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EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE

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					Appendix 1


                     EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE

                             BEST VALUE REVIEW

                   BASELINE SERVICE ASSESSMENT

STRATEGIC PURPOSE AND CONTEXT

What are we trying to achieve?
The aim of the Early Years and Childcare Service is to work in partnership with others
to maximise the availability of quality pre-school and childcare opportunities in
Shropshire for all children.

What purpose does the service have for the user, the community or the Council?
The purpose of the service is to identify children in non-maintained pre-school and
childcare settings who may have additional needs, and to provide support to enable
those needs to be met in an inclusive environment, as part of the lifelong learning
culture in the community. The service is also part of the Council’s arrangements for
meeting its statutory duty to secure the provision of nursery education for eligible
children.

What are the benefits to the whole community of the service?
The principal beneficiaries of the service are the children who have additional needs
and their families. The wider community benefits from a rationalised approach to
integration in an inclusive environment, minimising the adverse effects on the peer
group of unsupported additional needs within the setting.

What are the current objectives of the service?
The current objectives of the service are to ensure that early years and childcare
providers in the non-maintained sector have access to advice, guidance and support
with regard to children in their settings who may have special educational needs. The
process by which the Mentors provide this support can be summarised as follows:
When approached by an early years or childcare setting in the non-maintained sector,
the SEN Mentor will
 ensure that parents of the individual children are informed of the SEN Mentor
   involvement
 follow up the initial visit to monitor the effect of advice and give further support if
   necessary
 record all visits on a “note of visit” form, leaving a copy with the setting
 keep the Nursery Teacher Area Co-ordinator informed of any advice given relating
   to the management of the curriculum, staff or children
 meet with a representative from the Psychological Service and Learning Support
   Team on a half termly basis
 treat all matters relating to individual children and settings with confidentiality

What is the current level of satisfaction in the community as a whole rather than
amongst users?
The service was set up in May 2000 and has been in operation since June 2000.
Levels of satisfaction among service users have not yet been assessed.




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What outcomes from the delivery of the service are sought?
The overall outcome sought from the delivery of the service is to improve the level of
engagement in the learning process of identified children receiving the service.
Success in achieving this outcome can be measured in a number of ways, including:
     the number of children with additional needs who continue to receive early
       years and childcare provision within an inclusive mainstream setting,
      quality performance indicators such OFSTED reports on the settings,
       a reduction in the number of disruptive incidents in the settings which
       previously were the result of unmet additional needs,
       positive outcomes for children which result in the withdrawal of the service,
    
Why are we carrying out the service/activity at all?
The service forms part of the arrangements made by the Council to fulfil its obligations
in respect of securing good quality nursery provision for all four year olds whose
parents want it. The service is also offered to providers of pre-school childcare
services in the County.

Is there a statutory duty to deliver the service?
The School Standards and Framework Act 1998 sets out the duty of local educational
authorities to secure high quality local nursery education provision for all eligible four
year olds whose parents want it. The service recognises the differing needs of
children and tries to ensure that all eligible children have access to state-funded
nursery education. The LEA has a duty to provide appropriate levels of support to all
non-maintained providers of nursery education to ensure that high quality provision is
a feature of all registered settings. This service is one strand in the package of
support provided by the LEA.
The Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership, which is supported and
serviced by the LEA, is funded by DfEE to sustain, expand and support the delivery of
high quality childcare services in the County. In many instances, nursery education
providers in Shropshire are simultaneously delivering childcare services in the same
settings. The service, therefore, assists both the LEA and the EYDCP to meet their
respective objectives.

What has happened within the Service in, say, the last five years?
Free nursery education for four year olds was introduced through a voucher system in
April 1997. A change of government in May 1997 altered the administrative
arrangements surrounding the scheme and set in process a statutory framework for
the provision of nursery education.
At the same time, Early Years Development Partnerships were encouraged to expand
their membership to become Early Years Development and Childcare Partnerships.
Annual plans have since been required for approval by the Secretary of State for
Education which set clear targets for the expansion of services and the improvement
of equality of access to services and provision for pre-school children with special
educational needs, children in need and children with disabilities.
In drawing up the Early Years Development and Childcare Plan for Shropshire for
2000-2001, the Partnership sought to introduce a service to support non-maintained
providers and children in cases where children had additional needs to be addressed.
The Plan identified two different strategies for providing support to pre-school children
and children of school age in after-school facilities. This Review deals specifically with
arrangements relating to support for pre-school children in nursery education and
childcare settings.
The SEN Mentor Scheme potentially supports in the region of 160 non-maintained
providers. Initially, five Mentors were engaged half a day per week to implement the
scheme. It was recognised that if the scheme was successful, demand for the service


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would be likely to grow, and it would become necessary to reconsider the level of
support available to providers. The Partnership initiated the scheme to run as a pilot
project for up to two years. The Best Value Review of the SEN Mentor Scheme
provides a timely opportunity to assess its effectiveness.

Does the service have high political priority?
The Council fully recognises the importance of education and childcare services and
the significant part they play in promoting lifelong learning in the County. Historically,
the Council has not been a significant provider of these services itself, due in part to
the impact on viability that geography of the County has, and due also to other budget
pressures on the Council. Recent developments in Partnership working have, in fact,
endorsed the arrangements in Shropshire where the majority of these services are
delivered by the private, voluntary and independent sectors.
Nationally, the expansion of early years and childcare services, as delivered through
the National Childcare Strategy, underpins the drive for social inclusion. Funding to
develop these services, via Early Years Development and Childcare Partnerships, has
increased significantly since the launch of the National Childcare Strategy in 1998. A
proportion of Childcare Grant is ring-fenced to support children with special
educational needs.

Are there any corporate issues which need to be addressed?
The move towards universal nursery education entitlement for all three and four year
olds by September 2004 is likely to put pressure on the availability of places in the
non-maintained sectors. In addition, the provision of nursery outreach places will need
to be reviewed. Nursery outreach is currently offered alongside reception class
provision to a maximum of six four year olds in thirteen small rural schools where other
local pre-school provision cannot meet demand for the full entitlement of up to five
nursery education sessions per week. It would be inappropriate to extend the scheme
to three year olds, since reception classes in small rural schools frequently also
contain Key Stage One pupils. However, the universal entitlement to nursery
education for three and four year olds may provide opportunities for creative solutions
to problems to be found in rural areas.


POLICY FRAMEWORK

How does the Service contribute towards the Council’s objectives?
The SEN Mentor Scheme contributes towards both the Corporate objectives and the
Education Directorate objectives as follows:

Corporate Priorities relevant to the Service
 Sustainability
  - by providing support to providers in all areas of the County, helping to maintain
  children within local settings, and achieving social progress which recognises the
  needs of everyone.

 Social Inclusion
  -     supporting children with additional needs in mainstream provision and
     overcoming disadvantages by delivering new ways of providing information and
     access to services

   Lifelong Learning
    - by recognising that learning starts early and informally, and by supporting those
    with difficulties to help them develop confidence to participate in mainstream


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    learning activities

Education Directorate Targets relevant to the Service

   To continue to support schools in raising standards for pupils in Education,
    in accordance with the Education Development Plan
    In the context of the SEN Mentor Scheme, the term “schools” means
    establishments where pre-school children are educated and cared for.

   To empower people to participate in learning, enable progression and raise
    standards of achievement throughout life.

   To secure greater access to learning for all

   To be an organisation which is constantly seeking to learn, develop and
    secure high quality services

How does the Service currently benefit from being part of the Council?
The Service benefits from the Council’s considerable expertise in supporting school
age children with special educational needs. This wealth of experience is used to
support the delivery of the SEN Mentor Scheme in the non-maintained sector. The
involvement of the Advisory Service within the LEA and an Educational Psychologist
and a Learning Support Advisory Teacher in the delivery of the service has clear
benefits. The linking of this type of support before and after children achieve the age at
which statutory schooling begins facilitates consistency in the identification of special
educational needs and the subsequent provision that is made for such children.

How does the Council benefit from providing the service in-house?
The SEN Mentor Service provides support to nursery education and childcare
providers that are not part of the Council’s direct service provision.
The Service aims to sustain and improve external services that the County does not
provide itself. The Service, therefore, operates in recognition of and support for the
partnership that exists between the Council and private, voluntary and independent
nursery education and childcare providers. Additionally, because the LEA has a
statutory responsibility towards all children of legal school age, providing the service in-
house means that the LEA services that are concerned with children with special
educational needs, are informed about the pre-school arrangements for such children
and are better able to provide continuity for them.


What are the interfaces with other services/agencies/departments?
The interface with Children’s Services within the Education Directorate is explained in
the Section on the benefits to the Council of running the Service in-house.
The interface with the Advisory Service within the LEA, which has responsibility for
curriculum support and school improvement, has also been referred to. The SEN
Mentor Scheme also has an important interface with the Nursery Teacher Area Co-
ordinators who provide qualified teacher input to non-maintained education settings,
and with the Pre-School Learning Alliance Development Workers, who also have a
support function for providers. Social Services Registration and Inspection Officers
who also have regular contact with settings are represented on the Early Years
Development and Childcare Partnership and are aware of the service and its
objectives.




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What are the links to statutory plans?
The SEN Mentor Scheme is part of the arrangements put in place by the Early Years
Development and Childcare Partnership for the support of pre-school children in non-
maintained settings who may have additional needs. It is, therefore, an important part
of the Early Years Development and Childcare Plan. It also links to Priority 3 of the
Education Development Plan, which relates to improving the quality of early years
provision in all sectors.

What are the key policies that guide day to day operation of the service?
The Family Support Sub Group of the Early Years Development and Childcare
Partnership agreed the operating principles 21.6.99 and 22.7.99 of the service as part
of the process of producing the Early Years Development and Childcare Plan 2001-02.
The key principles are:
     ensuring access to LEA SEN support systems for non-maintained providers of
        early years and childcare services for pre-school children
     working in partnership with providers and other key agencies to maximise
        support to children and families
     supporting providers in developing skills and knowledge to make appropriate
        provision for children who may have additional needs

What are the links to other public agencies or other service providers and
common interests?
There are no direct links to other public agencies. However, interested agencies and
those with common interests are represented on the Family Support Sub Group of the
Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership. A list of represented
organisations can be found at sub-appendix a.


SUSTAINABILITY

Do you have or are you working on sustainability indicators and targets for the
service ?
At present there are no sustainability indicators and targets which are specific to the
service.

Have you completed a sustainability checklist for the service?
The Sustainability Checklist for the service is completed and attached at sub-appendix
b

How are you going to reduce negative impacts and maximise positive impacts
identified in the checklist?
Commitment to the scheme has been agreed as part of the Early Years Development
and Childcare Partnership Strategic plan. Evaluation is intended to be undertaken in
year two of the current Strategic Plan. The current scheme is a pilot project and any
recommendations as part of the Best Value Review process will be incorporated into
the monitoring and evaluation of the scheme in year 2002-2003

With what other service areas/other service delivery organisations is the service
inter-related? Should other links be made?
The Early Years and Childcare Partnership is an inclusive working body representing
all areas of the market sector. Representatives of all member organisations sit on
working sub groups which then make recommendations to the Partnership for
approval and implementation. Sub groups meet on a quarterly schedule with



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information sharing as an agenda item. A full list of the Family Support Sub Group
Members is attached at sub-appendix c.
Partnership membership of organisations is currently under review as part of the
current Implementation Plan. At present 33 different organisations have elected
representatives to sit on the main Partnership Group. Further links with other current
non-member organisations are being explored i.e. Community and Rural Transport
Network, Chamber of Commerce, Youth Service.

Are all linkages both direct and indirect, understood so that the potential
consequences of decisions are recognised?
Partnership working with the 33 representatives is a fundamental principle of the
EYDCP. In addition to the Quarterly Sub-group meetings, day to day contact exists
between all staff from organisations represented on the Partnership. This includes
representatives from private, voluntary, and maintained sectors. The development
team based at Shire Hall co-ordinate initiatives and contribute directly in conjunction
with the Advisory Service the delivery of SEN mentor scheme.

Has your sustainability assessment been verified by someone outside the
Directorate or County Council?
Advice has been sought from the County Council’s environmental co-ordinator


EQUALITY INFORMATION

How does the service contribute to equality objectives?
The initial motivation to provide the service was the Partnership’s concern to respond
to requests from providers for a mechanism to enable them to access the support
systems which were available to nursery providers in the maintained sector. The
service seeks to ensure that all children have equal access to such support systems,
irrespective of where they receive pre-school services.

Does the service meet the needs of the whole population?
The service is targeted at a small section of the population. It is designed to meet the
special educational needs of children of pre-school age who are accessing nursery
and childcare provision in non-maintained settings, and the support needs of the
providers of care and education for those children. Further, it is designed to identify
children whose development at around the age of three years may be causing
concern. The rationale for this is that those children with the greatest degree of
disability or special needs are likely to have been identified at or around birth by
medical professionals. Identifying less severe needs in children under three years may
require greater levels of professional expertise than is generally available among staff
in most pre-school settings across all sectors, and could result in unnecessary
labelling of children at a very early age.

Is the service delivered and promoted in ways that reach all sections of the
community?
The service is delivered and promoted in ways that reach all sections of the limited
target population described above. All providers who are registered to receive nursery
grant receive information about the scheme in a pack of information that is annually
updated. The SEN Mentors attend the regular Early Years Forum meetings around the
county and disseminate information about the scheme on those occasions. The
scheme is also promoted in the Early Years and Childcare Partnership newsletter that
is produced bi-annually, and the Children’s Information Service also holds information
about it. Additionally, agencies and organisations that regularly visit settings in the


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course of their support and development work promote the scheme as appropriate.

Is it necessary to make (reasonable) adjustments to how services are provided
to meet the new requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act?
Chapter 1 Section 6252 identifies pupils with special educational needs including those
with disabilities, as already being protected by the Education Act 1996. Section 31 of
the Education Act 1996 places a duty on LEAs and governing bodies of all maintained
schools “to have regard to the provisions of the code.” ( DfEE Code of Practice on
Special Educational Needs.) Section 4 of the 1996 Nursery Education and Grant
Maintained Schools Act extended this duty to those institutions providing nursery
education under partnership schemes. It is with regard to these guidelines that the
scheme operates.
Government is currently considering what additional protection disabled children may
require under the D.D. Act as part of the Disability Rights Task Force. Publication of
the proposals is expected late 2001. It is a registration and inspection requirement
under the Children Act 1989 that each registered early years provider has an Equal
Opportunity policy which promotes inclusion.


VOLUME OF SERVICE

What is the volume of key activities of the service?
The current arrangement of 3 SEN Mentors working for 0.1 days per week and 1
working for 0.2 per week offers support to 160 non-maintained registered nursery
education and childcare settings. The size of each cluster of settings varies to take
account of the rural nature of some parts of the county and travel time for the Mentors.
A total of 134 visits were made to settings between the beginning of the scheme in
May 2000 and March 2001. In addition the mentors have telephoned individual
settings and attended local forum meetings in order to raise awareness of the new
scheme; 18 settings have received funding through the scheme for additional support
within their groups in that time.

Who else provides the exact or similar service or the same or similar elements
of the service?
The Pre-School Learning Alliance operates a volunteer scheme to support children
with special needs and disabilities in Bridgnorth. This scheme was originally funded by
SCOPE for children with cerebral palsy in Bridgnorth. Limited funding is now secured
from Bridgnorth District Council to continue the scheme which has been opened to
children with other disabilities. Pre schools in Bridgnorth access the funding via their
local PLA branch to employ extra 1:1 workers in order to offer inclusive care to children
with disabilities.
The Advisory Service operate Learning Support Advisory Teachers employed by the
LEA to offer support and guidance to nursery staff in the maintained sector.


BENEFICIARIES OF THE SERVICE

What do you presently know about your customers?
There are two main groups of beneficiaries of the service; children who may have
additional needs and providers of early years and childcare services. There are 160
non-maintained nursery settings.

What is the present apparent demand for the service?
Demand for the service is increasing each term as awareness is raised of the services


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which the Mentors can offer, and the grants available for additional staffing support. As
stated in the introduction to the Code of Practice on the Identification and Assessment
of Special Educational Needs, it has been estimated that 20% of the school population
will have special educational needs at some time during their school career. From this
estimate it may be assumed that the potential demand for the service could be
approximately 600 children per year (20% of cohort).

Do you know if you meet all of your customers/ users needs?
The mentors have not failed to respond to requests for support from providers.
A survey of how well need has been met, has not yet been initiated because the
scheme is in its infancy.


RESOURCES EMPLOYED

What is the total level of statutory expenditure?
There is no statutory expenditure level.

What is the total level of non-statutory (discretionary) expenditure?
The total level of non-statutory allocation of expenditure for the year 2000-2001 was
£15,000

This was supported from the following budgets:
             Early Years Education Budget                   £ 5,000
             Partnership Child-care Grant                   £ 9,500
             Early Years Standards Fund                     £   500

               Total                                        £ 15,000

Actual end of year spend payments processed to
settings for additional support total                       £ 9,346

Payments to mentors and expenses                            £ 5,401

Non-budgeted corporate staff support time for the project £10,184
(Corporate overheads are currently absorbed within the overall Education Budget)


What are the main items in the total expenditure for the service expressed as a
proportion of the total budget for;-
-employee costs                                 percentage     36.62%
£4374     paid for mentor salaries
£1027    paid for expenses

-supplies, goods and services                       percentage      63.38%
£9346 paid to settings for additional support

-equipment and vehicles
The scheme does not own equipment or vehicles

-building and/or assets rentals
The scheme does not own or rent assets.

-corporate overheads


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Corporate staff support time for the project £10184
(Corporate overheads are currently absorbed within the overall Education Budget)

-support services (SLAs)
There are no Service Level Agreements with third party organisations


What income or fees does the service generate?
The SEN mentoring scheme does not generate revenue.

How are fees and charges set ( eg to break even, to generate surplus or to ration
demand)
Charges are not made for the delivery of this service.


PEOPLE MANAGEMENT

What are the staffing levels?
There are four mentors currently delivering the service. The LEA provides funding to
the mentors’ employers, most of which are non-maintained pre-school groups, to
enable them to work half a day per week on the scheme, additional to their existing
duties. Typically, their re-numeration is in the region of £6.00 per hour. Administrative
support for the scheme is provided from within the Early Years and Childcare Team
averaging 2 days per month.

Central corporate support time for the project is calculated on the following cost per
hour basis (7.4 hours per day) including 83p per hour per desk as identified in property
consideration Appendix 10

Administrative Support
               £ 6.04 + 17.5% oncost + 83p/hr deskcost = £7.93/hr
               2 days / month = £117.36 /month = £1408.32p.a.

Senior Early Years Officer
              £17.20 + 17.5% oncost + 83p/hr deskcost = £21.04/hr
              4 days / month = £622.78 /month = £7473.41p.a.

Educational Psychologist    £18.85 ph
              £ 18.02 +17.5% oncost + 83p/hr deskcost = £22.00/hr
              6 days per year and 2 days training £1,302.40 p.a.

                                     Total Corporate costs = £10,184


How are employees involved in assessing improvements and performance
issues?
SEN Mentors meet on a half-termly basis with an Educational Psychologist, Learning
Support Advisory Teacher and RAISE (Raising Achievement in Shropshire Education)
Adviser. They review the outcomes of any additional adult support and advice offered
through the scheme, in pre-school and private nursery settings, and they receive
feedback on the number of visits carried out each term.

What is the employee turnover level?
Out of a total of five mentors when the scheme began in May 2000, one mentor


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ceased employment with her substantive employer and therefore has a temporary part
time contract with Shropshire County Council. One Mentor gave up the role due to
pressure of work in her substantive post, and since that time one Mentor has worked
for 0.2 per week.

What is the average level of employee sickness absence in the service?
One mentor ceased to work for half a term following surgery, and another was absent
for half a term prior to giving up the role. There have been no other absences.

What is the annual average number of days of (or average spend on) training per
employee?
All Mentors undertook 2 days training with the Educational Psychologist prior to taking
up their posts. All were given the opportunity to undertake an Early Years SEN
course, consisting of 12 half day taught sessions, delivered by Manchester
Metropolitan University. This was taken up by three Mentors. Cost of £70 per person,
total £210.

What level of skills and experience do employees within the service have?
All Mentors have experience of delivering nursery education. One is a teacher with
extensive training in special educational needs, and extensive experience of leading
an Opportunities Pre-school, which includes a high proportion of children with special
educational needs. Other qualifications held include and B.T.E.C. Childhood Studies,
PPA Foundation Course, City and Guilds 730 Part 1 and 2, TDLB, High Scope, PLA
Special Needs Course, PLA Equal Opportunities Course. A full list of relevant
qualifications held by current mentors is shown in sub-appendix e.

How do you communicate with staff?
Communication is primarily through half termly meetings and also by post and
telephone when necessary. All four mentors attend Early Years Forum Meetings at
which information relating to the Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership
and other DfEE initiatives is disseminated. In addition, discussion about the LEA and
Pre-school Learning Alliance involvement in Special Educational Needs issues is
discussed at half-termly meetings.


THE USE OF ASSETS
The use of assets sheet is attached at sub-appendix d.


THE UTILISATION OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS

How many staff have access to a PC?
The SEN Mentors do not have access to County Council ICT services. Corporate
support staff access ICT services via the Education Directorate.

What type of software is available for team use?
Support staff currently have access to a range of software applications including Office
Windows 95, Office Windows 97 for general use and SAMIS for financial data
recording and processing.

Is access to the Internet readily available and if so, what do the team use it for?
Shared Internet access is available in one office to which admin. support has access.
This is used to obtain background information on service developments from
government departments.


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Is electronic mail received from any outside bodies on a regular basis?
Electronic mail is not used to communicate information by the SEN mentors. To date
there have been no instances of service providers attempting to access the service
through e-mail.

Are requests for information/or complaints received electronically?
This facility is not within the scope of the pilot scheme. At present all information is
handled in hard copy.

How many staff have access to an authority owned mobile telephone?
No staff have access to a Local Authority mobile telephone

Are there any financial processes performed electronically?
Administrative staff process financial claims using the County Council SAMIS system.

Do staff use database systems for information storage or analysis?
There is very limited use of electronic database systems for information storage. Due
to the relatively small scale of the scheme, its pilot nature, and insufficient analysis of
the working methodology of the existing systems have meant that is not yet practical to
establish large database information and retrieval programmes. Individual tables and
records of visits and contacts are kept on simple, local, individually designed, systems
using Office Pro.


PROCESS ISSUES

Describe the main process/functions of your service and who is responsible for
delivery.
In the light of nursery education entitlement for all four year olds, and increasingly for
three year olds, and increased childcare provision for all pre-school children, it has
become a priority to ensure that measures to meet the special needs of children are
efficient and effective. Previously, non-maintained nursery education settings did not
have a transparent and cohesive strategy for accessing professional guidance for
supporting children with SEN or for drawing down funding for individual support for
children.
The SEN pilot project employs 4 mentors to respond to requests from nursery
providers seeking advice and support in this area. Having obtained the permission of
the parents of any individual children, the mentors give advice to the setting on how to
assess the child, draw up an individual education or play plan, and offer a route to the
assessment panel in order to access a grant for additional staffing, if that is
appropriate.
The assessment panel, consisting of 4 mentors, an Educational Psychologist, a
Learning Support Advisory Teacher and an Education Officer, not only considers grant
applications, but also regularly gives advice and support materials to the mentors to
support their role.




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Appendix 1



                        Special Needs Mentor Scheme
                                Process Chart

                                Educational psychologist
          (from the child development centre and key member of CDC panel)




                              referrals if deemed necessary


SEN Mentor        SEN Mentor        SEN Mentor        SEN Mentor        SEN Mentor




                              referrals if deemed necessary

                                   Early Years Settings




CURRENT PERFORMANCE

How is the current performance of the service measured?
The service is currently measured on the basis of numbers referrals and visits to
settings.

What indicators are currently in place to measure the performance of the
service?
Given the pilot nature of the service there are no Local, Best Value, or Audit
Commission Performance Indicators.

What are your present quality standards and targets?
Given the pilot nature of the scheme no quality standards or targets have been set.

What are your present targets for service delivery?
There are no stipulated process targets or procedural time-lines allocated for this pilot.

Can you identify trends in results?
Given the pilot nature of the project it is not yet possible to identify consistent trends in
service uptake. Evaluation is intended to be undertaken in year two of the current
EYDCP Strategic Plan. Any recommendations as part of the Best Value Review
process will be incorporated into the monitoring and evaluation of the scheme in year
2002-2003.

Have you taken any action to address any identified trends?
The Best Value review will be used to guide the development of the service




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Appendix 1


MARKET POSITION

What is the current position regarding the potential for competition in the
delivery of your service?
At present there are no other local organisations offering the same service across the
county. In Bridgnorth District, the Pre-school Learning Alliance offers funding for a
scheme for children with cerebral palsy originally funded by the charity SCOPE. This
scheme is now funded by Bridgnorth District Council and is open to children with other
disabilities. Pre-schools in Bridgnorth access the funding via their local PLA branch to
employ extra one to one workers in order to offer inclusive care to children with
disabilities.

Has your service been subject to Compulsory Competitive Tendering?
No

Are there alternative credible providers of the service/who else actually provides
the exact/similar service?
There are no other known providers working in this market sector, that could offer the
same level of expertise that would be acceptable to the wide range of existing
childcare providers across the whole of the county.

What is the strength of the competition?
None known at this time.

What is the basis of the competition? (cost, product, differentiation, focus,)
See above.

Is it possible to enter into partnership with other service providers?
Partnership working already exists as part of the delivery mechanism for this service.
Mentors already work for other outside organisations as well as working as mentors on
the SEN scheme on behalf of the Advisory Service.

Can users or customers choose between service providers or make independent
comparisons between them?
There are no other known providers of a comparable service to choose from.

Can customers or users be involved in the delivery of services?
Involvement of service users and parents is crucial to the effectiveness of the service
delivery. All interested parties are invited to be actively involved in the mentor scheme.
Parents especially are actively encouraged to participate in the writing of individual
children’s Play Plans


COMMUNITY SAFETY

What are the community safety implications for your service?
Support and early intervention of social inclusion is a key element of the ethos of
community safety. At present it is not possible to directly correlate the outcomes of this
scheme with crime and disorder as no longitudinal study has been formed to establish
links. As already stated in the introduction, the beneficiaries of the service are the
children with additional needs and their families. By promoting information, advice and
guidance regarding positive behavioural techniques and models, and positive
parenting skills with the providers it is intended that there will be greater social
inclusion by minimising the adverse effects of disruptive behaviour in settings.


                                                                                        13
Appendix 1


The County Council supports the underlying principles of the five district Community
Safety Partnerships.




                                                                                       14
Appendix 1


Sub-appendix a

Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership Members

CHAIR PERSON                 BENEFITS AGENCY                COUNTY COUNCIL
MRS B MITTON                 MRS S DRUCE                    MR A G WHYTE
FACULTY OF HUMAN SCIENCES    CHILDCARE CHAMPION,            COUNTY COUNCILLOR
SHREWSBURY COLLEGE OF        BENEFITS AGENCY                BROWNLOW COTTAGE
ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY          BRANDON HOUSE                  WELSHAMPTON
LONDON ROAD                  HOLY WALK                      ELLESMERE
SHREWSBURY                   LEAMINGTON SPA                 SHROPSHIRE
SHROPSHIRE SY2 6PR           WARWICKSHIRE CV32 4JE



COUNTY COUNCIL               COUNTY COUNCIL                  COUNTY COUNCIL
MR B GILLOW                  MR R WALKER                     MALCOLM PERKS
COUNTY COUNCILLOR            COUNTY COUNCILLOR               HUNTSMANS LODGE
HOARSTONE                    27 ALLEN GARDENS                LLANYBLODWEL
MARKET DRAYTON               MARKET DRAYTON                  OSWESTRY
SHROPSHIRE                   SHROPSHIRE                      SHROPSHIRE
                             TF9 1BS                         SY10 8AF




COUNTY COUNCIL               DIOCESAN                        DIOCESAN
MRS M WINCKLER               TRISTRAM JENKINS                MRS C CRUMP
WATERS EDGE                  HEREFORD DIOCESAN BOARD         LICHFIELD DIOCESAN BOARD
3 BROOKSIDE DRIVE            THE DIOCESAN OFFICE             C/O MEOLE BRACE C.E. INFANT
HILTON                       THE PALACE                      SCHOOL
BRIDGNORTH                   HEREFORD                        CHURCH ROAD
SHROPSHIRE WV15 5PU          HR4 9BL                         MEOLE BRACE
                                                             SHREWSBURY SY3 9HG



DIOCESAN                     EDUCATION                       EDUCATION
MR E COXHEAD                 LIZ NICHOLSON                   S MENGHINI
ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESAN      EDUCATION DEPARTMENT            LEA SPECIAL SERVICES
64 UPPER ROAD                SHIREHALL                       EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
MEOLE BRACE                  SHREWSBURY                      SHIREHALL
SHREWSBURY                   SHROPSHIRE                      SHREWSBURY
SHROPSHIRE                                                   SHROPSHIRE




HEAD INFANT REPRESENTATIVE   HEAD PRIMARY                    HEAD PRIMARY REPRESENTATIVE
MRS W WHEELER                REPRESENTATIVE                  MRS M A MALCOLM
SPRINGFIELD INF SCHOOL       MRS A BAYLISS                   MARKET DRAYTON INFANT SCHOOL
MERESIDE                     BISHOP'S CASTLE PRIMARY         LONGSLOW ROAD
WENLOCK ROAD                 SCHOOL                          MARKET DRAYTON
SHREWSBURY                   OAK MEADOW                      SHROPSHIRE
SHROPSHIRE SY2 6LE           BISHOP'S CASTLE                 TF9 3BA
                             SHROPSHIRE
                             SY9 5AY




                                                                            15
Appendix 1



Sub-appendix a
HEALTH                       MENCAP                        NCH ACTION FOR CHILDREN
MRS J WYNNE-JONES            MRS D MORGAN                  JACKIE YATES
HEALTH VISITORS              MENCAP                        RICHMOND HOUSE RUTLAND
RADBROOK GREEN SURGERY       5 BARKER STREET               HARLESCOTT GRANGE
BANK FARM ROAD               SHREWSBURY                    SHREWSBURY
SHREWSBURY                   SHROPSHIRE                    SHROPSHIRE
SHROPSHIRE                   SY1 1QJ                       SY1 3QG

OSWESTRY BOROUGH COUNCIL     OUT OF SCHOOL                 HOME-START
MRS G JONES                  LIZ SMITH-KIETLEY             FEE SIBBICK
OSWESTRY BOROUGH COUNCIL     BOOST                         HOME-START
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT        45 OLD COLEHAM                ROY FLETCHER CENTRE
OFFICER                      SHREWSBURY                    12-17 CROSS HILL
CASTLE VIEW                  SHROPSHIRE                    SHREWSBURY
OSWESTRY                     SY3 7BU
SHROPSHIRE


PRE-SCHOOL LEARNING          COMMUNITY COUNCIL             REGENERATION
ALLIANCE                     PETER DUNHILL                 PIPPA FERGUSON
MRS M ELLIOTT                COMMUNITY COUNCIL OF          REGENERATION TEAM
PRE-SCHOOL LEARNING          SHROPSHIRE                    COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENT
ALLIANCE                     1 COLLEGE HILL                SERVICES
3 OWEN HOUSE                 SHREWSBURY                    SHIREHALL
RADBROOK COLLEGE CAMPUS      SHROPSHIRE                    SHREWSBURY
RADBROOK
SHREWSBURY

PRIVATE NURSERIES            DISTRICT COUNCIL              RACE EQUALITY COUNCIL
ASSOCIATION                  MS TRUDI ELLIOTT              MRS RAJ DHINDSA
LIZ BREARLEY                 BRIDGNORTH DISTRICT COUNCIL   RACE EQUALITY COUNCIL
14 HAFREN ROAD               WESTGATE                      65A NEW STREET
SHREWSBURY                   BRIDGNORTH                    WELLINGTON
SHROPSHIRE                   SHROPSHIRE                    TELFORD
SY3 8NG                                                    TF1 1LU




SCHOOL GOVERNORS             SOUTH SHROPSHIRE              PLAYBUS ASSOCIATION
MRS K HOWARD                 JULIE HAMLING                 JULIE JONES
20 PENDIL CLOSE              27 LINLEY VIEW DRIVE          36 ARLESTON AVENUE
WELLINGTON                   BRIDGNORTH                    WELLINGTON
TELFORD                      SHROPSHIRE                    TELFORD
SHROPSHIRE                   WV16 4RT                      SHROPSHIRE
TF1 2PQ                                                    TF1 2PB




SHROPSHIRE COMMUNITY         BROSELEY/SHIFNAL FORUM        CLUN FORUM
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES       K BURRAGE                     JANET LAW
SUE PREECE                   SHIFNAL PRE-SCHOOL CENTRE     FLAT 2
NHS TRUST DEVELOPMENT UNIT   CURRIERS LANE                 CROSS HILL
BEECHES SITE                 SHIFNAL                       SHREWSBURY
LINCOLN HILL                 SHROPSHIRE                    SHROPSHIRE
TELFORD TF8 7NZ                                            SY1 1JH




                                                                         16
Appendix 1



Sub-appendix a

CRAVEN ARMS FORUM         IFTON HEATH AND ELLESMERE     LUDLOW FORUM
J MILLER                  FORUM                         MRS JULIE FARR
MEADOW SIDE               E A HUGHES                    NOAH'S ARK NURSERY
BUSHMOOR                  SILVERDALE                    LOWER STREET
CRAVEN ARMS               NEW MARTON                    CLEOBURY MORTIMER
SHROPSHIRE                ST MARTINS                    KIDDERMINSTER
SY7 8DW                   OSWESTRY SHROPSHIRE




MARKET DRAYTON FORUM      NORTH SHREWSBURY FORUM        OSWESTRY FORUM
J HACKETT                 JACKIE DAY                    MRS K PERRY
7 CAERNARVON CLOSE        THE ACORN DAY NURSERY         CARREG LLWYD PRE-SCHOOL
MARKET DRAYTON            RSH SHELTON                   ARDWAYS
SHROPSHIRE                BICTON HEATH                  5 ARDMILAR LANE
TF9 1RH                   SHREWSBURY                    OSWESTRY
                          SY3 8DN                       SHROPSHIRE SY11 2JY




PONTESBURY FORUM          SOUTH SHREWSBURY FORUM        WHITCHURCH FORUM
JULIA WILKINSON           K PELLINGTON                  K MACFARLANE
BAYSTON HILL NURSERY      TOWER HOUSE NURSERY           19 PENDRELL CLOSE
CENTRE                    111 WENLOCK ROAD              BUNTINGSDALE
LONGMEADOW ROAD           SHREWSBURY                    TERN HILL
BAYSTON HILL              SHROPSHIRE                    SHROPSHIRE
SHREWSBURY                SY2 6JX
SHROPSHIRE



CHILDMINDER               EMPLOYMENT SERVICE            SHROPSHIRE CHILDMINDING
L NUTT                    KAIREN FRANCIS                ASSOCIATION
LORIC HOUSE               DISTRICT OFFICE               LIZ MORRIS
DUKE STREET               TELFORD HOUSE                 22 KINGSWOOD CRESCENT
BROSELEY                  SOUTHWATER WAY                COPTHORNE
SHROPSHIRE                TOWN CENTRE                   SHREWSBURY
TF12 5LU                  TELFORD TF3 4PD               SHROPSHIRE SY3 8UU




SHROPSHIRE CHILDMINDING   NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF TOY   SOCIAL SERVICES
ASSOCIATION               & LEISURE LIBRARIES           FRAN BECK
SANDRA CROFTS             SUSAN MORLEY                  SOCIAL SERVICES
37 FORD ROAD              ARGAE HAIMWOOD                SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
NEWPORT                   LLANDRINIO                    SHIREHALL
SHROPSHIRE                LLANYMYNECH
TF10 7TU                  POWYS SY22 6SQ




SOCIAL SERVICES           SOCIAL SERVICES               PRIMARY ADVISOR
TERRY JONES               ANDY DAVEY                    SALLY NOBLE
SOCIAL SERVICES           REGISTRATION AND INSPECTION   PRIMARY ADVISOR
SHIREHALL                 WINSTON CHURCHILL BUILDING    EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                          RADBROOK ROAD                 SHIREHALL
                          SHREWSBURY
                          SHROPSHRE SY3 9BL




                                                                     17
Appendix 1



Sub-appendix a
PRIVATE NURSERIES           PRIVATE DAY NURSERY         PRE-SCHOOL LEARNING ALLIANCE
ASSOCIATION                 PROPRIETOR                  DEBBIE WALSH
KERRY WALLACE               MR M PICKARD                THE PEWITTS
HAPPY DAYS NURSERY          ALBRIGHTON & DONNINGTON     7 STATION ROAD
BURLTON                     NURSERY                     STOTTESDON
NR SHREWSBURY               8 MEADOW ROAD               NEAR KIDDERMINSTER
SHROPSHIRE                  ALBRIGHTON                  WORCS DY14 8TT
SY4 5TB                     WOLVERHAMPTON WV7 3EP


SHROPSHIRE CHAMBER OF         EDUCATION WELFARE            HEALTH VISITOR
COMMERCE                      ANDREA MARSHALL              ADELE MINSHALL
SUE MARSTON                   EWO                          DODDINGTON SURGERY
SHROPSHIRE CHAMBER OF         25 MORETON CRESCENT          WHITCHURCH
COMMERCE                      BELLE VUE                    SHROPSHIRE
TREVITHICK HOUSE              SHREWSBURY                   SY13 1EN
STAFFORD PARK 4               SHROPSHIRE SY3 7BY
TELFORD TF3 2BA


EDUCATION                     EDUCATION                  EDUCATION
JOHN JONES                    JULIA PERRY                SUE ROUND
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT          ADVISORY SERVCE            EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL     EDUCATION DEPARTMENT       SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
SHIREHALL                     SHIREHALL                  SHIREHALL
SHREWSBURY                    SHREWSBURY                 SHREWSBURY




LOCAL LEARNING AND SKILLS   EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE    EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE TEAM
DIRECTOR                    TEAM                         PAULINE MORTON
CAROLINE ATKINS             JANET GRAHAM                 SENIOR CHILDCARE DEVELOPMENT
RYECROFT                    CHILDCARE MANAGER            OFFICER
LIVESEY ROAD                SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL    SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
LUDLOW                      SHIREHALL                    SHIREHALL
SHROPSHIRE SY8 1EZ          SHREWSBURY                   SHREWSBURY




EARLY YEARS AND             EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE    EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE TEAM
CHILDCARE TEAM              TEAM                         RACHEL CURRAN
BRENDA WOOD                 JULIE DUNCAN                 CIS PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR
DEVELOPMENT OFFICER FOR     CHILDMINDING DEVELOPMENT     SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
OUT OF SCHOOL AND HOLIDAY   OFFICER                      SHIREHALL
CARE                        SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL    SHREWSBURY
SHROPSHIRE COUNTY           SHIREHALL
COUNCIL                     SHREWSBURY
SHIREHALL
SHREWSBURY
EARLY YEARS AND CHILDCARE
TEAM
SIMON WILDE
DEVELOPMENT OFFICER FOR
EMPLOYER LIAISON
SHROPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
SHIREHALL
SHREWSBURY




                                                                         18
Appendix 1


Sub-appendix c

Family Support Sub Group Members

Name              Representing
F Beck,           Children & Families, Social Services
P Murphy,         Social Services District Manager
S Menghini,       Children's Services Manager Education
J Jones,          Shropshire Playbus Association
M Elliot,         Pre-School Learning Alliance
J Hamling,        The Marches Family Network
C Brown,          Home-Start
P Bickley,        NHS Trust
L Ferguson,       Shropshire Community Health NHS Trust
J Wynn-Jones,     Shropshire Community Health
A Richardson,     Shropshire Health Authority
P Dunhill,        Shropshire Community Council
S Smith,          EY Development Worker
A Hughes,         Whittington Under Fives
A Fricker,        Family Literacy Project
S Morley,         NATLL
T Jenkins,        Hereford Diocesan Board
J Duncan,         Childminding Development Officer, Early Years & Childcare
                  Team
S Wilde,          Development Officer Employer Liaison , Early Years &
                  Childcare Team
R Greenwood,      Registration and Inspection, Social Services
J Graham,         Early Years and Childcare Manager
K Francis,        The Employment Service
A Minshall,       Doddington Surgery, Whitchurch
L Morris,         Shropshire Childminding Association
K Harding,        Registration and Inspection, Social Services
G Pollard,        Registration and Inspection, Social Services
M Henderson,      Registration and Inspection, Social Services
J Jennings,       Registration and Inspection, Social Services
D Andrews,        Registration and Inspection, Social Services
B Skilton,        Community Development Worker, Early Years and Childcare
                  Team




                                                                              19
Appendix 1


Sub-appendix e

Training and Qualifications of SEN Mentors

Kate Jordan        BTEC Childhood Studies
                   Qualified Nurse
                   SEN Early Years - Manchester Metropolitan University
                   Intensive training (x2) with Peter Lees, Educational
                   Psychologist


Margaret Extance   B.Ed Hons 2:1,
                   PLA Tutor Fieldworker Course,
                   Curriculum Planning,
                   SEN Early Years - Manchester Metropolitan University
                   Intensive training (x2) with Peter Lees, Educational
                   Psychologist

Georgina Gibbons   B.A. Hons 2:1Manchester Metropolitan University
                   P.G.C.E. specialising in Early Years M.M.University
                   Intensive training (x2) with Peter Lees, Educational
                   Psychologist

Lynda Jones        B.A. Hons Cert Ed
                   Early Year Diploma Manchester M. University
                   Inset Special Needs Course
                   Intensive training (x2) with Peter Lees, Educational
                   Psychologist

Judy Sant          SEN Early Years - Manchester Metropolitan University
                   PPA Foundation Course
                   City and Guilds 730 Parts 1 and 2 TDLB 32,33
                   High Scope.
                   PLA Special Needs Course
                   PLA Equal Opportunities Course
                   Intensive training (x2) with Peter Lees, Educational
                   Psychologist




                                                                          20

				
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