A SIMPLE GUIDE TO WRITING A WORK PROGRAMME

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					A SIMPLE GUIDE TO WRITING A WORK PROGRAMME

Introduction

This briefing note is an abridged version of a document that needs to be completed by
all applicants requesting funding of £5,001 and above to Ealing Council’s annual grant
programme. We thought it would be useful to revise the document as it outlines a
number of basic methods and techniques that voluntary and community groups can use
in the planning of their activities.

This brief guide should be read in conjunction with some of our other simple guides,
namely: “Business Planning”, “Developing Performance Indicators” and “Planning,
Running, Monitoring and Evaluating Activities” which you will find elsewhere on this site.

There are four basic components to writing a work programme: objectives, key tasks,
targets and evaluation.

Objectives

An objective is a statement of what you want to achieve over a period of time based on
meeting the organisation's overall aim.

e.g.      “To increase transport provision to and from the centre for children with
          disabilities from two to three days a week within six months".

          "To provide leisure time activities on three evenings a week for the over 50s by
          the end of the year".

Objectives should be SMART, i.e.

Specific                      -    there should be no doubt as to what is to be achieved;
Measurable                    -    you must be able to measure progress towards achievement;
Agreed                        -   the people involved in achieving the objectives must agree them;
Realistic                     -    they must be achievable; and
Time based                    -    they must have a time for completion

Key Tasks

Each objective should have a number of key tasks that need to be undertaken in order
to meet that objective.

A Key Task is an action or activity that must be carried out to achieve an objective. The
items listed must be non-routine and crucial without which the objective could be met.

e.g.      "Recruit additional volunteer drivers".

          "Raise funds to buy games, craft equipment, etc."



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Targets

There should also be a number of targets or standards that you hope to reach for each
key task.

A Target is the level of achievement of a task or a date for its completion.

e.g.      "3 drivers to be recruited by end of September"

          "Aim to raise £5,000 pounds by December"

Whether or not you reach your target is a measure of your organisation's performance.

Evaluation

At periodic intervals, you should attempt some form of evaluation of your objectives and
services. You will need to look at the targets and performance indicators against each
key task and assess your success in meeting the targets and completing each task.

The evaluation should include your observations e.g. on why something worked
particularly well; why some targets have not been met; what might be done differently in
the future; or how you might meet additional or changing needs.

As well as being a management tool for your organisation, evaluation of the
performance of the organisation will form the basis of your reports to your funders.




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