Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

South Carolina - DOC 1

VIEWS: 80 PAGES: 14

									                                               DRAFT
                                           Idaho
                         Comprehensive Wild Turkey Management Plan


                                                  Idaho

Demographics

         In 2005, the US Census Bureau estimated the population of Idaho to be 1,429,096 people, a 9.5
percent increase from 2000. Over ten years from 1990 to 2000, Idaho saw a 22.2 percent population
increase. The average population density in this state is 17.1 people per square mile (US Census Bureau
2005). Of the 53,467,836 acres of land in the state, over 69% percent (over 37 million acres) is publicly
owned with USFS, BLM and Idaho Division of Lands (lands having public access) owning almost 35
million acres, while 30 percent (16,158,363 acres) is privately owned (Idaho CWCS). The vast majority of
the state is characterized as rangeland (38 percent) and timberland (33 percent). Only one percent of
Idaho is considered urban.

Land Stewardship

         As of 2005, there were approximately 11.8 million acres in agricultural production in Idaho
(USDA 2006). In 1982 there were approximately 13.9 million acres in agricultural production which
amounts to a 15 percent drop in twenty-four years. The average farm in Idaho was approximately 472
acres in size in 2005, which has not changed since 1997 (USDA 2006). The market value of agricultural
products sold in 2005 totaled over $3.9 million with top outputs in potatoes, hay, wheat, and barley
production.
         Idaho mining industry produced over $446 million in 2004 (US Department of the Interior
2005). The most common non-fuel mineral production in Idaho includes: molybdenum concentrates,
phosphate rock, sand and gravel, silver and Portland cement.
         According to results of the US Forest Service Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) published in 2002,
21.6 million acres of land in Idaho is forested, including 18.3 million acres in pubic ownership and 3.4
million acres privately owned. Timberland ownership has remained relatively stable over the last 50
years.

Climate

        Idaho‘s climate is diverse and influenced by weather patterns off the Pacific Ocean.
Generally, the northern part of the state receives more precipitation than southern Idaho, which
has warmer summer temperatures.
        The highest annual average temperatures for Idaho are found in the lower elevations of
the Clearwater and Little Salmon River Basins and in the stretch of the Snake River Valley from
the vicinity of Bliss downstream to Lewiston, including the open valleys of the Boise, Payette,
and Weiser Rivers.
        In the basin of the Snake River and its tributaries, between Twin Falls and Idaho Falls,
monthly mean temperatures of 32° F or lower persist from December through February, while
downstream from Twin Falls, at the lower elevations, monthly mean temperatures are freezing
or below only in December and January. Low-level areas like Riggins and Lewiston show no
month in the year with mean temperature of 32° F or lower.


                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -1-
        To a large extent, the source of moisture for precipitation in Idaho is the Pacific Ocean.
In summer, there are some exceptions to this when moisture-laden air is brought in from the
south at high levels to produce thunderstorm activity, particularly in the eastern part of Idaho.
Sizeable areas in the Clearwater, Payette, and Boise River Basins receive an average of 40 to 50
inches per year, with a few points or small areas receiving in excess of 60 inches. Large areas
including the northeastern valleys, much of the Upper Snake River Plains, Central Plains, and
the lower elevations of the Southwestern Valleys receive less than 10 inches annually.
        Snowfall distribution is affected both by availability of moisture and by elevation. Annual
snowfall totals in North Idaho have reached nearly 500 inches in the past. The greatest long-
term (1942-56) seasonal average was 182 inches at Mullan Pass, while the greatest snow depth
(also 182 inches) was recorded at that station on February 20, 1954. The major mountain ranges
of the state accumulate a deep snow cover during the winter months, and the release of water
from the melting snowpack in late spring furnishes irrigation water for more than two million
acres, mainly within the Snake River Basin above Weiser.
        The annual average percentage of possible sunshine ranges from about 50 in the north to
about 70 in the south. Winter, with its frequent periods of cloudy weather, has about 40 percent
of possible sunshine in the large open valleys of the south and less than 30 percent in the north.
In July and August the average percentage rises to the upper 80s in the southwest and to near
80 in the east and north.


                                         Wild Turkey Species

Merriam’s Wild Turkey

Rio Grande Wild Turkey


                         Historical Restoration and Conservation Efforts

Trap & Transfer

        The initial wild turkey restoration efforts began in 1961. From 1961 through 2006, a total of 5,521
Merriam‘s, Eastern and Rio Grande wild turkeys were trapped from ten states (including Idaho) and
released. Over 4,000 Merriam‘s wild turkey was released, four times greater than the other subspecies.
Since 2003 the majority of the suitable habitat was considered occupied. (IDFG 2006)

Fundraising

        Wild Turkey Super Fund, administered jointly by the National Wild Turkey Federation and the
Idaho NWTF State Chapter, is used for projects that support the conservation of the wild turkey and
preservation of the hunting tradition. Nationally, NWTF chapters and cooperating partners have raised
and spent more than $224 million for wild turkey conservation. Since 1985 over $263,622 has been raised
and spent by Idaho chapters on projects within the state
(http://www.nwtf.org/in_your_state/superfund.php).

                                      Wild Turkey Management

Population & Harvest

        The 2006 wild turkey population estimate for Idaho is 3,000 Rio Grande and 30,000 Merriam‘s
Wild Turkey for a total of 33,000. The 2006 spring harvest was estimated at 3,814 gobblers with 26% of
turkey hunters successfully harvesting a turkey. Harvest figures are based upon a questionnaires mailed
to turkey hunters, followed up by a telephone call to non-respondents.




                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -2-
        Idaho had 252,024 general licensed hunters in 2005. There are 14,800 turkey hunters based on
spring turkey tag sales. There are approximately 26,840 youth hunters age 17 years or younger based
upon Junior and Youth License sales.

Regulations

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/hunt/rules/

Hunting Opportunities

         Approximately 69 percent of Idaho is in public ownership. Good populations of turkeys occur on
public land open to hunters, most private timber company lands are open to hunting and many private
landowners allow hunting by permission. The northern and northwestern portions of the state (where the
majority of turkeys live) have open spring and fall hunting. The remainder of the state has either limited
or no hunting. General season hunters may take two birds with the extra tag available in the general hunt
areas.

Trap & Transfer

         Trap and transfer efforts were all but completed in Idaho in 2003. Supplemental intrastate trap
and transfers will be of limited application, but trapping on sensitive nuisance sites will continue. Idaho
is open to supplementing other states with their wild turkeys.

National Wild Turkey Federation Strategies

   The NWTF will work with IDFG to review regulations that will support Families Afield
    legislation and objectives.


                                                  Habitat

         Idaho falls within the Intermountain West Joint Venture (IWJV) (http://iwjv.org/) and has three
delineated Bird Conservation Regions (BCR). These BCR‘s include: Great Basin, Northern Rockies and
Southern Rockies/Colorado Plateau. The Great Basin BCR covers most of southern Idaho, the Northern
Rockies BCR covers north central Idaho and the Idaho Panhandle, and a small sliver of the Southern
Rockies/Colorado Plateau BCR juts into southeastern Idaho. For practical purposes, given the small part
of Idaho within the Southern Rockies/Colorado Plateau, the IWJV considers the state to be essentially
within only the two larger BCRs for migratory bird planning and management.
         Idaho‘s Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (CWCS) identifies five ecoregions and
subdivides these ecoregions into 14 ecological sections. The ecoregions are: the Canadian Rocky
Mountains in the northern part of the State, the Middle Rockies–Blue Mountains across the central
part of the State, the Columbia Plateau that follows the Snake River across the State, the Utah–
Wyoming Rocky Mountains along the southeastern boundary of the State, and the smaller Wyoming
Basins in the southeastern corner of the State. The 14 ecological sections include: the Okanogan
Highlands, Flathead Valley, Bitterroot Mountains, Blue Mountains, Idaho Batholith, Challis Volcanics,
Beaverhead
Mountains, Palouse Prairie, Owyhee Uplands, Snake River Basalts, Northwestern Basin and Range,
Yellowstone Highlands, Overthrust Mountains, and Bear Lake.

Canadian Rocky Mountains Ecoregion (CWCS 2005)

The Canadian Rocky Mountains Ecoregion extends over a large portion of the Rocky Mountains from
southeastern British Columbia and southwestern Alberta to northern Idaho and northwestern Montana.
The Idaho portion of this ecoregion is comprised of 3 ecological sections: the Okanogan Highlands,
Flathead Valley, and Bitterroot Mountains. Elevation in the entire ecoregion ranges from 915 m to 3,954
m (3,000 ft to 12,972 ft). Geologically, this ecoregion is complex, containing bedrock of sedimentary,
igneous, and metamorphic origin largely characterized by steep glaciated overthrust mountains with
sharp alpine ridges and cirques at higher elevations. Historic and current glaciation has sculpted the


                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -3-
mountainous landscape filling many of the intermountain valleys with glaciofluvial deposits and
moraines. Coniferous forests dominate vegetation in this ecoregion with structure largely dictated by
elevation. This ecoregion is best recognized for its full complement of large mammals—one of the few
places left in North America that can make this claim (Rumsey et al. 2003a).

Middle Rockies–Blue Mountains Ecoregion (CWCS 2005)

The Middle Rockies–Blue Mountains Ecoregion is characterized by a large mass of mountains and
intermontane valleys covering major portions of Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, and a small part of
Washington. Although the Middle Rockies–Blue Mountains ecoregion is consistent in terms of broad
climate, physical and biological patterns, it is remarkably diverse when viewed at finer scales. In Idaho,
four ecological sections are represented in this ecoregion: the Blue Mountains, Idaho Batholith, Challis
Volcanics, and Beaverhead Mountains. The relatively arid lowlands of the Columbia Plateau and Northern
Great Plains ecoregions lie to the west, south, and east, while the Canadian Rocky Mountains and Utah–
Wyoming Rocky Mountains ecoregions lie north and south along the cordillera. The ecoregion covers
81,587 square miles (52,215,958 acres) and, by comparison, is only slightly smaller than the state of
Idaho. While the ecoregion is topographically diverse, it can generally be characterized as rugged.
Abrupt elevational changes of 3,000 to 4,000 feet from valley floors to mountain summits are not
uncommon. At the extreme is Hells Canyon of the Snake River, along the Oregon–Idaho border, where, in
the deepest part, the elevation drops 8,000 feet in just four miles. The lowest elevation in the ecoregion is
790 feet, where the Snake River flows out of Hells Canyon south of Lewiston, Idaho, while the highest
occurs on Borah Peak at 12,662 feet, in the Lost River Range of central Idaho (TNC 2000).

Columbia Plateau Ecoregion (CWCS 2005)

The Columbia Plateau Ecoregion is characterized by a broad expanse of sagebrush covered volcanic plains
and valleys, punctuated by isolated mountain ranges and the dramatic river systems of the Snake,
Owyhee, Boise and Columbia. Covering 301,329 km², the Columbia Plateau stretches across the
sagebrush steppe of southern Idaho, connecting the Columbia Basin of eastern Washington and Oregon to
the northern Great Basin of Nevada, Utah and California. State representation in the ecoregion is varied
with Oregon having the largest percentage of the area at 32%, followed closely by Idaho. Nevada and
Washington have similar representations (17–18%) but California, Utah and Wyoming have only minor
area within the ecoregion. Four ecological sections are represented in the Idaho portion of this ecoregion:
the Palouse Prairie, Owyhee Uplands, Snake River Basalts, and Northwestern Basin and Range
(Andelman et al. 1999).

Utah–Wyoming Rocky Mountains Ecoregion (CWCS 2005)

The Utah–Wyoming Rocky Mountains Ecoregion includes the mountains just north of Yellowstone
National Park in south–central Montana, the Bighorn Mountains in northeast Wyoming, the Uinta
mountains of northeast Utah and Northwest Colorado, Utah‘s Wasatch Range, and the mountains and
valleys of the southeastern corner of Idaho, generally east of Interstate 15. Two ecological sections
comprise the Idaho portion of this ecoregion: the Yellowstone Highlands and Overthrust Mountains.
Embedded in this vast area is the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), with Yellowstone National Park
as its focal point. The GYE is considered one of the last intact temperate ecosystems on Earth, and the
farthest south in North America. Yellowstone is an extraordinary place containing the greatest
concentration of geysers, hot springs, and other thermal features in the world. Not surprisingly it is a
World Heritage Site (Noss et al. 2001).

Wyoming Basins Ecoregion (CWCS 2005)

The Wyoming Basins Ecoregion comprises 51,605 square miles (33 million acres or 13.3 million hectares)
of basin, plain, desert, and ―island‖ mountains in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, and Utah.
Considered by Bailey (1995) as part of the Intermountain Semidesert Province, TNC scientists decided to
detach the Wyoming Basins, in part because of the vegetational differences between Wyoming and points
west. Although the entire area is dominated by sagebrush species, many of which are common, the
Wyoming Basins contains blue grama grass (basically a great plains species) which the Great Basin



                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -4-
deserts lack. Rhizomatous grasses like Western wheatgrass are more common in Wyoming than in the
Great Basin desert. The separation from the Intermountain Province was also made to simplify TNC‘s
ecoregional planning process. The ecoregion is also characterized by unusual rock formations, sand
dunes, and saltbush communities. Mountains rising from the basins are timbered with limber pine,
Douglas fir, and stands of aspen. Only one ecological section occurs in the Idaho portion of this
ecoregion—Bear Lake, which is home to 4 endemic fish species including Bear Lake whitefish, Bonneville
cisco, Bonneville whitefish, and Bear Lake sculpin (Freilich et al. 2001).

National Wild Turkey Federation 5 Year Plan - Goals and Strategies
 Goal - Expand and support private land CRP projects with NRCS and IDFG that improve forage
   conditions and hunter access in the four major Ecoregions.
       Strategy - Leverage ID Super Fund dollars to provide a match on NRCS and IDFG funding.
       Strategy - Seek cooperative funding through the NRCS to develop private land contracts
       supporting habitat management on CRP lands.
 Goal – Initiate urban/USFS interface habitat projects concentrating on Ponderosa Pine woodlands in
   the Canadian Rocky Mountains, and Middle Rockies-Blue Mountains Ecoregions
      Strategy - Identify counties with urban/USFS fire prevention grant funding and concentrate
       efforts in those areas.
      Strategy - Involve Idaho NWTF chapters and super funds in projects.

Current and Potential Projects

There are no current or potential projects identified. Focus areas will allow us to concentrate efforts into
biological important areas across Idaho. Habitat Focus Areas (HFA) will concentrate on Ponderosa Pine
habitats in key ecoregions.

Access History and Present Status
Over 69% of Idaho is in public ownership and the majority of these lands are open to public hunting. The
Idaho State Chapter therefore, has not been active in allocating Super Fund dollars towards land
purchases. As opportunities arise, the Idaho State Chapter would be active in easements that open access
to public lands that are difficult to or have no access. To date, the chapter has spent $365 on land
acquisitions or easements. (NWTF database – Tapley).
         Idaho Fish and Game Department has two access programs. Access Yes! and Accessible Idaho.
Access Yes! compensates willing landowners that provide access to hunters and fishers. Currently the
program has 102 properties with 620,215 acres costing $470,000 annually. The program initially received
start up funding and has $150,000 going into the program annually. Locating more permanent funding
for this program is a high priority for IDFG. The Accessible Idaho program partners with private
landowners, Idaho counties and federal and state agencies to provide information on accessible areas and
to incorporate accessible designs into facilities for hunting, fishing and wildlife viewing.
Hunter numbers have decreased by 7% nationally from 1991 to 2001 (USFWS). Idaho hunters increased
2% during the same time period. In Idaho the hunter replacement ratio has been determined to be only
0.41; not enough to adequately replace hunter numbers (Families Afield). The Families Afield report has
also identified Idaho as a ‗Very Restrictive‘ state in terms of youth recruitment because of their laws and
regulations on the minimum age requirement for hunters. Nationally lack of access has been identified as
the top-rated cause of hunter dissatisfaction. Idaho with over 69% public land however, is not likely to
follow this statistic.

Access 5-year Goals and Strategies

Issue: Public land
 GOAL -Promote access and hunting in state, federal and local land management plans.
 STRATEGIES:
       - Develop process for making access and habitat related comments on management plans.
       - Identify public lands that are inaccessible to public access and develop an access plan.
 CURRENT AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS:
       Comments are made on all USFS management plans at appropriate times.


                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -5-
Issue: Private lands
 GOAL – Work with corporate partners and industrial landowners to provide hunting opportunity.
STRATEGIES:
        - Work with industrial forestlands and Timber Investment Management Organizations (TIMOs)
on solutions to keep their property open to public hunting or to open their land for hunting.
        - Collaborate and coordinate plans with other organizations.
        - Through the Energy for Wildlife program work with landowners to provide additional access.
        - Develop framework and support grass-roots effort to influence legislation related to access and
hunting especially at the state and local level.
        - Support conservation easement legislation at state and national level.
        - Support legislation that limits landowner liability related to hunting/public hunting access.
        - Utilize ―special opportunity‖ hunts for youth, disabled, women, etc., to gain access to closed
properties.
        - Develop a marketing campaign that illustrates the benefits hunters provide to landowners and
gives good PR to the landowner.
        - Find cooperative habitat projects using outside sources of funding to match Super Fund and
other monies dedicated to these efforts.
CURRENT AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS:
        Discussions with Idaho Power on the Energy for Wildlife program are currently in progress.

 GOAL -Promote hunter access to private agricultural lands.
STRATEGIES:
         - Work with NRCS and IDFG to identify landowners that potentially will allow hunting.
         - Develop cooperative habitat projects with landowners using Conservation Program and Super
Fund funding.
         - Educate landowners on hunting related issues.
         - Support legislation and programs that preserve hunting and/or reduce potential threat of
urbanization of private lands.
         - Develop framework and support grass-roots effort to influence legislation related to access and
hunting especially at the state and local level.
         - Support conservation easement legislation at state and national level.
         - Support legislation that limits landowner liability related to hunting/public hunting access.
         - Utilize ―special opportunity‖ hunts for youth, disabled, women, etc., to gain access to closed
properties.
         - Utilize targeted educational efforts to reduce landowner concerns regarding hunting and access
issues.
         - Educate landowners and promote existing liability protection laws.
         - Develop a marketing campaign that illustrates the benefits hunters provide to landowners.
         - Find outside sources of funding to match Super Fund and other monies dedicated to these
efforts.
CURRENT AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS:
         The State Chapter is assisting private landowners with CRP habitat projects as identified by the
NRCS and IDFG. These landowners are allowing public hunting access.

Issue: Politics and Legislation
 GOAL - Influence legislation and funding for programs at all levels of government will be critical to
providing access and hunting opportunity over the long-term.
STRATEGIES:
        - Utilize Families Afield initiative to promote legislation that will improve hunting access and
opportunity.
        - Identify laws that limit access in Idaho and develop strategy specific to those issues to effect
change.
        - Support IDFG in efforts to promote legislation and funding designations that will impact
hunting and access in Idaho.
        - Support involvement with state sportsmen‘s caucuses.
        - Continue to encourage the State Chapter‘s support in the National Association of Sportsmen‘s
Caucus and Idaho Sportsmen‘s Caucus Advisory Council.


                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -6-
         - Encourage legislators to join the caucus.
         - Develop framework and support grass-roots effort to influence legislation related to access and
hunting, especially at the state and local level.
         - Encourage volunteers to become involved in political issues
         - Provide volunteers with information needed to effectively engage in the legislative issues and
carry a common message.
CURRENT AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS:
         - The Idaho State Chapter supports both the Idaho and National Sportsmen‘s Caucuses. NWTF
volunteers are president and treasurer of the Idaho Sportsmen‘s Caucus Advisory Council.

Issue: Collaboration
 GOAL – Collaboration among the many groups interested in access is important to ensure a unified
voice, reduce duplication of effort, and secure significant funding.
STRATEGIES:
         - Organize appropriate groups and agencies into an Access Partnership to share information,
identify key issues, and coordinate activities associated with access.
          - Actively engage in partnerships to increase political influence, take advantage of organizational
strengths, expand educational and outreach efforts to other user groups, and secure significant funding
for programs.
         - Work with appropriate NGO‘s to distribute common messages regarding hunting and access to
their memberships.
CURRENT AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS:
         There are no current or potential projects identified.

Research (IDFG 2006)
         Turkey Populations Reductions in SW Idaho: There has been a perceived or real population
reduction in southwest Idaho. Turkey hunters and biologists have expressed their concern. Speculations
have included poor winter survival, excess fall harvest, poor poult survival, change in wintering location,
lack of supplemental winter-feeding, and change in management. Research is intended to determine
limiting factors and what management changes (if any) are likely to effect populations.

         Effects of the Forest Health Initiative (FHI) on Wild Turkeys: Idaho has seen a significant effort
to reduce catastrophic fire potential through implementing the FHI. Evaluating what effect does FHI
habitat changes have on wildlife, and what specific actions improve or limit the health of wildlife will
provide direction for future FHI projects.

   The NWTF will work with the IDDNR, USDA Forest Service, and land grant universities (Boise State
    University, University of Idaho, etc…) to identify additional funding sources to compliment NWTF
    research support.

   The NWTF will work with the ID State Chapter to allocate a percentage of Super Fund dollars to
    support state research priorities if applicable.

   The NWTF work with IDFG and other agencies to identify similar research priorities to pool
    resources.


                                          Contact Information

State and Federal Agencies
       Idaho Department of Fish and Game
       600 S. Walnut
       Boise, ID 83712

        Idaho Department of Lands
        954 West Jefferson
        Boise ID 83720-0050



                   IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                         -7-
      USDA-Forest Service
      Intermountain Region (South Idaho)
      324 25th Street
      Ogden, Utah 84401

      USDA-Forest Service
      Northern Region (North Idaho)
      Federal Building
      200 East Broadway
      P.O. Box 7669
      Missoula, MT 59807
      USDA-NRCS Idaho State Office
      9173 West Barnes Drive, Suite C
      Boise, ID 83709-1574


National Wild Turkey Federation

      Mike Blanton
      Wheelin' Sportsmen Regional Coordinator
      9454 Long Branch Ave, South
      Inverness, FL 34452
      Phone: (352) 637-3747
      E-Mail: cynbad@xtalwind.net

      Barnabas Koka
      Regional Director
      #5 Sunburst
      Horseshoe Bend, ID 83625
      Phone: (208) 793-3070
      Fax: (208) 793-3071
      E-Mail: kokanwtf@gwtc.net

      Theresa Luna
      Women's Regional Coordinator
      4320 Thornton Road
      Orofino, ID 83544
      Phone: (208) 435-4464
      Fax: (208) 435-4063
      E-Mail: nwtfluna@orofino-id.com

      John Thiebes
      Regional Wildlife Biologist
      1084 Castlewood Dr.
      Medford, OR 97504
      Phone: (541) 772-9908
      Fax: (541) 245-0170
      E-Mail: johntnwtf@charter.net




                IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                      -8-
                        Appendix – Habitat Focus Area
1. DESCRIPTION & NARRATIVE: Idaho Batholith – Ponderosa Pine Management

The Idaho Batholith is one of four ecological sections of the Middle Rockies-Blue Mountains
Ecoregion. The Idaho Batholith section is characterized by extensive mountainous terrain;
alpine ridges, cirques, and large U-shaped valleys with broad bottoms, and other features of
glacial origins dominate many areas, such as the Sawtooth Mountains. Water bodies are
predominant, including major portions of the Salmon, Clearwater, Payette, and Boise rivers.
Many perennial streams and lakes are present, as well as a number of reservoirs. Elevation
ranges from 425 to 3400 m (1400 to 11,000 ft). Soils are generally shallow to moderately deep
loam and sand. Volcanic ash accumulations in some soils have caused them to be especially
productive. Annual precipitation ranges from 51-203 cm (20-80 in), much of which falls as snow
during the fall, winter, and spring. Climate is maritime-influenced with cool temperate
weather and dry summers. Average annual temperature ranges from 2-7°C (35-46°F)
but may be as low as -4°C (24°F) in the high mountains. The growing season lasts 45-
100 days.
The northern portion of the section is primarily wilderness, with few small communities.
Communities in southern areas are typically small and concentrated along rivers.
Larger towns, such as Stanley and McCall are the focus of tourism and recreation.
Timber harvest and recreation are dominant land uses, with livestock grazing and
mining of local importance.
The section is 59% timberland, 30% wilderness, and 8% rangeland.

2. LOCATION: (E.G. COUNTY, PUBLIC/PRIVATE, ARIAL MAP, TOWNSHIP, RANGE)
The Idaho Batholith section is located (see map) in mid-Idaho, bordered to the north by the
Salmon and Clearwater River drainages and to the south by the upper reaches of the Boise and
Payette Rivers.


3. SPATIAL DATA: (E.G. CURRENT, NEEDED)
Spatial data is available from the USFWS, IDFG, and TNC


4. MANAGEMENT PRACTICES, OBJECTIVES, & RECOMMENDATIONS:
Management practices should focus on maintaining or expanding meadows and open woodlands,
urban interface fire protection, riparian enhancement and open (older) pine forests. Management
efforts should key in on lower elevations where turkey populations and private lands are most
abundant.

5. PROJECT DURATION (E.G. TIMELINE):
Management activities will be ongoing and continue indefinitely.

6. ESTIMATED FUNDING REQUIRED & FUNDING CURRENTLY AVAILABLE:
No funding estimate is available. Funding could be available through the USFS Stewardship
Program, National Wildland/Urban Interface Program, NRCS, County Governments, NWTF,
USFWS and other conservation organizations.



                 IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                       -9-
7. CURRENT ACTIVITIES:
Current activities are primarily through USFS Stewardship programs, National Wildland/Urban
Interface Program, IDFG, and NRCS.


8. CURRENT & POTENTIAL COOPERATORS:
Potential cooperators include: NWTF State and local chapters, RMEF, USFS and NRCS.


9. CURRENT & POTENTIAL NWTF STATE/LOCAL CHAPTER INVOLVEMENT:
The NWTF Idaho State Super Fund and NRCS is funding some private land work on the
northern edge of this ecological section. The greatest NWTF State and local chapter
involvement potential is on the upper reaches of the Payette and Boise Rivers.


10. FLORA & FAUNA SPECIES IMPACTED: (E.G. THREATENED, ENDANGERED,
SPECIAL CONCERN, INDIRECT, DIRECT, POSITIVE, NEGATIVE)
Species of Greatest Conservation Need in the Idaho Batholith: Pacific lamprey, white sturgeon,
leopard dace, Umatilla dace, Westslope cutthroat trout, inland redband trout, steelhead, sockeye
salmon, kokanee, chinook salmon, bull trout, Wood River sculpin, Woodhouse's toad, northern
leopard frog, Idaho giant salamander, Coeur d'Alene Salamander, ring-necked snake, long-nosed
snake, northern pintail, lesser scaup, Harlequin duck, greater sage-grouse, sharp-tailed grouse,
mountain quail, red-necked grebe, western grebe, Clark’s grebe, American white pelican, great
egret, black-crowned night-heron, bald eagle, Swainson’s hawk, ferruginous hawk, merlin,
peregrine falcon, sandhill crane, American avocet, upland sandpiper, long-billed curlew,
Franklin’s gull, California gull, Caspian tern, flammulated owl, burrowing owl, short-eared owl,
boreal owl, Lewis’s woodpecker, white-headed woodpecker, American three-toed woodpecker,
pygmy nuthatch, Brewer’s sparrow, grasshopper sparrow, black rosy-finch, lesser goldfinch,
pygmy shrew, Merriam's shrew, dwarf shrew, coast mole, fringed myotis, spotted bat,
Townsend's big-eared bat, pygmy rabbit, red-tailed chipmunk, Northern Idaho ground squirrel,
Townsend's pocket gopher, gray wolf, kit fox, fisher, wolverine, Canada lynx, mountain goat.


11. IMPLICATIONS FOR WILD TURKEYS AND THE NWTF:
Continued work on forest openings by expanding meadows and opening woodlands, working on
urban interface fire protection with citizens, riparian enhancement and enhancing older pine
forests will increase hunting opportunities for all game animals and improve NWTF’s image
with the public.


12. REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION: (E.G. CWCS, TNC MAPPING,
BCR PLAN, JV PLAN, PARTNERS IN FLIGHT, ETC…)
IDFG CWCS, TNC MAPPING, TNC Canada, IMWJV , NABCI http://www.nabci-us.org/map.html,
NatureServe, Designing a Geography of Hope: Guidelines for Ecoregion–based Conservation in
The Nature Conservancy (TNC 1997), North American Waterfowl Management Plan
(NAWMP), Partners in Flight – North American Landbird Conservation Plan, Idaho Bird and the
Conservation Plan.


                 IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                       - 10 -
13. ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:




           IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                 - 11 -
                             Appendix -- Land Protection Area

13. DESCRIPTION & NARRATIVE: Boise River

The Boise River drains a rugged portion of the Sawtooth Range northeast of Boise, as well as
part of the western Snake River Plain. The watershed encompasses approximately 4,100 mi²
(10,600 km²) of highly diverse habitats, including alpine canyons, forest, rangeland, agricultural
lands, and urban areas.
 The Boise River rises in three separate forks in the Sawtooth Range above an elevation of
10,000 ft (3000 m) and is formed by the confluence of its North and Middle forks. The North
Fork is 50 mi. (80 km) long and originates in the Sawtooth Wilderness Area along the Boise-
Elmore county line 60 mi. (100 km) northeast of Boise. It flows generally southeast through the
remote mountains in the Boise National Forest. The Middle Fork (approximately 70 mi. or 110
km long) rises within 20 mi. (32 km) of the North Fork in the southern Sawtooth Wilderness
Area in northeastern Elmore County. It flows WSW, joining the North Fork to form the Boise
River approximately 15 mi. (25 km) southeast of Idaho City. The main stream flow southwest
through Arrow Rock Reservoir before receiving the South Fork.
The South Fork (100 mi. or 160 km) rises in northern Camas County in the Sawtooth National
Forest, 60 mi. (100 km) east of Boise. It flows generally southwest, descending through a basalt
canyon and passing through the Anderson Ranch Reservoir, then turns northwest in central
Elmore County. It joins the main stream from the south as an arm of Arrow Rock Reservoir 20
mi. (32 km) east of Boise to form the main stream.
Downstream from its confluence with the South Fork the river flows generally WNW, passing
through Lucky Peak Reservoir and emerging from the foothills at Boise. It passes through
downtown Boise, lined by an extensive recreational greenbelt, then flows northwest across the
western end of the Snake River Plain, becoming a braided stream with a wide floodplain as it
approaches the Snake.
The Boise River is the primary channel bringing water to the Boise valley (called Treasure
Valley), and a primary destination of ground water discharge. The basin has an average annual
runoff of 2,005,000 acre-feet of water. Annual flooding has been reduced substantially since the
construction of three major dams in the upper Boise River Basin – Anderson Ranch, Arrowrock,
and Lucky Peak. Reservoirs created by these dams reduce flooding in the lower Boise River and
store water for use during summer irrigation. However, flooding still occurs, from dam releases
under full reservoir conditions and from surface water runoff from tributary basins in the
Treasure Valley.
The river is a popular destination for floating and whitewater rafting. On the lower (warmwater)
course of the river, low summer flows and poorer water quality from agricultural runoff limit
fishery production. The city of Boise formed a 10-mile recreational greenblet through the city
center.




                 IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                       - 12 -
14. LOCATION: (E.G. COUNTY, PUBLIC/PRIVATE, ARIAL MAP, TOWNSHIP, RANGE)
The Boise River basin lies in southwestern Idaho is approximately 75 mi. (120 km) long and
contains about 4,100 square miles of land. The headwaters of the Boise River originate in the
Sawtooth Mountains at elevations in excess of 10,000 feet. It flows in a westerly direction for
about 200 miles through both the Sawtooth and Boise National Forests before emptying into the
Snake River near Parma at an elevation of 2,100 feet. Major tributaries to the Boise River
include the North Fork Boise River (382 square miles), the South Fork Boise River (1,314 square
miles) and Mores Creek (426 square miles).
 Maps are available at
http://www.idwr.state.id.us/waterboard/planning/Lower%20Boise/lower_boise.htm


15. PROJECT DURATION (E.G. TIMELINE):
No specific project has been identified.


16. ESTIMATED FUNDING REQUIRED & FUNDING CURRENTLY AVAILABLE:
The Lower Boise River has extensive agricultural use and development demands. Funding for
acquisitions or easements will be costly. The average Idaho farm/ranch land acreage runs
$784/acre according to a government survey. Farm listings along the Boise River can run $2,000
to $40,000 per acre. The Idaho State Chapter Super Fund has supported past and current projects
along the Boise River.


17. CURRENT ACTIVITIES:
The Intermountain West Joint Venture has identified the Lower South Fork of the Boise River as
a Priority Bird Habitat Conservation Area and the Boise Foothills (including IBA Boise Ridge)
as a Potential Bird Habitat Conservation Area.
The city of Boise is continuing to acquire land for and manage the Boise River Greenblet within
the city limits.
The Idaho Water Resources Board has developed plans for the South Fork Boise River and
Upper Boise River. A plan for the lower Boise River is currently being prepared.
The NRCS and IDSWCD have developed plans with Boise River landowners.


18. CURRENT & POTENTIAL COOPERATORS:
NRCS, NWTF, DU, Pheasants Unlimited, IDSWCD, USFWS, IDFG, and TNC.
The greatest potential is to work with private landowners within NRCS programs.


19. CURRENT & POTENTIAL NWTF STATE/LOCAL CHAPTER INVOLVEMENT:
NWTF State Super Fund and Regional program grants have gone towards private landowner
habitat assistance along the Boise River and Boise River flood plain. Local NWTF Chapters
have volunteered time working on conservation projects.


20. FLORA & FAUNA SPECIES IMPACTED: (E.G. THREATENED, ENDANGERED,
SPECIAL CONCERN, INDIRECT, DIRECT, POSITIVE, NEGATIVE)

                IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                      - 13 -
Boise River State Threatened, Endangered and Candidate Species include:
bald eagle, lynx, bull trout, southern Idaho ground squirrel, and yellow-billed cuckoo.

21. IMPLICATIONS FOR WILD TURKEYS AND THE NWTF:
The Boise River’s 4,100 sq. mi. watershed contains a wide variety of habitats from alpine to
urban. Over 60% Idaho’s human population lives within its drainage. A building Rio Grande
turkey population lives within the river corridors. Working with landowners will improve
NWTF’s image in Idaho’s core population area and increase hunting access.


22. REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION: (E.G. CWCS, TNC MAPPING,
BCR PLAN, JV PLAN, PARTNERS IN FLIGHT, ETC…)
Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise_River
State of Idaho - http://www.idwr.state.id.us/tvalley/Boise_River.htm
Idaho State University - http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/geog/fishery/drainage/drain20.htm
USGS - http://id.water.usgs.gov/projects/lwr_boise/
Idaho Water Resources Board – Boise River Comprehensive Basin Plans
http://www.idwr.state.id.us/waterboard/planning/Lower%20Boise/lower_boise.htm
USDA Real Estate Estimates - www.fca.gov/Download/agrealestate.pdf
Intermountain West Joint Venture - http://www.iwjv.org/about.htm
Idaho Conservation Data Center - http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/tech/CDC/


13. ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
The Lower Boise River Bird Habitat Conservation Area contains the following Priority A
Habitat Acres: Ponderosa Pine - 3,962; Aspen – 364; Sagebrush/Salt Desert Shrub – 35,838;
Marshes, Lakes, Ponds – 6,107; Riparian – 5,031




                 IDAHO COMPREHENSIVE WILD TURKEY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                       - 14 -

								
To top