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Rhetoric Rhetoric Undergraduate Handbook

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Rhetoric Rhetoric Undergraduate Handbook Powered By Docstoc
					              Rhetoric
                  Undergraduate Handbook
                          2009-2010
                             Visit the Department’s website at
                         http://rhetoric.berkeley.edu/index.html




DEPARTMENT OFFICE:
7408 Dwinelle Hall
642-1415
Hours: Mon-Fri 9:00-12:00 and 1:00-4:00

UNDERGRADUATE ASSISTANT:

642-1416
7407 Dwinelle Hall
Hours: Mon-Fri 9:00-12:00 and 1:00-4:00

HEAD FACULTY UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR:
Ramona Naddaff
7414 Dwinelle Hall



RHETORIC/FILM STUDIES LIBRARY:
7337 Dwinelle Hall
Hours as posted each semester

Students should be advised that although the Department of Rhetoric offers courses in oral
argument, its program does not emphasize public speaking.
Undergraduate Studies in Rhetoric

The Department of Rhetoric at Berkeley offers instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels in
the history and practice of rhetorical theory, from Antiquity to modern times. Rhetoric is here
understood (1) as involving the modes of persuasion that may be operative in a given situation and (2)
as involving the study of the tropological or figurative aspects of discourse. By extension, rhetorical
studies at Berkeley focus on (a) the motives, interests, desires, perspectives, and purposes that allow
events to be construed as "persuasive" and on (b) the interpretation of discourse as grounded in the
operations of figure and trope. The question as to which of these conceptions of rhetoric is the prior,
older, or more traditional is itself the study of scholarly debate. The Department embraces them both.

Rhetoric majors are trained in the history of rhetorical theory and practice, grounded in argumentation
and in the analysis of the symbolic and institutional dimensions of discourse. The department offers both
a pragmatic understanding of the elements of rhetorical analysis--with special attention to logic, style,
tropes, figures, images--and a thorough grounding in the historical development of these elements in
rhetorical theory, making possible a disciplined grasp of the contemporary character of rhetoric and
language. Through its emphasis on the history and theory of rhetoric, the department provides an
under-standing of the format of contemporary theories of interpretation as well as an opportunity,
within this framework, to explore the role of persuasion in pragmatic and aesthetic contexts.



The Undergraduate Major
Majors concentrate their studies in one of three areas of emphasis: History and Theory of Rhetoric; Public
Discourse; Narrative and Image. Majors must complete the following course requirements: Rhetoric 10 and
20 in the lower division, and 103A and 103B in the upper division, plus five additional upper division courses
in Rhetoric (three in the specified area of concentration, one from each of the other areas) and one
course outside the department related to the specified area of concentration. Guidelines for choosing
a course offered in another department are in Appendix B on page 15.

Rhetoric 10 and 20 must be completed with a grade of C or better before declaring the major and are
prerequisite to all upper division courses unless otherwise specified. Lower division requirements should
be completed by the start of the junior year. Rhetoric 103A-103B should be completed in sequence
during the junior year; course work in the specified area of concentration should be completed during
the senior year. However, concurrent enrollment in 103A and 103B and other upper division courses is
permitted. A C average in all upper division major courses is required to successfully finish the major. No
course for major credit may be taken passed/not passed.

A note about availability of 103A and 103B: the courses are typically offered one time
only during the regular academic year, 103A in the Fall and 103B during the Spring.
Students are advised to inform themselves about course availability.
                                     Rhetoric Major Requirements
                                          All courses must be taken for a grade
                                 Overall grade point average of C required to graduate

 PREREQUISITES (Grade of C or better in 10 or 20 required to declare major)
      2 lower division courses, RHETORIC 10 AND RHETORIC 20, both required to complete the major

 MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
      RHETORIC 103A AND RHETORIC 103B

 3 UPPER DIVISION COURSES from one of three areas of concentration:
       HISTORY & THEORY OF RHETORIC, PUBLIC DISCOURSE, NARRATIVE & IMAGE

 2 UPPER DIVISION COURSES outside the area of concentration, one in each of the other areas

 1 UPPER DIVISION COURSE, related to the chosen area of
       concentration, from another department

A. HISTORY AND THEORY OF RHETORIC: Focuses upon understanding the development of Rhetorical theory
and practice from its genesis in the classical period to its situation in the present. Students will consider how the
discipline of Rhetoric has both shaped and itself been shaped by social, political, technological and intellectual
developments over the course of two millennia. Individual courses will enable close study of the process of
Rhetoric's influence and adaptation, both in theory and in practice, in specific contexts throughout its history.
105 110 132 137 138 140 173 174 175 177 181 189 (if topic appropriate)

B. PUBLIC DISCOURSE: Focuses upon understanding Rhetoric in its symbolic and institutional dimensions, with
special emphasis on legal and political forums. Students consider the discourse of law, politics, and society both in
theory and in practice, in an attempt to understand the rhetorical nature of public judgment, action, justice and
legitimacy. Individual courses will enable close study of specific problems, concerns, vocabularies, modes of
interpretation and strategies of argumentation arising in public forums of the past and present.
131 136 141AC 150 152 152AC 153 155 157A 157B 158 159A 159B 160 162AC 163 164
165 166 167 168 170 171 172 179 189 (if topic appropriate)

C. NARRATIVE AND IMAGE: Focuses upon understanding the function of rhetoric in literary, cinematic and visual
texts, with emphasis on the role of figure and image in the representation of reality. Students consider the
production and reception of narrative 'literature'--oral epic, folktale, lyric poem, novel, etc.--and film, in an attempt to
understand the boundaries of the aesthetic text as a rhetorical analysis of particular literary and visual genres
arising in a variety of cultures and historical epochs.
119 121A 121B 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 133 134 135 139AC 156 176 178
180AC 189 (if topic appropriate)

See Appendix A, page 14, for the titles of the courses cited above.

DECLARING THE MAJOR
The major may be declared after completion of Rhetoric 10 and 20 with a letter grade of C or better. Obtain a
Petition to Declare the Major and the Rhetoric Major Application from the Undergraduate Assistant in 7407 Dwinelle
Hall. The petition is also available from the College of Letters and Science, 113 Campbell Hall. Present a copy of
your transcript along with your petition and application to the Undergraduate Assistant for approval signature and a
brief orientation.
ADVISING
The Faculty Adviser assists and advises Rhetoric majors about academic program plans and educational progress.
Our Faculty Advisers rotate; check with the Department for the current Faculty appointment. The Undergraduate
Assistant provides TeleBears registration information, Letters and Science or Office of the Registrar petition
signatures, and adviser code release. Your study list for Telebears enrollment must be approved. When you
receive notice to register, see the Undergraduate Assistant for your advisor code and the Undergraduate Assistant
or the Rhetoric Adviser for study list approval. Updated and revised information, including class schedules, office
hours and scholarship and prize announcements are announced through the undergraduate e-mail list. Let the
Undergraduate Assistant know if your e-mail address changes.

HONORS PROGRAM
Seniors must have completed Rhetoric 10, 20, 103A, and 103B, and have a minimum 3.7 Rhetoric gpa and a 3.5
overall Berkeley gpa to undertake the two semester Honors Thesis series, Rhetoric H190A-H190B, under the
supervision of a Rhetoric faculty member. Four units of credit (two units each semester) for the H190AB sequence
may be used as fulfillment of one major upper division elective. Honors candidates who complete the 4-unit course
with a letter grade of A- or better, have at least a 3.7 gpa in all rhetoric courses, and an overall UC Berkeley gpa of
at least 3.5 will receive a BA with honors in the major. Seniors eligible to enroll in the honors program must make
arrangements with a faculty member willing to direct their honors thesis in the semester before they enroll in
H190A. See the Undergraduate Assistant for Honors information and application. Warning: graduating honors
candidates who complete major requirements but take an incomplete in the H190AB series must drop themselves
from the degree list or honors will not appear on your official transcript or diploma.

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES
Relations between faculty and students in the Rhetoric Department presume mutual respect, toleration, and a
commitment to the ideals of the University and the life of the mind. Any disputes that arise are typically resolved
informally by the involved parties. For the rare cases in which resolution cannot be reached informally, a formal
grievance procedure exists. Students may obtain a description of the formal departmental procedure, which follows
Berkeley campus policies, from the Undergraduate Assistant, the Undergraduate Adviser, or the Chair of the
Department.



                                            The Minor Program
REQUIRES COURSES (C Average     required)
RHETORIC 10, 20, 103A, 103B

3 ELECTIVES from 105 -181 & 189

Passed/not passed courses do not satisfy requirements.

DECLARING THE MINOR
The minor should be declared the semester the student is graduating. The Completion of L and S Minor petition is
required and available from the College of Letters and Science, 113 Campbell Hall. The petition should be
submitted by the end of the fifth week of the semester with a bear facts printout of the student’s grades and a copy
of their current schedule.


RHETORIC LIBRARY
7337 DWINELLE HALL

HOURS CHANGE EACH SEMESTER AND ARE POSTED AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE LIBRARY.

Devoted to the field of Rhetoric, the collection includes reserve materials, a small reference section and periodicals.
Books are loaned to undergraduate students for a maximum of four weeks. Reserve materials may be checked out
for two hours with instructor approval.

BERKELEY UNDERGRADUATE RHETORIC SOCIETY (BURS)
BURS exists as a student initiated undergraduate organization registered with the ASUC and is eligible for
administrative ASUC funding. Contact the Undergraduate Assistant.

FELLOWSHIPS AND INTERNSHIPS
The Scholarship Connection
 http://ls.berkeley.edu/ugis/scholarships/

Undergraduate Research@Berkeley
301 Campbell Hall      643-5376
 http://LS.berkeley.edu/ugis/our
This office and website provide a clearinghouse for information about undergraduate research opportunities. Also
houses the Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) that offers students opportunities to work as
apprentices on faculty-led research projects.

CAREERS FOR RHETORIC MAJORS
The Career Center
2111 Bancroft Way, 4th floor      642-1716
 http://Career.berkeley.edu/
There are reference resources, seminars, resume workshops, graduate application, professional and academic
information available to students planning their future careers. Rhetoric is the epitome of the liberal arts degree.
Students go on to write, teach, and edit in such fields as business, journalism, and law.



Rhetoric Course Descriptions
(All courses are 4 units unless otherwise noted.)

1A. The Craft of Writing. Prerequisites: Subject A or examination. Rhetorical approach to reading and writing
argumentative discourse. Close reading of selected texts; written themes developed from class discussion and
analysis of rhetorical strategies.

1B. The Craft of Writing. Prerequisites: 1A or equivalent. Intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy
stimulated through selected readings and class discussion.

10. Introduction to Practical Reasoning and Critical Analysis of Argument. Prerequisite for Major. Topics
treated will include: definition, the syllogism, the enthymeme, fallacies, as well as various non-logical appeals.
Also, the course will treat in introductory fashion some ancient and modern attempts to relate rhetoric and logic.

20. Rhetorical Interpretation. Prerequisite for Major. Introduction to the study of rhetorical interpretation,
treating how the action of tropes, figures and performances generates meaning in communication: from fiction and
other forms of literature, to politics, to film, to visual and material culture generally.

24. Freshman Seminar. (1) Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per week.
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an
intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Check department for meeting times.

30. Rhetorical Theory and Oral Argument. Examination of basic principles of rhetoric and strategies of
argumentation, with practice in oral argument.
39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Seminar format. Priority
given to freshmen and sophomores. Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the
opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small seminar setting.
Check department for meeting times.

40AC. Rhetoric of Film in American Cultures. Prerequisites: 1A -1B or equivalent. Course may be repeated for
credit. Study of the rhetoric of film in American culture, with emphasis on topics such as the ideology of race and
gender, miscegenation, "passing," and other cultural fantasies and anxieties. Satisfies the American Cultures
requirement.

41AC. Race and Identity: Performing American Identities. This course focuses on the rhetorical construction of
American identity. Drawing from among African American, Native American, Asian American, Latino, and European
oral and written traditions, the course will explore what it means to be "American." The course will analyze and
compare specific performances of identity and consider how these performances construct, maintain, and
revolutionize cultural and ethnic identifications. Satisfies the American Cultures requirement.

42AC. Foundations in American Cyber-Cultures. Students think about and engage in experiments in the
interactions between new media and perceptions/performances of embodiment, agency, citizenship, collective
action, individual identity, time and spatiality. This courses focuses on race, ethnicity, gender, and disability in the
U.S. and how the new media reinforce social hierarchies yet offer possibilities of transcendence. New media can
divide and disenfranchise, yet they also liberate in unexpected ways. This course explores these strands and the
links between them.

84. Sophomore Seminar. (1, 2) -- Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members
in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact
between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department
and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

98. Supervised Group Study. (1-3) Freshman or Sophomore standing. Course may be repeated for credit.
Three hours of work per week per unit. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Instruction for a small group
of students on a topic initiated by those students.

103A. Approaches, Ideas, and Paradigms I. Major requirement. A broad consideration of the historical
relationship between philosophy, literature, and rhetoric, with special emphasis on selected themes within the
classical and medieval period.

103B. Approaches, Ideas, and Paradigms II. Major requirement. A broad consideration of the historical
relationship between philosophy, literature, and rhetoric, with special emphasis on selected themes within the
modern period.
105. Rhetorical Theory and Practice in Historical Eras. An examination of how rhetorical principles and patterns
operate in an author's or speaker's presentation of self in relation to the character of an intended audience.

110 and 110M. Advanced Argumentative Writing. Prerequisites: Any 1A -1B sequence or upper division
standing. Study and practice of advanced techniques of argumentation for students with well-developed writing
skills. Ethical, logical and pathetic appeals; control of register and tone; assessment of a wide variety of real
audiences genre studies. (110M is equivalent to 110, but 110M is restricted to Rhetoric majors and minors only.)

119. Genre of Film and Literature. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of a particular genre (e.g.,
detective/mystery, horror/thriller, melodrama) with attention to theories of genre in popular culture. May be repeated
for credit with different topic.

121A. Rhetoric of Fiction. Definition and techniques of narrative, including voice, point of view, time orders, and
related matters.
121B. Rhetoric of Fiction: Content and Context. Interpretation of author intentionally in selected works of
modern fiction, in terms of their cultural and historical contexts.

122. Rhetoric of Drama. Examination of the way character is created in drama by repetitive rhetorical patterns
and the ways themes are defined by manipulation of such patterns.

124. Rhetoric of Poetry. Consideration of the relationship between the texture of poetic discourse largely defined
by figures of speech and overall poetic structures.

125. Poetics and Poetry. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Studies in the relationships between poetic
theory and poetic practices from Aristotle's Poetics to the present day.

126. Rhetoric of the Realist Novel. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Rhetorical analysis of the realist
novel in the context of intellectual and social history. The course will explore the development of literary realism in
relation to the social problems of industrialization and urbanization in nineteenth-century Europe.

127. Novel and Society. Prerequisites: 121A and 121B. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of
instructor. Intensive analysis of novelistic discourse with specific reference to social context. Focus on author
intention as a form of social practice.

128. Novel into Film. Close examination of the adaptation of written fiction to the cinema. Focus on the problems
arising from the transformation of five novels, which will be read, into their filmed versions.

131. Rhetoric of Religious Discourse. Consideration of the rhetoric of hermeneutics or biblical interpretation with
special emphasis on the mythical, symbolic, and allegorical language as the bearer of persuasive intention.

132. Rhetoric, Culture and Society. Prerequisites: 103A; Upper division standing. Analysis of rhetorical practice
in the context of social and cultural change with particular reference to the historical transition from pre-industrial to
industrial society in the west.

133. Selected Topics in Film. A study of a film topic not covered by the other film course categories. This course
might focus on the work of a single filmmaker, a particular cinematic "theme," or a non-historic and non-generic
category. Examples: Feminist Film Practice, Gay and Lesbian Cinema, Race and Cinematic Representation,
Alfred Hitchcock. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

135. Rhetoric of Narrative Genres in Nonliterate Societies. May be repeated for credit with different instructor.
Investigation of the rhetorical and cultural principles common to various genres of narrative, both prose and poetic,
in non literate societies. Mythic, epic and folk narratives considered as well as written works from cultures in
transition.

136. Rhetorical Approaches to Folklore. Course may be repeated with instructor's consent. Performance,
persuasion and play in rhetorical perspective. The course will explore performance genres on the margins of
orality/literacy in diverse cultures, including particularly contemporary Arabic folk cultures, medieval European
vernacular traditions, and contemporary American popular cultures.

137. Comparative Rhetoric. Prerequisites: 103A, 103B or non- western language preparation. Rhetorical theory
in cross-cultural perspective. The course will explore "other" Rhetorics, i.e., non-Western, seeking to discover the
ways in which diverse peoples have codified their rhetorical systems. The course will also investigate rhetorical
method applied to other cultures.

138. Rhetoric and Literature under the Roman Empire. Prerequisites: 103A and consent of instructor. Course
may be repeated once for credit with consent of instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. The course will
examine the development of rhetorical theory and practice under the early Roman Empire (1st - 3rd centuries CE)
or the late Roman Empire (4th - 6th centuries CE), with special attention to the evolution of literary genres. All texts
will be studied in translation.

139. Rhetoric of Autobiography. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Rhetorical analysis of autobiographical
discourse, with specific attention to the evolution of the genre in relation to changing modes of human subjectivity.

139AC. Autobiography and American Individualism. Rhetorical analysis of autobiographical discourse, with
special attention to the ideology of individualism in America. Satisfies the American Cultures requirement.

140. Discourse of Qualities. Prerequisites: Any 1A-1B sequence or upper division standing. Study of the
discourse of qualities, with focus on how we speak about the "howness" of things as opposed to the "whatness" of
things. Topics to include questions of taste, of aesthetic judgment, of expression, and representation.

141AC. American Cultures as a Problem of Postmodernity. Establishes the relevance of discussions about the
postmodern, one of this era’s major categories of analysis, for understanding the seemingly chaotic cultural
expressions of ethnicity and race. Explores how multiculturalism in America is articulated as a specifically political
problem.

150. Rhetoric of Contemporary Politics. Examination of the characteristic rhetoric of a variety of manifestations
of modern politics. Emphasis on building a theoretical foundation for critical observation and participation in the
contemporary political process.

152. Rhetoric of Constitutional Discourse. The rhetorical context of The Federalist. Examines the tradition of
Anglo-American constitutional argumentation in the 18th century, its sources, and its implications. Readings
include Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, pamphlets of the American Revolution, and Anti-Federalist writings.

152AC. Race and Order in the New Republic. This course will explore how the social issue of race in the new
American republic shaped the political founding of the United States in 1787. We will investigate perceptions of
race at the time of the founding, try to understand the origins of those perceptions, and estimate how they affected
the founding and establishment of a new nation. This course satisfies the American Cultures requirement.

155. Discourses of Colonialism and Postcoloniality. Course may be repeated for credit. This course critically
explores key concepts and figures used in the public discourse of European colonialism to justify territorial
expansion in the 19th century such as "race," "culture," "civility", and "the Orient" and their disturbing legacies for
the knowledges, practical projects, and problems of contemporary postcolonial societies in a globalizing world.

156. Rhetoric of the Political Novel. Investigation of major 19th and 20th century works of fiction in which political
stances are exploited as dominant themes; close reading of author viewpoints and rhetorical strategies.

157A. Rhetoric of Modern Political Theory. Study of textual strategies of important works of modern European
and American political theory from the 17th through the 19th centuries.

157B. Rhetoric of Contemporary Political Theory. Study of the textual strategies of important works of 20th
century European and American political theory.

158. Advanced Problems in the Rhetoric of Political Theory. Close study of selected works of modern political
theory, including debates over the nature and interpretation of political theory and the role of the political theorist.
Specific themes and readings vary from year to year.

159A. Great Theorists in the Rhetoric of Political and Legal Theory. Prerequisite: permission of Instructor. This
course explores the development of one or two theorists or an important theme or issue, with close readings of
major texts as well as attention to important commentators.
159B. Great Themes in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Political and Legal Theory. Prerequisite: permission of
Instructor. Concentrates on aspects of 20th century political, social, and legal theory that are too complex to be
treated comprehensively as one section of a course in modern theory.

160. Introduction to the Rhetoric of Legal Discourse. The application of rhetorical methodology to all categories
of legal texts.

162AC. Rhetoric of American Culture. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. This course explores the ways
laws and regulations in the United States identify and classify--or fail to identify and classify--groups in American
society. Readings include a wide array of theoretical and historical materials as well as legal and governmental
documents. Satisfies American Cultures requirement.

163AC. Law, Ethnicity, and the Rhetoric of National Security. Examines the way in which the category of
"National security" has emerged in political and legal discourse as an interest which is balanced against, and
usually overrides, the rights of individual citizens. Satisfies the American Cultures requirement.

164. Rhetoric of Legal Theory. Rhetorical methodology applied to close analysis of the argumentative framework
of important works in modern legal theory.

165. Rhetoric of Legal Philosophy. Consideration of basic philosophical issues related to the political and moral
foundations of the law.

166. Rhetoric, Law, and Politics in Ancient Greece and Rome. Course may be repeated once for credit with
consent of instructor. Examination of the role of rhetoric in Greek or Roman legal and political thought. All texts will
be studied in translation.

167. Advanced Topics in Law and Rhetoric. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisites: At
least one course from 160, 164 or 165. Thorough consideration of particular rhetorical themes in the field of legal
theory, legal philosophy, and legal argumentation.

168. Rhetoric, Law, and Political Theory, 1500-1700. Examination of European political and legal discourse from
1450 to 1700.

170. Rhetoric of Social Science. Analysis of the ways in which political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists,
economists, and psychologists establish the authoritativeness of their claims. Focus is on the presentation of data
as fact, the use of quantitative methods, and of the "strategies" through which social knowledge is transformed into
objective information.

171. The Problem of Mass Culture and the Rhetoric of Social Theory. Study of the textual strategies whereby
the masses and mass culture emerge as objects of anxiety, hope, and scrutiny for social theorists of the 19th and
20th centuries.

172. Rhetoric of Social Theory. Rhetorical analysis of theorists from Durkheim and Weber, as well as Marx,
Ricardo, and Bentham, to contemporary representatives of social and economic thought.

173. Rhetoric of Historical Discourse. A study of how historical knowledge is produced and interpreted. Topics
might include narrative and representation, the uses of evidence, forms of historical argumentation, and historical
controversies in the public realm.

174. Rhetoric of Scientific Discourse. Examination of the characteristic function of discourse in and about the
natural sciences with particular examination of the ways in which scientific language both guarantees and, at the
same time, obscures the expression of social norms in scientific facts.
175. Rhetoric of Philosophical Discourse. Introduction to theoretical issues involved in applying rhetorical
analysis to philosophical discourse; intensive analysis of selected philosophical works.

177. Language, Truth and Dialogue. Examination of philosophical dialogues from Plato to Heidegger. Focus on
the interaction within the dialogue, the participation required of the reader/listener, and the relation of such
interaction and participation to thinking, speaking and knowing.

178. Rhetoric of the Novel. Prerequisites: any 1A -1B sequence or upper division standing. Course may be
repeated for credit. A study of the origins and transformations of the novel as a genre, with special reference to the
relationship between the rhetoric of novelistic discourse and the social history of the modern individual. Readings
will be drawn from primary and secondary sources in the Western tradition, in translation where appropriate.

179. Rhetorics of Sexual Exchange and Sexual Difference. Course may be repeated for credit. This course
examines the centrality of sexual difference and sexual exchange to the structuring of societies, cultures, and
political life. Possible topics include theories of desire and corporeality; the figure of woman as object of exchange
in historical and contemporary contexts such as Sati, prostitution, surrogacy and IVF, and the global traffic in female
labor; and an examination of how sexual difference functions as a blind-spot in theories of culture, society, and
economy.

181. Undergraduate Seminar on the Theory and Practice of Reading and Interpretation. An introduction to
contemporary modes of reading and interpretation in the humanities, from structuralism through psychoanalysis,
with an emphasis on theories of the sign (semiotics). Examples drawn from such fields as contemporary literature,
architecture, history, painting, film, and popular culture.

189. Special Topics. Course may be repeated for credit. Course may be repeated for credit. Group instruction
and investigation of topics not accommodated in regular course offerings.

H190A - H190B. Honors Thesis. (2;2) Tutorial. Students must take 2 units of H190A and 2 Units of H190B.
Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence. Prerequisites: Senior standing with a 3.7 gpa in
Rhetoric and 3.5 gpa overall. Independent study under guidance of a faculty director culminating in a written thesis.
Required of all Rhetoric majors desiring to earn the A.B. degree with Honors.

194W. Special Topics. (2.5) Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Group instruction and investigation of topics not
accommodated in regular course offerings.

198. Supervised Group Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: Junior standing. Course may be repeated for credit. Tutorial.
Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Instruction for a small group of students on a topic initiated by those
students.

199. Supervised Independent Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: 3.0 gpa. Course may be repeated for credit. Tutorial.
Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: 3.0 gpa. For special projects that cannot be
otherwise accommodated.




         FACULTY AND THEIR AREAS OF INTEREST
DAVID BATES                      European intellectual history, 18th-20th c
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR              Enlightenment thought and culture
PHD CHICAGO                      Political and revolutionary discourse
                                 Philosophy of history
DANIEL BOYARIN              Talmud
PROFESSOR                   Judaism and Christianity in Late Antiquity
PHD AMERICAN                Religion and systems of sex and gender
THEOLOGICAL UNION           Rhetoric of interpretation

JUDITH BUTLER               Feminist theory, sexuality studies
PROFESSOR                   19th and 20th century continental philosophy
PHD YALE                    Philosophy and literature
                            Social and political thought

ANTHONY J. CASCARDI Philosophy and literature
PROFESSOR                Aesthetics, The novel
PHD HARVARD              Critical theory, Renaissance/Early Modern

SEYMOUR CHATMAN             Narrative structure and style in film and literature
PROFESSOR OF THE            Language of film
GRADUATE SCHOOL             Relation between film and novel
PHD MICHIGAN                Semiotics

PHENG CHEAH                 18th-20th c. continental philosophy and critical theory
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR         Postcolonial theory and Anglophone, postcolonial literatures
PHD CORNELL                 Theory of globalization, Philosophy and literature, Legal philosophy
                            Social and political thought, Feminist theory

CAROL J. CLOVER             Film and popular culture, Oral literature; orality and literacy
PROFESSOR                   Medieval literature (esp. Germanic vernacular)
PHD BERKELEY                Feminist theory

DAVID COHEN                 Social theory, Legal philosophy and rhetoric
PROFESSOR                   Ancient history, classical rhetoric
JD, PHD CAMBRIDGE           Ancient law

MARIANNE CONSTABLE          Legal rhetoric and philosophy
PROFESSOR                   Sociology of law, social theory
JD, PHD BERKELEY            Anglo-American legal and political traditions
                            Philosophy of social science

HUBERT L. DREYFUS*          Continental philosophy
PROFESSOR OF THE            Cognitive science
GRADUATE SCHOOL             Artificial intelligence
PHD HARVARD                 Philosophy of technology

SAMERA ESMEIR               Colonialism and Modernity, War, Violence, ,
Assistant Professor         Development, Memory, Sociolegal Studies, Social and
LL.M, PhD New York Univ.    Political Thought, Middle Eastern Studies

FELIPE GUTTERRIEZ           Contemporary rhetorical theory
LECTURER                    Social theory
JD, PHD BERKELEY            Legal rhetoric

SHANNON JACKSON             Performance theory
PROFESSOR                   American studies, Oral performance
PHD NORTHWESTERN             Twentieth century theatre and performance art

MARTIN JAY*                  European intellectual history,
PROFESSOR                    19th & 20th century Marxist theory
PHD HARVARD                  Visual discourse and culture

ANTON KAES*                  Film theory
PROFESSOR                    German cinema
PHD STANFORD

VICTORIA KAHN*               Renaissance literature, rhetoric and poetics
PROFESSOR                    Literary theory
PHD YALE                     History of rhetoric

ANTHONY LONG*                Ancient philosophy
PROFESSOR                    Greek literature
PHD LONDON

MICHAEL MASCUCH              History and theory of narrative discourse
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR          Early Modern and Modern literature, culture
PHD CAMBRIDGE           and society, especially British
                             History and theory of orality and literacy

DANIEL F. MELIA              Oral literature
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR          Celtic languages (Welsh, Irish) Folklore
PHD HARVARD                  Medieval history and literature

RAMONA NADDAFF               Ancient Greek philosophy and literature
Assistant Professor          Politics and the novel, 20th century French thought
PhD Boston University        History of philosophy

BARBARA SHAPIRO               Intellectual and cultural history, 1500-1700
PROFESSOR IN THE              Early modern legal and political discourse
GRADUATE SCHOOL               Science and society, 1500-1700
PHD HARVARD                   Tudor and Stuart England


KAJA SILVERMAN                Feminist theory
PROFESSOR                     Psychoanalysis
PHD BROWN                     Film theory, Cultural studies


TRINH T. MINH-HA              Film aesthetics and analysis
PROFESSOR                     French cinema, Third World cinema
PHD ILLINOIS                  Women in film, Ideology and film


LINDA WILLIAMS                Film history and genre
PROFESSOR                     Melodrama and pornography
PHD COLORADO                  Feminist theory
                              Visual Culture

MICHAEL WINTROUB              History of science, early modern cultural history
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR                      Vernacular consciousness and literature,
PhD HARVARD                              Material and visual culture, sociology of science,
                                         History of anthropology and intellectual history




___________________________________________
 Associated with the Department of Rhetoric




APPENDIX A: AREAS OF CONCENTRATION
Students declaring the Major after Spring, 1995, choose an area of emphasis and take three Rhetoric courses within it and one course outside
the Department related to the area of concentration.


A. HISTORY AND THEORY OF RHETORIC
105       Rhetorical Theory and Practice in Historical Eras
110       Advanced Argumentative Writing
132       Rhetoric, Culture and Society
137       Comparative Rhetoric
138       Rhetoric and Literature under the Roman Empire
140       Discourse of Qualities
173       Rhetoric of Historical Discourse
174       Rhetoric of Scientific Discourse
175       Rhetoric of Philosophical Discourse
177       Language, Truth and Dialogue
181       Undergraduate Seminar on the Theory and Practice of Reading and Interpretation
196       Special Topics (as appropriate)

B. PUBLIC DISCOURSE
131       Rhetoric of Religious Discourse
141AC     American Cultures as a Problem in Postmodernity
150       Rhetoric of Contemporary Politics
152       Rhetoric of Constitutional Discourse
152(AC)   Race and Order in the New Republic
153       American Political Rhetoric
155       Rhetoric and Imperialism
157A      Rhetoric of Modern Political Theory
157B      Rhetoric of Contemporary Political Theory
158       Advanced Problems in the Rhetoric of Political Theory
159A      Great Theorists
159B      Political and Legal Theory
160       Introduction to the Rhetoric of Legal Discourse
162AC     Rhetoric of American Culture
163AC     Law, Ethnicity, and the Rhetoric ofNational Security
164       Rhetoric of Legal Theory
165       Rhetoric of Legal Philosophy
166       Rhetoric, Law, and Politics in Ancient Greece
167       Advanced Topics in Law and Rhetoric
168       Rhetoric, Law, and Political Theory, 1500-1700
170       Rhetoric of Social Science
171       The Problem of Mass Culture and the Rhetoric of Social Theory
172       Rhetoric of Social Theory
179       Rhetorics of Sexual Exchange
189       Special Topics (as appropriate)

C. IMAGE AND THE NARRATIVE
119       Genre of Film and Literature
121A      Rhetoric of Fiction
121B      Rhetoric of Fiction: Content and Contex
122       Rhetoric of Drama
123       Poetry and Performance
124       Rhetoric of Poetry
125       Poetics and Poetry
126       Rhetoric of the Realist Novel
127       Novel and Society
128       Novel into Film
129       Theories of Film
133       Selected Topics in Film
134       National Cinema
135       Rhetoric of Narrative Genres in Nonliterate Societies
139AC     Autobiography and American Individualism
156       Rhetoric of the Political Novel
176       The Problem of Evil and the Rhetoric of the Modern Novel
178       Rhetoric of the Novel
180 AC    Rhetoric of Race and Science
181       Undergraduate Seminar on the Theory and Practice of Reading and Interpretation
189       Special Topics (as appropriate)




APPENDIX B: POLICY STATEMENT ON THE ONE, MAJOR-RELATED COURSE TAKEN OUTSIDE THE
DEPARTMENT.

All majors who declared after Spring 1995 are required to take one course outside the Department related to the specified area
of concentration in the major (i.e., History and Theory of Rhetoric, Public Discourse, or Narrative and the Image).

The following courses qualify as potentially appropriate. Please use good judgment in selecting the course; a class on law will
likely fit Public Discourse majors; a class on nutrition will not. You are more likely to avoid difficulties if you select a course with
a broader range of inquiry, a degree of reflectiveness about the disciplinary composition of its subject, and/or a treatment of
issues clearly related to the fields of study in Rhetoric. For example: Anthro 156B, Culture and Power, which you could use for
Area B, is acceptable; Anthro 132, Analysis of Archaeological Materials, is not.

Select your course from upper-division classes (excluding language instruction, of course) in:

Anthropology                                    Latin American Studies
Art History                                     Logic and the Methodology of
Asian Studies                                     Science
Classics                                        Near Eastern Studies
Comparative Literature                          Philosophy
English                                         Political Science
Ethnic Studies                                  Psychology
French                                          Public Policy
German                                          Romance Languages and
Hispanic Languages and Literatures                Literatures
History                                         Sociology
Italian                                         South and Southeast Asian Studies
Jurisprudence and Social Policy




If your choice of course does not fit the guidelines above, see the Undergraduate Adviser. Otherwise there is no need to get
your course "approved."



APPENDIX C: PREVIOUS MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS

A. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS WHO DECLARED FALL 1993-SPRING 1995
Undergraduate courses in Rhetoric are grouped into three categories:
Argument; Narrative; and Law, politics, journalism, religion and science.
As of Fall 1993, newly declared Rhetoric majors must fulfill the following
requirements for the major: Rhetoric 10, 30, 100, 101, and five additional
upper division courses, which must include at least one course from each
of the three categories.

I. PREREQUISITE COURSE        - Rhetoric 10 (prerequisite to all required courses)
II. REQUIRED COURSES FOR DECLARED MAJORS TO GRADUATE:
         Lower Division requirement taken sophomore or junior year: Rhetoric 30

          Upper Division sequence to be taken junior year: 100 and 101 (prerequisite to upper division)

          Upper Division electives: 5 courses, including one course from each of the categories listed below

     A. Argument 105A-B-C-D-E, 110J, 110/110M, 121A, 132, 137, 166, 177.
     These courses explore the philosophical basis of rhetoric practice,
     and familiarize the student with rhetoric as a part of Western and
     non-Western intellectual traditions from the Classical period to our
     own time and/or focus on refining the rhetorical skills introduced in
     lower division courses.

     B. Narrative Discourse 121B, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 135,
     136, 138, 142, 156, 176, 178. These courses examine such text types
     as oral traditions, lyric poetry, history, the novel, and film, and
     consider, in part, the relation between rhetoric and culture.

    C. Law, Politics, Journalism, Religion, and Science 130, 131, 139, 150,
    152, 153, 154, 155 157A 157B, 158, 159A, 159B, 160, 161, 162, 164, 165, 167, 168, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 179.
 These courses consider language and argument in various areas of public discourse.

NOTES:
1. For categories of Rhetoric courses prior to Fall 1993 see below.
2. Rhetoric 10 is required to declare. Rhetoric 10 & 30 are prerequisites to Upper Division courses for Majors. A grade of C or
   better is required for credit toward completion of the Major.
3. Courses taken to satisfy the Major and Minor requirements must be taken for letter grades and may not be taken on a
   Passed/Not Passed basis.
4. Students may NOT receive credit for both Rhetoric 110 and 110M. Rhetoric 110J is not considered a duplication of
    Rhetoric 110 or 110M -- you may receive credit for taking Rhetoric 110J along with 110 or 110M. Rhetoric 110M is
    restricted to majors and minors only.
5.  Only one Rhetoric 198 (3 units only) fulfills an upper division elective Rhetoric 196 may count towards either an elective or
    one of the categories, Rhetoric H190 Honors Thesis taken for the total of 4 units counts towards one upper division
    elective.
6.  Rhetoric 10 offered Fall 1991 or later is not equivalent to Rhetoric 1B and does not meet the second half of the
    University's Reading and Composition requirement.




B. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS WHO DECLARED FALL 1990-SPRING 1993

Undergraduate courses in Rhetoric are grouped into three categories: Theory and history of rhetorical practice; fictive discourse;
argumentative and declarative discourse. Students entering Fall 1991 through Spring 1993 must fulfill the following major
requirements:

Prerequisites: Rhetoric 10. Requirements to be taken during the Junior year: 30 or 32, 100, and 101. Requirements to be
taken during the Senior year five additional courses, at least one course from each category.

I. PREREQUISITE COURSE - As of Fall 1991, Rhetoric 10 is prerequisite to all required courses

II. REQUIRED COURSES FOR DECLARED MAJORS TO GRADUATE:
  Lower Division: (taken by end of Jr yr) Choice of Rhetoric 30 or 32

 Upper Division Sequence to be taken junior year: 100 and 101 (prerequisites 10 and 30 or 32)

 5 Upper Division Electives: one course from each of the categories listed below.

 A. Theory and History of Rhetoric Practice: 105A-B-C-D-E, 121A, 132, 137, 164, 165, 166, 168, 177. These courses explore
 the efforts to establish a philosophical basis for Rhetorical practice, and familiarize the student with Rhetoric as a part of
 Western intellectual tradition from the Classical period to our own time.

 B. Fictive Discourse: 121B, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 135, 136, 142, 156, 176, 178. These courses examine how
 forms such as lyric poetry, the novel, and film achieve their special impact on audiences.

 C. Argumentative and Declarative Discourse: 110J, 110/110M, 130, 131, 139, 150, 152, 153, 154, 155, 157, 158, 159A, 159B,
 160, 161, 162,    170, 171, 173, 174, 175, 179. These courses analyze the persuasive strategies used in various kinds of
 argument, including legal, political, philosophical, scientific, historical, and religious discourse.

C. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS WHO DECLARED PRIOR TO FALL 1990

Undergraduate Rhetoric courses are grouped into three categories: theory and history of rhetorical practice; fictive discourse;
argumentative and declarative discourse. Majors must fulfill all requirements: Rhetoric 1A -1B (or 10); 30, 32, and 100; plus
seven additional upper division courses, which must include at least one course from each of the three categories.

I.     PREREQUISITE COURSES (Must be taken before declaring the Major)

Rhetoric 1A -1B (or old Rhetoric 10 prior to Fall 91 if 1A -1B requirement was fulfilled outside Rhetoric) and Rhetoric 30

II.    OTHER REQUIRED COURSES

Rhetoric 32 and Rhetoric 100

III.   SEVEN ELECTIVES (including one course from each of the categories listed below)

        A. Theory & History of Rhetorical Practice: 101,105A-B-C-D-E, 121A, 129, 132, 137,164,165,166,168,177. These
courses explore the efforts to establish a philosophical basis for rhetorical practice, and familiarize the student with Rhetoric as a
part of Western intellectual tradition from the Classical period to our own time.

       B. Fictive Discourse 121B, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 135, 136, 129, 156, 176, 178. These courses examine how
forms such as lyric poetry, the novel, and film achieve their special impact on audiences.

        C. Argumentative and Declarative Discourse 110J, 110/110M, 130, 131, 139,150, 152, 153, 154, 155, 157, 158,
 159AB, 160, 161, 167, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 179. These courses analyze the persuasive strategies used in various
 kinds of argument including legal political, philosophical, historical, and religious discourse.

NOTES:
1. Rhetoric 1A -1B or Rhetoric 10 and Rhetoric 30 are prerequisite for Upper Division courses.
2. A grade of C- or better in Rhetoric 30 and 32 required for credit toward completion of the Major.
3. Major & Minor requirements are taken for letter grades and may not be taken Passed/Not Passed.
4. Special Note Majors who completed Rhetoric 30 before Fall 1986 are required to take Rhetoric 101. These two will count
toward the 7 Upper Division electives.
5. Rhetoric 198 (3 units only) may fulfill one Upper Division Elective.
 6. Rhetoric H190 Honors Thesis 4 units (2 units each semester) fulfills one Upper Division elective

D. RHETORIC MINOR PROGRAM 1989 to Spring 1995

The College of Letters and Science approved the Rhetoric Minor on a permanent basis in 1989. Minors must fulfill the following
requirements: Rhetoric 10; Rhetoric 100; and four upper division courses distributed in any way among the three categories of
courses [see below].

REQUIRED COURSES:

Rhetoric 10 (prerequisite for upper division courses and to declare the minor) and Rhetoric 100.

ELECTIVE COURSES: 4 upper division courses numbered between 101-179 and 196.

After completing Rhetoric 10 with a C or better, students may declare the Rhetoric Minor by presenting a copy of their Student
Record to the Undergraduate Assistant. Before confirming the completion of the minor program a student must submit the
completion of minor petition and provide the Undergraduate Assistant with a final transcript. The Undergraduate Assistant
serves as adviser to Rhetoric Minors. All Rhetoric courses for the minor must be taken for a letter grade.