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					                 Council on Postsecondary Education
                  Committee on Equal Opportunities
                               June 18, 2007



                               Status Report
             Institutional Departments of Public Safety


The primary role of the institutional department of public safety is to
provide a safe environment that protects students, faculty, staff,
administrators, and visitors on campus, and occasionally in the vicinity
immediately adjacent to the campus. Beginning with the 2000 report,
institutions submit reports annually, and the Committee on Equal
Opportunities utilized this particular report as a tool to better understand
the campus climate for African American students, faculty, and staff. The
committee’s interest is focused on how the institutions view the interaction
between campus police and students in its strategy to increase student
retention as well as provide a welcoming environment that recognizes the
benefits of establishing a diverse educational community. The report
below provides a summary of activities between January 1, 2006, and
December 31, 2006 at the public universities. KCTCS does not employ
campus police at the community and technical colleges. The institutions
rely, instead, on the local and state police for any infractions that may
occur at the institutions.

Summary of Reports

Each university submitted a 2006 Department of Public Safety Report,
however, many of the reports failed to provide the information contained
in the May 1 request, which included an outline highlighting specific
information to ensure that data collection and reporting was consistent
from institution to institution (see Attachment I).

Organizational Reporting Structure
All universities utilized the organizational template and identified the
reporting structure; with the exception of three institutions, analysis of the
department of public safety show African American staff are
overwhelming represented in positions at the lower level tier (cadets,
dispatchers, bike patrol, etc), in comparison to whites that appear in
upper tier positions (police chief, lieutenant, director, etc).
Six of the eight reports indicated that a Chief of Police oversee the daily
operations of the departments, while two reports indicate the
departments are supervised by directors. The KSU and NKU reports did not
provide narrative that identified an individual or unit that the Chief of
Police report to. The remaining institutional reports indicated that the
chief reports to the following unit leaders:


      Vice President for Student Affairs (EKU)
      Information not provided (KSU)
      Vice President of Student Life (MoSU)
      Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services (MuSU)
      Information not provided (NKU)
      Associate Vice President for Campus Services (UK)
      Associate Vice President for Business Affairs (UofL)
      Vice President for Student Affairs/Campus Services (WKU)

Process and Procedures for Officer Selection
Each university reported the standard operating procedures used for
campus police hiring practices and noted that staffing has not changed
since the 2005 report; new officers employed receive initial training at the
police academy at the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice Training
Center in Richmond, Kentucky. Training typically lasts 16 to 18 weeks,
additionally, officers at three institutions take part in supplementary
training: weekly evaluation reports for 3 months (MuSU), additional training
with senior-level officers for 16 weeks (UK), and 10 weeks of field training
and probationary status for 1 year (WKU). On-going training for each
institution typically consists of 40 hours each year, with an additional 14
weeks at NKU.

On-going Training/Diversity Training/Interface with Students
Diversity training appears to be incorporated in the initial training program
in Richmond. Multiple hours of annual training and workshop sessions
include, cultural diversity, ethics, firearms, hate crime policies, law
enforcement, lethal weapons, public safety department philosophy,
sensitivity, sexual harassment, and standard operating procedures.
Colloquiums and seminars are provided by in-house staff, and through the
Equal Opportunity Office or Office of Multicultural Student Affairs/Services
at several institutions.

Additionally, the majority of the reports highlighted special programs
established by the university to promote positive relationships between the
department of public safety and the student community. EKU conducts
training sessions on an annual basis addressing diversity and sensitivity


                                      2
issues; training is both student focused and law enforcement based. KSU
provides mandatory programs, however, they were not identified.
Officers at MoSU interface with students in various ways: New Student
Days, SOAR (Summer Orientation and Registration), open house, MSU 101
and Take Back the Night. Also, SGA leaders walk with members of the
department to determine if and where additional safety phones are
needed. MuSU promotes a collegial relationship throughout the campus,
specifically with the Office of Student Affairs, Housing, and Judicial Affairs.
The Public Safety Department promotes specific initiatives to provide
further responsiveness to the students including:

      Periodically attending SGA, Black Student Council, and
       International Student Executive Council meetings
      Participating in university-wide committees and work groups (i.e.,
       Campus Safety Committee, University Alcohol Policy)
      Preparing and publishing articles on safety information, and
       awareness issues in the university newspaper
      Meeting weekly with Housing and Student Affairs Management Staff

NKU officers participate in diversity forums sponsored by various campus
organizations, for example: the campus chapter of the NAACP and STAR
(Students Together Against Racism); workshops and presentations are
conducted to familiarize students with police procedures and the
community policing philosophy. Police officers are also informed about
African American students’ perceptions of the police and the manner in
which they enforce the law.

The UK report indicated that in the past, officers received diversity training
from the EOO office on a 3-5 year rotation. Additionally, the UK medical
center security was trained by the EOO in 2004, with six training sessions
provided to all police personnel in June 2005. Diversity training continues
to be provided to all new hires, furthermore, UK sponsors the Campus
Oriented Police Program (Adopt-A-COPP) to encourage positive
relationships between police officers and the student community. Each
residence life has assigned officers with 12-20 officers volunteering
annually.

The UofL report indicated that community policing strategies include
interaction with students through instruction in subjects of topical interest
such as: personal safety, property protection, alcohol and drug abuse
programs, operation identification, identity theft, fire safety, anti-terrorism,
bomb threats, theft from autos, building safety and buckle up for safety
sessions. Furthermore, UofL conducts topical presentations to local high
schools, civic and church organizations.


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WKU offers a variety of in-house training, diversity training (presented by
the Office of the Dean of Student Life), sexual harassment (presented by
the Office of General Counsel), and employee performance evaluations
(provided by the Office of Human Resources.)

Organization of the Department of Public Safety
Each university presented a racial breakdown of the current campus
police department (see Attachment II); however, three universities
omitted the description of the employment categories. Four reports
indicated that students are utilized within the department of public safety:

      NKU has an established student cadet program; according to the
      NKU report, cadets are charged with enforcing university parking
      rules and regulations and issue the majority of parking citations on
      campus. The program allows students to obtain familiarity with the
      department and officers, with the expectation that cadets may
      become future police officers. African Americans currently
      comprise 15% of the cadet program.

      According to the UofL report, cadets are assigned to auxiliary duties
      that support the overall mission of the department. Cadets earn $7
      per hour, their employment does not conflict with classes or
      assignments. One African American cadet was promoted in
      February 2007 to a permanent position as a security officer.

      The EKU organizational chart identified eight cadets, however,
      information was omitted that identified the cadets as students or
      regular citizens.

      Similarly, WKU identified six student patrols in the organizational
      template, as well as six student workers. Unfortunately, the report
      did not include narrative that conveyed a relationship between
      student patrols and their relationship within the department of
      public safety. Additional information is needed from both EKU and
      WKU to identify the relationships of the students to the departments.

Citations and Arrests: January – December 2006

A number of reports excluded the requested information regarding
citations issued between January and December 2006. The majority
were unable to include the disposition of citations or arrests. Two
institutions failed to provide comparison data for 2005 and 2006. Data for
specific citation offenses were not provided by four universities. Three


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institutions noted an increase in the number of citations issued to African
Americans in 2006, in comparison to citations issued in 2005 (see
Attachment II). Information regarding the disposition of citations and
arrests was unavailable for all universities; however, one institution
maintained records regarding the results of actions in 2006. Those results
are presented independently in the attached spreadsheet.

Below is the most recent data compiled for citation and arrest information
between January and December 2006.

Eastern Kentucky University

Citations
Of the 36 categories presented by EKU, 667 citations were issued in 2006,
40 (6.0%) to African Americans and 580 (86.9%) to whites. Overall,
citations were issued for no insurance (194) and expired registration plates
(119). The greatest number of citations received by African Americans fall
into two groups: no insurance (11) and expired registration plates (8).
Similarly, whites received the greatest number of citations for the same
charges, no insurance (172) and expired registration plates (104).
Comparison data for citations issued in 2005 show that 84 (8.4%) citations
were issued to African Americans, while 887 (88.6%) citations were issued
to whites. Overall, EKU noted a decrease in the number of citations issued
to both African American and whites in 2006, in comparison to the
number issued in 2005.

Arrests
EKU reported that a total of 306 arrests were made in 2006, 25 (7.9%) were
African American, and 280 (88.1%) were white. The greatest number of
arrests include: alcohol intoxication (75) and driving under the influence
(34). Arrests of African American fall into twelve categories; the greatest
numbers include: possession of marijuana (4), disorderly conduct,
operating on a suspended license, and warrants (3 each). Similarly,
whites were arrested in 31 categories, the greatest numbers include:
alcohol intoxication (72) and driving under the influence (29). In
comparison, the number of African Americans arrested in 2005 totaled 33
(10.6%) and whites 273 (87.8%). Overall, the number of African Americans
arrested decreased in 2006, while the number of whites arrested
increased. The disposition of arrests was not provided.

Kentucky State University

Citations



                                      5
The specific categories of citations issued were not presented. A total of
248 citations were issued in 2006, 141(56.9%) to African Americans and 94
(37.9%) to whites. Comparison data for citations issued in 2005 show of the
739 citations issued, 405 (54.8%) were issued to African Americans, while
272 were issued to whites. KSU showed a decrease in the number of
citations issued for both African American and whites in 2006 compared
to 2005. The disposition of citations was not available.

Arrests
A total of 38 arrests were made in 2006, 29 (76.3%) were African American,
while 9 (23.7%) were white. Categorical data for arrests in 2006 was not
provided. In comparison, a total of 110 arrests were made in 2005: 84
(76.4%) were African American, and 20 (18.2%) were white. Overall, the
number of African Americans and whites arrested decreased. The
disposition of arrests was not provided.

Morehead State University

Citations
Of the 13 categories presented by MoSU, a total of 81 citations were
issued in 2006: 5 (6.1%) to African Americans, and 75 (92.5%) to whites. The
majority of the citations were written for alcohol intoxication (12) and DUI
(26). Whites received the majority of citations issued for alcohol
intoxication and DUI. African Americans received citations ranging from
no proof of insurance to DUI. By comparison, citations issued in 2005 show
that 116 citations were issued (7 to African Americans and 107 to whites).
African-Americans received two fewer citations in 2006, as compared to
2005. Dispositions for the citations issued were not available.



Arrests
MoSU reported that a total of 61 arrests were made in 2006; the total
arrests, by race, include: 4 (6.5%) African-Americans, and 57 (93.4%)
whites. In comparison, in 2005, a total of 97 arrests were made, six (6.1%)
African-Americans, and 89 (91.7%) whites. Compared to 2005, thirty-six
fewer arrests were made in 2006. African-Americans were arrested two
times less in 2006, as compared to 2005, although the percentage shows
an increase. According to MoSU, the increase does not reflect that
African-American faculty, staff, and students, are targeted by the police
officers for arrests. Dispositions for arrests were not available.

Murray State University



                                     6
Citations
Categories for citations issued in 2006 were not presented by MuSU. A
total of 51 citations were issued in 2006: 4 (8.0%) to African Americans and
46 (90.0%) to whites. Comparison data for citations issued in 2005 show
that of the 71 citations issued, 11 (16%) were received by African
Americans, while 59 (84%) were issued to whites. Overall, the number of
citations issued to African Americans decreased in 2006. The dispositions
of citations were not available.

Arrests
MuSU reported that a total of 53 arrests were made in 2006: 6 (11%) were
African American, while 47 (89%) were white. The report did not include a
breakout of categories for arrests. Of the 66 arrests made in 2005, 19 (29%)
were African American, while 47 (71%) were white. Data shows that the
number of arrests made in 2006, in comparison to 2005, decreased. The
disposition of arrests was not available.

Northern Kentucky University

Citations
NKU did not provide categorical data for citations issued in 2006. Of the
total 254 citations issued in 2006: African Americans received a total of
27(10.6%) while 224 (87.0%) were issued to whites. A total of 363 citations
were issued in 2005: 37 (10.2%) to African Americans, and 320 (88.2%) to
whites. The number of citations issued to African Americans decreased
between 2005 and 2006. The disposition of citations was not provided.

Arrests
A total of 78 arrests were made in 2006: 14 (17.9%) were African American,
and 64 (82.1%) were white. Categorical data for arrests made in 2006 was
not provided. In comparison, a total of 116 arrests were made in 2005: 10
(8.6%) were African American, and 105 (90.5%) were white. Overall, the
number of African Americans arrested increased by (4) in 2006, while the
number of whites, arrested decreased. The disposition of arrests was not
provided.

University of Kentucky

Citations
Of the 13 categories of citations presented in the report, a total of 1,925
were issued in 2006: 260 (13.5%) to African Americans and 1,614 (83.8%) to
whites. Most citations were issued for speeding (512) and under the
category all other offenses (512). African Americans received the largest
number of citations for all other offenses (72) and speeding (68). Similarly,


                                      7
whites received citations in the same categories: speeding (431) and all
other offenses (427). Comparison data for the categories of citations
issued in 2005 were not provided. Comparison data for 2005 showed a
total of 221citations were issued to African Americans, while 1,460 citations
were issued to whites.

UK reported that (6) African Americans received citations for possession of
marijuana; two cases were suspended, (2) were banned from
housing/student organizations, (1) placed on probation, (2) were diverted
to Choices (an educational program occasionally offered to students with
a first-time criminal law violation) and (2) were identified as other. A total
of 1,614 citations were issued to whites for the following offenses: criminal
trespass, disregarding a stop sign, disregarding a traffic control device,
expired registration, failure to wear a seatbelt, and possession of
marijuana. Of the 82 citations issued for possession of alcohol by a
minor/intoxication, (4) cases were pending, (4) were suspended, (4) were
banned from housing/student organizations, (16) were placed on
probation, (33) were diverted to Choices and (9) were identified as other.
Overall, the data shows that the number of citations issued to both African
Americans and whites increased in 2006, although the narrative provided
does not imply that an increase occurred.

Arrests

Of the 253 total arrests made in 2006, 37 (14.6%) were African American,
while 212 (83.7%) were white. African American arrests were identified in
eight categories, however only two displayed actions: alcohol
intoxication and drug offenses. The arrest regarding alcohol intoxication
was diverted to Choices, while the remaining (5) were identified as
follows: (1) student suspended, (1) banned from housing/student
organizations, (1) placed on probation, (1) diverted to Choices and (1)
was identified as other. Of the eight arrest categories displayed for
whites, information regarding arrest actions was only provided for five
categories: alcohol-DUI, alcohol intoxication, disorderly conduct, drug
offenses, and all other offenses. A total of (10) alcohol-DUI arrests were on
probation, (1) was diverted to Choices, and (5) were identified as other.
Three arrests regarding alcohol intoxication were pending, (3) were
suspended, (4) were banned from housing/student organizations, (10)
were on probation, (1) was diverted to Choices, and the remaining (5)
were identified as other; the disorderly conduct was listed under other,
and of the (11) drug offenses, (2) were pending, (3) were on probation, (2)
were diverted to Choices, and (5) were identified as other. And finally,
the all other offenses category indicated that (1) student was suspended,
(4) were banned from housing/student organizations, (4) were placed on


                                      8
probation, and (2) were identified as other. The disposition of arrests was
not available. The data revealed that the number of arrests made in 2006
increased for both African Americans, as well as whites, although the UK
narrative does not specifically state that an increase in arrests occurred.

University of Louisville

Citations
A total of 33 categories were presented by UofL for citations and arrests,
however, no distinction was made between the two. Additionally,
specific categories for citations issued in 2006, by race, were not
provided. A total of 186 citations were issued in 2006: 62 to African
Americans and 114 to whites. Comparison data for citations issued in 2005
show that 33 citations were issued to African Americans, while 87 were
issued to whites. Overall, the number of citations issued to African
Americans nearly doubled, while the number of citations issued to whites
also increased. The dispositions of citations were not available.

Arrests
Of the 270 arrests made in 2006, 113 were African American and 144 were
white. Comparatively, 2005 arrest information, shows that of the 174
arrests made, 55 were African American and 69 were white. Categories
for arrests made in 2005, by race, were not available. The number of
arrests from 2005 to 2006, doubled for both African Americans, as well as
whites, the dispositions of arrests was not available.

Western Kentucky University

Citations
WKU did not provide categorical data for citations issued in 2006. Of the
total 501 citations issued, African American received a total of 73 (14.5%)
while whites were issued 405 (80.8%). Comparison data for 2005 was not
presented by WKU; however, data obtained from the prior reporting
period indicated that a total of 743 citations were issued in 2005: 119 to
African Americans, and 598 to whites. The number of citations issued to
African Americans decreased between 2005 and 2006. The disposition of
citations was not provided.

Arrests
Of the 338 arrests made in 2006 at WKU, 67 (19.8%) were African American
while 246 (72.7%) were white. Data displaying the category of arrests
were not presented. Additionally, comparison data for 2005 was not
available, however, data obtained from the prior reporting period
indicated that 192 arrests were made in 2005: 34 were African American,


                                     9
and 141 were white. The number of arrests increased between 2005 and
2006 for both African Americans and whites. The disposition of arrests was
not available.

Use of Institutional Data

Sharing Data with the CET
Seven of the eight institutional reports offered a description regarding the
use of the data as well as the report. One university did not respond to
section five. Four institutions indicated that the report and data are
shared with the CET, or its equivalent; the data is used by MoSU as part of
the university’s compliance under the Clery Act and Minger Law.
Additionally, the report was reviewed by the President’s Diversity Council
in conjunction with the April 2006 campus visit. The NKU report indicated
that the data is shared internally as part of an in-service training program,
in addition to being shared with the African American Student Affairs and
Ethnic Service to improve the relationship between the Public Safety
Department and the minority community. UK presents the data and report
to the CET at regularly scheduled meetings; the committee assesses the
information and may make recommendations to university officials, as
needed. The information is shared with WKU’s Diversity Environment
Committee, and appropriate recommendations are made to the
president if issues arise from the analysis and discussion of the data.

Policies Regarding the Disposition of Student Cases
All universities utilize a code of student conduct, additionally, KSU’s
department of public safety collaborates with the Division of Student
Affairs to determine whether campus rules are violated. Arrest and crime
information is also shared with the HR department to determine whether
employees have violated employment policies. Currently, there are no
polices regarding the disposition of students’ cases in the local court.

Based upon information presented in the MoSU report, the disposition of
students is left to the judicial system. Similarly, MuSU reported that the
university’s disciplinary process for students is solely managed and
administered by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. This
process in not connected to the criminal court process. NKU reported that
limited or no interaction exits between the Commonwealth Attorneys
office and the university in reference to the court’s proceedings or
sentencing of students. UK reported that no specific written policies or
regulations exits regarding how student cases are disposed of if they are
addressed in the Fayette District and circuit court systems. The UK police
department does not track the disposition of cases outside of the
institutional data. Information on dispositions of citations and arrests that


                                     10
were adjudicated by university officials under the code of student
conduct is included in the 2006 citation and arrest summary reports. The
2006 citation and arrest information is to be presented to the UK Campus
Environment Team at the next meeting. The CET will assess the information
and make necessary recommendations to university officials.

UofL reported that the university is independent of the local court system;
there are no rules concerning how the local courts dispose of students’
cases. And finally, WKU reported that students are responsible for
familiarizing themselves with the WKU student handbook, and those
students who violate laws may incur penalties prescribed by civil and
criminal authorities. According to the report, WKU will attempt to monitor
judicial proceedings that involve students, when made aware of those
proceedings and/or when circumstances justify it. However, the university
maintains an autonomous disciplinary process and does not suspend,
withhold, or withdraw disciplinary charges or sanctions based only on the
existence of civil or criminal judicial proceedings.

Interface with Local Law Enforcement and Coordination Between the
Institutional Judicial Process and Local Courts
Currently, no collaboration or interface exists between the KSU police
department and the local law enforcement agency to discuss the
treatment of students. The MoSU response indicated that the Dean of
Students generally interfaces with the court system to place students who
have been required to perform community service. Additionally, some
coordination exists between the local courts and the university. MuSU
reported that the department of public safety has ongoing dialogs with
local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.

According to the NKU report, there is limited or no interaction between
the Commonwealth Attorney’s office and the university in reference to
the court proceedings of students. As part of a Town Gown Commission,
UK reported that the university and officials from the city of Lexington
meet on a regular basis; the dean of students and the associate vice
president for campus services are members of this Commission.
Additionally, the Dean of students office meets regularly with the UK
police department, as well as the Lexington Fayette Urban County
Government Police Department to discuss student related issues. The
associate vice president for campus services also coordinates activities
with the Commissioner of Pubic Safety and UK Police Department officers
regularly and cooperates in responses and investigations with the
Lexington police.




                                    11
The report provided by UofL indicated that no collaboration exits
between the department of public safety and the local law enforcement
departments. WKU faculty and staff members serve on the Bowling Green
Police Departments Citizens Advisory Team and Town and Gown
Committee. The body serves as an advisory group and addresses various
issues related to citizen contact and perceptions of the Bowling Green
City Police.

Punishment by the Campus Judicial Process
KSU indicated that with the exception of violations of state and/or federal
law, the administrative actions of the university and the criminal process of
the judicial system are independent of each other. Additionally, the
MoSU report stated, if a student violates a university policy and a state
law, then that student may face discipline from the university, as well as
punishment imposed by the courts. The standard of proof utilized by the
local court is much more stringent than that used by MoSU, that is, the
university does not require proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

Based upon the information obtained from the MuSU report, the
disciplinary process for students is solely managed and administered by
the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs; this process is not
connected to the criminal court process. No specific policy exists that
addresses the disposition of student cases in the local court system. As
with any criminal case, the prosecutor makes all recommendations to the
court on matters of case disposition. It is a practice that the prosecutor
receives comments from investigating law enforcement agencies before
making adjudication recommendation to the court.

NKU noted that the universities’ judicial process can proceed with
administrative charges against any student totally independent of the
court’s findings. The Department of Public Safety provides copies of
reports describing the alleged incident and police officers testify as to
their actions regarding the incident at the judicial hearing if required. The
decision to punish a student arrested for a criminal violation is at the
discretion of the Dean of Student’s Office.

The report issued by UK indicated that students can be exonerated in the
local courts and still found in violation of the code of student conduct and
disciplined through the university judicial process. UK applies a different
standard of proof when adjudicating cases of misconduct and the
student discipline process does not employ the technical procedures
used by the local courts.




                                      12
UofL reported that the administrative actions of the university and the
criminal process of the judicial system are independent of each other.

And finally, WKU offered the following response: while the institution does
not desire to act as a policing authority for the activities of the student off
of University property, and while it cannot serve as a sentencing authority
for a student's violation of federal, state or local law, the University can
take appropriate action in situations involving misconduct that violates
the WKU code of student conduct. When actions or incidents occur off
campus, the nature of the misconduct may call into question the student's
continued membership in the educational community either because the
student grossly violated elementary standards of behavior required for the
maintenance of the educational community or because the student's
continued presence would adversely affect the pursuit of educational
goals by others.

Institutional Policy Changes
Two institutions indicated that minor policy changes have taken place
during the past two or three years, however, none of the changes were
related to the Department of Public Safety Report:

      MoSU established a policy whereby all residential facilities are non-
       smoking.
      WKU is one of six alcohol free Greek communities in the country.
       The university adopted an Alcohol Free Student Organization
       Housing Sanctioning Policy effective 2005.

Emergency Action Planning
Each institution was requested to provide planning information on how to
address emergencies such as the Virginia Tech incident. Three of the
eight universities, as well as KCTCS, forwarded the requested documents
to the Council office.

In conclusion, analysis of the 2006 public safety reports indicate that some
disparities were found in the data, based upon the citations issued and
arrests made, in comparison to the 2005 data. Several institutions noted
an increase in citations issued, as well as arrests made between January
and December 2006. The university reports demonstrate that increased
attention to the campus and community environments has fostered
improvements at many of our campuses with the intention of creating an
environment that supports diversity and increases student retention.




                                      13
Institutional representatives have been asked to appear at the June 18
CEO meeting to respond to questions or provide more detail regarding
the institutional reports.




                                            Staff preparation by Rana Johnson




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