France releases white paper on future energy development

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					Here is the French White Paper the Speech by Minister Mme Nicole Fontaine introducing
White paper Here is the Government site on the issue and the Internet debate site for the public
to participate

Here are some Comments -

France releases white paper on future energy development
Doris Leblond
OGJ correspondent

PARIS, Nov. 11 -- Following a year's "national debate on energies" carried on throughout France to
determine the energy mix over the next 30 years, Delegate Industry Minister Nicole Fontaine
presented Nov. 7 the outcome of the country's situation in a white paper on energies

Based on an unprecedented nationwide debate conducted through open meetings and the internet, the
white paper contains the government's proposals, which will still be open to debate until yearend. A
framework draft law will then be submitted to Parliament in first quarter 2004.

Predraft law details

Not surprisingly, the predraft law retains nuclear energy in its mix, but it also focuses on energy conservation
and renewables since France has long-term international commitments to the European Union for
renewables, which must account for 21% of its energy mix by 2010. (Based on the Kyoto Protocol on
Climate Change, France is required to reduce by 5.2% its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the
Currently renewables account for about 15% of France's energy resource base, mainly through various
hydroelectric, wood, wind, and solar energy projects around the country. The white paper provides a real
policy to encourage these projects' development—particularly wood and solar

Energy conservation falls within the realm of sustainable development for which the white paper encourages
voluntary actions as well as tax and regulatory incentives including the creation of "White Certificates" under
which energy suppliers will have to encourage their clients to carry out energy savings along the lines of
what already is being done in the UK. The government will set yearly targets and lagging suppliers will be
able to trade certificates with more virtuous entities

As for nuclear energy, there was no question that it could not be scrapped in a country where it accounts for
75% of electric power generation and has contributed to reducing France's energy dependence to 50% from
76% over the last 3 decades. Nuclear power also has reduced GHG emissions to the lowest in the EU and
has compensated for the country's poor oil and gas resources

However, nuclear also has become a controversial subject in France. The renewal of the country's 58
nuclear plants starting in 2020 requires that a third generation reactor be launched soon in order that a
demonstration model be ready for a government decision in time "for the deployment of an industrial series,"
said a government official. This is still a subject for debate even within the government and it will be up to
Parliament to take a final decision

Currently renewables account for about 15% of France's energy resource base, mainly through various
hydroelectric, wood, wind, and solar energy projects around the country. The white paper provides a real
policy to encourage these projects' development—particularly wood and solar




 Link to
http://ogj.pennnet.com/articles/web_article_display.cfm?ARTICLE_CA
TEGORY=GenIn&ARTICLE_ID=192113

                                               Nuclear power options kept open
                                               by France 10 Nov 2003, 15:19 GMT
The French government is considering building a prototype, next-
generation nuclear reactor in an effort to keep its options open in the
face of its ageing existing system that produces 80% of the country's
electricity.

 The announcement was met with instant protest from environmental groups, which have
successfully pushed Germany into withdrawal from nuclear power.

As French nuclear plants come to the end of their lives around 2020, the decision on whether
it renews its nuclear power or not must therefore be made between 2012 and 2015.

It is considering the construction of a new-generation nuclear reactor within the next eight
years, at an estimated cost of E3 billion ($3.44 billion), financed by a European partnership
of industrial groups.

The decision involves a complicated balancing act involving the maintenance of France's
energy independence, low greenhouse gases and stable electricity prices

Link to http://www.energy-business-review.com/article_news.asp?guid=89BF5D98-FC65-
422B-B3E8-54CDC0E5EF88




W A R . W I RE


France mulls new nuclear reactor to preserve energy
options
PARIS (AFP) Nov 07, 2003
France said Friday it was considering building a prototype next-generation
nuclear reactor to keep its options open in the face of an aging system that
produces 80 percent of the country's electricity.

The announcement drew instant protest from environmental groups, which have
successfully pushed Germany into a gradual withdrawal from nuclear power.

Junior Industry Minister Nicole Fontaine said the government had decided it
needed to keep "all options open" when it decides between 2012 and 2015
whether to renew its nuclear power sector.

Presenting an energy "white paper", or outline policy plan, to the press, Fontaine
emphasized that it does not give a blank check to the new nuclear reactor but
"another choice would hardly be responsible".
The white paper said that as nuclear power plants came to the end of their lives
around 2020 "France will have to be in a position to be able to decide whether or
not to replace all or part of the total with a new nuclear series".

At issue, it said, was "maintenance of France's energy independence, low
greenhouse gases and stable and moderate electricity prices".

The white paper calls for the construction of a new-generation European nuclear
reactor (EPR) within the next eight years. Its cost, estimated at three billion euros
(3.42 billion dollars £2Bn), would be financed by a European partnership of
industrial groups.

The Franco-German EPR project, developed since 1992 by the French state
Areva group's subsidiary Framatome-ANP and Siemen, could construct a
prototype and connect it to the network by 2010-2012 for testing.

France has 58 pressurized-water nuclear reactors in 19 power stations, most of
which were built in the 1980s. They provide about 80 percent of the electricity
consumed in France and are believed to have a lifespan of about 40 years.

Fontaine said that a test version was vital because technology was evolving
rapidly in terms of safety.

A prototype would also improve the way any new power stations were financed
and located, she said.

However, she effectively ruled out the possibility the country could give up
nuclear power in 2015. "It's imaginable, but it's necessary to remain serious and
responsible."

Fontaine said two requirements had shaped the white paper's proposals: energy
independence and respect for the environment.

The government aims to increase thermal energy from renewable resources,
mainly wood, by 50 percent by 2015, she said.

In line with a European Union directive, the white paper foresees the
development of renewable resources to supply 21 percent of electricity
consumption by 2010.

Nuclear energy is a highly controversial subject in many countries, but less so in
France, where the French pride themselves on their energy independence.

Lacking major energy resources, apart from a dwindling coal industry, France
decided decades ago to go nuclear. By contrast, Italy, for example, adopted a
non-nuclear strategy and is now a major customer of French electricity exports, a
dependency painfully highlighted by the massive and costly blackout across the
Italian peninsula last summer.

A report by the International Energy Agency on Monday sounded the alarm about
a looming world energy crisis, saying the electricity sector would swallow up the
bulk of the 16 trillion dollars (13.9 trillion euros) needed to meet demand over the
next 30 years.

France's announcement Friday sparked outrage among anti-nuclear groups and
environmentalists.

The Network to Get Out of Nuclear called for a nationwide protest demonstration
on January 17 in Paris.

And Greenpeace, which also is lobbying for France to abandon its nuclear
dependence, said the government's plan was "a grave error".

"It mortgages away any alternative option," said Frederic Martignac of
Greenpeace-France.

Link to http://www.spacewar.com/2003/031107164621.vqx5zynq.html

French govt underlines need to consider new nuclear plant
                     The French government has presented a white paper on energy policy, the
                     industry ministry said.

                     ROGER FRY Europower
                     The white paper reiterated the need for France to consider new nuclear capacity to
Nicole Fontaine      replace ageing nuclear power plants and a commitment to green energy, according to
                     Platts.

The paper, presented to the French government by industry minister Nicole Fontaine, was welcomed
Monday by French grid operator RTE for the issues raised on security of supply. (see next item)

RTE has been given the task to report to the French government with an "early warning system" for any
security of supply issues.

It has been assigned the task of evaluating risks and challenges to France's security of supply over five
years. By providing this early warning service, RTE will enable the government to launch tenders to avoid
shortfalls in the capacity of generating facilities.

Early studies by RTE presented to the government show new generation capacity must be developed in
France by 2008 for peak facilities, and by 2017-2020 for base facilities, so that France can cover its total
demand, RTE said.
(2003-11-10 16:51:09)

For link http://www.europower.com/site/ep_article.php?artid=3357
11/10/2003 - Presentation of White Paper on French Energy Policy.

                                    RTE approves the main lines of the White Paper on energy.

                             7th November 2003, Mrs Nicole Fontaine, Delegate Minister for
                             Industry, has presented a white paper on energy policy, the main
                             lines of which set out balanced preparations for French energy in
the future. The White Paper adheres closely to the spirit of dialogue and openness that typified
the     national  energy     debate,    in    which      RTE      played   an    active    role.

André Merlin, Director of RTE, is delighted that the security of power supply occupies a prominent
place in the text of the paper. "It is a crucial element for guaranteeing our people and our
companies have secure and sustainable access to energy, which is both a factor of
competitiveness     and     a    source     of     social    cohesion,"   said    André     Merlin.

"Equal access to electricity across the country is not just a question of price. It is also a question
of quality of the current supplied. It is therefore quite appropriate for the law to set down
conditions for ensuring that, in the future, this level of quality should be the same for all. This is
something to which RTE will continue to contribute in the years ahead," continued the Director.

RTE is also pleased with the early-warning role it is set to be handed with regard to the security of
supply. At all times, it will have the task of assessing the outlook for the next 5 years, and
monitoring the risks of failure in the power system. By providing this "early-warning" service, it will
enable the State to launch the calls for tender required in time to avoid shortfalls in the capacity of
generating                                                                                    facilities.

In this respect, the studies carried out by RTE show that new capacities will have to be developed
by 2008 for peak facilities, and by 2017-2020 for base facilities, so that France can cover its total
demand, even where this demand is controlled.

For link http://www.rte-france.com/jsp/an/actu/viewdepeche.jsp?Id=5061




                                                                New law to raise
                                                                electricity reserve levels
                                                The European Union Commission is
                                                set to present new draft legislation
                                                that would impose an increase in the
minimum levels of reserves required for electricity companies.

14 Nov 2003, 15:02 GMT - The new measures, which follow a spate of recent blackouts, will allow national
regulators to override operators' objections to launch tenders for infrastructure projects if they think it is in
consumers' interest.

European Union (EU) governments decided to speed up energy deregulation last year. This m eans from
July 2004, all businesses across the EU will be free to choose their supplier. From 2007 households will also
get the choice.

This year's blackouts have also raised concerns about the vulnerability of Europe's power grids. The
Commission recommends the continent needs to build 750 new power plants and strengthen grid
connections.

The new draft legislation, due to be unveiled before the end of the year, will require EU countries to adopt
concrete policies on security of supply, define clear roles and responsibilities for market participants and
impose clear obligations upon them.

If government fail to act the EU could end up with a collection of regional markets, dominated by a handful of
companies such as Electricity de France, E.On [EON] and Enel [EN], rather than one deregulated market.
Link to http://www.energy-business-review.com/article_news.asp?guid=ACADDEE3-5F54-
410F-B7FC-F7F0B5F3277C

Here are some sites that may also be of interest ;

European Energy Efficiency
http://www.eceee.org/latest_news/2003/news20031113.lasso

On this site find
http://www.eceee.org/library_links/links/links_selection.lasso
Which has probably the best available links on the Web to energy
related sites.Indispensable.

Sustainable Development Commission
http://www.sd-commission.gov.uk/

				
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