EAS 6138 Gas Dynamics

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EAS 6138 Gas Dynamics Powered By Docstoc
					EAS 6138 Gas Dynamics              Spring 2005                 University of Florida

Instructor: Dr. P.M. Sforza, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
        Room 218, MAE-A Building, (352) 392-0512, sforzapm@ufl.edu
Office hours: 10:40 – 11:30 MWF
Course Prerequisites: EAS 4112 or the equivalent
Course Objective: Provide the student with a firm grasp on the fundamentals of
        aerodynamic phenomena associated with vehicles traveling at supersonic and
        hypersonic speeds
Textbook: Elements of Gasdynamics, by Liepmann & Roshko
References: Modern Compressible Flow by Anderson and Compressible Fluid Flow by
        Oosthuizen and Carscallen

Lecture   Date           Topic (Chapter.section)         Homework
1         W – Jan. 5     3.2-3.3
2         F – Jan. 7     3.4-3.7                         1 - exercise 2.5 (plot ans)
3         M – Jan 10     3.8-3.11
4         W – Jan 12     3.12
5         F – Jan 14     4.2-4.5                         2 – exercise 3.8
-         M – Jan. 17    Holiday
6         W – Jan. 19    4.6-4.8
7         F – Jan. 21    4.9-4.12                        3 – exercise 4.3
8         M – Jan. 24    4.13-4.15
9         W – Jan. 26    4.16-4.17
10        F – Jan. 28    4.18-4.19                       4 – exercise 4.9
11        M – Jan. 31    4.20-4.21
12        W – Feb. 2     7.2-7.4
13        F – Feb. 4     7.5-7.7                         5 – exercise 4.10
-         M – Feb. 7     Catch-up class
-         W – Feb. 9     EXAM 1: Lecs. 1-13
14        F – Feb. 11    7.8-7.10                        6 – exercise 7.1
15        M – Feb. 14    7.11-7.13
16        W – Feb. 16    Review of exam
17        F – Feb. 18    8.2-8.4                         7 – exercise 8.1
19        M – Feb. 21    9.4-9.8
20        W – Feb. 23    9.9-9.11 (Mid-term point)
21        F – Feb. 25    9.12-9.13                       8 – exercise 9.2
          Feb.28-Mar.4   Spring break
22        M – Mar. 7     9.14-9.17
23        W – Mar. 9     9.18-10.1
24        F – Mar. 11    10.2-10.3                       9 – exercise 9.4
25        M – Mar. 14    10.4-10.6
26        W – Mar. 16    10.7
27        F – Mar. 18    12.2-12.4                       10 – exercise 10.1
28        M – Mar. 21    12.5-12.7


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-         W – Mar. 23     EXAM 2: Lecs. 14-26
29        F – Mar. 25     12.8-12.10                       11 – conical nozzle
30        M – Mar. 28     12.11-12.12
31        W – Mar. 30     14.1-14.2 (O&C)
32        F – Apr. 1      14.3-14.4 (O&C)                  12 – circular arc airfoil
33        M – Apr. 4      14.4-14.5 (O&C)
34        W – Apr. 6      1.1 (CN)
35        F – Apr. 8      1.2 (CN)                         13 – X-15 nose
36        M – Apr. 11     1.3 (CN)
37        W – Apr. 13     15.1-15.2 (O&C)
38        F – Apr. 15     15.2-15.3 (O&C)                  14 – biconic section
39        M – Apr. 18     15.4 (O&C)
40        W – Apr. 20     15.4-15.5 (O&C)
-         Apr. 21,22      Reading days
-         M – Apr. 25     FINAL EXAM: Lecs. 1-40           10:00 – 12:00 noon

Note: The above schedule is subject to change as the semester progresses. Chapter
       headings are from Liepmann & Roshko except O&C (Oosthuizen & Carscallen)
       and CN (class notes)
Exams: 2 take-home exams during semester and one 2-hour final exam. Make-up exams
       are not normally given. Inform instructor of conflicts that may interfere with
       taking an exam on time so that accommodations may be attempted.
Homework: Typically 14 HW assignments: assigned on Fri., questions on Mon., due on
       Wed. Late submittals of homework will not be accepted.
Lectures: 40 periods each covering an average of 5 pages of the text. Attendance at all
       lectures is expected.
Grading: Based on exams, each minute having equal weight. Homework assignments will
       not be graded but due diligence will be considered in awarding final grade.
Class Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 2nd period, 8:30 – 9:20 PM
Class Location: Room 122, CSE Building
Academic Honesty: All students admitted to the University of Florida have signed a
       statement of academic honesty committing them to be honest in all academic
       work and understanding that failure to comply with this commitment will result in
       disciplinary action. This statement is a reminder to uphold your obligation as a
       student at the University of Florida and to be honest in all work submitted and
       exams taken in this class and all others.
Accommodations for Disabilities: Students with disabilities who are requesting
       classroom accommodation must first register with the Dean of Students Office.
       The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to the student who must
       then provide this documentation to the Instructor when requesting
       accommodations.




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Other Student Resources:
University Counseling Center - (352) 392-575-http://www.counsel.ufl.edu/default.asp;
Mental Health Services - (352) 392-1171 - http://www.health.ufl.edu/shcc/smhs.htm;
Alachua County Crisis Center - (352) 264-6789

Lecture plan for EAS 6138. Text is Elements of Gas Dynamics by Liepmann & Roshko
(Chapter headings refer to Liepmann and Roshko unless otherwise indicated)

Lecture 1
3.2 the propagating shock wave
3.3 one-dimensional isentropic equations

Lecture 2
3.4 the acoustic equations
3.5 propagation of acoustic waves
3.6 the speed of sound
3.7 pressure and particle velocity in a sound wave

Lecture 3
3.8 linearized shock tube
3.9 isentropic waves of finite amplitude
3.10 propagation of finite waves
3.11 centered expansion wave

Lecture 4
3.12 the shock tube

Lecture 5
4.2 oblique shock wave
4.3 relation between  and 
4.4 supersonic flow over a wedge
4.5 Mach lines

Lecture 6
4.6 piston analogy
4.7 weak oblique shocks
4.8 supersonic compression by turning

Lecture 7
4.9 supersonic expansion by turning
4.10 the Prandtl-Meyer function
4.11 simple and non-simple regions
4.12 reflection and intersection of oblique shocks

Lecture 8
4.13 intersection of shocks of the same family



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4.14 detached shocks
4.15 Mach reflection
Lecture 9
4.16 shock-expansion theory
4.17 thin airfoil theory
Lecture 10
4.18 flat lifting wings
4.19 drag reduction

Lecture 11
4.20 the hodograph plane
4.21 cone in supersonic flow

Lecture 12
7.2 notation
7.3 the equation of continuity
7.4 the momentum equation

Lecture 13
7.5 the energy equation
7.6 the Eulerian derivative
7.7 splitting the energy equation

Lecture 14
7.8 the total enthalpy
7.9 natural coordinates, Crocco’s theorem
7.10 relation of vorticity to circulation and rotation

Lecture 15
7.11 the velocity potential
7.12 irrotational flow
7.13 remarks on the equations of motion

Lecture 16
8.2 derivation of the perturbation equations
8.3 pressure coefficient
8.4 boundary conditions

Lecture 17
8.5 two-dimensional flow past a wave-shaped wall
8.6 wavy wall in supersonic flow

Lecture 18
8.7 supersonic thin airfoil theory
8.8 planar flows
9.2 cylindrical coordinates



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9.3 boundary conditions

Lecture 19
9.4 pressure coefficient
9.5 axially symmetric flow
9.6 subsonic flow
9.7 supersonic flow
9.8 velocities in the supersonic field

Lecture 20
9.9 solution for a cone
9.10 other meridian shapes
9.11 solution for a slender cone

Lecture 21
9.12 slender body drag
9.13 yawed body of revolution in supersonic flow

Lecture 22
9.14 cross-flow boundary conditions
9.15 cross-flow solutions
9.16 cross flow for slender bodies of revolution
9.17 lift of slender bodies of revolution

Lecture 23
9.18 slender body theory
9.19 Rayleigh’s formula
10.1 introduction to similarity rules for high speed flow

Lecture 24
10.2 2-D linearized flow; Prandtl-Glauert and Gothert rules
10.3 2-D transonic flow; von Karman’s rules

Lecture 25
10.4 linearized axially symmetric flow
10.5 planar flow
10.6 summary and application of the similarity laws

Lecture 26
10.7 high Mach numbers; hypersonic similarity

Lecture 27
12.2 hyperbolic equations
12.3 the compatibility relation
12.4 the computation method




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Lecture 28
12.5 interior and boundary points
12.6 axially symmetric flow
12.7 non-isentropic flow

Lecture 29
12.8 theorems about plane flow
12.9 computation with weak finite waves
12.10 interaction of waves

Lecture 30
12.11 design of supersonic nozzles
12.12 comparison of characteristics and waves

Lecture 31 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
14.1 introduction
14.2 characteristics of hypersonic flow

Lecture 32 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
14.3 Newtonian theory
14.4 modified Newtonian theory

Lecture 33 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
14.4 modified Newtonian theory (continued)
14.5 forces on a body

Lecture 34 (Class notes only)
1.1 forces on slender hypersonic flight vehicles: performance

Lecture 35 (Class notes only)
1.2 moments on slender hypersonic flight vehicles: stability and control

Lecture 36 (Class notes only)
1.3 blunt bodies in hypersonic flight

Lecture 37 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
15.1 introduction to high temperature flows
15.2 effect of temperature on specific heats

Lecture 38 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
15.2 effect of temperature on specific heats (continued)
15.3 perfect gas law

Lecture 39 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
15.4 dissociation and ionization




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Lecture 40 (Chapters headings refer to Oosthuizen and Carscallan)
15.4 dissociation and ionization (continued)
15.5 nonequilibrium effects




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