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Better Care Higher Standards for Liverpool 200405

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Better Care Higher Standards for Liverpool 200405 Powered By Docstoc
					The City of Liverpool




                                      LIVERPOOL

                                  CITY COUNCIL


             ADULT SOCIAL CARE SERVICES


                                  BETTER CARE

                          HIGHER STANDARDS


                                             2007/08




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0
What is Better Care Higher Standards? ............................ 4
How you can help us to provide better services .............. 5
How we will respond to your queries ................................ 5
How we communicate with you about what we do .......... 7
Services we provide that are covered by Better Care
Higher Standards ................................................................ 9
Fair Access to Care Services ........................................... 11
Single Assessment Process (SAP).................................. 12
What is SAP? ..................................................................... 12
Ethos of SAP and Person Centred Care: ........................ 12
Documentation .................................................................. 12
Safeguarding Adults in Liverpool .................................... 13
Supporting People in Liverpool ....................................... 14
Finding a Suitable place to live ........................................ 17
The Common Allocation Policy for Sheltered Housing . 19
Adaptations and Equipment to use in your Home ......... 22
Carers ................................................................................. 25
Our Commitment to Equalities ........................................ 27
Equality Action Plans........................................................ 28
Appendices ........................................................................ 29
  1.     Strategies, plans and leaflets .................................. 29


Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   2
  2. Useful Telephone numbers, email addresses and
  web addresses. ............................................................... 31
  3. “How to complain” What to do if you are unhappy
  with the service. .............................................................. 34
  4.     The Corporate Customer Care Standards ............. 36
  5.     Fair access to Care .................................................. 38
  Comments / Feedback Forms ........................................ 43




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   3
What is Better Care Higher Standards?
Welcome to this edition of Better Care Higher Standards. This is the Long Term
Care Charter for Liverpool City Council, Adult Social Care.


Better Care Higher Standards was first implemented in June 2000 and this
document has five main aims:

   To make services more accessible to people

   To give more accurate information about services to people who use them

   To explain about the standards of service staff should be providing

   To involve people in improving standards

   To explain to people what to do if they are dissatisfied with a service

We hope that this charter will provide you with useful information and help in
obtaining the services you need and also give you the opportunity to feed back
your comments if we fall short of meeting the standards set. Through this charter
we hope to continue raising the standards of the services we provide.

Better Care Higher Standards Questionnaire

At the back of this document is an opportunity for people to tell us what they think
of the information we have provided here. Your feedback is important to us and
will provide us with useful information on how we can improve on future editions
of the charter.
You can either complete the feedback form on the intranet or if you would like us
to send you a postal form then please contact us on the telephone number
below.

Information and Intelligence Team 233 4167 or 233 3162




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   4
How you can help us to provide better services

We have set the standards in this Charter to ensure that you receive the best
possible care and support to meet your identified needs. In order to achieve this
we need to work in partnership with you. It will make a real difference if you:

       Are able to provide full and accurate personal information
       Keep appointments and give us advance notice if you cannot make them
       Tell people who provide you with a service what you need from them and
        let them know if you do not need them, either on a particular day/time
       Look after your equipment and return it when it is no longer needed
       Treat staff courteously and with respect
       Advise us if your needs change
       Tell us what parts of the service work well and what parts you have
        problems with and why

Confidentiality:

 When you provide us with personal information we will advise you of how the
information will be used. We may need to share your information with other
agencies to help provide the service that you need. If we do need to share your
information we will first gain your consent to do this. The only exception to this is
where we have a legal duty to share information without your consent in order to
protect your interests or those of other individuals.

How we will respond to your queries

Liverpool City Council has a range of services available to deal with your queries
concerning Adult Social Care as detailed below:

Careline is Liverpool City Council‟s twenty four hour seven days a week social
care call centre. Careline provides a central contact point for enquiries about
people of any age and this includes people with disabilities, people with mental
health needs, homeless families, and older people.

Liverpool City Council has ten „One Stop Shops‟ which are council buildings,
situated within the community where Liverpool citizens can walk in to:

       Request a council service.
       Access other partner services (where they are available).
       Access information.
       Carry out any other council business.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   5
     One stop shop employees are specially trained in all the services the one
      stop shops offer and will wherever possible, try to resolve your query on
      the spot.
     This means that all your council business can be dealt with in one place.
For further information on the locations of our One Stop Shops and the
„Corporate Customer Care Standards‟ please see the Appendices (page 31)




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   6
How we communicate with you about what we do
Adult Social Care is committed to putting your needs first. To do this we aim to
ensure that services are as accessible as possible and we try to provide
information in accessible formats such as:

        Braille,
        Large print
        Audio tape
        Other languages
        Sign - British sign language interpretation is available at all one stop
         shops.

Adult Social Care produces information about its business in the form of:

        The Corporate Performance Plan – This plan outlines how we are
         performing in providing a better service to you, in relation to meeting the
         targets set by the Government and also the targets which we set
         ourselves.

A list of the plans and strategies and how to access them is available in the
appendices (p29)

Information is also available through Liverpool City Council web site which can be
viewed at www.liverpool.gov.uk. This website is regularly updated to keep you
informed of any changes or new information.

In 2004, „Fifty Plus, a web site for older residents in Liverpool was launched. This
web site provides information about council services, including housing and
Community Services, health and voluntary agencies such as „Age Concern‟. It
also provides an „Activity Finder‟ which is a comprehensive and easy to use
directory of local area activities and events.

We will also communicate with you through the use of:

        City Magazine which provides news items of interest about the Council.
        Leaflets and posters will be produced and distributed via internet, One
         Stop Shops, GP surgeries, health centres, outpatient clinics, libraries,
         leisure centres and voluntary sector partners.
        Consultation with customers. The Corporate Consultation strategy sets
         out the council‟s policy on consulting with customers. We will give
         customers feedback on the results of consultation and explain how we
         have taken their views into account.
        Adult Social Care, Comments, Compliments and Complaints procedure
         will also be used to gain customer feedback.


Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   7
        National / Local Media. We will provide information to the News Centre
         for articles in the national and local press and radio and television.
        Partner and voluntary organisations. We will work with partner and
         voluntary organisations to identify opportunities to communicate with
         customers including community based newsletters.




          Our Standards for Communicating with you:

                  We will treat you with courtesy and respect
                  We will not discriminate against you on grounds of age, sex, race,
                   religion, disability or sexual orientation
                  We will use plain language and avoid jargon
                  We will offer to provide an interpreter, if needed, for other languages
                   including British Sign Language.
                  We will make information about services widely available, including
                   in different formats e.g. audio tape, Braille, large print and
                   languages when requested.
                  If you have a learning disability or a mental health need we will
                   ensure that an advocate can support you if you wish
                  We will explain to you how we will assess your needs




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   8
Services we provide that are covered by Better Care
Higher Standards
Adult Social Care provides a range of services for vulnerable adults and the
people who care for them. This includes people who have difficulties associated
with ageing, adults who have learning disabilities, people with physical disabilities
and adults with long term illnesses including mental illness, adults at risk of
abuse and neglect.
We aim to provide services which meet your needs and help you to live
independently in your own home for as long as possible. Some of the services
we provide to help you include:
     Services to help people regain independent living skills.
     Personal help in the home.
     Equipment to help cope with physical disability or frailty.
     Finding a Suitable place to live.
     Payments to allow people to arrange their own care.
     Short stays in residential homes or with families to provide a break.
     Day and night sitting in the home.
     Residential care – in many different types of home.
     Delivered meals – frozen meals service.
     Day services for social, educational and work activities or to help speed
      recovery.
     Protecting vulnerable adults.
     Assistance for homeless adults and their families.
     Community Safety Services.
     Supporting People services.
    What Standards can you expect?

       You can expect an assessment of your needs to begin within 48 hours if
        an appropriate member of staff deems it necessary
       If for any reason we cannot provide direct help, we will try and direct you
        to someone who can
       If we assess that you need a service, then we aim for it to be in place
        within 4 weeks, although there may be occasions where this is not
        possible. In such cases we undertake to have the care in place as soon as
        possible
       If your needs are prioritised as low you will generally not receive an
        assessment but will be given advice and information where possible
       A full assessment if you are worried about your health or about being
        independent at home
       A copy of your agreed statement of needs
       A plan of the care arranged so that you know who will visit and when

Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   9
       Staff should listen to your opinion and take your views into account at all
        stages
       Not all services are free but we will always tell you how charges are set
       We will review your needs regularly with you to ensure you are receiving
        the correct help

    In addition to these commitments:

       We will treat you with respect.
       We will listen to your views.
       We will involve you in decisions.
       We will keep you informed.
       Your welfare, independence, safety and health are our top priority.
       Your comments or complaints will be responded to openly, honestly and
        quickly
       Your own social worker will meet with you and your carers




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   10
Fair Access to Care Services
When assessing your needs Liverpool City Council follow national guidelines
from the Department of Health called „Fair Access to Care Services‟. These
guidelines set out what the risks to your independence would be if your needs
were not met.

There are four separate categories in the guidelines that we use to assess your
needs:

        Critical
        Substantial
        Moderate
        Low

Priority is always given to people who have the greatest needs and who are most
likely to lose their independence.

A social worker or care manager will discuss with you how you manage:

        Your day to day life
        What your needs and wishes are
        The needs of your carer.

In Liverpool we provide services for people in the Critical, Substantial and
Moderate bands. People in the low bands will not be entitled to a service from us,
however we will provide you with information, advice and guidance to help you
make other arrangements to meet your needs, for example from private providers
or voluntary organisations.

For more detailed information on Fair Access to Care and the standards we
have set please see the Appendices section 5 (page 38)




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   11
Single Assessment Process (SAP)

What is SAP?

The Single Assessment Process (SAP) was introduced to us by the Department
of Health in 2001 as part of the National Service Framework (NSF) for Older
People.
It introduces the concept of person centered care and shares information about
our customers with other professionals involved in their care. This helps to
remove the need to duplicate requests for information.
The process allows for the active participation of the Older Person bringing them
to the centre of the assessment. The majority of Liverpool City Council Adult
Services and relevant Primary Care Trust teams will be implementing SAP from 1
April 2006.

Ethos of SAP and Person Centred Care:
    Person Centred Approach
    Information given to one professional and shared
    Professionals work together for benefit of customer
    Customers views and wishes are central
    Assessment should be proportionate to need and take account of
      customer's strengths
    Assessment should provide a more rounded picture of the person's needs
      and circumstances and take account of issues around housing, benefits,
      transport and other matters
    Consent from customer will need to be obtained to share the information
      you have gathered with other professionals.

Documentation

The City Council together with our health partners have agreed to use a form of
documentation known as Easycare. This documentation is already being used by
our neighbouring boroughs at Knowsley, Sefton and St Helens and because of
overlaps with local authority and health boundaries it is better for our customers.

The documentation is accredited as a good tool by the Department of Health and
will assist us in reaching person centred outcomes for our customers.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   12
Safeguarding Adults in Liverpool
Safeguarding Adults means the protection of vulnerable adults who may not be
able to protect themselves from harm or abuse. Abuse can include physical,
emotional, financial, sexual abuse and neglect.

Since 2001 Liverpool has had a set of procedures for the protection of vulnerable
people. The procedures were put together and signed up to by a wide range of
organisations including the police and NHS organisation. Many voluntary and
independent organisations have been part of the process. The „Safeguarding
Adults‟ procedure can be accessed on the city councils website
www.liverpool.gov.uk

Anyone can raise a concern about a vulnerable adult by contacting Careline;
Telephone 0151 233 3800. Once a concern has been raised a discussion will
take place between all of the relevant agencies for that case. A decision as to
whether to investigate the case or not will then be made.

Each case will be looked at on its own merit. In all cases the views and wishes of
the person involved will be taken into account.




      What standards you can expect:

           That your concerns will be taken seriously.
           There will be a multi-agency approach to the issue.
           That the wishes of the person will be taken into account.
           That minutes will be taken at all meetings.
           That every effort will be made to put a protection plan into place.
           That the current system is constantly updated in line with national
            changes.




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Supporting People in Liverpool
What is Supporting People?

Supporting People is a national government programme (via Communities and
Local Government) for the funding of housing related support services. The
programme aims to support people who have a range of needs to live as
independently as possible in their community.

The fund is managed by local authorities to ensure that services are meeting the
needs of local people and that services are monitored at a local level. Liverpool
City Council acts as the „administering authority‟ for Liverpool‟s Supporting
People Programme and we work in partnership with Probation and Health in
making decisions about how Supporting People works locally.

The Supporting People Programme funds „housing related support‟ services.
These are services, which can support people who have support needs to
develop their skills and confidence so they can live independently. This could
include people with a variety of needs including young people, people who are
homeless, people at risk of domestic violence, people with mental health issues,
teenage parents, older people, refugees and people with a physical or learning
disability. All of these groups and others may have needs, which could be met by
a housing related support service. A housing related support task could include
the following:
       Assistance in setting up and maintaining a home
       Assistance in managing money and other independent living skills
       Support in a sheltered housing scheme
       Assistance in claiming benefits and completing forms
       Assistance, advice and support to prevent homelessness
       Provision of an emergency alarm call and monitoring service

Supporting People does not pay for personal or health care; but it could fund
housing related support as part of a co-ordinated package of care for people who
also need personal or medical care.
We recognise that people will require support for different lengths of time; so we
fund services that are short-term (up to two years) or long-term support, which is
delivered on an ongoing basis. Examples of this are someone who has
experienced homelessness may need short-term support to set up a new home.
While, an older person may need support on an ongoing basis to allow them to
remain independent in their own home.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   14
Who Provides Supporting People services?

In Liverpool a wide range of organisations are funded to provide housing related
support services on behalf of the Supporting People Programme. This includes
charities, housing associations, voluntary and private providers and Liverpool
City Council. The services provide support in a wide range of settings including;
service user‟s own homes through a floating support service; sheltered housing;
domestic violence refuges; hostels and supported housing.
What standards can you expect from a Supporting People service?

There are many different models and types of service that Supporting People
funds. However, we do monitor all services and providers to ensure they are
delivering quality services. We monitor providers to make sure the services that
people access provide the following standards:


Standards you can expect from a Supporting People Service:


           A support plan based on your needs that takes account of any
            associated risk
           A regular review of your support plan to show progress you‟ve
            made
           That your views are taken into account in all areas of support
            received
           A safe, secure environment where you are protected from abuse
            of all kinds
           A publicised eligibility criteria that tells you clearly what the service
            can offer you
           Support that doesn‟t discriminate against you, or anyone else
           Information on cultural and religious organisations and centres in
            your area
           A publicised complaints policy that tells you how to raise issues,
            how they will be dealt with, and how the result of your complaint
            will be communicated back to you




We monitor providers on the above using the national Supporting People Quality
Assessment Framework, which is a tool to make sure that services are meeting
minimum standards. We also work with providers using this framework to
continuously improve their services to make sure they are meeting the needs of
service users. We fund Supporting People services through a contract between



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   15
the council and the provider; if there were serious concerns about the quality of
services that could not be addressed we could stop contracting with that provider.


How can people access Supporting People services?
Because of the wide range of Supporting People services, there is not a single
access route. Instead, providers advertise their services and how service users
can be referred into them. For some services this will be self-referral e.g. for a
direct access homeless centre, other services will accept referrals from a wide
range of agencies such as Citizens Advice Bureau, health and social workers
and advocacy groups. Some specialist services e.g. substance mis-use or
offending services, will have specific referrals routes with Drug and Alcohol
workers or the Probation Service.


All services publish their referral routes in a service directory on Liverpool City
Council‟s website www.liverpool.gov.uk. This allows anyone to look up a specific
service or search to see what services are available. Information and advice on
how to access Supporting People services can also be obtained from Careline on
233 3800.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   16
Finding a Suitable place to live
If you or a member of your household is
     a disabled person experiencing barriers to accessibility in their current
       home or
     an older person wishing to live in sheltered or extra care sheltered housing
       or
     an adult with a learning disability wishing to access accommodation

Then ACCESS Liverpool may be able to offer you support in finding a suitable
home.

What is ACCESS Liverpool?

ACCESS Liverpool is a flagship agency representing a number of organisations
including Liverpool City Council, 23 registered social landlords, Age Concern
Liverpool, The Housing Corporation and The Primary Care Trust. It represents a
unique way of providing housing and associated services to people who live or
wish to live in Liverpool and require specialist housing services.

ACCESS Liverpool operates a number of services for people who have specific
housing needs. ACCESS Liverpool operates on behalf of housing providers in
the city:

       the Accessible Homes waiting List for people with significant mobility
        difficulties who need to move into an adapted property
       the „Common Allocation Policy‟ for Sheltered Housing for older people in
        Liverpool
       a single application and assessment process for older people with care
        needs who wish to access Extra Care sheltered Housing
       assistance to Adults with Learning Disability who wish to access a
        suitable home

The Accessible Homes Waiting List

This service offers disabled people whose home is unsuitable for them because
of mobility difficulties and who need to move to an accessible or adapted home,
the opportunity to register their details on a database.

What is adapted or Accessible Housing?

These are properties that have been specifically designed or built for disabled
people. It also includes properties that have been adapted around the needs of a
previous tenant who was disabled and may be a flat, a house or in a small
number of cases, a bungalow. All these properties will have some kind of special

Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   17
features, such as low level kitchen units or wide doorways for wheelchair users or
it may be a house with a stair lift.

Ordinary properties, such as a house without any special features or a
bungalow with a standard bath, are not adapted and will not be given to
ACCESS Liverpool or to anyone on the waiting list.

What standards can you expect from ACCESS?

         We cannot guarantee to find you a new home, nor can we give an
          indication of how long you might wait to be re housed
         We will write to you within 10 days of receiving your form to tell you
          what will happen next
         In some cases we may need to contact you or visit you at home to
          obtain more information about your need for accessible housing
         If your application is successful, we will record the type of property we
          would match you to, your 3 areas of choice, the number of bedrooms
          you require for your family's needs, your date of application and
          nomination group.
         When an accessible property is referred to us it is always matched to
          the mobility needs of people on the database.
         You will be contacted before your name is put forward to a housing
          provider for a property. However, you will only be able to refuse 3
          offers or decline to be nominated to a property on 3 occasions before
          your details are removed from the waiting list.
         You will have to renew your application every 12 months in order to
          remain on the waiting list. You will be contacted by ACCESS
          Liverpool when it is time to renew


How do I get my name on the waiting list? You can contact the service for an
application form or you can find one of these forms at any of our One Stop Shops
or in your local Housing Association's office. You can also ring ACCESS
Liverpool on 0151 233 2150 for advice. We may be able to arrange an
appointment for a home visit if necessary. You may also visit our wheelchair
accessible offices at:

ACCESS Liverpool, 3rd floor, Sir Thomas House, (Age Concern Building)
5 Sir Thomas Street, Liverpool, L1 6BW

Office hours are:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9.00am - 4.00pm
Tuesday's 1.00pm - 4.00pmTelephone: 0151 233 2150
Fax: 0151 233 2155
Email: access.liverpool@liverpool.gov.uk

Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   18
The Common Allocation Policy for Sheltered Housing
What is Sheltered Housing?

Sheltered housing is accommodation for rent, which is specially designed for
older people, grouped together, usually within one complex. There is usually a
range of communal facilities available such as a lounge, laundry, hairdressing
room and so on. Each complex is usually called a scheme and has a scheme
manager.

Sheltered housing can be applied for on ACCESS Liverpool's Common
Application Form. You can find one of these forms at any of our One Stop Shops
or in your local Housing Association's office. You can also ring ACCESS
Liverpool on 0151 233 2150 for advice.

What help is provided in sheltered housing?

Each flat has an alarm which you can use to summon help. This is fixed in the
flat and is not a personal alarm you would wear (although you could arrange for
yourself to have one of these too).

A scheme manager is available on a part-time or full-time basis during week-
days. It is their duty to make a daily check on all of their tenants, in person or on
the intercom system. When the scheme manager is off duty, tenants are linked
by their alarm to a call centre and staff there will be able to contact someone for
assistance - either the tenant's named carer or the emergency services if
needed.

What help is not provided in sheltered housing?

Scheme mangers are not there to help tenants with shopping, cooking, cleaning,
administering medicines or any other personal support. If you need this help, you
should make sure before moving that you have arranged for your family to help
you, or a private agency, or Social Services.

It is your responsibility to do all internal decoration, upkeep and furnishing of your
property.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   19
What Standards can you expect when we receive your application for
Sheltered Housing?


         Within 10 working days of receiving your completed form, ACCESS
          Liverpool will send you an acknowledgement letter confirming
          receipt and explaining what will happen next.
         An assessment of your need for sheltered housing will be made
          from your application form so it is important that your application is
          fully completed.
         If it is necessary for a member of staff from ACCESS Liverpool to
          visit you at your home you will be contacted beforehand to make an
          appointment.
         ACCESS Liverpool will then write to you usually within 30 working
          days to inform you of the outcome of the assessment.
         If you are rejected for any of your chosen schemes the reason for
          this will be made clear and if you are accepted you will be told your
          Date of Application on the waiting list.
         The length of time that you have to wait will be influenced by the
          popularity of the scheme and the number of vacant properties that
          arise within it.
         You will have to renew your application every 12 months in order to
          remain on the waiting list. You will be contacted by ACCESS
          Liverpool when it is time to renew
         If you wish to know anything about your application you can contact
          ACCESS Liverpool who will be happy to help.



Extra Care Sheltered Housing

What if I need extra care and help, and my family cannot provide this?

There is also a new kind of sheltered accommodation in Liverpool called Extra
Care Sheltered Housing. This is designed for older people who need help with
certain daily tasks for example managing meals and/or personal care activities
like washing and dressing.

In order to be accepted onto a waiting list for Extra Care Sheltered Housing, you
must be assessed by your local authority as being in need of care and support.
Your local authority will write a Care Plan which will outline what your needs are
and how these will be met. Care and support for people living in Extra Care
housing is arranged as part of the Care Plan and you need to be willing to accept
this care and support from the care agency in order to get into Extra Care
Sheltered Housing.



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   20
If you have care and support needs and are interested in moving to Extra Care
Sheltered Housing, you can do so by completing the ACCESS Liverpool
sheltered housing application form or by contacting them for more information on
0151 233 2150.

Assistance to adults with Learning Disability seeking accommodation

ACCESS Liverpool is currently in the initial stages of developing a housing
advice and information service for people with learning difficulties. Together with
our partners in housing and social care, ACCESS Liverpool is seeking to
establish a single application and assessment route into supported
accommodation and to general housing with access to floating support where
appropriate.


If you would like to know more about whether ACCESS Liverpool can help you or
someone in your family with a learning disability then contact the service for more
information.

ACCESS Liverpool, 3rd floor, Sir Thomas House, (Age Concern Building)
5 Sir Thomas Street, Liverpool, L1 6BW

Telephone: 0151 233 2150 Fax: 0151 233 2155
Email: access.liverpool@liverpool.gov.uk




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   21
Adaptations and Equipment to use in your Home
If you have a permanent physical and/or sensory impairment which makes it
difficult for you to carry out every-day activities in your home, and to help you
remain independent for as long as possible, you are entitled to an assessment of
your needs.
Following this assessment, we may be able to offer:
      Advice and assistance in the form of equipment or adaptations to help
          you. (You also need to be aware that adaptations are different from
          repairs)
      The range is from small items (e.g. raised toilet seats and additional rails)
          to more complicated, major adaptations such as building works. Often, a
          combination of the two is needed.
      Some items are funded by Community Services, but we can also advise
          you if you want to buy equipment independently.
      We work very closely with colleagues in the Primary Care Trust to ensure
          that any items you may need urgently, (for instance if you are about to be
          discharged from hospital) are provided as quickly as possible.
      Adult services also commission services from Liverpool Voluntary Society
          for the Blind and Merseyside Society for Deaf People who provide
          specialist assessments for people who are deaf, hard of hearing,
          registered blind or partially sighted.
      If you have already adapted your property or purchased equipment before
          you have been assessed, you will not be reimbursed.
      If you need adaptations, the current process we follow depends on who
          owns your property.

Having an Assessment of Your Needs

An Occupational Therapy assessment may take place at home or over the
telephone, or in some cases, a self-assessment can take place. If you have a
spell in hospital, the Hospital Occupational Therapist may carry out an
assessment before you are discharged, but only the equipment you need for a
safe discharge can be requested by them.
The Community Services Occupational therapist can recommend a variety of
adaptations, for example:-
      Stair lifts
      Through-ceiling lifts
      Step lifts
      Hoisting equipment
      Special toilets
      Bathroom adaptations
      Widening doors
      Ramps and step alterations
      Repositioning of light, heat and power switches
      Levelling floors for wheelchair access.

Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   22
Major Adaptations

Major building adaptations can be considered but usually this is when all other
options are exhausted. If major adaptations are required, you may have to make
a contribution towards the cost, if using a Mandatory Disabled Facilities Grant.
A Mandatory Disabled Facilities Grant is a means-tested grant which is available
for adapting a property to meet a disabled persons needs. This should be their
main home once the adaptations have been done.

Adaptations That Can Be Provided

The Community Services Occupational Therapist will visit your home and decide
whether you need any adaptations that may need to be funded with a Mandatory
Disabled Facilities Grant.
A Mandatory Disabled Facilities Grant is available for the following:-
    To allow access by the disabled occupant to and from his or her home
    To provide adaptations to make a property safe for the disabled person
      and their carer.
    To allow access to a main family room.
    To allow access to a room which may be used as a bedroom by the
      disabled person.
    To allow access to a toilet, bath or shower, and hand basin which can be
      used by the disabled person.
    To allow access to food preparation and cooking.
    To improve the heating system in the home to meet the medical needs of
      the disabled person.
    To allow access to heating, power and lighting controls.
    To allow the disabled person access and movement around his or her
      home so they can care for their immediate family.



Waiting Lists and Priority Procedures

If the Occupational therapist recommends adaptations using a Mandatory
Disabled Facilities Grant, your referral will join a queue managed by Agency
Services.
You will be added to the list according to the date of the recommendation by the
Occupational Therapist. Although the City Council is making progress in reducing
the waiting time for these Grants, the process is long and involves planning
applications etc.
A priority award system is in operation to deal with the critical needs of some
disabled service users, following a set of criteria, and staff from the Occupational
therapy service and Agency services meet regularly to consider the applications.



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   23
Further Guidance Notes

Additional Guidance Notes about grants are available from Agency Services
(0151 233 2317) and include:-
    “Test of Resources”
    “Agency Services”
    “What to do after grant approval”
    “Mandatory Disabled Facilities Grant”
    “Grant Conditions after the works have been completed”




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   24
Carers
You are a carer if you provide substantial and regular unpaid care to a spouse,
partner, parent, child, sibling, other relative or friend who due to illness or
disability would not be able to live in the community without your help. You are
legally entitled to an assessment of your own needs to see whether you can get
assistance to help you continue in your role as a carer. You can have a carers
assessment even if the person you care for has refused an assessment or help
from Community Services.

What is a Carers’ Assessment?
A Carers‟ Assessment is usually carried out by a member of staff from Adult
Social Care. They will meet with you and ask you questions to find out what help
you might need and look at ways of meeting your needs perhaps by involving
other organisations. You can also complete a Carers‟ Self Assessment which
enables you to identify your own needs and how those needs can best be met.
Your Carers Assessment will be reviewed at regular intervals or when you
request it. If your circumstances change you can request a reassessment.

How do I get a Carers’ Assessment?
You should ask the Social Worker, who is involved with the person you care for,
for a Carers‟ Assessment and they should be able to help you. Alternatively you
need to contact Careline and request a Carers‟ Assessment. Contact details in
the appendices.

What happens next?
Following your request for a Carers‟ Assessment, you will be contacted to
arrange a date for your assessment to take place. Likewise, when your self
assessment has been received you will be contacted to enable you to discuss its
content further with a Social Worker. If there are issues or problems that you
identify as a result of talking to the Social Worker, a Care Plan will be drawn up
detailing what needs to be done and who will do it. You will be given a copy of
the care plan.

Do I have to pay for a Carers’ Assessment?
You do not have to pay for a Carers‟ Assessment, but you may have to pay
something towards any services that you receive as a result of the assessment.
You will be given information about this.

Strategic Aims for 2005/06
The 2005/06 Liverpool Supporting Carers Strategy is a multi-agency plan that
has been developed in partnership and following extensive consultation with
carers and organisations supporting carers. It provides a strategic framework for
developing and delivering carer support services in Liverpool.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   25
The strategy has been broken down into 9 key priorities for action:

       Identifying Carers
       Information
       Consultation and Involvement
       Carers Assessments
       Short Breaks and Support Services
       Direct Payments
       Maintaining the Health of Carers
       Carers from Black and Minority Ethnic Communities
       Young Carers

    What Standards of Service can you expect?

       We will offer a Carers assessment to any Carer providing regular and
        substantial care to a person eligible for support from Social Services. This
        will usually happen at the time of review or assessment of the person you
        care for.
       The outcome of your Carers assessment will be written down and shared
        with you.
       Carers views will be taken into account as part of the assessment or
        review of the service user.
       Carers will be supported in their role to allow them to continue caring.
       We will work in partnership with organisations that represent carers by
        consulting with them and listening to their views about the services we
        provide
       Each year we will report on the number of carers receiving an assessment
        or review.




For information on how to obtain a copy of the 2005/06 Supporting Carers
Strategy or any advice or information regarding carers support and services
please contact Careline contact details in appendices.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   26
Our Commitment to Equalities
The City Council has committed to:

“Recognise and promote people’s individual qualities irrespective of age,
gender, race, sexual orientation and disability”

As a direct result of the Equal Opportunities Public Review, the Council made a
commitment to providing a specific resource to improve the development and
implementation of equal opportunities.

The Equality Team is a corporate resource, working with all service areas to
improve access to services and opportunities.

Our aim is to:

       Develop strategies and plans to improve service provision for traditionally
        disadvantaged groups
       Improve access to services and offer wider opportunities afforded by the
        council for these groups
       Assist other service areas to work more effectively within the community
       Assist service areas to ensure their services are applied in a non-
        discriminatory way which meets legal requirements
       Inform and develop the workforce to promote equal opportunity in all of our
        activities
       Manage and communicate the councils performance on equality

The priorities are:

       Implementing key recommendations arising from the McPherson report of
        the Stephen Lawrence enquiry
       Challenges for the Future and ensuring all service areas fulfil their
        responsibilities
       Preparing an action plan for producing and implementing community
        cohesion for the city, involving all communities, voluntary sector, public
        and private companies
       Supporting service areas to comply with equality legislation including the
        Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000, the Disability Discrimination Act
        1995, the Human Rights Act 1998, the Equal Pay Act 1970, the Sex
        Discrimination Act 1975 and EU employment Directives on Sexual
        Orientation, Religion & Belief and Age
       Auditing the Council's performance against National performance
        indicators including the Equality Standard for Local Government and
        making recommendations on a way forward
       Co-ordinating a series of project and policy initiatives linked to race and
        regeneration.

Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   27
 Equality Action Plans
The council proposes to achieve its equalities targets through an action
planning approach applied across the council to:

       improve services
       monitor customers' background, requirements and service use
       publicise services to all sections of the community
       improve accessibility
       consult customers
       ensure suppliers and partners observe our equality standards
       monitor and train our workforce

As part of the Corporate Equality Plan, all the council's services have a service
equality action plan, setting out how they will improve under these headings and
the progress they are making. These equality action plans are held on a council
wide accessible database which service managers update and which are
interrogated regularly throughout the year to monitor progress on the
implementation of services' equality action plans.

From April 2005, the council has taken the decision to publish its equality action
plans each quarter (July, October, January and April) so that service users can
also monitor progress and inform equality priorities by sharing their views with the
appropriate service plan author.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   28
Appendices

     1. Strategies, plans and leaflets

A list of strategies, plans and leaflets mentioned in Better Care Higher Standards
and how these can be accessed.

How we communicate with you.

Leaflets produced by Community Services
These leaflets are available through One Stop Shops.

       Assessments and care plans for you and your carer.
       Direct payments – money we can give you to choose and pay for the care
        you need.
       Fair access to care - How we use government guidelines to decide how
        we can help.
       Frozen Meals - delivered to your home.
       Help for Carers - Carers‟ assessment information.
       Help for carers of older people who have dementia or a mental illness.
       How to contact Adult Social Care if you need help.
       Occupational Therapy services - Helping you to live independently in your
        own home.
       Why we hold information about you and what we do with it – your
        questions answered.
       Your guide to social services for older people in Liverpool.

If you require a translation of these leaflets please telephone Marie Jones on
0151 233 4437. We are also a member of Language Line and can arrange
interpreters in different languages for this service please contact Careline on
0151 233 3800.

Corporate Performance Plan: Can be viewed in hard copy at libraries and One
Stop Shops. Also available on www.liverpool.gov.uk A-Z council services,
Corporate Performance Plan.

Liverpool First Community Strategy: Available online at
www.liverpoolfirst.org/ComStrategy.asp

Draft Supporting People 5 Year Strategy 2007 - 2012: Available at
www.liverpool.gov.uk A-Z council services –Supporting People or by contacting
Careline 0151 233 3800 or email: wecanhelp@liverpool.gov.uk

Equal Opportunities Statement: Available at www.liverpool.gov.uk A-Z council
services – Equal Opportunities.


Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   29
Carers Strategy: www.liverpool.gov.uk A-Z council services
To obtain hard copies of the strategy please contact:
Careline (Adults) Tel: 0151 233 3019




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   30
Appendices

     2. Useful Telephone numbers, email addresses and web
        addresses.

Adult Social Care

Liverpool Direct - General Enquiries: Telephone: 0151 233 3000

Minicom: 0151 225 3275 email; liverpooldirect@liverpool.gov.uk

To make an appointment to see a customer service advisor in your local
One Stop Shop telephone 0151 233 3016.

One Stop Shops

Belle Vale: 6 Hedgefield Road, Liverpool, L25 2RW

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 9am – 5pm.

Broadway: Unit 1 Broadway Shopping Precinct, Broad Lane, Liverpool, L11 1JB.

Opening Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 8am – 6pm.
Thursday 8am – 8pm. Saturday 9am - 1pm.

City Centre: Municipal Buildings, Dale Street, Liverpool L69 2DH.

Opening Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 8am – 6pm Thursday
8am – 8pm Saturday 9am - 1pm

Dingle: 200 Park Road, Liverpool, L8 6SJ

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm.

Garston: Garston Community Library, Bowden Road, Liverpool, L19 1QN

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm.

Kirdale: 101 Walton Road, Liverpool, L4 4AG

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm.

Knotty Ash: 269 Blackmoor drive, Liverpool, L12 3HA

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm.


Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   31
Old Swan: 1a Derby Lane, Liverpool, L13 6QA

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm.

Speke: Parklands, Conleach Road, Liverpool, L24 0TY

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 9am – 5pm.

Wavertree: Wavertree Library, Picton Road, Wavertree, Liverpool L15 4LP

Opening Hours: Monday - Friday 8.30am – 5.30pm.

Careline – Liverpool City Council Social Care Call centre - 24 hour seven days a
week service: Adults : 0151 233 3800

Adult Protection – Careline 0151 233 3800

Integrated Children’s Services: 0151 233 3700

Carers - For information on carers support or if you would like a copy of the
2005/06 Supporting Carers Strategy: 0151 233 3019

Careline email contact: wecanhelp@liverpool.gov.uk

Minicom: 0151 225 2500

We Can Help – Helpline providing advice/support relating to domestic violence
0800 731 1313

We Can Help – Helpline providing advice/support relating to incidents of hate
crime 0800 731 3200

Carers’ Free phone and Advice Line: 0800 731 4140

Local Solutions Carers Project: 0151 705 2307.
Main Switchboard 0151 709 0990.

Fifty Plus - www.fiftyplus.liverpool.gov.uk Email:
FiftyPlusAdministrator@liverpool.gov.uk

Age Concern (Liverpool) – Sir Thomas Street, Liverpool L1 6BW

Telephone 0151 330 5678 email: mail@acliverpool.org.uk

www.acliverpool.org.uk



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   32
Help the Aged Senior Line – Telephone 0808 800 6565

National Supporting People web site: www.spkweb.org.uk

Performance Indicators for social services: http://www.csci.gov.uk/

Other Formats and Translations – Copies of information in either Braille,
large print, audio tape format or into different languages contact Careline
0151 233 3800

We are a member of Language Line and can arrange interpreters in
different languages.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   33
Appendices

     3. “How to complain” What to do if you are unhappy with the
        service.

Adult Social Care comments, compliments and complaints procedure provides
useful feedback and helps us to improve what we do

       Comments provide useful ideas on how we can improve a service

       Compliments let us know when you are happy with a service and tell us
        when something is working well.

       Complaints tell us when you are not happy with a service and this gives us
        the chance to put things right and learn from our mistakes

How do I make a compliment comment or complaint?

You can let us know your comment compliment or Complaint in any of the
following ways

       Pick up and complete a comments, compliments & complaints form at a
        one stop shop and other city council reception points.

       E-mail: AdultServiceComplaints@liverpool.gov.uk

       By filling in a complaints form on line on www.liverpool.gov.uk

       Telephone Liverpool Direct 0151 233 3000 or the Customer Care Team
        on 0151 233 1126

       By Fax: 0151 233 4496:

       By talking to a member of staff or their manager about your concerns

       Write to:        Complaints Manager
                         Customer Care Team
                         Community Services
                         Municipal Buildings
                         Dale Street
                         Liverpool
                         L2 2DH




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   34
What happens once I have made a complaint?

We will acknowledge your complaint and ask a manager to respond to your
complaints within 10 working days. If this will take longer we will let your know.

If you are not happy with the response you receive, you can contact the
Customer Care Team who will arrange for an investigating officer to carry out a
full and fair investigation within 25 days. If the investigation will take longer we
will let your know.

If you are still not satisfied with the response you have the right to ask us for a
review-panel hearing.

If you are still not satisfied, you can complain to the Local Ombudsman. You can
contact the Ombudsman at any point, but if you have not given us the chance to
respond to your complaint, the ombudsman may decide to send it back to us to
investigate. You can contact the ombudsman at:

The Commission for Local Administration in England
Beverley House
17 Shipton Road
York
YO30 5FZ
Phone: 01904 380200

If you have sent us a comment we will pass this on to the relevant service
manager to respond.

If you have sent us a compliment we will pass this on to the member of staff and
their manager.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   35
Appendices

     4. The Corporate Customer Care Standards

This can be viewed at www.liverpool.gov.uk A-Z of services, customer care
standards.

Our Key Customer Care Standard Targets

       We aim to resolve your enquiry first time.
       Our policy is to deal with your enquiries in a calm, concise and polite
        manner and always to the highest level to ensure maximum efficiency at
        all times.
        We have staff that are multi-lingual, trained in British sign language/lip
        reading skills and using language line we have access to over 100 ethnic
        languages.
       Our One Stop Shops are Disability Discrimination Act compliant and we
        also offer the use of a private interview room on request.
       We will be responsible and accountable for the accuracy and quality of our
        work.
       On request we will provide you with an update regarding your enquiry.
       „Have your say‟ is available for comment, compliments or complaints.


Our Staff

       We will provide a polite, welcoming and efficient service.
       We will be responsible and accountable for the accuracy and quality of our
        work.
       No matter what the enquiry, our staff will deal impartially and with
        discretion. All matters will be treated in confidence.
       We will provide staff with the training and support required to deliver an
        excellent service to you.
       Customers facing staff wear a uniform and name badge so you can easily
        identify them.

We aim to provide the following excellent level of Customer Service

       If you require an appointment, we aim to offer this service within 5 working
        days.
       We aim to see you within 10 minutes of your arrival.
       We aim to have your complete Housing and Council Tax benefit form
        processed within 14 days.
       We will reply to correspondence within 10 working days.



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   36
       All printed materials produced by Liverpool City Council can be requested
        in another language or in an alternative format.
       We aim to answer your call promptly and in a clear, concise and friendly
        manner.
       Once your call is answered you will be given the name of the service area
        you are through to and the name of the person you are speaking to.
       During your call we will repeat back to you your details to ensure
        accuracy, providing constant feedback on how we are dealing with your
        enquiry and what happens next.
       We may need to obtain more details; here we will call you back within 48
        hours.
       During your call we will either deal with your enquiry in full or forward your
        request to the relevant service for follow up action.
       Our vision is for all our calls to be taken by a real person, rather than a
        machine.

Contacting us through email/ fax or in writing

       You can contact us through email/fax, or alternatively via our website at
        www.liverpool.gov.uk
       We offer you the choice of having the information you request either
        emailed or faxed to you.
       Email enquiries will be replied to within 24 hours. We will send you an
        acknowledgement of your email, action taken and when we will be able to
        respond fully.
       If you write to us we will respond to your letter within 10 working days of
        your letter being received.

Using our Website

       We offer the use of access keys rather than a mouse.
       You can specify the font size and text, background and foreground
        colours.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   37
Appendices


     5. Fair access to Care

How we use government guidelines to decide how we can help you.
It is our priority to help you keep your independence but we have limited
resources. We follow national guidelines from the Department of Health called
'Fair access to care services'.
These guidelines categorise what the risks to independence would be if your
needs are not met. There are 4 categories - critical, substantial, moderate and
low.

What are eligibility criteria?
These are the conditions you have to meet to get help from us.
Councils are allowed to decide whether they have enough resources to provide
help for all four of the eligibility criteria bands, or just for some of them.

Who can we help?
In Liverpool, we have enough money to provide services to people in the critical,
substantial, and moderate bands. These three bands constitute those eligible for
services.

People in the low band do not meet our eligibility criteria and so will not get a
directly funded service, but we will provide information and advice on other
sources of help where possible.

We will review our eligibility criteria every 12 months.

How does it work?
When you contact us for help we will offer you an assessment. This looks at your
situation and shows what help you need.
Together with you, we will work out how much your independence is at risk if you
don't receive help.
When working out the risk to your independence, government guidance says we
need to focus on 4 factors that are central to a person's independence.

       Autonomy and freedom to make choices. This is about your ability to make
        choices affecting your situation.
       Health and safety, including freedom from harm, abuse and neglect, and
        taking wider issues of housing and community safety in to account.
       The ability to manage personal and other daily routines.
       Involvement in family and wider community life, including leisure, hobbies,
        unpaid and paid work, learning and volunteering.



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   38
We will also take in to account:

           Help you have from carers, and other agencies.

    Risks faced by others such as your carers.

           Which risks are acceptable to you, or are a natural part of independent
            living.
           What are the priorities for an assessment?

Brief guides to the bands are:



 Critical

  People who are in a crisis situation or are actually at risk or pose a
 serious risk, when;

            Life is or will be threatened; and/or
            Significant health problems have developed or will develop;
             and/or
            There is or will be little or no choice and control over vital aspects
             of the immediate environment; and/or
            Serious abuse or neglect has occurred or will occur; and/or
            There is or will be an inability to carry out vital personal care or
             domestic routines; and/or
            Vital involvement in work, education or learning cannot or will not
             be sustained; and/or
            Vital social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be
             sustained; and/or
            Vital family or other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will
             not be undertaken.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0    39
  Substantial

  People and/or carers who are having significant difficulties in coping and
  are potentially at significant risk, when;

          There is or will be only partial choice and control over the
           immediate environment; and/or
          Abuse or neglect has occurred or will occur; and/or
          There is or will be an inability to carry out the majority of personal
           care or domestic routines; and/or
          Involvement in many aspects of work, education or learning
           cannot or will not be sustained; and/or
          The majority of social support systems and relationships cannot or
           will not be sustained; and/or
          The majority of family and other social roles and responsibilities
           cannot or will not be undertaken.




  Moderate

  People and/or carers who are finding it hard to cope and there is some
  risk to their health, when:

  There is, or will be, an inability to carry out several personal care tasks or
  domestic routines; and/or

  Involvement in several aspects of work, education or learning cannot or
  will not be sustained; and/or

  Several social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be
  sustained; and/or

  Several family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will
  not be undertaken.



Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   40
  Low

  Will generally not get an assessment but will be given advice and
  information where possible.

  People whose quality of life could be improved but their situation is stable
  and there is no risk to them or their carers, when:

  There is or will be an inability to carry out one or two personal care or
  domestic routines; and/or

  Involvement in one or two aspects of work, education or learning cannot
  or will not be sustained; and/or

  One or two social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be
  sustained; and/or

  One or two family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will
  not be undertaken.

      What Standards can you expect?

         You can expect an assessment to begin within 48 hours if an
          appropriate member of staff deems it necessary.
         If we assess that you need a service then we target that it will be
          in place within 4 weeks, there may be occasions where this is not
          possible. In such cases we undertake to have the care in place as
          soon as possible.
         If your needs are prioritised as low you will generally not receive
          an assessment but will be given advice and information where
          possible.
         A full assessment if you are worried about your health or about
          being independent at home
         A copy of your agreed statement of needs
         A choice of services to support you at home
         A plan of the care arranged so that you know who will visit and
          when
         Your age should not effect the type or level of service you are
          offered
         Staff should listen to your opinion and take your views into
          account at all stages




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   41
Carrying out an assessment does not necessarily mean we will give you a
service.

What happens next?

We will give a level of risk to each of the four factors of independence by
matching the risks identified to you, to the circumstances described in the
Governments four eligibility bands - critical, substantial, moderate or low. Your
overall eligibility band will be the highest of the four levels.

For example if the risk to your level of independence is:

       low for autonomy and freedom of choice
       moderate for health and safety
       substantial for managing personal and daily routines
       low for family and social involvement

Then your overall eligibility will be the highest of the four levels - so in this
example you will be in the substantial eligibility band. This means we can meet all
your needs that are moderate or substantial. We can't meet any that are low as
they are outside our eligibility criteria.

What happens if I'm not eligible?
We will write and tell you whether you are eligible or not. If you are not, we will
provide you with advice and information about other sources of help in the
community.

You can also make a complaint if you are unhappy with our decision.

What happens if my needs change?
If your needs change you should contact Careline or your social worker and ask
for a review.

We will work out if you still meet the eligibility criteria. You may find you are in a
higher eligibility band, or that you no longer meet the criteria at all.




Information and Intelligence 23/04/07 V1.0   42
Comments / Feedback Forms

Your feedback is important to us and will provide us with useful information on
how we can improve on future editions of the charter.

You can either complete a feedback form by accessing the link here or if you
would like us to send you a postal form then please contact the Information and
Intelligence Team on the telephone number below.

233 4167 or 233 3162




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