums and galleries


The Children’s Art Day grants programme involved:
 1859 children
 77 teachers and headteachers
 61 artists
 80 gallery and museum staff
 60 others (classroom assistants, carers, parents, partner organisations, etc.)
 31 primary schools
 9 secondary schools
 7 ‘special’ schools
 6 other educational groups
 3 hospital schools
 7 groups of members of the public


Conclusions

Outcomes for children included:
  first–time visits to museums and galleries
  experience of working with art and artists
  development of personal and communication skills, e.g. team working, increased
   confidence and self-esteem, increased motivation
  additions to course work and links to the curriculum
  new skills in arts and crafts techniques
  opportunity to take part in a national event


                                         2
Outcomes for teachers and schools included:
 input from other arts and education professionals
 new ideas, knowledge and skills to take back to the classroom
 improved / new partnerships with local galleries and museums
 development of pupils’ skills and abilities through projects


Outcomes for galleries and museums included:
 opportunity to work with new schools and groups of children
 opportunity to pilot new activities which can be repeated in the future
 development of relationships with schools, artists and group leaders
 reaching families and friends of the children through the projects
 opportunity to link in with a national event




                                          3
Quotes from the Projects

‘A worthwhile and rich learning experience’
Teacher, Abbot Hall Art Gallery project

‘The students expresed a desire to do this kind of work in school’
Teacher, Astley Cheetham Art Gallery project

‘It was great having a real artist to motivate the children’
Teacher, Craft Centre Middlesbrough project

‘It was a really engaging experience, one that would be impossible
to have at school’
Teacher, Burghley Sculpture Gardens project

‘The Gallery provided an excellent platform for stimulation, with
pupils feeling free to try new ideas and methods of working’
Teacher, New Art Gallery Walsall project

‘It changed pupils’ expectations of visiting an art gallery’
Teacher, Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts project

‘I thought it would just be loads of pictures’
Pupil, Crafts Council project

‘I thought I was no good at art until I got involved with this thing. I
have learnt that art has many forms and I am really good at some of
them’
Pupil, Crescent Arts project

‘Abstract art takes just as much skill’
Pupil, Ikon Gallery project

‘Now I want to make my living like Andy Goldsworthy does’
Pupil, Museum of Cannock Chase project

‘You have inspired me to be more of an artist’
Pupil, Pump House Gallery project

‘It’s great to be doing art all day - such a luxury’
GCSE student, Ruthin Craft Centre project
                                    4
‘I thought artists had to be really old or dead to have exhibitions’
Pupil, Ruthin Craft Centre project

‘My normally hard-to-impress boys were buzzing with enthusiasm’
Parent, Fruitmarket Gallery project

‘Given the opportunity, young people have lots of innovative ideas
for museums and galleries, waiting to be utilised’
Project Co-ordinator, Harris Museum project

‘It was fantastic to hear the children responding to the Bernard
Frize exhibition in their own language - using skateboarding and
computer terminology that I was unfamiliar with, made me look at
the paintings in a new way’
Artist, Ikon Gallery project




                                   5
List of Funded Projects
Gallery / Museum                 School / Group Participating      Amount Awarded
20-21 Visual Arts Centre,        St Luke’s Special School          £500.00
Scunthorpe

Abbot Hall Art Gallery /         Sandygate Special Needs           £500.00
Lakeland Arts Trust, Kendal      School

An Tuireann Arts Centre,         Rassay Primary School             £500.00
Portree

Arts in Healthcare, Eastbourne   Children’s Units at Eastbourne    £500.00
                                 District General Hospital and
                                 Conquest Hospital Hastings

Aspex Visual Arts Trust,         Admiral Lord Nelson School        £500.00
Portsmouth

Astley Cheetham Art Gallery,     Stamford High School              £500.00
Stalybridge

Barber Institute of Fine Arts,   Montgomery School                 £500.00
Birmingham

Braintree District Museum,       ‘Cart Club’ members and           £400.00
Braintree                        visitors to the museum

Burghley Sculpture Gardens,      St Gilbert’s Primary School, St   £500.00
Stamford                         George's Primary School,
                                 Malcolm Sergeant School and
                                 Bluecoat Primary School

Chichester District Museum,      Chichester High School for        £350.00
Chichester                       Boys

Clwyd Fine Arts Trust,           Ysgol y Faenol                    £500.00
Bodelwyddan

Collective Gallery, Edinburgh    Open to the public                £500.00

Craft Centre Middlesbrough,      Archibald Primary School          £500.00
Middlesbrough

Crafts Council, London           Laycock School                    £470.00

Crescent Arts, Scarborough       Pindar School                     £500.00
                                        6
Design Museum, London            Open to the public             £500.00

Fabrica, Brighton                Carlton Hill Primary School    £500.00

FACT, Liverpool                  The Greenhouse Project         £450.00

Fashion and Textile Museum,      Beormund Primary School        £475.00
London

Focal Point Gallery, Southend    St George’s Catholic Primary   £500.00
on Sea                           School

Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh   Open to the public             £500.00

Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool    Barnardo’s Project             £270.00

Harris Museum and Art Gallery,   The Learning Tree Childcare    £500.00
Preston                          Centre

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham         Howley Grange Primary          £500.00
                                 School

Jewish Museum, London            Rainbow Montessori School      £400.00
                                 and Cavendish School

Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge         Highfields School              £325.00

King of Hearts, Norwich          Magdalen Gates First School    £500.00

Manchester Art Gallery,          Newbrook School                £500.00
Manchester

Modern Art Oxford, Oxford        Oxfordshire Hospital School,   £410.00
                                 John Radcliffe Hospital

Museum of Cannock Chase,         Pye Green Valley Primary       £500.00
Hednesford                       School, Beecroft Special
                                 School, Hagley Park Sports
                                 College

New Art Gallery Walsall, Walsall Ruskin House Referal Unit      £500.00

North Herts Museums              Westbury Primary School        £400.00
Education Service / Letchworth
Museum and Art Gallery,
Hitchin

                                        7
October Gallery, London         Netley Primary School          £500.00

Oriel Davies Gallery, Newtown   St Mary’s Catholic Primary     £500.00
                                School

Orleans House Gallery,          Hampton Junior School and   £500.00
Twickenham                      Archdeacon Cambridge School

Peacock Visual Arts, Aberdeen   MeAL (Multi Ethnic Aberdeen    £500.00
                                Centre)

Pump House Gallery, London      Furzedown Secondary School     £500.00

Royal Albert Memorial Museum    Ellen Tinkham Special School   £450.00
and Art Gallery, Exeter         and John Stocker Middle
                                School

Ruthin Craft Centre (The        Ysgol Pentrecelyn and Ysgol    £500.00
Gallery), Ruthin                Brynhyfryd

Sainsbury Centre for Visual     Thomas Bullock VE Primary      £500.00
Arts, Norwich                   School

Science Museum, London          Westway Development Trust,     £500.00
                                The Somali Mothers and
                                Children’s Association and
                                BLIN Language and Culture,
                                Supplementary Schools in
                                Kensington and Chelsea

Serpentine Gallery, London      Open to the public             £500.00

South Hill Park Arts Centre,    Kennel Lane Special School     £350.00
Bracknell

Studio Voltaire, London         Clapham Manor Primary          £500.00
                                School

Taigh Chearsabhagh Trust,       Eriksay and Stoneybridge       £300.00
North Uist                      Primary Schools

The Lowry, Salford              St Clements Primary School     £500.00

Tullie House Museum and Art     Trinity School                 £450.00
Gallery, Carlisle


                                       8
Vital Arts, London             Children’s Ward patients     £500.00

Welfare State International,   Bram Longstaff Primary School £500.00
Ulverstone

Whitechapel Art Gallery,       Shapla Primary School        £500.00
London

Wolsey Art Gallery, Ipswich    St Helen’s Primary School    £500.00




                                      9
Summary of Funded Projects


20-21 Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe
Natural Forms
Number of children involved 16 year 6 children with moderate to severe learning
difficulties
School / group participating St Luke’s Special School

Project Co-ordinator Sarah Curtis, Education and Outreach Officer
Artist(s) involved Mandy Baker, mixed media artist; Emma Lloyd, dancer; Keith
Angel, percussionist
Others involved Peter Binnington and Carol Thorne-Alley, teachers; carers

Project Summary
Initial planning was carried out between the Gallery and the teachers. Artists were
selected who had experience of working with special needs children. Sarah Curtis
and one of the artists met the children prior to the project to talk about what would be
happening. The activities were centered around the sculptural exhibition ‘Full Circle’
consisting of work by Martyn Barratt using wood, stone, bent wire and lead based on
the idea of circles.

The pupils spent a day at the Gallery taking part in various short activities to allow for
limited attention spans. The activities included: exploring the art works through
talking and touching; creating ‘tree hangings’ - decorated CDs using feathers, bottle
tops, raffia, etc.; dance movements - focusing on circles, stones & water, and growth;
percussion - working on pieces to go alongside the dance movements. The pupils
responded in different ways to the activities, some more positively than others.
However, they were all able to respond to the contemporary art works and this was
helped by the tactile / hands-on nature of the activites. The day ended with a
performance by the pupils in the sculpture courtyard, for staff and visitors. The
feedback from the School was very positive.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The School was able to participate in organised activites at the Gallery for the
  first time.
 The Gallery has developed its links with St Luke’s School and other Special
  Needs schools.
 The funding allowed the Gallery to experiment with using three artists from
  different disciplines.
 The pupils were clearly stimulated by the experience.




                                           10
Abbot Hall Art Gallery / Lakeland Arts Trust, Kendal
Inside / Outside
Number of children involved 1 class of pupils aged 10-14
School / group participating Sandygate Special Needs School

Project Co-ordinator Frances Snowden
Artist(s) involved Caroline Eustace, artist
Others involved Sara Wilson, teacher; 3 support workers

Project Summary
Planning was carried out with the artist and teacher prior to the visit. The pupils had
some lessons at school around the subject of ‘space’ before their visit to the Gallery.
The project was based on an exhibition at Blackwell by Felicity Aylieff, called ‘Sense
and Perception’ and consisting of large-scale, tactile ceramics.

On arrival at the Gallery, the pupils explored ideas of internal and external spaces by
looking at objects such as vessels, fruit and seed pods. They then explored the
exhibition of ceramics through sight, touch and discussion. This was followed by a
practical activity: the pupils each used clay to cover a tennis ball. The clay was then
cut in half to make two hemi-spheres. These were embedded with stones, shells,
sand, plastic, etc. to reflect the work they had seen in the Gallery. Finally the pupils
put a ‘hidden secret’ object that they had brought in with them in the middle and the
two halves were joined together. Later they made other clay vessels. The pupils
retained their interest throughout all the activities, demonstrating that they were
engaged in the project.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The Trust plans to have more projects at Blackwell in the future as this one was
  so successful.
 Blackwell hopes to work with more Special Needs groups in the future.
 The pupils created art works to go towards their course work.
 The rest of the School had an ‘Arts Week’ to coincide with the project.


Quotes from the Project
„Being able to have a “hands-on” approach to the exhibition made the experience
real for a lot of the children, and their comments on the way home confirmed that
they got a lot from it’ Teacher

„A worthwhile and rich learning experience‟ Teacher




                                          11
An Tuireann Arts Centre, Portree
‘Ossian’ Stones and Images
Number of children involved Whole school - 17 pupils
School / group participating Rassay Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Katherine MacLeod, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved Johnny Gailey, photographer
Others involved Norma Young, Headteacher; Cailean MacLean, Cultural Co-
ordinator for Skye & Lochalsh schools; Angus Peter Campbell, writer

Project Summary
Although the Arts Centre had worked with the School before, pupils had never
actually visited the Centre because of transport and cost issues (the School is on the
Isle of Rassay off the coast of Skye). The project was planned with the Headteacher
to link in with a local history project currently underway in school, and the Cultural
Co-ordinator and local writer contributed to the project in relation to local history. The
artist was also involved in planning the activities.

Pupils spent a day at the Gallery working around the photographic exhibition ‘Ossian
- Fragments of Ancient Poetry’ by Calum Colvin. They explored the exhibition which
was inspired by myths surrounding ‘Ossian’. The pupils were introduced to local
stories of places around Skye and Rassay - this included some drama work exploring
one of the stories. They also looked at found objects and ideas of old and new, as
well considering the use of photography.

On the second day, the artist Johnny Gailey went to the School to work with the
pupils. They made images of items they treasured using digital cameras and then
learned how to make their own pinhole cameras. The pupils used these cameras to
take images around the School grounds to express their identity and where they
lived. The work produced went on to form an exhibition at the Arts Centre.

The Education Officer made a follow-up visit to discuss the project with both pupils
and teachers and to strengthen links with the School.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The grant allowed a remote school to access the Arts Centre.
 The children gained a sense of pride from their exhibition at the Gallery and from
  advertising it in their local community.
 The Arts Centre has strengthened its links with the School.


Quotes from the Project
„The children were thrilled with the exhibition, which for many of them was the first
time they had visited an art gallery' Project Co-ordinator

'I really enjoyed making my own camera' Pupil

                                           12
'I know how other people think about their paintings now' Pupil

'I thought the exhibition was VERY interesting' Pupil

'The children had a fun and informative experience but also gained new skills and
were able to express their ideas through hands-on activity' Teacher




Arts in Healthcare, Eastbourne
Points of View
Number of children involved 27 patients or past patients
School / group participating Children's Units at Eastbourne District General
Hospital and Conquest Hospital Hastings

Project Co-ordinator Penny Jones, Arts Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Liz Major
Others involved Maud Belleguic, Hastings Museum; Chris Dumbrell and Annika
Davidson, play therapists

Project Summary
All the arts activities were based on themes from Ingrid Pollard's photographic
exhibition at Hastings Museum. The themes of the activities were planned by the
Project Co-ordinator with the artist and the Exibitions & Education Officer at the
Museum. They decided on self-portraiture using collage and landscape photography
to explore ideas of identity. Support was also given by the play therapists. The
workshops in the hospitals were led by the artist. The children were encouraged to
collage self-portraits using a variety of painting and printing techniques. The starting
point was an enlarged polaroid photograph of each child. Materials used included
ink, water, wax and photocopying. The final pieces were photographed to be made
into a digital collage for each ward.

At the Museum workshop, attended by five children, the work of photographer Magali
Nougarede was discussed. The children took photographs of each other next to a
chosen work from the exhibition, having first decided how they wanted to be
represented – for example using facial expressions, body language or written signs.
They then did some work based on imaginary landscapes.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The activities provided a diversion from illness or pain for the children.
 The children were able to create their own art works and also to produce
  something more permanent for the ward.
 The project encouraged visits to the Museum by children and parents.


                                           13
Aspex Visual Arts Trust, Portsmouth
Look - Draw - Write
Number of children involved 24 year 9 pupils
School / group participating Admiral Lord Nelson School

Project Co-ordinator Susie Clark, Education / Outreach Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Jeannie Kerswell
Others involved Paul Fox Williams and Gianni Angio, teachers; IT technician

Project Summary
The project was planned between the teachers, artist and Project Co-ordinator. The
English teacher also teaches ICT so the project extended to include ICT, literacy and
art. The planning determined the content of the sessions, the use of software and the
number of children involved.

The project was based on the exhibition ‘Elysium’ by Yao Jui Chung, a photographic
installation including large-scale photographs of Taiwanese landscapes featuring
animals, dinosaurs, statues and imagery from ancient myths.

During their initial visit to the Gallery, the pupils explored the exhibition. In three
separate groups they then photographed parts of the exhibition which interested
them, using digital cameras; brainstormed words and phrases about the exhibition
with the English teacher, and created their own slogans or quotes to use in their
work; analysed the Gallery's interpretative material; and started to prepare a brief for
their first project of designing a poster.

The Gallery visit was followed by three afternoons of workshops over the subsequent
few weeks. During the workshops the pupils worked with the artist and teachers to
create posters for the exhibition using Adobe Photoshop and then created their own
art works in response to the exhibition. Both these activities included layering of
digital images taken in the Gallery, words and phrases, and digital images taken
around the School. The use of colour was also important, as was the inclusion of
something personal that related to themselves.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 This was a first-time visit to the Gallery for 80% of the pupils.
 The pupils learned about and engaged with contemporary art.
 The pupils gained skills in Adobe Photoshop as well as art and literacy.
 Strong links were made between the Gallery and the School


Quote from the Project
'It was fun and I had a fantastic time expressing my ideas' Pupil




                                           14
Astley Cheetham Art Gallery, Stalybridge
Exhibit!
Number of children involved years 9 and 10
School / group participating Stamford High School

Project Co-ordinator Karen Sykes, Education Facilitator
Artist(s) involved Mary Rudkin, textile artist
Others involved Joanna Thomas, Gallery Educator; Karen Moores, art teacher

Project Summary
The Gallery Educator, teacher and artist were all involved in planning the project and
several meetings were held. The aims of the project were: to increase access to and
usership of the Gallery; to produce an interactive display board; to develop new skills
and techniques; and to develop links with the School.

The artist worked with two different groups on two days in the Gallery. The theme of
the project was places and spaces, about which the pupils had done some
preliminary work at school.

One key aim of the project was to create a decorative display board, incorporating a
variety of art works, to be used to advertise Gallery activites and events. After an
introduction to the Gallery, the artist showed pupils the different techniques she uses
in her textile-based work, such as batik, silk painting and appliqué. The pupils used a
variety of these techniques to translate drawings they had completed previously – for
example sketches of local buildings – into colourful designs on fabric. The artist then
incorporated the finished works on fabric into the interactive noticeboard, leaving
spaces for advertising materials and the documentation of projects.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils gained new skills through using new materials and techniques.
 The Gallery gained a new display board where children's work can be shown.
 Strong links have been developed with the School.


Quotes from the Project
'The techniques used complemented the different ones used in school' Teacher

'The students expressed a desire to do this kind of work in school' Teacher

'I will come back and see our project in the future' Pupil

'It was great because I learnt new things' Pupil




                                           15
Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham
Mixed Media Collage Project
Number of children involved 8 year 3 pupils
School / group participating Montgomery School

Project Co-ordinator Brian Scholes, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved Hannah Higham
Others involved Ela Chauhan, teacher; 4 volunteers

Project Summary
The project was planned by the teacher, artist and Project Co-ordinator at the
Gallery. This included discussing the theme of the project, which art works would be
used as stimuli and the type of art work which would be produced. They decided to
work with a small group of eight pupils – partly due to limited space and funds, but
also to allow for a higher-quality experience. The project was planned to link in with
the School's out-of-hours learning scheme and to link into curriculum areas of
literacy, citizenship and identity.

The artist made an initial visit to the School where she showed her own multimedia
collage of her everyday life. She led a discussion with the pupils about their favourite
things and what they might include in their own collages.

The pupils spent a half-day in the Gallery where they looked at the print exhibition
‘Work and Play, scenes from everyday life’ and some portraits from the collection.
For many, this was their first visit to an art gallery. They talked about presentation of
their ideas and drew out designs for their collages.

They spent another full day in the Gallery with the artist where they made their own
multimedia collages based around their everyday lives. They used objects and
images they had brought from home, drawings they had done at school and also
made extra objects to include using papier mâché and other materials. The final
pieces were returned to the School where they were displayed.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project developed a new link between the Gallery and the School; there are
  plans to build on this in the future.
 The pupils were able to experience works of art at first-hand and to work with a
  practising artist.
 The pupils developed their art, craft and literacy skills through creating and
  discussing their work and ideas.




                                           16
Braintree District Museum, Braintree
Quilt Art – Kids’ Day!
Number of children involved 30 aged 8-12
School / group participating ‘Cart Club’ members and visitors to the Museum

Project Co-ordinator Sarah Cook, Museum Exhibitions, Access & Outreach Officer
Artist(s) involved Jacqueline Davies
Others involved Geraldine Spiller, Cart Club leader

Project Summary
The project was planned with the artist and club leader; this included finalising the
activities and materials to be used. In advertising the event, the young people were
encouraged to bring in items and / or fabric that had a personal meaning for them.

The project took place on one day. The young people looked around the exhibition
‘Quilt Art Re-Interpretations’ and then took part in practical activities. Led by the artist
and club leader, they made their own textile art works and a collaborative quilt using
a range of techniques including sewing, hemming, embroidery, collage and painting.
They employed various materials such as hessian, paper, feathers, beads and
fabrics.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project attracted new participants to the activity.
 The involvement of artists increased the quality of the project.
 The Museum plans to offer more arts and crafts activities to visitors in the future.




Burghley Sculpture Gardens, Stamford
Children's Art Day Sculpture Workshops
Number of children involved 154 pupils year 4 to year 6
School / group participating St Gilbert’s Primary School, St George’s Primary
School, Malcolm Sergeant School and Bluecoat Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Holly Wood
Artist(s) involved Martyn Barratt and Stephen Wood
Others involved 4 teachers

Project Summary
The project was mainly planned by the Project Co-ordinator along with the artists.
The aim was to give the children a real in-depth experience of the Sculpture Garden
away from school and any creative restrictions they might normally encounter there.

                                            17
Four local primary schools each brought a class to the Sculpture Garden for a two-
hour workshop. Each workshop was split into two parts. Martyn Barratt gave a
demonstration of wood-carving followed by a discussion about sculpture. Pupils then
had a tour of the Garden and discussed several of the sculptures in depth which they
were encouraged to touch and smell as well as see.

For the second part, the children collected found objects such as leaves, nutshells
and stones to use in a clay workshop. Using their found objects, they worked with
Stephen and Holly Wood to make Henry Moore-inspired macquettes from clay.
Some of these were then sprayed in metallic bronze to show what the sculptures
would look like if they were cast. The children then sketched their sculpture and
thought about where it might be positioned.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The children had an experience of real art works and of collaborating with artists.
  They were able to work with a different approach from the way in which they
  worked at school.
 All the schools plan to make further visits to the Sculpture Garden with other
  classes, and are interested in working with artists in school.

Quotes from the Project
'The children were really proud of their work' Teacher

'It was a really engaging experience, one that would be impossible to have at school'
Teacher




Chichester District Museum, Chichester
Sculpting the Museum
Number of children involved 15 GCSE and GNVQ pupils
School / group participating Chichester High School for Boys

Project Co-ordinator Jane Seddon, Assistant Curator
Artist(s) involved Jennifer Ulrich
Others involved Julie Roper, teacher

Project Summary
The project was planned through discussions between the artist, teacher and Project
Co-ordinator - this included planning the content as well as the type of group to be
involved.

The group of students visited the Museum and saw the exhibition ‘Unpacked’ - an
exhibition of art pieces inspired by objects in the Museum's collection. The artist
                                          18
explained how she had created her own pieces; students then drew from objects in
the Museum that interested them and made notes about their ideas and reactions.

Back at school, led by the artist, the students created their own sculptural art works
inspired by their drawings. They used a variety of materials including paper slotting
and modroc. After a final discussion, the artist told the students about her own work
and her career as an artist.

Their finished work went back to the Museum to be displayed as part of the
exhibition.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 This was an innovative project for the Museum as it does not usually provide art-
  based activities.
 The students had contact with a practising artist and learnt about the possibilities
  of making a living from art.
 The Museum has made new links with several teachers from the School, and this
  may lead to future projects.
 The Museum gained experience of working with a secondary school - previously
  it had mainly worked with primary schools.




Clwyd Fine Arts Trust, Bodelwyddan
Our Exhibition: Our Work
Number of children involved 70 KS2 pupils
School / group participating Ysgol y Faenol

Project Co-ordinator Gwenno Eleri Jones, Arts and Museums Education Officer
Others involved Gill Rostron, teacher

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Project Co-ordinator and the teacher to assess how
to link it in with work in the classroom and to ensure all 70 pupils took part. The
project would link into an area of the Welsh National Curriculum dedicated to learning
about issues of specific relevance to Wales.

The project was based on the Clwyd Fine Art Trust collection - a body of more than
300 works by artists from or based in Wales. The Project Co-ordinator made an initial
visit to the School with over 50 scans of art works from the collection. In groups,
pupils looked at a selection of images and used them to decide on the theme of their
exhibition – as well as exploring why their selected works related to that theme. They
then made a presentation to the other groups explaining how they curated their
exhibition. The pupils voted on the ‘exhibition’ (made up from a selection of the
images) they liked best. This would be the one they would work from.
                                          19
The exhibition of the works selected by the pupils was displayed in the education
room for their visit to Boddelwyddan Castle. They called it ‘Cosy Homes’ and it
concentrated on various images of Welsh dwellings by a range of artists. They
discussed this exhibition and their reactions to it. This was followed by a practical
activity. The pupils had previously discussed ideas for their own collaborative art
works at school and looked at different techniques, styles and colours used by
artists. In their groups, the pupils worked on large-scale collaborative art works
inspired by the works in the exhibition. Materials used included charcoal, paints and
oil pastels.

During the day the pupils also had a tour of Bodelwyddan Castle and saw a range of
portraits from the National Portrait Gallery. At the end of the day the groups gave
presentations to the others about how they had produced their art works and the
decisions they made. The pupils’ work was then put on display in the castle
alongside their ‘Cosy Homes’ exhibition - and finally, on display at the School.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Education work is quite new for the Clwyd Fine Arts Trust and the success of the
  project has made it more of a priority.
 The pupils were very proud of their achievements.
 The School plans to work with the Trust in the future.




Collective Gallery, Edinburgh
Fan-tastic
Number of children involved 11 aged 5-8
School / group participating Open to the public

Project Co-ordinator Rebecca Marr
Artist(s) involved Jessica Voorsanger
Others involved Christine Frew, Gallery Programmes Manager, 2 gallery assistants

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Gallery staff, Project Co-ordinator and artist. During
the planning stages the potential participants changed: as the day fell outside the
school term, the event was advertised in the local Dumbiedykes estate from which
some children had taken part in previous projects. The take-up from this was very
low so the event was advertised more generally and attracted other children.

The project was based on the exhbition ‘It's my birthday too’ by Jessica Voorsanger
which expresses ideas of celebrity. The work includes pieces using signed
photographs of celebrities, slabs of concrete with hand prints and miniature
embroidered dolls of pop stars.
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The children met the artist in the Gallery and toured the exhibition with her, asking
questions and offering opinions. They responded very positively to the work on
show. After lunch they had a discussion about the nature of celebrity, for example for
pop stars and footballers. They then split into two groups and dressed up as either a
pop star or a footballer and assumed different identities. They took digital
photographs of each other, taking turns to be the stars and the audience. The
children then used prints of the photographs and made decorated portraits of their
‘celebrities’ using ornate frames and boxes, paints, glitter and other materials.

The children’s work was exhibited in the Gallery on Children's Art Day and family and
friends were intvited to the opening. During the opening some of the children gave
‘artists’ talks’ and explained what they had done.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The children gained a good understanding of the artist’s work.
 The children had great fun and took pride in the work they produced.




Craft Centre Middlesbrough, Middlesbrough
I.D. Portraits
Number of children involved 14 pupils
School / group participating Archibald Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Janet Brown, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved 1 photographer, 1 artist
Others involved Lindsay Lowson, teacher; 1 other teacher

Project Summary
Initial planning was done by the teacher and the Project Co-ordinator in terms of the
target group and the type of project. Final plans were shaped by the photographer
and artist who would be leading the sessions.

Prior to the event the Project Co-ordinator visited the School and talked about the
project. The pupils were also given a homework sheet; however, the group make-up
changed for the Gallery visit so not all participants had received the initial input.

The pupils spent a day at the Gallery where they worked with the artist and the
photographer. The original art works used were a portrait of a Spanish lady by
Bronzzino and a black-and-white photograph of an old lady from Staines. Two pieces
of jewellery were also used, one by Marjorie Schick and one by Andrew Logan. The
focus of the project was portraiture and upon arrival at the Gallery the pupils were
photographed in their school uniforms. They looked at the art works and jewellery
and discussed the differences in cultures and social status suggested by the
                                         21
portraits. The artist then talked about the different media and techniques used, and
the photographer demonstrated how photographic portraiture had evolved. The
pupils also discussed their homework sheets. The artist then showed the pupils how
to achieve different effects such as a variety of lines, tones, facial expressions and
colour.

After lunch the pupils dressed up in various costumes and then drew portraits of
each other. Wearing the costumes made them more confident and often changed
their body language.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The School and Gallery plan to continue working together.
 The Gallery also plans to work with the local Creative Partnerships officer to
  provide more events for schools and to provide professional development for
  teachers.
 The pupils developed their confidence in producing art work during the project.
 The pupils learnt to understand different pictures.


Quotes from the Project
„I liked being able to allow the kids to make art in a less traditional manner‟ Artist

„It was great having a real artist to motivate the children‟ Teacher

„This is the best day of my life‟ Pupil

„I would have liked more time with the artists because they are wicked‟ Pupil




Crafts Council, London
Future Fabricate!
Number of children involved 20 year 2 pupils with language development learning
disabilities
School / group participating Laycock School

Project Co-ordinator Marnie Hardy, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved Kelvin Birk, ceramic artist
Others involved Charlotte Bavistock, teacher; Liz Emtage, workshop assistant

Project Summary
The project was planned by the artist and the Project Co-ordinator to link into the
exhibition ‘Out There’. Other planning regarding logistics took place with the
Headteacher.



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The pupils were asked to bring in some of their own recycled materials to use in their
own art works: this made them think about the project prior to the visit. The day at the
Gallery began with the pupils exploring the exhibition ‘Out There’ with the artist. They
looked at the individual art works and discussed what they might be and how they
were made through conversation, games and word play. Taking inspiration from the
show, the pupils designed and sculpted their own futuristic plant formations using a
variety of recycled materials and methods of construction. They then collaborated to
create an overall futuristic environment from their individual items.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project enabled the Gallery to re-establish a link with the School.
 For most pupils this was their first visit to a contemporary craft gallery.
 Pupils gained a first-hand experience of working with an artist.
 Pupils developed their skills and vocabulary in discussing contemporary art, as
  well as developing practical skills in constructing sculptural objects and thinking
  about the role of design. They also improved their levels of concentration.
 Teachers gained ideas for future projects.


Quotes from the Project
„The Gallery session was useful in making the children think about the pieces in an
in-depth way‟ Teacher

„Good links to current science topic‟ Teacher

„Aaron worked really hard and persevered in a way he usually finds difficult to do‟
Teacher

„I thought it would just be things in glass boxes‟ Pupil

„I thought it would just be loads of pictures‟ Pupil

„I liked the shiny things‟ Pupil




Crescent Arts, Scarborough
Our Place, Our Space
Number of children involved 29 aged 12-15, classed as ‘at risk of social and
educational exclusion’
School / group participating Pindar School

Project Co-ordinator Sara Adams, Education Officer
Others involved Iona Calvert


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Project Summary
The main aim of the project was to provide young people with an alternative means
of understanding their place in their own community, understanding new skills and
tools of analysis and having a more positive form of self-expression. The group was
selected by the Head of Art and the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator at the
School. The project was planned by Sara Adams and Iona Calvert.
The project ran over six weeks. The initial session was a visit to the Gallery and
‘Resist’, an exhibition of topical protest art; this was accompanied by a talk by one of
the exhibiting artists. Initial ideas for the exhibition came out of this session. In other
sessions the students worked on ideas which came out of responses to their own
environment – their thoughts, feelings, beliefs and opinions about the place in which
they lived and worked. This included photography, working with Photoshop, drawing,
painting and collage. They worked together to create an exhibition of their art work
and also created posters, fliers and invitations. They hung their work and prepared
speeches for the private view. The exhibition portrayed not only the feelings of
frustration which young people generally experience, but also a sense of what they
appreciated, what they thought could be achieved and suggestions as to how they
could make it happen. Seventy-three people attended the private view of the
students’ exhibition, at which the students themselves provided tours and
information.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The Gallery has developed its links with the School and is in discussion about
  future projects. They also worked with a new audience group.
 All the young people enjoyed the project and produced some stunnning art work.
 Three young people who thought they were ‘rubbish at art’ discovered hidden
  talents and have expressed real interest in going on to art college.
 Some young people became more engaged with school as a result of the project.
 All young people increased their self-esteem and also developed new skills in
  media, IT and composition.
 The School has taken on board many of the comments made by the young
  people through their exhibition.
 The School gained positive press coverage.
 The work produced by the young people will be auctioned to raise money for the
  art department.

Quotes from the Project
„I thought I was no good at art until I got involved with this thing. I have learnt that art
has many forms and I am really good at some of them‟ Pupil

„It‟s been great, I'm going to keep lots of sketch books, stop drawing so many
dragons and go to art school‟ Pupil

„Isn't it amazing what they can do when you give them a chance?‟ Parent

„I didn't know he had it in him. I'm impressed!‟ Parent


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„This was a very useful exercise in cross-curricular activities and was obviously very
helpful to many of the young people involved in many different areas‟ Teacher

„We don‟t usually get the chance to work with a mixed age group or to do this scale
of project‟ Teacher




Design Museum, London
Kids’ Open Day
Number of children involved 50 aged 6-12
School / group participating Open to the public

Project Co-ordinator Katherine Williams, Development Manager
Others involved Henry Wilkins and Sue Postlewaithe, group leaders; parents and
carers; museum assistant; 2 illustration students

Project Summary
Planning was done by the Museum’s education staff. This project was new to the
Museum as they normally work with Design and Technology rather than Art and
Design. The event was advertised locally in collaboration with North Southwark
Education Action Zone.

The sessions were designed to enhance the experience of visiting the Museum
where exhibitions included ‘The Peter Saville Show’ on graphic design, the ‘Wild Silk’
contemporary design installation, ‘A Century of Chairs’ and the ceramic designs of
Hella Jongerius. After looking round the exhibitions, the children were offered a
choice of four different workshops in which they could design and make hats, model
chairs or silk scarves to take home. They could also take part in drawing activities led
by the illustrators.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project built on the Museum's existing relationships with local Southwark
  schools and communities.
 The project raised awareness of the Museum and its education programmes.
 Many of the children plan to return to the Museum for further activities.
 The project illustrated the value of collaborating with local organisations such as
  Southwark Education Action Zone.




                                          25
FACT, Liverpool
Common Room
Number of children involved 12 aged 8-12
School / group participating The Greenhouse Project

Project Co-ordinator Wibke Hott, Common Channel Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Jackie Passmore, multimedia artist
Others involved Bernadette McGrath, webcast co-ordinator; Debbie Wright and
Sam Saleh, The Greenhouse Project; SPLICE - young artists and recent graduates
from Liverpool

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Gallery staff in consultation with the Greenhouse
Project, a multicultural play and arts after-school club for young people. The project
was part of FACT’s community-led streaming project which is with and for rather than
about young people.

Over four weeks, the young people worked up to and presented a live webcast on
Children’s Art Day using Kirstin Lucas’s exhibition ‘Celebrations for Breaking
Routine’. The webcast included critical responses to the exhibition as well as a
variety of performing arts pieces and videos prepared by the young people. The main
focus of the workshops was a series of Gallery visits, debates about art theory and
hands-on experiences in digital content development. Activities included the young
people writing their own visions of the future, creating a drama piece in which they
acted as fictitious art critics and writing a rap song about the Greenhouse Project.

In the live webcast, the young people discussed the exhibition as art critics, showed
a video of the song they had written, presented a practical ‘Art Attack’-like session,
talked about Liverpool’s Young Culture Action Group, presented the Greenhouse
Project’s programme and showed other music videos. The event was attended by
friends, families and members of the public; others watched via the live webcast.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project helped FACT’s research and development into its community
  webcasting facility and will help it to work with other diverse community groups.
 FACT and the Greenhouse Project plan to work together more in the future.
 The young poeple gained various skills in using digital media and in webcasting.




                                          26
Fashion and Textile Museum, London
My Favourite Fashion - Puppet Workshop
Number of children involved 8 year 4
School / group participating Beormund Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Timothy Hunter, Education Officer
Others involved Lara Hailey, museum education assistant; Russ Vetham, teacher; 3
classroom assistants; 2 workshop instructors

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Museum education staff and included getting in
contact with this School which specialises in dealing with behaviourally challenged
children. The project was planned around the exhibition ‘My Favourite Dress’
featuring the work of 70 different designers.

The pupils spent a day at the Museum. Initially they had a discussion with the
workshop leaders about the content of the day and about their favourite outfits. They
then explored the ‘My Favourite Dress’ exhibition and made sketches onto
worksheets of details of the designs that they liked best. After this activity, the pupils
used their sketches to design outfits for puppets which were then made up using
various fabrics and accessories. Polaroid photographs were taken of each of the
pupils’ faces which were then transferred onto the puppets’ faces so that they looked
like them.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils had an opportunity to see fashion design which they would not
  normally be able to access.
 The pupils learnt about design, fabrics and techniques and developed their
  literacy skills through discussion.
 The School and the Museum hope to work together on future projects.
 The Museum was able to work with an under-priviledged school from its local
  area.

Quotes from the Project
„The activities you planned for the day were great‟ Teacher




                                           27
Focal Point Gallery, Southend on Sea
Time and Tide
Number of children involved 30 year 6
School / group participating St George's Catholic Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Laura Bowen, Exhibitions and Marketing Assistant
Artist(s) involved Anne Bjerge Hanson
Others involved Jenny Wellsby, teacher; Joanna Smith, Gallery staff

Project Summary
The project was planned with the Gallery staff, the teacher and the artist. It was the
first time the Gallery had worked with the School.

The project took place over three days. On the first day, pupils visited the Gallery and
explored the exhibition ‘Interludes’ with the artist Anne Bjerge Hanson. She explained
the process behind her work and how the pupils could apply her processes to their
own work. On the way back to school the pupils documented their journey through
specific observations in the form of drawings, writing and a collection of found
objects.

Anne Bjerge Hanson and Laura Bowen met the group back at school where they
discussed the journey and the pupils’ travelogues. The materials produced and
gathered were made into a 2D and 3D collage on the wall representing the collective
experience of the journey between the Gallery and the School. A smaller version was
photocopied and made into booklets for the pupils to take away.

The following day the artist returned to the School. Each pupil had been asked to
bring in two objects from home which had some significance: they animated some of
these using a video camera and also drew some of them in still-life settings. The next
day a preview of the work produced was shown alongside the ‘Interludes’ exhibition
at the Gallery and families of the pupils were invited.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils were able to interact with a practising artist and to experience a
  gallery space.
 The Gallery hopes to continue to work with the School in the future.
 The pupils produced work of a high quality as well as understanding new artistic
  concepts.




                                          28
Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh
The Imagination Chamber
Number of children involved 60 aged 5-12
School / group participating Open to the public

Project Co-ordinator Tracy Morgan, Education Manager
Artist(s) involved Jonny Boatfield, artist and author
Others involved Kate Mountey, Edinburgh International Book Festival; Stills Gallery;
Rosemary Lesso and Lindsay Hamilton, volunteers

Project Summary
All those involved in the project took part in the planning process. The event was
advertised through various mailouts as it was run during the school holidays. It was
decided to hold the event in the Stills Gallery (over the road from the Fruitmarket
Gallery) as this was between exhibitions and had more space. The event was over-
subscribed and some people had to be turned away.

The project was run four times over two days and attracted about 15 children to each
session. It was based around Jonny Boatfield's ‘Imaginations Chamber’, an
installation derived from his own studio space with many personal details recreated
in paper or cardboard – for example a blackbird that lives in the porch - and filled with
lots of drawings and collected memorabilia.

In each session Jonny introduced the children to the ‘Imaginations Chamber’ and
then worked with them to create their own Official Artist’s Licences. This involved
filling in the licence with various personal images and a polaroid photograph of
themselves. The children then worked on creating their own picturebook characters
and developed storyboards for their characters. The artist had explained what
storyboards were and how they were used by writers and illustrators. This process
required the children to stretch their imaginations fully. They also had the opportunity
to put their art work up on the Gallery walls.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The children gained experience of working with an artist and an original art work.
 Parents were impressed with the creative experience their children had enjoyed,
  and with the input from the artist.
 The Gallery hopes to run similar events in the future.


Quotes from the Project
„Thank you for an excellent Children's Art Day event. It was really enjoyable and the
artist was incredibly child-friendly and encouraging...he really inspired the
children...they all came away glowing with a sense of their own achievement‟ Parent

„My normally hard-to-impress boys were buzzing with enthusiasm‟ Parent

                                           29
Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool
Telling Pictures
Number of children involved 10 aged 8-13
School / group participating Barnardo's Project

Project Co-ordinator Louise McCall, Education and Outreach Officer
Artist(s) involved Leslie Melville, storyteller
Others involved Joan McIsaac, Access Officer, Barnardo's

Project Summary
Planning was carried out by the Project Co-ordinator and the Access Officer from
Barnardo’s. Barnardo’s had worked with the Gallery on previous occasions, so there
was an understanding of the needs of the children. The participants were part of an
art club at Barnardo’s.

The group made an initial visit to the Gallery on the Thursday evening where they
were introduced to the storyteller Leslie Melville. They talked about how paintings
could be used to tell stories and the kinds of stories they enjoyed hearing. They
were also introduced to what would happen at the next session. On Saturday the
group returned to the Gallery where, with Leslie, they looked at paintings from the
permanent collection and thought of stories they might tell. The storyteller created
stories around some of the art works. Later, the children chose their favourite
painting and wrote their own story about it with illustrations. These were then
displayed alongside the original paintings in the Gallery.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The day enabled the children to engage with the paintings in a new and exciting
  manner.
 The children were able to engage with a professional storyteller for the first time.
 Links have been strengthened between the Gallery and Barnardo’s.
 Given the success of this project, the Gallery plans to run similar such events in
  the future.

Quotes from the Project
„The children...no longer think of them [the paintings] as “boring”, as they did
previously‟ Project Co-ordinator

„The chldren were far more enthusiastic than I first imagined and had a great
experience‟ Project Co-ordinator




                                           30
Harris Museum and Art Gallery, Preston
Kidz Sense
Number of children involved 11 aged 9-11
School / group participating The Learning Tree Childcare Centre

Project Co-ordinator Lisa Watson, Education Officer
Others involved Alan Buchanan and Paul Cross, graphic designers; Kate Bibby and
Amy Curtis, the Learning Tree Childcare Centre

Project Summary
Planning was carried out by the Project Co-ordinator, the graphic designers and Kate
Bibby from the Learning Tree Childcare Centre. The aim of the project was to
produce a leaflet made by children and aimed at other children visiting the Museum
and Art Gallery.

After an initial visit to the Centre to introduce the children to the project, the group
spent a day in the Gallery. They were given a tour of the Museum and Gallery and
then brainstormed ideas for the context, look, style and design of the leaflet on the
theme of ‘Summer at the Harris’. The children worked with the graphic designers on
the leaflet during the same day, choosing the colours and fonts, taking and appearing
in the photographs, and drawing sketches which were included in the leaflet. The
overall theme of the leaflet was ‘the senses’ – hence the title, ‘Kidz Sense’. The final
design was approved by the children before printing. The leaflet was launched on a
‘Sunday Fun Day’ by the Mayor of Preston who also presented the children with
certificates of achievement.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project built on the relationship between the Gallery and the Learning Tree.
 The children were able to be professional designers following a design process
  and making all the key decisions in creating the leaflet.
 The children hope to work with the Gallery again.


Quote from the Project
„Given the opportunity, young people have lots of innovative ideas for museums and
galleries, waiting to be utilised‟ Project Co-ordinator




                                          31
Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
Frize Frame
Number of children involved 29 year 5
School / group participating Howley Grange Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Nikki Matthews, Education Assistant
Artist(s) involved Sally Anne Lomas
Others involved Hywel Evans, Pauline Rogers, Mrs Priest and Ms Willety, teachers

Project Summary
The Project Co-ordinator and the artist planned the project in terms of theoretical and
practical ideas; they also consulted teachers at the School to find out their aims and
objectives for pupils’ development. A preliminary visit to the School was made by the
Project Co-ordinator, who introduced the pupils to the project and showed slides of
the Gallery and work by contemporary abstract artists. This acted as an ice-breaker
and introduced the pupils to a wide range of contemporary artistic practice.

The class spent a whole day at the Ikon Gallery. The workshop was facilitated by the
artist and the Project Co-ordinator. After introductions, the pupils were shown Sally
Anne Lomas’s work and that of other abstract artists before taking part in a
discussion. They then had a tour of the Bernard Frize exhibition where there was
much lively discussion about the work. The students were asked to write down key
words and phrases inspired by the colours, marks and techniques used. The group
then experimented with paint on large sheets of paper working collaboratively and
independently. After lunch the group moved to a space outside the Gallery where
they produced a collaborative painting on a large canvas. This was made using a
variety of techniques including pouring, dripping, rolling and splattering to create an
abstract work of art.

On the following Saturday, six of the pupils, the artist and the Project Co-ordinator
gave a Gallery talk about the Bernard Frize exhibition and the Children’s Art Day
project. Visitors included family, friends and teachers who also had a chance to see
some of the other work produced by the pupils. This was followed by a family drop-in
session outside the Gallery where participants produced similar abstract paintings in
the style of Bernard Frize.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 A new partnership has been developed between the Gallery and the School.
 The collaborative art work will be displayed in the School.
 The pupils were able to work on a large-scale piece using quality art materials
  which they do not experience in school.

Quotes from the Project
„Art is not just about fine lines and brushstrokes, it's about movement and feeling‟
Pupil
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„Abstract art takes just as much skill‟ Pupil

„I liked all of the different paintings they had in the Gallery‟ Pupil

„I liked meeting a real artist and I especially liked doing experiments with paint‟ Pupil

„It opened their eyes to new possibilities of working with paint‟ Teacher

„It was fantastic to hear the children responding to the Bernard Frize exhibition in
their own language - using skateboarding and computer terminology that I was
unfamiliar with made me look at the paintings in a new way‟ Artist

„I witnessed the children developing aesthetic appreciation - distinguishing between
works, refining and improving techniques and following through ideas‟ Artist




Jewish Museum, London
Make a Wish
Number of children involved 27 aged 8-11, 5 aged 14+; 23 year 6 pupils
School / group participating Rainbow Montessori School and Cavendish School

Project Co-ordinator Susannah Alexander, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved Gordon Charatan
Others involved Linda Madden and Wensley Smart, teachers; Ian Lillicrapp,
photographer

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Museum in consultation with the artist. It was agreed
that the project would enable the pupils to use materials they did not usually have
access to in school and also to link into the Literacy, Citizenship and Art & Design
curriculum.

Both schools spent a day at the Museum. Their visits began with a tour of its
ceremonial art gallery, where the Project Co-ordinator introduced the collection and
the concept of portraying wishes through objects. The pupils looked at the ways in
which craftsmen had used Jewish objects, utilizing particular symbols and motifs to
portray their own wishes. The group discussed their own wishes - for themselves,
their friends and the wider world – before taking part in a workshop led by the artist, a
calligrapher. He introduced the project as a way of interpreting religious ideas using
art forms from other cultures. The pupils employed a wide variety of materials
including calligraphy pens, inks, acetate, paper, cardboard and ribbons to create two-
and three-dimensional designs, based on their own wishes, to become part of a class
mobile. The completed mobiles were photographed and then taken back to school.
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Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils had an opportunity to work with a professional calligrapher and to use
  new techniques and materials.
 The Museum developed its relationship with both schools and plans on working
  with them again.
 The Museum was able to use its collection to link in with Art, Citizenship and
  Literacy for the first time, rather than with Religious Education.
 Pupils developed a sense of pride in the work they produced.
 The Museum plans to use similar workshops with other schools and other age
  groups.




Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge
Plants and Prints
Number of children involved 8 aged 14-16
School / group participating Highfields School

Project Co-ordinator Julia Tozer, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved Anna Townley and Jay Ayton
Others involved Mary Darby and Caroline Pledger, teachers; Christine Preston,
Cambridge Botanic Gardens

Project Summary
The project was planned between the Gallery, the School, the artists and the Botanic
Gardens. The School includes pupils with a wide range of physical and learning
difficulties; the project was therefore planned to meet the needs of all the pupils who
would be involved.

The group spent the morning of Children's Art Day in the Botanic Gardens where
they collected leaves and plants and made drawings. In the afternoon they visited the
house at Kettle’s Yard and saw some of the permanent collection on show. They
then used their collected leaf and plant specimens to make photographic prints
based on arrangements of natural forms.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 This was the first time the Gallery had worked with this School; they plan to
  continue to work together.
 The pupils were able to work with artists, art works and new techniques.




                                          34
King of Hearts, Norwich
3D Art Day
Number of children involved 50 year 3
School / group participating Magdalen Gates First School

Project Co-ordinator Sophie Emery, Education Assistant
Artist(s) involved Natasha Carsberg, metal sculptor
Others involved Peta Jackson, teacher; Aude Gotto, Gallery Artistic Director

Project Summary
The project was planned between the Gallery and the School. The School planned a
day of arts activities for all its pupils, so that everyone could celebrate Children's Art
Day. Year 3 pupils studied sculpture in school prior to their visit, so already had
some understanding of it.

The day began with a visit to the Gallery by two year 7 classes. The Artistic Director
gave them a tour of the Gallery and sculpture courtyard, during which they discussed
the sculptures and the different materials used, and what they liked and did not like.
The pupils then returned to school to take part in further activities. Fourteen pupils
took part in a workshop led by sculptor Natasha Carsberg – having first discussed
her work and the materials she uses. They used pre-cut metal shapes and other
materials to create small individual sculptures, some of which were added to a metal
frame to create a ‘tree’ that could be displayed in the Gallery and at school. This was
the first time the pupils had worked with metal and they responded in different ways.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Some students returned to the Gallery with their parents to see their sculptures.
 The Gallery plans to develop links with more schools in the future.
 The pupils have learnt not to be afraid to talk to artists and encounter art in
  different contexts.




Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester
Children’s Art Day
Number of children involved 16 aged 5-11 with hearing impairments (all BSL
users)
School / group participating Newbrook School

Project Co-ordinator Zoe Renilson, Public Programmes Curator
Artist(s) involved Artist educator


                                            35
Others involved Susan Parsons and 8 other teachers (all with BSL skills);
photographer

Project Summary
The project was planned by an artist educator, the School contact and the Project
Co-ordinator. This was the first time the School had worked with the Gallery – and it
was the first time the Gallery had worked with a school for deaf children. It was
agreed that other teachers would provide the sign-language translation required.

On the day of the visit the pupils were taken around the Gallery to look at and
discuss the art works. They focused mainly on paintings and sculptures from the
permanent collection with narrative themes. The pupils looked at the difference
between sculpture and painting, 2D and 3D, old and new works; they also looked at
what was happening in the different images, for example: What were the two people
doing in Ford Maddox Brown’s ‘Manfred on the Jungfrau’? They then went to the
studio to create their own relief masks thinking about expressions, emotions and
colour. This exercise was explained in BSL and also by explanatory cards on the
tables.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Some of the children who had been reticent in school were very keen to fully
  participate in the Gallery session.
 The teachers were very enthusiastic about the day and promised to return to the
  Gallery before the end of term.
 The Gallery plans to develop further sessions for deaf audiences.
 The Gallery plans to target other groups with disabilities who may be interested
  in such a visit.

Quotes from the Project
„The effect on one of the youngest pupils sounded magical‟ Teacher

„Everyone has commented on the huge benefit the children derive from such events
and how important they are for all of them‟ Teacher

„We would all have been happy to stay longer‟ Teacher

„Visits and activities are wonderful for deaf children and definitely accelerate their
learning‟ Teacher




Modern Art Oxford, Oxford
Dispensing Art
Number of children involved 15
School / group participating Oxfordshire Hospital School, John Radcliffe Hospital
                                           36
Project Co-ordinator Sarah Mossop, Community and Education Manager
Artist(s) involved Diana Bell and Katja Hock
Others involved Anne Stevenson, teacher, Hospital School

Project Summary
The project was planned well in advance with the art teacher from the Hospital
School and other teachers, as much had to be passed by the medical staff and
hospital management. It was decided to collaborate with artist Diana Bell, who had
worked previously in the hospital, and with Katja Hock who had worked with the
Gallery before and had been photographing hospitals as part of her work. The target
group was unpredictable as would be the time spent with each child.

Fifteen children and adolescents took part in the project for varying lengths of time.
With support from the teachers, the two artists approached individual patients and
their families to encourage them to take part in creative activities. There were
sessions on three days and the ‘Modern Art Trolley’ was used to take materials
around the wards. The main theme of the sessions was ‘My Space’ and activites
ranged from a six-year-old boy and his brother creating crocodiles to go on his bed to
a 14-year-old in an isolation unit taking polaroid photographs of his environment. The
work produced was displayed in the Gallery entrance space.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 This was the first project between the Gallery and the Hospital School and they
  plan to work together again.
 The participants enjoyed meeting the artists and being able to explore the
  creative possibilities of the situations they were in.
 Participants were able to take part in art activities they would otherwise be
  missing at school.




Museum of Cannock Chase, Hednesford
Connect to the Chase
Number of children involved 15 KS2; 10 aged 11-13; 15 year 9
School / group participating Pye Green Valley Primary School, Beecroft Special
School, Hagley Park Sports College

Project Co-ordinator Lee Smith, Museum Services Officer
Artist(s) involved Gillian Garner and Suzanne Walker, sculptors; Lyndsey
Catchpole, photographer
Others involved Ruth Stephenson, Deborah Luke and Nicky Hambleton, teachers;
Lisa Shephard, Arts Development Officer; Alison Rowbotham, Lisa Fowles-Parkes
and Dinah Mann, Museum guides; countryside officer

                                         37
Project Summary
Planning took place between the Museum, the artists and the schools. Extra planning
was needed to prepare for the special school which the artists visited in advance to
gain an understanding of the needs of the pupils.

Each school spent a day at the Museum. The day started with an introduction to the
work of Andy Goldsworthy to gain an understanding of his work and inspiration for
the day. This was followed by a short talk from the countryside officer about the
Hednesford Hills heathland environment. The pupils then went on a walk with the two
sculptors, the Museum guide and the photographer to collect items to create the art
work. These included natural and found materials such as sticks, leaves, stones and
pine cones. They then created their own sculptural pieces using these, inspired by
the work of Andy Goldsworthy. They were encouraged to think of art as something
other than painting and drawing. The photographer helped the pupils to take
photographs of their work which would be shown in the Museum during the summer.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project enabled the pupils to work directly with artists in a new and exciting
  way.
 The project has strengthened the links with the schools involved. The Museum
  also plans to continue working with the countryside agency.
 The work produced will be included as part of a bigger exhibition in the future.
 Some of the activities from the visit have been replicated back at school.


Quotes from the Project
„Really exciting. We couldn't wait to get onto the next thing. It‟s like opening a new
book after reading the same one for ages‟ Pupil

„We thought art was just painting and drawing and this has been great‟ Pupil

„Now I want to make my living like Andy Goldsworthy does‟ Pupil




New Art Gallery Walsall, Walsall
Fantasy Landscapes
Number of children involved 3 aged 14
School / group participating Ruskin House Referral Unit

Project Co-ordinator Eleanor Thompson, Assistant Education and Events Curator
Artist(s) involved Raksha Patel
Others involved Sandra McKay, teacher; Kate Travers, Education and Events
Curator



                                           38
Project Summary
The project was planned between the Gallery, the artist and the School. The pupils
involved are excluded from school and have social and behavioural problems. The
School requested that only five pupils attend as they would require high levels of
input; on the day only three were able to take part.

The project was based around art works in the exhibition ‘Narrascape’ which are
united by the premise that they explore natural and man-made environments and
raise questions about our preconceptions - things are not always as they seem. The
pupils spent a day and a half in the Gallery, taking part in critical discussion around
the art works and developing ideas from which they produced their own pieces. The
group experimented with a variety of photographic techniques including pinhole,
digital and polaroid photographs. They photographed each other in relation to the
Gallery spaces using different lighting effects, created photomontages and created a
mini installation. A selection of their work was exhibited in the Gallery throughout the
summer.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils were able to visit a gallery for the first time and to access
  contemporary art in innovative and challenging ways.
 The pupils increased in confidence during the workshop sessions.
 The Gallery hopes to develop further links with the unit.
 The Gallery has gained experience in working with special needs groups.


Quotes from the Project
„The Gallery provided an excellent platform for stimulation, with pupils feeling free to
try new ideas and methods of working‟ Teacher

„They were proud to have their work displayed and thought of themselves as artists‟
Teacher




North Herts Museums Education Service / Letchworth Museum
and Art Gallery, Hitchin
Art Attack: 100 Years of a Garden City
Number of children involved 60 years 3, 4 and 5
School / group participating Westbury Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Amanda Young, Education Officer
Others involved Patricia Jenkins, Headteacher; Ros Allwood, Curator; Samantha
Clarkson, Assistant Curator; Anthony James, model-maker, Creaturama; 6
classroom assistants, 1 teacher


                                           39
Project Summary
The project was planned by Museum staff and the Headteacher. The School chosen
was within walking distance of the Museum and in a socially deprived area.

The project was based around two exhibitions at the Museum: ‘Garden City 100’, an
exhibition of 100 images of Letchworth old and new; and ‘Unlocking Letchworth’s
heritage: Garden City Architects’. Each class spent half a day in the Museum: this
involved investigating parts of Letchworth where competition cottages were built, plus
a visit to the First Garden City Heritage Museum. The pupils were able to discuss the
different types of building and make drawings. They also had a chance to look round
the exhibitions in the Museum and to sketch from them.

At school the following day, pupils took part in a workshop to see how Letchworth
would develop in the next hundred years. They worked with model-maker Anthony
James to create cardboard and junk models of futuristic houses they had drawn. On
the Saturday there was a public drop-in session at the Museum where visitors could
paint or draw their impressions of Letchworth.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The School is keen to work with the Museum on future projects.
 The pupils gained new skills and knowledge.


Quotes from the Project
„Lots of my children are keen to try this at home, having been inspired by the
workshop‟ Teacher

„There was a real buzz of enjoyment and concentration over the two days‟ Project
Co-ordinator




October Gallery, London
Spirit of the Amazon
Number of children involved 45 year 6
School / group participating Netley Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Avigail Ochert, Education Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Martha Elsesser, Colombian performance artist; Elvis Luna,
Peruvian artist; Lara Hailey, textile artist
Others involved 2 teachers, 2 primary helpers

Project Summary
The project was developed by the Project Co-ordinator and teachers along with a
Latin American performance artist and a textile artist. It was decided to work with
year 6 pupils as their time was not too restricted by the school curriculum.
                                          40
The project ran over a month and the sessions totalled four and a half days. Initially
the Project Co-ordinator led a session in school where she taught the pupils how to
make hand-made felt. This was followed by a visit to the Gallery where the pupils
studied three paintings by the Peruvian artist Elvis Luna, who would be exhibiting
later. They also worked with the performance artist who talked to the pupils about the
Amazonian rainforest and its hidden, spiritual dimensions. She performed part of a
Shamanic ceremony and the pupils were invited to design their own guardian spirit
which might live in the forest.

At school the pupils worked with the textile artist and Project Co-ordinator to create
their own spirits out of felt and other yarns and materials. They learnt various new
techniques using different materials. Some of the pupils also made large felt panels
which were sewn together to create a rainforest background with creepers, vines and
other plants. The individual spirits were then attached to the panel. This rainforest
mural was displayed in the Gallery’s courtyard during the exhibition by artist Elvis
Luna. The pupils had an opportunity to meet him and he discussed his work with
them and helped them to try out the painting techniques that he used. The pupils
also took part in a drama workshop led by the performance artist based on the mural
and spirits they had created.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The School requested a follow-up INSET session from the Gallery so that all the
  teachers would be able to teach felt-making.
 The pupils learnt new skills and techniques.
 The Gallery plans to continue to build its relationship with the School.


Quotes from the Project
„I learned that art isn't all it seems...that your work comes to life without you even
trying‟ Pupil

„I liked learning all about rainforests and actually making the felt‟ Pupil

„It has been wonderful for us to learn an enjoyable skill and about a fascinating artist
and part of the world‟ Teacher




Oriel Davies Gallery, Newtown
The David Cox Story
Number of children involved 18 Key Stage 2
School / group participating St Mary’s Catholic Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Claire Martin, Education Officer
Artist(s) involved David Cox
                                            41
Others involved Rob Lowe, Exhibitions Officer; Peter Lymer, Headteacher
Project Summary
The project was planned by the Gallery in consultation with artist David Cox. He
added new ideas to the project such as including a light show and featuring work
produced with school children in a previous residency.

The pupils visited the Gallery twice for Children’s Art Day. The first visit was in the
evening where they attended a light show within the exhibition ‘New Stories’ by David
Cox. The pupils were able to look around the exhibition and interact with some of the
art works which could be made to move. The artist was available to talk to them and
to explain the pieces. The following day the pupils worked with the artist to produce
their own art works. David Cox was keen that the art works produced should be
durable and demonstrated how reclaimed materials could be used. They made
‘shakers’ - little figures with bodies filled with dried beans and carnival mask faces
constructed from willow, cardboard and paper. The pupils took their work back to
school to be displayed. The work inspired the pupils both creatively and technically.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Some pupils returned to the Gallery in the summer holidays for more inspiration.
 The teacher gained new skills which will be translated back into the classroom.
 The Gallery plans to offer similar projects to other schools in the area.




Orleans House Gallery, Twickenham
Stand and Deliver!
Number of children involved 90 year 4
School / group participating Hampton Junior School and Archdeacon Cambridge
School

Project Co-ordinator Nathalie Palin, Projects Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Martha Chester
Others involved Andrea Cunningham, Gallery Education Co-ordinator; Rachel
Tranter, Head of Arts; Caroline Corker, advanced skills teacher

Project Summary
The project was planned by all partners including the Gallery, the artist and the
School. The project was based on the exhibition ‘Attention!..To Detail’ showcasing
the work of five artists working in a variety of media.

The pupils worked in three groups. Each group visited the exhibition and then worked
with the artist to produce individual art works in response to the tapestry, paintings
and prints exhibited. The pupils then worked together to produce a collaborative work
on a large scale. The visits were followed by full-day, artist-led workshops in school,
during which the pupils used their drawings produced at the Gallery as the basis for
                                          42
tie-dying and marbling using fabric to make batik hangings which represented
diverse cultures and artistic practices. These workshops resulted in three vibrant
hangings combining all of the pupils’ work. The hangings were installed in the Gallery
for Children’s Art Day.

Complementary workshops were led for Archdeacon Cambridge School by artist
William Jeffries, to produce woven pieces in response to his work; these were
displayed in the courtyard of the Gallery. A launch event was held at the Gallery to
celebrate Children’s Art Day and to show the work that had been produced: this was
attended by pupils, teachers and local councillors. The project also linked in with
Hampton Junior School’s involvement in Creative Spaces - pupils were consulted on
the development of a new education space in the Gallery.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils gained experience of working with a practising artist and producing
  work in a new medium.
 Pupils had an opportunity to work collaboratively to produce a team outcome.
 It increased the schools’ awareness of the Gallery as an educational resource
  and potential partner for future projects.
 The Gallery established closer links with the schools.




Peacock Visual Arts, Aberdeen
Arty Icons
Number of children involved 9 aged 10-14
School / group participating MeAL (Multi Ethnic Aberdeen Centre)

Project Co-ordinator Susan Grant, Education Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Kenny Hunter
Others involved Kemi Adebayo, MeAL; Fiona Macalister, Education Co-ordinator;
Craig Barrowman, assistant tutor artist; Caroline Steed and Adanma Njoku,
volunteers

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Gallery, the artist and MeAL to provide a day of
activities relevant to children from a range of different communities. It was run as part
of a series of artist-led workshops where art work produced by the young people was
exhibited alongside that of the artists themselves. Participants were recruited through
MeAL and through the Gallery’s mailing list.

There was an evening launch of the workshop series, with a Children’s Art Day
emphasis, and the artist Kenny Hunter gave a talk about his work. The launch was
attended by some of the children who would take part in the following day’s
workshop. The participants had been asked in advance of the workshop about
                                           43
particular interests – especially in relation to cultural or religious icons. On the day of
the workshop itself, the children were given an initial tour of the Gallery and were
introduced to Kenny Hunter. They used air-drying clay to create sculptural
masterpieces focusing on their own personal mythological and cultural interests. The
participants also saw slides of the artist’s work which featured figures such as
Bubbles and Monica Lewinsky. They created a collage of images of their chosen
icons called ‘Buddha Shines his love on Mosque Street’.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The Gallery plans to develop further projects with MeAL.
 The children benefited from working with a practising artist and with quality
  materials.
 The Gallery has formed links with new audiences.


Quotes from the Project
„A most enjoyable and positive experience‟ Artist

„I like my sculptures because they both have a meaning‟ Participant




Pump House Gallery, London
Found Paintings
Number of children involved 15 aged 11-12
School / group participating Furzedown Secondary School

Project Co-ordinator Hilary Williams, Gallery Curator / Manager
Artist(s) involved Ben Cook
Others involved Michaela Truscott, teacher; David Falkner, Gallery staff

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Gallery and the School, and it was decided to focus
on the exhibition ‘Found Paintings’ by Ben Cook, which explored the elements of
chance, error and the notion of aesthetics. The artist was invited to lead the
workshop.

When they arrived at the Gallery, pupils were given a tour of the exhibition by the
artist and introduced to his creative practice based on faults found in manufactured
fabrics. The pupils then had a chance to take digital photographs of the Gallery and
the surrounding park to be used to develop their own collage designs for
contemporary textiles / wallhangings. They worked directly onto large pieces of card,
cutting up waste textiles to create collages and also using gluing and stitching. The
pupils were introduced to the scanning of images and investigated contemporary
approaches to design, the digital manufacture of textiles and ideas about current
moves in abstract painting. The pupils were able to learn about recycling, the use of
                                            44
digital media, abstract painting and the notion of aesthetics. The focus of the day was
on the process rather than the final resulting art works.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils gained their first direct experience of working with an artist.
 Pupils were able to talk freely about their ideas and about art in general.


Quotes from the Project
„You really inspired me to do some work on textiles‟ Pupil

„You have inspired me to be more of an artist‟ Pupil




Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery, Exeter
All at Sea
Number of children involved 40 year 6
School / group participating Ellen Tinkham Special School and John Stocker
Middle School

Project Co-ordinator Sasha Dobrota, Community Activities and Exhibitions Officer
Artist(s) involved Andy Boal
Others involved Carol Blatchford and Carolyn Purslow, teachers

Project Summary
Planning took place in consultation with the teachers and the artist. The project was
based around the exhibition ‘All at Sea’ which reflected the maritime history of Devon
and South West England through the work of 70 artists.

Pupils from both schools met at the Museum and were introduced to each other and
to the artist. They had a tour of the exhibition and made sketches from the art work
on show. The following week the artist ran follow-up workshops at the schools. The
pupils drew designs inspired by the sea which were then drawn into clay. These were
cast in plaster and painted to give them an antique effect. The tiles were assembled
to create a beach scene with creatures under the water at the bottom and the sky at
the top. The children were invited back to the Museum for an official unveiling of their
work on Children’s Art Day with invited friends, family and councillors.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils were able to engage with the Museum’s collections, work with an
  artist and create a collaborative art work.
 Links were developed between the Museum and the two schools.
 The pupils created an interactive art work for the Museum that will offer greater
  accessibility to the collection.

                                          45
Quotes from the Project
„I thought it was a great project, the kids loved it‟ Teacher



Ruthin Craft Centre (The Gallery), Ruthin
Waves of Stiches
Number of children involved 20 aged 9-11 and 2 year 9
School / group participating Ysgol Pentrecelyn and Ysgol Brynhyfryd

Project Co-ordinator Emma-Jayne Jones, Education Animateur
Artist(s) involved Donna Jones, textile artist
Others involved Gareth Roberts and Linda Coolidge, teachers; 2 other teachers

Project Summary
Donna Jones was artist-in-residence during the project and planned it together with
the Project Co-ordinator and the teachers. As she is a Welsh speaker it was decided
to invite a Welsh medium school to participate. Two pupils taking GCSE Textiles
from a high school were also offered the chance to be involved by supporting the
artist during the workshops.

The project took place over three days at the School, the beach and the Gallery. On
the first day the artist and the Project Co-ordinator visited the School, where pupils
created sketch books from various papers and then went outside to take part in
drawing activities in preparation for the beach visit. Donna Jones introduced the
pupils to fabrics, cottons and needles which they used to create a variety of marks.
On the following day the pupils, teacher, artist and Project Co-ordinator all went to
the beach at Llandudno where the pupils were split up into groups to go and make
drawings. They drew tide lines, shells, stones, seaweed and sea creatures. In the
afternoon they went to the Craft Centre where Donna showed them her exhibition
and talked about her work. The pupils were also taken round the other exhibition by
artist Richard Slee.

On the last day the artist showed the pupils examples of work which had influenced
her and also how she envisaged their final art work. The group then produced new
work by sewing directly onto pages in their sketch books and onto sheets of canvas,
building up different types of marks. The pieces were all mounted onto large frames.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The Gallery plans to build on links made with the schools.
 The Gallery plans to offer more work experience opportunities to pupils from the
  high school.
 The pupils had the experience of working with a practising artist and learnt new
  skills.



                                            46
Quotes from the Project
„It‟s great to be doing art all day - such a luxury‟ GCSE student

„I thought artists had to be really old or dead to have exhibitions‟ Pupil

„The project has been a positive learning experience for all those involved‟ Project
Co-ordinator




Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich
Facing the World
Number of children involved 30 year 6
School / group participating Thomas Bullock VE Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Veronica Sekules, Head of Education
Artist(s) involved Jessica Perry
Others involved Angela Phelps, teacher; Betty Joiner, Headteacher

Project Summary
There were several planning meetings between the teacher and the Project Co-
ordinator, at the School and at the Gallery. There were also meetings with the artist
in both venues. The planned project was to look at and discuss representations of
faces from around the world in the Sainsbury collection. It was decided to focus on
artefacts from North America as the pupils had been studying American Indians.

The pupils visited the Gallery twice: once for a workshop with the Project Co-
ordinator and to view a play ‘Around the World in 40 Minutes’; the second time to
have a workshop with the artist Jessica Parker. Both visits were followed up by
workshops in school led by Veronica Sekules and Jessica Parker. The teacher also
did a lot of preparatory and follow-up work with the pupils at school, linking to images
of faces, citizenship and art. The pupils were encouraged to look for special features
in the works in the Gallery and these images were used to inspire 3D work with the
artist. They also made sets of cylinders out of clay, designed to sit inside each other
and to express their dreams and aspirations, their outer image and their inner
thoughts. They wrote these thoughts on scrolls and placed them inside the cylinders.
Finally the pupils ran a workshop and created an exhibition of their work to which
family, friends, governors and parents were invited.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Some of the interim results of the project were presented by the teacher Angela
  Phelps at an engage regional seminar.
 The Gallery plans to work with the School again this year.
 The teacher and artist involved will run a project-based INSET session at the
  Gallery.
                                           47
   Many of the pupils’ parents visited the Gallery for the first time.

Quotes from the Project
„The project enabled pupils to experience working with a practising artist, to try a
different approach to the artistic process and new ways of working which engage
with works of art‟ Teacher

„It changed pupils‟ expectations of visiting an art gallery‟ Teacher

„I thought it would be boring but it wasn‟t‟ Pupil




Science Museum, London
Zoetrope Workshop
Number of children involved 10 aged 11-16 from Somali Mothers and Children's
Association; 3 students and 3 adults from BLIN Language and Culture from Eritrea;
20 children and 6 adults for drop-in session
School / group participating Westway Development Trust, the Somali Mothers’ and
Children’s Association and BLIN Language and Culture, Supplementary Schools in
Kensington and Chelsea

Project Co-ordinator Anna Bunney, Head of Programmes and Events
Artist(s) involved Alex Julyan
Others involved Angela Bell, Westway Development Trust; Khadija Khan,
Community Outreach Manager, Science Museum; Alex Patrick, IMAX Education
Officer, Science Museum; Annie Devitt and Dan Brookman, Interactive Galleries
Team Leaders, Science Museum

Project Summary
Planning took place with all those involved in organising the project, to ensure that
the needs and timescales of the community groups were met. This included tailoring
each session for each particular group.

The main part of the project comprised workshops held over two days - one for
specific groups and one for the general public. In addition, the Science Museum held
11 workshop sessions over Children’s Art Day / Weekend which attracted 120
children.

The first workshop was for the Somali Mothers’ and Children's Association and BLIN
Language and Culture from Eritrea. The second was open to the general public and
also attracted a group of Brownies. The workshops began with the artist Alex Julyan
introducing the concept of how still images can appear to be moving. Various optical
toys in the surrounding exhibition were used to illustrate this. The participants were
encouraged to design their own cartoon character to be used as the basis of an
                                            48
animation. These were then made into a series of images which could be used in the
Zoetrope to create a moving image. The workshops encouraged the participants to
see the links between science and art.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The workshops encouraged local community groups to make use of the
  Museum.
 The Museum plans to develop its links with the local Supplementary Schools.
 The Museum plans to include similar workshops in its ongoing education
  programme.




Serpentine Gallery, London
Art in the Open
Number of children involved 300
School / group participating Open to the public

Project Co-ordinator Anna Linch, Education Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved Andy Fisher, Ben Johnson, Farina Graham and Nilu Izadi
Others involved Adam Farrar and Tracey Weller, the Royal Parks

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Serpentine Gallery and the Royal Parks, based on
the artists’ proposals. The main aim of the day was to explore identity and the use of
lens-based media with a link to the Cindy Sherman exhibition through a range of
activities suitable for the whole family.

A total of 300 visitors took part in the various activities on Children’s Art Day. The
activities were as follows:

      ‘Clowning Around’ - using a 19th century photographic process, visitors
       created contact prints of clown images using cut-out shapes and acetate on
       light-sensitive paper
      ‘The Prince and I’ - visitors were encouraged to dress up using costumes and
       props and to become ‘live sculptures’ inspired by the sculptures in the park;
       they were then recorded on polaroid
      ‘The Secret Photo Path’ - participants followed a trail of questions and
       instructions taking them on a journey through the gardens. They assumed the
       role of a particular character, and recorded their story using a disposable
       camera
      ‘Camera Obscura’ - visitors were able to step inside the camera obscura and
       experience the first ever photographic process while viewing the park and its
       surrounding area

                                           49
Artists were on hand to help participants with the activities – all of which were
suitable for a wide range of children.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Both parents and children reacted very positively and enthusiastically to the
  activities.
 The Serpentine plans to do more work with family / cross-generational groups.
 The relationship between the Gallery and the parks has been strengthened.




South Hill Park Arts Centre, Bracknell
Sculpture in the Landscape
Number of children involved 1 class
School / group participating Kennel Lane Special School

Project Co-ordinator Fiona Heathcote, Visual Arts Assistant
Artist(s) involved Andy Glass
Others involved 1 teacher, 2 helpers

Project Summary
The project was planned by the artist and the Project Co-ordinator. The artist had
worked with the School previously and understood the needs of the pupils there. It
was decided to focus the project on the grounds of the Arts Centre using natural
materials to create sculptural forms.

The pupils spent a day at the Arts Centre working with artist Andy Glass. He
introduced them to the project and also to the work of environmental sculptors such
as Andy Goldsworthy and Chris Judd who use materials from the natural
environment. The pupils discussed the work and the materials used. In groups they
took part in different activities including: creating a ‘medicine wheel’ decorated with a
variety of found natural materials such as feathers, leaves and twigs; weaving a large
organic form out of withies; and creating a structure out of bamboo, leaves and twine.
Throughout the day the pupils also had a chance to visit the galleries in the Arts
Centre and see work by various artists. The work produced was initially displayed in
one of the galleries for friends and teachers to view and was then hung outside in the
environment for other visitors.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The Arts Centre plans on working with the School on future projects.
 The pupils gained a sense of pride from the work they produced.




                                           50
Quotes from the Project
„I liked working in a team‟ Pupil

„The work produced was stunning and of an exceptionally high standard‟ Teacher

„It was great and fun‟ Pupil




Studio Voltaire, London
OPEN
Number of children involved 60 aged 9-10 (year 5)
School / group participating Clapham Manor Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Laura Aldridge, Education Co-ordinator
Artist(s) involved All the workshop leaders were artists
Others involved Daniel Wallis, Fay Blyth and Amy Marshall, workshop leaders;
Miranda Sharp, Tamasin Rhymes, Andy Parker, Stephen Cohen, workshop
assistants; Anne Crocker, Mark Hewitt, Amanda Grace, teachers

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Head of Art and the Project Co-ordinator. Artists from
Studio Voltaire (artists’ studios and Gallery) were involved in planning and leading
the workshops.

Two classes from the School were involved in the project and each spent a day at
the Gallery taking part in artist-led workshops. The workshops took place in the main
gallery space where the exhibition ‘Open’ was on display. Initially the pupils looked
around the exhibition and then, in groups, took part in workshops that responded to
the work they had seen. These included:

      A photography workshop looking at the symbolism used in two paintings of
       Saint Jerome; this involved dressing up and playing the parts of Saint Jerome
       and the lion as well as creating props and a backdrop
      A sculpture workshop around plaster casting using both man-made and
       natural objects
      A video workshop in which the pupils made storyboards about objects they
       had found and then filmed each other acting out the stories
      A painting workshop focusing on colour and also on how animals can
       symbolise other things

All the workshops involved a lot of discussion about ideas and reasons behind
producing art works.


                                         51
On the third day, the two classes were mixed and split up into two groups. One
stayed at school and worked with one of the artists to create publicity posters and
invitations for the opening of their exhibition. The other group went back to the
Gallery to curate and hang all the work created to make a show. On the final day, the
pupils returned to the Gallery with their families and friends for a special opening of
their exhibition.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 This was the first big education project run by the Gallery.
 The School and the Gallery plan to work more closely together on future projects
  and possible artists-in-residence opportunities.
 The pupils were given a chance to be creative and also gained a sense of
  achievement by displaying their art work.
 The artists gained valuable experience in leading workshops.




Taigh Chearsabhagh Trust, North Uist
Arts Visit by South Uist and Eriskay Pupils
Number of children involved 15 aged 4-7
School / group participating Eriksay and Stoneybridge Primary Schools

Project Co-ordinator Joan Robertson, Arts Education Officer
Artist(s) involved Elspeth Lamb
Others involved Mrs MacInnes and Mrs Rodgers, teachers

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Project Co-ordinator in discussion with the artist and
teachers from both schools.

The Project Co-ordinator made initial visits to each of the schools to help them to
prepare for the Gallery session by creating collography plates. On another day both
schools visited the Gallery - it was a 90-minute journey for one school and a 60-
minute journey for the other. The pupils worked with the artist Elspeth Lamb to print
their collographs using brightly coloured inks. Their prints each represented a
favourite fairytale. The pupils also had the chance to visit an exhibition in the Gallery
by the artist Elspeth Lamb, called ‘Nagasawa Cantrips’; this consisted of prints and
an installation, and they were able to discuss the work with her. The art work
produced by the pupils was then put on display in the Gallery for Children’s Art Day.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 Pupils from remote parts of the Island were given the opportunity to visit the
  Gallery and work with an artist.


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    Pupils gained new skills in a new form of printmaking that they had not
    experienced at school.




The Lowry, Salford
Faces and Places
Number of children involved 33 year 6
School / group participating St Clements Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Fay Taylor, Informal Education Manager
Artist(s) involved Julie Mosley
Others involved Joyce Bird, teacher; 1 classroom assistant

Project Summary
Planning took place between the Gallery staff, the School and the artist. It was
decided to link a schools’ workshop and a family session with the same theme - the
crowd scenes from Lowry paintings.

The family activity took place over a weekend in the Lowry Gallery, during which
visitors were encouraged to draw full-length self-portraits to add to a pre-prepared
background to create a crowd scene. This included people of all ages. The school
event took place in the Gallery on 3 July: pupils were introduced to the artist and the
plan for the day, and then taken around the Lowry exhibitions - focusing particularly
on the ‘Mill Scene’ which features a crowd scene. They discussed the use of
perspective and how the different figures were depicted. The pupils then took part in
a practical workshop which involved recreating their interpretation of the ‘Mill Scene’
using textiles. They were split into three groups, each of which worked on a different
panel of the picture. The materials used were various fabrics, pipe cleaners, felt and
glue. The finished piece was shown in the Gallery over the summer.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project enabled the Gallery to develop its relationship with the School.
 The pupils enjoyed having a first-hand experience of the art work and a practical
  workshop.
 The pupils gained new skills and techniques through the workshop.


Quotes from the Project
„The children learnt that art work isn‟t just an individual project‟ Classroom assistant

„I liked everything, looking at the pictures and making everything‟ Pupil




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Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery, Carlisle
Delft Mox Reality
Number of children involved 20 KS4 pupils
School / group participating Trinity School

Project Co-ordinator Heather Tipler, Assistant Learning and Access Officer
Artist(s) involved Paul Scott
Others involved Celia Diggle and Nick Dodds, teachers

Project Summary
The project was planned by the Project Co-ordinator along with the teachers and the
artist, who was also exhibiting. It focused on the exhibition by Paul Scott called ‘Delft
Mox Reality’ which contains contemporary utility ceramics screenprinted with
traditional patterns such as the willow pattern, and amalgamated with controversial
images - for example the Sellafield nuclear plant and Foot and Mouth disease.

The pupils visited the exhibition with the artist and discussed the printing techniques
and the subject matter he uses. They made sketches from the artist’s work and from
traditional ceramics in preparation for further work. The Gallery visit was followed by
two half-day sessions in school. The pupils created collages from various printed
materials which were then transferred onto porcelain sheets by a special print
transfer technique. The porcelain sheets were then manipulated by the pupils to
create 3D artworks. Finally the work was fired and put on display in the Museum.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The pupils gained from working with a practising artist and learned new skills.




Vital Arts, London
Inside-Out
Number of children involved 7 aged 8-17
School / group participating Children’s ward patients, The Royal London Hospital

Project Co-ordinator Ginny Carvisiglia, Artist-in-Residence
Artist(s) involved Barbara Sampson
Others involved Moira Sinclair, Vital Arts Director; Brenton Sandford and Sue
Hannington, hospital school teachers; Carol and Dee, classroom assistants




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Project Summary
The project was planned by the Project Co-ordinator, teachers and the artist Barbara
Sampson who was also exhibiting in the hospital. Careful planning was necessary to
allow for the needs of the different children who might take part in the project.

The project took place over four sessions - one on Children’s Art Day and three
before. Participants from the children’s wards had a variety of injuries and illnesses
which affected their mobility and their ability to be involved: not all children were able
to take part in all the sessions. On the first session the artist introduced the children
to the project and talked about the idea of using boxes to make art pieces, with
actual examples. Each child was given a sketch book and a glass-fronted box to
work on and encouraged to collect objects, ideas and images to do with the idea of
bringing the outside inside. After this session, the most mobile children were able to
visit the exhibition of Barbara Sampson’s work. On the second and third sessions,
Barbara and the teachers continued to help the children to create their boxes and
introduced new children to the project. On Children’s Art Day the boxes were
completed and made ready for inclusion in the exhibition alongside the work of the
artist.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project allowed children confined to a ward to work alongside a practising
  artist and to use her art work as stimulus for their own work.
 The teachers felt that the project was very beneficial for the children.
 The arts team are planning future projects with the children’s ward and other
  local schools.
 The hospital teachers are continuing to work on art projects with the children’s
  ward.




Welfare State International, Ulverstone
Childscapes Photographic Workshop
Number of children involved 30 under 5s
School / group participating Bram Longstaff Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Jay Haigh, Programme Manager
Artist(s) involved Jude Richardson
Others involved Jackie Drake, Headteacher; Sharon Harris, teacher; 3 other
teachers

Project Summary
The project idea stemmed from a UNICEF touring exhibition ‘Childscapes’ about the
UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The project was planned by the Gallery,
the School and the artist.

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During the day, the artist led activities in school with groups of children from the class
to illustrate the rights of the child. Initially the artist used a small toy to make
scenarios and showed photographs of the toy with food, rest, shelter, community and
play. The children were able to take photographs of the toy in the various scenarios.
Later Jude worked with another group and discussed what children need, and they
then re-enacted the ‘rights of the child’ and photographed each other. The children
were taught how to use a digital camera and discussed their downloaded
photographs. Twelve of the children took cameras home for the weekend to
continue taking images important to them. All the images were collated and
displayed at the Lanternhouse to complement the Childscapes exhibition. The
children and their parents and teachers were invited to an opening event.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 For many of the children, this was their first experience of using a camera
  creatively.
 The children gained first-hand experience of working with an artist and having
  their work in an exhibition.
 The Gallery plans to continue to work with the School and to run some INSET
  sessions in the creative use of digital cameras.

Quotes from the Project
„The project was an excellent catalyst to make other related things happen in the
School‟ Headteacher




Whitechapel Art Gallery, London
Hidden Paths
Number of children involved 22 pupils; family workshops - 32 children and 17
adults
School / group participating Shapla Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Annabel Johnson, Schools Programmer
Artist(s) involved Sarah Carne and Jaimini Patel
Others involved Miranda Ross, teacher and Dee Bleach, Deputy Head

Project Summary
The project was planned mainly by the two artists in consultation with the Project Co-
ordinator. Teachers were involved in arranging the practicalities. The project was
based on the Janet Cardiff and the Philip-Lorca di Corcia exhibitions at the Gallery.

The main project was with a primary school class and took place over four days. The
artists worked with the class to create an audio and visual installation of a street. In

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the Gallery the pupils looked at art works from both exhibitions, discussed them and
made up stories about them. They also took part in the Janet Cardiff recorded walk
around Whitechapel. Pupils were asked to draw a sound, noise or phrase overheard
on their walk from the School to the Gallery.

The pupils built up their installation over the days and it included photographs of
things like shop fronts, cars, local signage, buildings drawn from memory,
photographs of people on the streets, drawings from pictures of historical buildings
found in books, and self-portrait photographs of the pupils. All these images were
stuck onto cardboard so that they could stand up in and around the street. The audio
elements included recorded stories about the buildings; recordings of sounds from
the local streets; created sound pieces such as whispering or an angry person;
stories about different people.

The finished installation was on view over the weekend of Children’s Art Day, and
families were invited to take part in workshops which involved exploring the
installation and adding drawings of their own homes and related stories connecting to
their family history.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 The project attracted the families of the children involved to the Gallery, many for
  the first time.
 The Gallery developed its relationship with the School.
 The pupils were able to work with artists and with art work by internationally
  renowned contemporary artists.

Quotes from the Project
„The pupils enjoyed the experience‟ Teacher

„It tied in really well with history we have studied in class and the Gallery exhibitions‟
Teacher

„My daughter enjoyed her visit, it was her first time‟ Parent




Wolsey Art Gallery, Ipswich
Carnival Capers
Number of children involved 30 year 6
School / group participating St Helen’s Primary School

Project Co-ordinator Catherine Richardson, Arts Resource Officer
Artist(s) involved Bekka Tozer and Natalie Toplass
Others involved Blue King, Ipswich Community Carnival; Mr Golding, Headteacher;
Miss Thrower, teacher
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Project Summary
Planning meetings took place between all the partners in devising this project. The
project was designed to link in with Ipswich’s Arts Festival ‘IP Art’ and with the
reinvigorated community carnival.

Two initial sessions were held in school for the class of pupils and were led by the
two artists and Blue King. The pupils looked at images of portraits from the Gallery
and discussed changing 2D images into 3D images. They then began to construct
shapes from willow and tissue. The final session was held in the Gallery where the
pupils spent the day making sculptures and costumes for the carnival. This included
a ‘gigantium’ lady based on a tudor portrait from the collection: materials used
included willow, plasterzote, papers and fabrics. The workshop took place in the
Gallery space where the exhibition ‘Our Town’ was on show which focused on
Ipswich places and characters.

The pupils were able to exhibit their art works by taking part in the town carnival with
their costumes and sculptures. An exhibition and video of the sculptures, costumes
and workshops connected with the carnival later went on a tour of Suffolk Libraries.

Benefits and Outcomes of the Project
 A new partnership was developed between the Gallery, the School and the
  carnival.
 The pupils were involved in a unique and memorable project in which they
  gained skills for the future.

Quotes from the Project
„I thought it was a lot of fun to be able to make such wonderful things and then
actually parade them around the town in a carnival‟ Pupil

„You were allowed to use your imagination‟ Pupil




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