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					Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”


                                                                         Module: Food and Nutrition
                                                                         Lesson: Pyramid for Health


Date:                                 Time:              Place:



Meeting Overview
                                Activity                                         Time
Introduction:                   Fill out Name tags                               5-10 minutes
                                Welcome: Introduce staff and topic
Physical Activities:            Warm up: Frozen Fruitcicles                      5 minutes
                                Pretend                                          15 minutes
Program/Education:              Many Foods Make Me Healthy                       10 minutes
                                MyPyramid for Kids Picks                         20 minutes
                                Slam Dunk Your Germs                             5 minutes
Snack/Craft/Service:            Trail Mix                                        10 minutes

Evaluation:                     Talking it Over                                  5 minutes
Extra Activities:               Abdominal Tag
                                Tense and Collapse

Objectives for this meeting
1. The children will identify that being healthy involves eating a variety of healthy foods and
   being physically active.
2. The children will perform a variety of fitness activities and indicate where they fit into the Kid’s
   Activity Pyramid.
3. The children will demonstrate the proper way to wash their hands.
4.


Lesson Background
Physical:
MyPyramid for Kids is an illustration that depicts the idea that children should be physically active
every day. Children should engage in various types of physical activities including recreational,
sport-related, and everyday movement tasks. The guide should help children understand what
physical activities are most beneficial to their health and how often and for how long they should
perform these physical activities. MyPyramid for kids recommends children should be physically
active for 60 minutes everyday or most days.

Physical activities we should do everyday or as often as possible make up the base of the
pyramid. A good base—choosing to be active every day—is important to being healthy. Time
spent being active - for example, by playing outside in a safe area instead of playing video games
or riding bike to school or to a neighbor’s house in a safe area instead of riding there in a car—
helps children to have a good base level of fitness. We all need to incorporate physical activity
into our everyday tasks. Physical activities help blood circulate in our bodies and carry fresh
oxygen to the muscles and organs. Fresh oxygen helps us stay alert and feel better, and supplies
the muscles and organs with nutrients when the blood circulates to them. Everyday movement

Pyramid for Health                                                                              1 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”
activities also help people stay limber and flexible and help them maintain strong muscles and
bones.

Aerobic activites should be done at least three times a week. Doing these activities five times a
week is even better. Aerobic exercise means that they’re vigorous enough to get the heart
pumping fast. Aerobic activities should be done for at least 20 minutes at one time to obtain the
most benefit from them. Activities at this level can be done either individually (such as biking or
in-line skating) or with a team or group (such as basketball or soccer). In general, most people
find it more fun to participate in a variety of activities. Having a friend to play with is also a good
way to have fun while exercising and serves as an incentive to stay active.

Two or three times a week, children should work on their strength and flexibility and participate in
leisure types of activities. Leisurely activities (such as playing miniature golf or swinging) don’t
make the heart pump as fast as aerobic activities, but they do still use muscles to complete
movements. These activities help us keep a good range of motion (ability to use muscles easily
and completely at the joints) because they use different muscles in the tasks. Strength and
flexibility also are important in maintaining range of motion. When people are limber and have
good range of motion, they’re less likely to get hurt.

The narrow triangle at the top of the Pyramid shows inactive pursuits that should be minimized
each day. In general, children should spend no more than 30 minutes at a time in these inactive
pursuits and only after they’ve been active in their day. Children who play computer or video
games for too many hours or who watch television have less time available to participate in
healthy physical activities when compared to children who limit such sedentary games. Inactivity
is an unhealthy habit to develop because it hurts the body and prevents children from learning to
enjoy active pursuits. These inactive pursuits can lead to excessive weight gain if children snack
while doing them.




Pyramid for Health                                                                             2 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”


Nutrition:
MyPyramid for Kids is a chart or picture guide designed to help people choose foods to build a
healthy diet. It provides information about the kids and amounts of foods we should eat everyday
to grow and stay healthy. MyPyramid has five major food groups:
 The Grains group
 The Fruit group
 The Vegetable group
 The Milk group
 The Meat and peans group

Each of these food groups provide some, but not all of the nutrients our bodies need every day.
(Nutrients are found in foods. They play an important role in helping the body grow, develop and
heal. Protein, vitamins and minerals are examples of nutrients.) No one food group is more
important than another. For good health, we should eat a variety of foods from all five food groups
everyday to get all the nutrients our bodies need.

The foods in the grains group are made from wheat, rice, corn meal, and barley, such as bread,
pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereal, tortillas, and grits. Foods in the grains group provide
carbohydrates (the body’s main source of energy) and fiber. In general, 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of
ready to eat cereal, or ½ cup of cooked rice, pasta or cooked cereal can be considered 1 ounce
equivalents from the grains group. At least half of all grains consumed should be whole grains.
We need the most servings from this group each day. A minimum of 6 ounce equivelents each
day are recommended for active children 9-13 years of age so that they have plenty of energy to
run, jump and play. MyPyramid for Kids recommends that children 9-13 years of age who are less
active eat 5 ounce equivilents of grains each day.

The fruit group includes all fresh, frozen, canned, and dried fruits and fruit juices. In general, 1
cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the fruit
group. Foods in this group provide vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates and fiber. Vitamins A and C
are key vitamins found in fruits. Vitamin A helps us see at night and keeps our skin healthy.
Vitamin C helps us heal cuts and bruises, and fight infections. MyPyramid for Kids recommends
that active children 9-13 years of age who are less active eat 1 ½ cups of fruit each day.

The vegetable group includes all fresh, frozen, canned, dried vegetables and vegetable juices. In
general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens can
be considered as 1 cup from the vegetable group. Foods in this group mainly provide vitamins,
minerals and fiber. MyPyramid for Kids recommends that active children 9-13 years of age eat at
least 3 cups of vegetables, and children 9-13 years of age who are less active eat 2 cups of
vegetables.

The milk group includes all fluid milk products and foods made from milk that retain their calcium
content, such as yogurt and cheese. Foods made from milk that has little or no calcium such as
cream cheese and butter are not part of the group. Most foods in the milk group provide vitamin D
and calcium, which our bodies need to build strong bones and teeth. Most milk group choices
should be fat-free or low-fat. In general, 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese, or
3 ounces of processed cheese can be considered as 1 cup from the milk group. MyPyramid for
Kids recommends that both active and less active children 9-13 years of age get at least 3 cups
of milk each day. Children who get sick when they drink milk can drink other calcium fortified
beverages like orange juice.

Foods in the meat and beans group provide protien, B vitamins and minerals such as iron. Our
bodies need these nutrients for growth and strong muscles. In general, 1 ounce of lean meat,
poultry, fish, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, ¼ cup dried beans, and ½ ounce of nuts or
seeds can be considered a 1 ounce equivalent of the meat and beans group. MyPyramid for Kids

Pyramid for Health                                                                           3 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”
recommends that active children 9-13 years of age eat at least 6 ounce equivlients of meat and
beans, and children 9-13 years of age who are less active eat 5 ounce equivilents of meat and
beans each day.

A band representing oils includes fats from many different plant and from fish that are liquid at
room temperature, such as canola, corn, olive, soybean, sunflower oil. Some foods are naturally
high in oil, like nuts, olives, some fish, and avacados. Foods that are mainly oil include
mayonnaise, certain salad dressings, and soft margarine. MyPyramid for Kids recommends that
active chilren 9-13 years of age eat 6 teaspoons of oils, and children 9-13 years of age who are
less active eat 5 teaspoons of oils each day.

The “What the Food Groups Do for You” reference sheet lists the food groups, the major and
other nutirents provided in the food group, how the food groups help you stay healthy, the
recommended number of cups or ounce equivilents from the found groups for children 9-13 and
examples of foods in the group with the standard amounts.


A Portion or A Cup or Ounce Equivilent?
It’s important to note that the “portions” of food most people eat are often larger than the cups or
ounce equivilents recommended in MyPyramid for Kids. A “portion” is the amount of food you
choose to eat.

A “cup” or “ounce equivilent” is a standard amount of food that nutritionists use to help give
guidance about how much of that food to eat or to identify how many calories and nutirients are in
a food. For example, the standard ounce equivalent from the grain group is 1 slice of bread. So
when you eat two slices of bread in a sandwhich, you’re eating two ounce equivalents from the
grain group.




Pyramid for Health                                                                           4 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”

Materials Needed
INTRODUCTION
Name tags:
 Name tag for each participant
 Name tag holder
 Pens
 Stickers

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES
Frozen Fruitcicles:
 Cones or other boundary markers such as cardboard boxes or empty milk jugs
 MyPyramid for Kids poster
 Masking tape
 Whistle (optional)
 Drinking water (make available to children as needed)
 Music player and music (optional)

Pretend:
 MyPyramid for Kids poster (already up from Frozen Fruitcicles)
 Cones or other boundary markers such as cardboard boxes or empty milk jugs
 Drinking water (make available to children as needed)
 Music player and music (optional)

PROGRAM/EDUCATION
Many Foods Make Me Healthy:
 MyPyramid poster (already up from Frozen Fruitcicles)
 Newsprint or other large paper
 Masking tape
 Marker

Pyramid Picks:
 “Pyramid Picks Game Sheet” handout (one per team of 3-4 children)
 Pencils or pens (one per team)
 Alphabet cards
 Bag or other open topped container
 MyPyramid poster (already up from Frozen Fruitcicles)
 MyPyramid handout (one for each participant)
 Brainstorming rules poster
 Masking tape
 Newsprint or other large paper (optional)
 Markers (optional)

Slam Dunk Your Germs: (everything but “Germ-buster” poster should be at the site)
 Soap
 Warm water
 Sink or dishpan
 Paper towels
 “Handwashing Poster”




Pyramid for Health                                                               5 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”
SNACK/CRAFT/SERVICE
Trail Mix: (Makes 5-1/2 cups)
  1 cup O-shaped cereal pieces
  1 cup square-shaped corn cereal
  1 cup pretzels
  1 cup popcorn, popped
  1/2 cup raisins
  Large bowls (one per ingredient)
  Serving spoons (one per bowl)
  Resealable sandwich bags

EVALUATION
No supplies needed

EXTRA ACTIVITIES
Abdominal Tag:
 Cones or other boundary markers such as card board boxes or empty milk jugs
 2 or 3 scarves
 Drinking water (make available to the children as needed)
 Music player and music (optional)

Tense and Collapse:
 Soft calming music and music player (optional)
 Drinking water (make available to children as needed)




Introduction
NAME TAGS
 Fill out name tags, including information on the back of each nametag
 Place a sticker over the date
 Put name tags in name tag holders

WELCOME/INTRODUCTION TO SUMMER SURVIVOR
 Introduce SS staff
 Introduce program
 Introduce topic for the day

Physical Activities
Warm up:
FROZEN FRUITCICLES
Procedure:
Before the meeting:
1. Set the cones along the outer boundaries to designate the movement space.

2. Display the MyPyramid for Kids poster in your meeting space where everyone can see it.

During the meeting:
1. The keys to this activity are making sure the kids are following the stop-and-go commands, keeping the
activity moving, and using different body parts and types of movements so they start to understand that
there are a lot of different types of activities they can do.



Pyramid for Health                                                                                6 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”
2. Have the children stand at least arm’s length apart, giving themselves room to move around. Tell them
they’ll be playing a game called “Frozen Fruitcicles.”

3. Explain that they’ll be listening for a signal that will let them know when to move and when to be still
and listen. The signal that it’s okay to move is “Ready, Go!” The signal to stop and turn into a frozen
fruitcicle is “Freeze.” (Volunteer Note: You may want to blow a whistle as the stop signal.)

4. Tell the group that they’ll need to listen to your directions carefully so they know how and when to
move. When you say “Ready, Go!” they should move the way you’ve told them to (for example jumping
like a kangaroo). When you say, “Freeze,” they should become frozen fruitcicles and hold whatever
position they’re in at that point.

5. Say “Freeze.” Compliment the kids who followed your directions. Then tell the group that when you
give the “Ready, Go!” signal they’re to march in place until you say “Freeze,” when they should turn into
frozen fruitcicles again. Now say “Ready, Go.”

6. Continue the pattern of having the group move and then freeze. Each time you have them freeze,
comment quickly on how well a few of them have done, then have them complete another movement. If
they’re following commands well while staying in place, allow them to do movements in general space
(movement space that everyone shares).

7. Some of them movements you could have the group perform include:
Swinging arms back and forth, round and round, up and down, or side to side
 Jogging in place while turning, with arms on hips or while doing arm circles
 Marching with knees high, with heavy stomping steps or with light steps
 Moving like various animals (such as kangaroos, elephants, bears, crabs) around the area
 Tiptoeing
 Jumping in place or around the area like Jiff the kangaroo
 Galloping, skipping, hopping or sliding
 Swaying like a tree in a light breeze or bending like a tree during a heavy windstorm (that is, bending,
    twisting, turning or stretching)

8. Movement ideas that go well with the food and nutrition themes include:
 Doing a chicken walk
 Popping up like popcorn or toast
 Picking apples, green beans or cherries and putting them in a basket
 Doing noodles curl-ups
 Performing bread-kneading pushups


Try This, Too:
 Have the kids suggest some different movements.
 Ask for volunteers to lead the group in a few movements.


Talking It Over:
Ask the group the following questions.
Share It:
 How do you feel after-doing this activity?
 Describe the stop-and-go signal you learned.
Process It:
 When can we use the stop-and-go signal?
 Why is it important to warm up at the start of physical activity?




Pyramid for Health                                                                                    7 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”
PRETEND

Procedure:
Before the meeting:
1. Set the boundary markers in place to designate the movement area.
2. Display the MyPyramid for Kids poster or graphic in your meeting space where everyone can see it.

During the meeting:
(Volunteer Note: Keep this and the other movement activities going quickly to help increase the
children’s heart rate.)
1. While the kids are catching their breath after playing Frozen Fruitcicles, ask where they have seen
    MyPyramid for Kids when talking about health. Reinforce the concept that physical activity and eating a
    variety of foods are important for health. Then tell them that healthy kids are active and have fun by
    doing lots of different activities each week.
2. Tell them they’re going to play a game of “Pretend” where they’ll mimic or pantomime (perform
    without speaking) doing different tasks or activities.
3. Start with those activities that we should do each day (play outside, ride your bike or walk to the
    store). Have the group pantomime doing some of the activities listed on that level. Remind them to
    follow the “Ready, Go” and “Freeze” signals they learned to follow in the Frozen Fruitcicle game.
    (Volunteer Note: On the “freeze” command, the children just need to stop immediately and look at
    you. They don’t have to get into a “frozen fruitcicle” pose.)
4. Explain to the kids that aerobic activities help the heart and lungs pump blood and oxygen. Continue
    with the “Pretend” game. Ask the group if they can come up with any other ideas of good aerobic
    movements.
5. Explain that the activities in the strength and flexibility area help our muscles and joints be strong and
    limber. An important aspect of stretching is to hold a steady stretch for 8 to 12 seconds. They
    shouldn’t bounce because it isn’t good for the muscle. Bouncing causes muscles to tighten rather than
    loosen.
6. Continue with the game.
7. Explain that inactive pursuits should be minimized each day. Have the kids continue the “Pretend”
    game by slouching down to do these activities. Explain that they should do these activities for no more
    that 30 minutes at a time and only if they’ve been active that day!

Try This, Too:
Have the kids work in teams of three or four to act out some movements from a sport for the large
group. Have the spectators guess the sport being acted out.




Program/Education
MANY FOODS MAKE ME HEALTHY
Before the Meeting:
Display the MyPyramid for Kids poster in your meeting space where everyone can see it.

During the Meeting:
To introduce the concept of eating a variety of foods, ask the children to name some of their
favorite foods, or foods they eat most often. Record their responses on newsprint.

Review the list of foods with the children, identifying the food group the food belongs in (for
example, the fruit or vegetable, or meat group).

Explain that they will be learning about MyPyramid for Kids and how it reflects the variety of foods
they eat.



Pyramid for Health                                                                                   8 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”
Talking It Over
Ask the group the following questions:
Share It
         What food groups do your favorite foods belong in?
Process It
         How can you identify which food groups different foods belong in?


MY PYRAMID FOR KIDS PICKS:
Before the meeting:
Display the MyPyramid for Kids poster in your meeting space where everyone can see it.

Write one letter of the alphabet on each index card. Place the alphabet cards into the hat or bag.
You may want to omit the letters “q,” “u,” “x,” and “z” because there are not many foods that start
with those letters in English.

Make one copy of the “MyPyramid for Kids Picks Game Sheet” handout for each team.

During the meeting:
1. Direct the children’s attention to the MyPyramid for Kids poster. Starting from the base on the
   left, briefly explain the food groups and the types of foods in the groups. Using the “Nutrition
   Background Basics” explain that:
    Similar foods are grouped together like a family on MyPyramids for Kids because of how
         they help our bodies.
    Most of the foods we eat should come from the grains, fruit, and vegetable groups.
    We should eat foods from the tip of each group of MyPyramid for Kids only once in a
         while.
    We should eat food from all the major food groups to get the nutrients we need to grow,
         play and be strong.
    Each food group works to keep us healthy in different ways:
             o Fruits and vegetables supply vitamins and minerals to keep us healthy.
             o Grains give us energy to run, jump and play.
             o Meats give us protein to keep us strong.
             o Milk keeps our bones and teeth healthy and strong.

2. Highlight a few foods found in each food group. Tell the kids they’re going to play “MyPyramid
   for Kids Picks” to name foods that are found in each of the food groups.

3. Divide the groups into three or four person teams. Have the teams choose food names (such
   as “The Bananas,” “The Noodles” or “The Peanut Chews”) for their teams.

4. Give them each one copy of the “MyPyramid for Kids Picks Game Sheet” and a pencil or pen.
   Also, give each participant a copy of MyPyramid Food Pyramid handout.

5. Ask for a Leader to draw a letter from the hat. Start the game with this letter. Explain that the
   teams will have up to five minutes to brainstorm a food item from each of the major food
   groups that begins with the letter that was drawn from the hat. For example, if the chosen
   letter is “s,” a team may brainstorm scones (grain group), squash (vegetable group),
   strawberries (fruit group), steak (meat group) and Swiss cheese (milk group). Encourage
   participants to be as creative as possible when identifying foods. Before they begin, go over
   the rules of brainstorming with the group.




Pyramid for Health                                                                          9 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”

     Leader Note:
     Have the children follow these rules as they do their brainstorming:
     Rule 1: Do not judge ideas!
     Rule 2: It’s okay to be far-out!
     Rule 3: Think as many ideas as you can.
     Rule 4: Piggyback on someone else’s ideas.
     You may want to write these rules on a sheet of newsprint and display it where all the
     children can see it.


6.   After the first round of play, review as a large group each team’s answers then choose
     another letter and continue to play.

Try This, Too!
    To encourage creative, unique responses, add the different responses from all of the groups
    to arrive at a grand total. Come up with a target number that the total group can work toward.

(Leader Note: Competition within a group can be discouraging to many children. Instead, we
want to foster collaboration and creativity. One fun and motivating way to stimulate the children’s
creativity and to encourage group cohesion is to create a phantom group against which the
children can compete. For example, you could tell your group: “I’ve thought of eight foods. Can
you do better than I did?”)

SLAM DUNK YOUR GERMS:
1. Discuss with the children the importance of washing their hands properly before they eat or
   handle food. Explain that washing our hands “slam dunks” the germs away and keeps the
   germs off of the foods we eat. Washing our hands helps to keep us from spreading germs
   and getting sick. Ask the children to identify times when they should be sure to wash their
   hands. (After touching a pet or playing outdoors, after covering your mouth to sneeze or
   cough, after blowing your nose, after using the bathroom and before eating.)

2. Explain that to wash their hands properly they need to use soap and warm water and scrub
    for 20 seconds. Twenty seconds is about how long it takes to sing the alphabet (ABC) or the
    “Happy Birthday” song twice. Now demonstrate the proper way to wash your hands with soap
    and warm water while scrubbing for twenty seconds. Be sure to scrub between and around
    your fingers, your wrists and the fronts and backs of your hands. When you are done
    scrubbing, dry your hands with a paper towel.
(Leader Note: If you don’t have access to water, pantomiming will do. Sing the Alphabet song out
loud to time your self during the pantomime.)

3. Now have the children pretend to wash their hands while singing the alphabet song twice.

Try This, Too:
Display the “Handwashing Poster” where your group can see it. You could also photocopy and
distribute it to the group to take home.




Pyramid for Health                                                                        10 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
 Summer Survivor 2006
 “Jump Into Food and Fitness”
 Talking It Over:
 Ask the group the following questions.
 Share It:
          What new foods did you learn about today?
 Process It:
          What did you learn about MyPyramid that will help you be healthy?
          What is the best way to wash your hands?
          How many seconds does it take to wash your hands correctly?
 Generalize It:
          What food groups do you need to work on eating more of?
 Apply It:
          What foods that we talked about today will you try at home?
          How will you try to add all of the food groups to you meals at home?


Snack/Craft/Service
 TRAIL MIX
 Before the Meeting: Gather ingredients and supplies

 During the Meeting:
 1. Have group members wash their hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds before
    beginning to prepare the recipe. Be sure that all work surfaces are clean.
 2. Arrange bowls and serving spoons in a line on the table where the youth can reach them.
 3. Pour one ingredient into each of the bowls.
 4. Distribute the resealable sandwich bags and invite the youth to scoop one spoonful of each
    ingredient into their bags to create their own trail mix.

 Have youth seal their bags, shake and enjoy!

 Evaluation
 Remind the children that to look good, grow strong and have energy, they need to eat a variety of
 foods and stay active every day. Encourage them to choose foods from all of the food groups and
 enjoy a variety of physical activities with their family and friends. Reinforce the concepts the
 children have learned in the activities in Kangaroo Jump 1: MyPyramid for Health by asking the
 following questions:

 Share It:
  What activities did you like?
  What activities would you try at home?
  What did you enjoy learning about the most in this Kangaroo Jump?

 Process It:
  What did you learn about MyPyramid for Kids that can help you be healthy?
  What did you learn in this Kangaroo Jump that surprised you the most?
 Apply It:
  What did you learn in this Kangaroo Jump that you want to share with an adult you know?
  How many of the foods we talked about today will you try at home?
  What new activities might you try this week?




 Pyramid for Health                                                                        11 of 15
 Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”

Extra Activities
ABDOMINAL TAG
Before the meeting:
Set cones out to serve as boundaries for the playing area.

During the meeting:
1. Tell the group that they’re going to be playing “Abdominal Tag.” Have them scatter around
   the playing area. Ask for one or two Leaders to start out as “chasers” who will be identified by
   wearing pennies or scarves tied around one arm.

2. Read aloud or paraphrase the following information to the group:
      When I give you the signal, the chasers will try to tag other people. If you’re tagged, you
      must lie on your back and put your feet and hands in the air with your toes and fingers
      pointed toward the ceiling. This position will help strengthen your abdominal, or stomach
      muscles. This is also so you won’t trip the chasers and they won’t step on you. To
      become unfrozen, you must be tagged on the hand by a free runner.

(Leader Note: You may choose to have those tagged hold their hands and feet in the air for a 15-
30 seconds and take a 5 second rest and then do it again, depending on the age of the children.)

Try This, Too:
Have the children pretend to ride a bike with their legs while they’re on their backs.

TENSE AND COLLAPSE
(Leader Note: You may want to play soft, calming music during this activity to help the children
relax as they stretch.)
1. Have the group move from a slouched position to sitting in an “L” position with their legs in
    front of them and their arms straight overhead. Tell them that they’re going to play a quiet
    game called “Tense and Collapse.”

2. Have them tighten (tense) all of their muscles in their body and hold that position for 8 to 12
   seconds, then tell them to relax (collapse) all of their muscles. Repeat. Encourage them to try
   to keep their backs straight, their shoulders pulled back and their ears between their arms.
3. Next have them sit with their legs in the straddle position and move one arm across the front
   of their body, using the other hand to gently pull the arm toward the body. Have them hold
   this shoulder stretch for 8 to 12 seconds, then repeat it on the other side.

4. Ask the kids to sit with their legs crossed. Have them move one arm above their head, then
   drop that hand down behind the back. Tell them to use the other arm to push gently against
   the elbow and hold the stretch. Repeat on the other side.

5. Have all the kids lie on their backs with their arms extended overhead and their legs straight
   out. Have them repeat the tense and collapse motion twice.

Talking It Over:
Ask the group the following questions:
Share It:
         Where are your abdominal muscles?
Process It:
         Has your heart rate slowed down after completing the cool down activity?
         What can you do this week to strengthen your abdominal muscles?
Generalize It:
         What did you learn about the Kid’s Activity Pyramid that can help you be healthy?
Apply It:
         What activities might you try this week?

Pyramid for Health                                                                         12 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
Summer Survivor 2006
“Jump Into Food and Fitness”



Take Home
   “MyPyramid for Kids” food pyramid handout
   “Germ-buster” handwashing handout
   Family Newsletter




Pyramid for Health                                                               13 of 15
Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
   Summer Survivor 2006
   “Jump Into Food and Fitness”
   REFERENCE SHEET:
        What the Food Groups Do for You*
   *Adapted from Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture. MyPyramid, 2005.


Food Group                Nutrients in the           Helping You Stay              Recommended                 What Counts as a
                           Food Group                    Healthy                  amount for 1800               Cup or ounce
                                                                                   calorie pattern               equivalent
Grain Group              Main nutrients:             Energy source, whole       6 ounce equivalents               1 slice of bread
                         carbohydrates, Other        grains help bowels                                           1 cup of ready-to-
                         nutrients: iron, B          work properly                                                 eat cereal
                         vitamins                                                                                 ½ cup cooked
                                                                                                                   cereal, rice or
                                                                                                                   pasta
Vegetable Group          Main nutrients:             Helps see in the dark,     2 ½ cups                          2 cups of raw leafy
                         vitamins A and C            keeps skin healthy,                                           vegetables(such as
                                                     creates barrier against                                       lettuce or spinach)
                                                     infections, heals                                            1 cup other
                                                     wounds and broken                                             vegetables, cooked
                                                     bones, helps fight                                            or raw
                                                     infections, strengthens                                      1 cup vegetable
                                                     blood vessels                                                 juice
Fruit Group              Main nutrients:             Helps see in the dark,     1 ½ cups                          1 large banana or
                         vitamins A and C            keeps skin healthy,                                           orange
                                                     creates barrier against                                      1 cup chopped,
                                                     infections, heals                                             cooked or canned
                                                     wounds and broken                                             fruit
                                                     bones helps fight                                            1 cup 100% fruit
                                                     infections, strengthens                                       juice
                                                     blood vessels                                                ½ cup dried fruit
Milk Group               Main nutrient:: calcium     Builds bones and           3 cups                            1 cup milk** or
                         Other nutrients:            teeth, helps regulate                                         yogurt
                         protein, riboflavin,        blood pressure, helps                                        1 ½ ounces natural
                         vitamin D                   blood to clot                                                 cheese(such as
                                                                                                                   Cheddar)
                                                                                                                  2 ounces
                                                                                                                   processed cheese
                                                                                                                   (such as American)
Meat & Beans             Main nutrients: protein     Builds muscle,             5 ounce equivalents               1 ounce cooked
Group                    Other nutrients:            provides energy                                               lean meat, poultry
                         Iron, niacin, vitamin B-                                                                  or fish
                         12                                                                                       ¼ cup cooked dry
                                                                                                                   beans or tofu
                                                                                                                  1 egg
                                                                                                                  1 tablespoons
                                                                                                                   peanut butter
                                                                                                                  ½ ounce nuts or
                                                                                                                   seeds
Oils                     Not a food group            Oils are used in           5 teaspoons
                                                     cooking and as
                                                     flavorings.

   ** Includes lactose-free and lactose-reduced milk products. Soy-based beverages with added calcium are an
   option for those who prefer a nondairy source of calcium.




   Pyramid for Health                                                                                                   14 of 15
   Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003
  Summer Survivor 2006
  “Jump Into Food and Fitness”
  HANDOUT:
  MyPyramid for Kids Picks Game Sheet
  Work with your team to identify one food from each of the five major food groups that
  begins with the chosen letter. For example, if the chosen letter is “S”, you may
  brainstorm scones (grain group), squash (vegetable group), strawberries (fruit group),
  steak (meat and beans group), and Swiss cheese (milk group). Be as creative as possible
  when brainstorming food names.

  MyPyramid for Kids Picks Round 1: Letter
Grain Group Food

Vegetable Group Food

Fruit Group Food

Meat & Beans Group Food

Milk Group Food


 MyPyramid for Kids Picks Round 2: Letter
Grain Group Food

Vegetable Group Food

Fruit Group Food

Meat & Beans Group Food

Milk Group Food


  MyPyramid for Kids Picks Round 3: Letter
Grain Group Food

Vegetable Group Food

Fruit Group Food

Meat & Beans Group Food

Milk Group Food




  Pyramid for Health                                                               15 of 15
  Source: Jump Into Foods and Fitness, Michigan State University Extension. 2003

				
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