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PART THREE MSc and Diploma Programmes

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PART THREE MSc and Diploma Programmes Powered By Docstoc
					PART THREE MSc and Diploma Programmes
MSc Courses - Duration and Structure
       Each MSc lasts 50 weeks (October to September), with registration and orientation
taking place during the first week of October.
       The MSc involves six 12-week units, usually assessed by an essay of no fewer than
2,500 but not more than 3,500 words long for each unit. Some units use a mix of forms of
assessment. The pass mark is 50. Students must attend all seminars for each unit taken.
Non-attendance without a valid reason will be penalised and may result in the withholding
of the credit points necessary for the award of the MSc or Diploma. Students should
explain any absence to the unit owner preferably before or failing that as soon as possible
after any seminar they have been unable to attend.
       MSc students must also write a dissertation with a minimum of 10,000 and not
exceeding 15,000 words, the pass mark for which is also 50.

Diploma Courses - Duration and Structure
        The Diploma lasts 9 months (28 September to 30 June). It involves six 12-week
units (the same ones as for the MSc) during weeks 1-24, usually assessed by an essay of
no fewer than 2,500 but not more than 3,500 words long for each unit. Some units use a
mix of forms of assessment. The pass mark is 50. In addition, Diploma students may
choose to write three more essays during weeks 25-30. The essays can be from any
three units from weeks 1-24, but with no more than one per unit. These last three essays
are not assessed essays: students are not required to submit them and do not need to
score 50 or above to be awarded the Diploma. They are an opportunity for students to
explore areas of interest voluntarily without pressure of assessment during their final six
weeks of study. Diploma students do not have to write a dissertation. Diploma students
may upgrade to MSc if they successfully pass all 6 taught units with a mark of 50.
Students who upgrade to MSc do not have to write the three unassessed Diploma essays.
Instead, they begin preparation for their MSc dissertation.

Upgrading from Dip to MSc
      Every Diploma student has the opportunity to upgrade to MSc if their essay marks
are consistently 50 or over. Eligible students will be identified by the Graduate Studies
Administrator and the Course Directors, and the relevant paperwork will be completed by
the Department.

Options for Part-time Study
        The Department does its best to help part-time students use their time in an optimal
way. We can develop an individually-tailored programme of study, and this can be
adapted as circumstances develop. This can represent an important limitation on the
choices available to part-time students. Students should be aware that work commitments
cannot be taken into account for extension or suspension of study. In accepting a place as
a part-time student, you are committing yourself to delivering work as required for your
particular programme of study. A combination of working and studying is the nature of
part-time study. All MSc courses can be undertaken on a part time basis. The maximum
period of part time study is two years.




                                             4          All information correct at time of printing – Sept 2009
MSc and Diploma in Development and Security
Course Director: Ryerson Christie

          Since the end of the Cold War, violent conflict has cost the lives of millions of
people and displaced many more, overwhelmingly in the developing world. However the
causes and consequences of contemporary conflicts extend far beyond the security
community’s traditional focus on military issues. They also require a consideration of many
of the core themes of development studies. This innovative programme explores the
linkage and tensions between development and security concerns in theory and practice.
Specifically, it builds on the Department of Politics' unique combination of staff expertise
and experience to:
     examine the nature of violent conflict in the world today and the international
       community's response to it;
     locate this analysis in a comprehensive theoretical understanding of wider
       development and security studies debates and controversies, particularly in relation
       to evolving patterns of global governance;
     explore these issues and dilemmas through contemporary, empirical case studies.

Careers Before and After Graduation
        There is a growing demand for postgraduate students with knowledge of
development and security issues in a wide range of organisations. These include non
governmental organisations such as security centres, charitable foundations, and
International organisations such as NATO, the UN, International Atomic Energy Agency
and the European Union (especially since the creation of a common European defence
policy). There is also strong demand from government departments, including ministries
of foreign affairs, defence and international development, both in the West and across the
world. Moreover, with the changing nature of the security agenda, a wide range of
commercial companies are increasingly interested in employing graduates with knowledge
of development and security issues.

Units for Weeks 1-12 (1st teaching block)
All Dev & Sec students will take the following THREE units as core units:
Conflict, Security and Development
Theories of Securitisation
Theories of Development

Units for Weeks 13-24 (2nd teaching block)
Students choose THREE units from the option list common to all of the MSc/Diploma
programmes.


MSc and Diploma in European Governance
Course Director: Dr Nieves Perez-Solorzano

       This programme allows students to engage with the study of Europe from a variety
of perspectives – the domestic, the regional/supranational, and the global. It draws on
theories of international relations, comparative politics and European integration, as well
as dealing with some of the biggest practical political challenges facing Europe today. It
allows students to develop their knowledge of European politics by engaging with subjects
that stretch beyond the European continent, by focusing, for example, on international
security, development or globalization; or alternatively by specializing in European Studies.


                                             5           All information correct at time of printing – Sept 2009
        Core units in the first semester prepare students for a wide range of optional units in
the second semester, and students are included in the seminar programmes given by
visiting researchers and external speakers. Students writing their dissertations will be
expected to select a project that involves a European dimension. One of the core units will
be led by Dr Michelle Cini who has edited key textbooks in this field of expertise.

Programme Structure

Units for Weeks 1-12 (1st teaching block)
All Eur Gov students will take the following THREE units as core units:
The EU: theories, institutions and policies
Comparative European Politics
Theories of International Relations

Units for Weeks 13-24 (2nd teaching block)
Students choose THREE units from the option list common to all of the MSc/Diploma
programmes.


MSc and Diploma in Gender and International Relations
Course Director: Dr Jutta Weldes

        This programme interlocks with Bristol’s world-leading research into the gendered
character of world politics. It examines and deploys perspectives from feminism, gender
studies, cultural studies, and sexuality studies, in conjunction with inter-disciplinary
research in international political economy, civil-military relations, international
development and the study of men and masculinities. Core units prepare students for a
wide choice of options, and students are included in the workshop programmes given by
visiting researchers and associates. Students writing essays and dissertations are
encouraged to bring the ‘gender lens’ to bear on contemporary issues in international
development, security, conflict and militarisation. This unique programme was launched in
1998 with personal and continuing support from international feminist scholars, and it also
has ongoing contact with leading researchers into masculinities and military sexualities.

Careers Before and After Graduation
       Students come to us from many different backgrounds. There is much open to MSc
and Diploma in Gender and International Relations graduates. Options include pursuing
further postgraduate study towards an academic career; working for ministries, non-
governmental and international organisations or local agencies; or working in business,
law or the media.

Units for Weeks 1-12 (1st teaching block)
All GIR students will take the following TWO units as core units:
Theories of International Relations
Feminisms and International Relations

And either International Security or International Political Economy as a THIRD core unit.

Units for Weeks 13-24 (2nd teaching block)
Students choose THREE units from the option list common to all of the MSc/Diploma
programmes.


                                              6           All information correct at time of printing – Sept 2009
MSc and Diploma in International Development
Course Director: Dr Vernon Hewitt

       The programme is designed to assist a wide range of people involved in
conceptualising or administering policies which aim at a sustainable and substantial level
of development in the world's poorer countries. It is especially suitable for those already
involved in planning development strategies, those currently working for non-governmental
organisations (NGOs) in the development field and those planning a career in
development.
       The programme combines an intellectual and academic approach with policy-
oriented and empirical studies of development, addressing three interrelated but separate
facets of the development process:
        Analysis of what 'development' means
        Studying the processes of planning (external aid, regional disparities,
           environmental factors, poverty, and industrialisation)
        Examining how development policies may be delivered and administered,
           analysing the importance of effective political and bureaucratic structures, and
           evaluating the contributions of NGOs and other external bodies

Careers Before and After Graduation
       Not surprisingly perhaps, many former students work with a whole variety of
development orientated agencies, at the local, national and international level. A majority
of our students have gone on to work for NGOs, especially in the areas of Africa and
South Asia, while several now work with various international agencies, such as the UN
and the various UN agencies concerned with Human Rights and Environmental
Degradation. Many of our overseas students have gone on to work within their respective
government departments concerned with such issues as sanitation, urban planning and
migration. Other individuals have gone on to do such diverse things as start their own
small businesses (in one case, designing tube wells for export), qualify as a librarian, or
set about doing doctoral work.

Units for Weeks 1-12 (1st teaching block)
All Int Dev students take the following THREE units as core units
Conflict, Security and Development
International Political Economy
Theories of Development

Units for Weeks 13-24 (2nd teaching block)
Students choose THREE units from the option list common to all of the MSc/Diploma
programmes.


MSc and Diploma in International Relations
Course Director: Dr Eric Herring

       This programme presents a broad assessment of contemporary international
relations. It integrates theoretical approaches with the study of many cases and issues. It
also explores the ways in which the line between the domestic and international is blurred
by trade, financial, environmental, strategic, ideological, cultural and ethical issues. The
Department promotes a closely-knit student community with easy access to members of
staff who all give teaching and supervision a high priority while maintaining high-quality,
high-volume research.

                                             7          All information correct at time of printing – Sept 2009
Careers Before and After Graduation
       Approximately one third of the MSc and Diploma students each year are from
countries other than the United Kingdom, including Angola, Bangladesh, Belgium, Belize,
Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Denmark, Finland,
France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan,
Kazakhstan, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, the Netherlands, New
Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Russia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea,
Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, UAE, the United States, and Uzbekistan. Most
of our students come to us straight from a degree in Politics or a related discipline such as
History, Economics, Sociology or Law. Others join us as mature students who may or may
not have a degree but who have experience in business, international organisations (IOs),
non-government organisations (NGOs) or the armed forces. An increasingly common
pattern is for people with experience in NGOs, such as the International Crisis Group or
IOs, such as the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, to take a mid- or early-career
sabbatical year to develop a deeper understanding of the context in which they work. Our
students have gone on to diverse careers in, for example, finance, business, law, the
armed forces, the Home Office, the Foreign Office, the Treasury, The Times newspaper,
the Thai Foreign Ministry, the US Department of State, the Italian diplomatic service, the
United Nations, lobbying in Washington, DC, working for the Government of Turkmenistan,
as well as remaining in the Department as research students.

General Preparatory Reading
       If you do not have a strong background in international relations, see John Baylis
and Steve Smith (eds), The Globalisation of World Politics (Oxford: Oxford University
Press, 2005).

Units for Weeks 1-12 (1st teaching block)
All IR students take the following THREE units as core units:
International Security
Theories of International Relations
International Political Economy

Units for Weeks 13-24 (2nd teaching block)
Students choose THREE units from the optional units list common to all of the
MSc/Diploma programmes.


MSc and Diploma in International Security
Course Director: Dr Columba Peoples

          September 11, 2001 has highlighted the possibility that the new millennium will
not be more peaceful than the last. Instead we are confronted by a growing number of new
threats in international security ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to
the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The variety and complexity of these
threats are challenging traditional approaches to international security. States are
increasingly helpless in the face of transnational dangers which cannot be resolved by
national armed forces, but require international collaboration.
          This programme provides students with a theoretical and empirical understanding
of the new international security environment of the post-Cold War era, including the
origins of conflicts and peace, the emergence of new security threats and the multiplicity of
actors involved in conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peacemaking today. It aims to be

                                              8          All information correct at time of printing – Sept 2009
praxis relevant by teaching students how to apply theoretical concepts to contemporary
conflicts and current affairs.

Careers Before and After Graduation
       There is a growing demand for a postgraduate students with knowledge of
international security in a wide range of organisations. These include non governmental
organisations and security centres , charitable foundations, and International organisations
such as NATO, the UN, International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Union
(especially since the creation of a common European defence policy). There is also strong
demand from government departments, including ministries of foreign affairs, defence and
international development, both in the West and across the world. Moreover, with the
changing nature of the security agenda, a wide range of commercial companies are
increasingly interested in employing graduates with knowledge of international security
issues.

Units for Weeks 1-12 (1st teaching block)
All Int Sec students take the following THREE units as core units:
Security Governance
Theories of Securitisation
International Security

Units for Weeks 13-24 (2nd teaching block)
Students choose THREE units from the optional units list common to all of the
MSc/Diploma programmes.




                                             9          All information correct at time of printing – Sept 2009

				
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Description: PART THREE MSc and Diploma Programmes