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					The Team! Trekking Team Nepal
All the technical wizardry and networking at our disposal would mean
nothing if it weren't for our friendly and helpful staff who will look after
you right from the moment of your arrival to the time of your departure in
legendary Nepalese style. Whether it is a case of miss-directed baggage on
arrival or shipping of your shopping on departure, a case of finding
directions to the right restaurants or finding the doctor after visiting the
wrong one, a case of having to be evacuated from high altitudes or not
being able to catch your connecting flight due to bad weather, our office
and field staff will help you every step of the way during your stay in this
region, whether you are in Kathmandu city or in the High Himalaya. Our
leaders are selected for their personality, their experience in adventure
travel and their wealth of knowledge of the area within which they work.
They are well -trained and have the ability to provide the support you
should expect when you visit remote areas of the country. They are able to
cope with most emergency situations including those requiring evacuation
and hospitalization. Porters are mostly hired locally in the trekking area,
and most of them have remained with our company season after season,
climbing to higher positions by learning in the field and under going
training. Our field staff and guides have been taught to respect the local
cultures of the places that they visit and guide our clients into. We believe
in travel as a learning experience and hope that you will be able to learn
from the people of the Himalaya about their way of life, their cultures, their
customs and their beliefs. To that end, most of our programmes are
designed so that you will have opportunities to meet the local people and
interact with them but, we do ask that you be sensitive to their way of life.
Carry pictures from home. These work wonders in bridging the language
barrier. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Why Trekking Team Nepal ? http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
There are so many reasons to choose Trekking Team Nepal for your
holiday among hundreds of other agents who also offer similar kind of trip
to Himalaya; here are some reasons;
Prompt Response: Whatever your queries, questions or comments our
friendly sales team here in Kathmandu will get back to you within 36 hours
with the answers. Our Kathmandu office is always ready to help you
whether you are planning a trip to Nepal or are changing your travel plans
once you arrive here.
Up-to-the-date information: We will always endeavor to provide you with
up-to-the-date information which may affect your travel plans or an
itinerary. Conversely, we will try our level best in getting any information
that we may receive for you while you are on a trip with us.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Value for the money:Value for money doesn't necessarily mean being the
cheapest. Our reputation has been built on the quality of our holidays. This
means ensuring that all the ingredients are right, not just the price. It also
means those added experience that lift a holiday out of the ordinary. We
believe in including as much as possible, so that you need to spend less
whilst you are travelling.
Even so- when comparing like for like - you'll find that few others can
match our prices for the standard of services we provide.
Flexibility:Our itineraries have been designed to let you enjoy the very best
that each country has to offer. As such they can not be rigid and will
occasionally be amended to take account to local conditions.
When you travel with us, we are always aware that you have a life outside
of the vacation that may occasionally intrude upon your idyll. We are
always ready to work with you to the furthest extent possible where changes
need to be made to your program, even in the middle of a trip, to allow for
emergencies and will not burden you with additional expenses as long as
the proposed changes do not affect the flights, permits and costs. Whilst in
general, we stick to the published route. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
State-of-the-art equipment:Equipment is another element of being prepared
for anything. Climbing, Rafting are like flying, scuba diving or safe sex, is
intrinsically dependent on using the most advanced and reliable equipment.
We use the best equipment available.
Our drivers are professionals and our vehicles are among the best available
in Kathmandu and elsewhere. Further, every care will have been taken to
inspect ensure that these meet the comfort and safety levels you expect on
your holiday. On our adventure trips in the Himalaya we will provide you
with the best available commercially manufactured tents by world‟s
renowned company or ones that we have designed and have had custom
manufactured here in Kathmandu. On treks which go higher than 5000
meters, we will send a Hyperbaric Portable Altitude Chamber, oxygen
cylinders, Satellite Telephone and as well as Pulse Oxymeters upon request.
These, however, need to be booked in advance and are limited in supply,
except for the bottled oxygen.
The Best Network: TREKKING TEAM NEPAL & RAFTING TEAM
NEPAL have the largest network in Nepal & its neighbour countries with
fully manned offices in Kathmandu and agents in Every City where the
friendly staffs are able to help in booking hotels, flights, sightseeing and
adventure tours even at the 11th hour. Further this presence allows us to
respond to any last moment changes that you may wish to effect to your
travel plans or which may be necessitated due to any number of reasons
while traveling in remote areas. Our Kathmandu offices are fully
computerized and using our in-house developed Management Information
System. We are able to track your holiday from the moment you arrive in
Nepal to the time of your departure.
We have also largest networking with tour operator worldwide so that
incase you want to book your trip through your nearest agent, please write
us for the addresses. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Safety:Our safety record is unsurpassed because we leave nothing to
chance. We don‟t skip or cut corners and we ensure that every small detail
is taken care of; thus enabling you to relax totally and enjoy your holiday.
At Trekking Team/ Rafting Team, we take safety very seriously. It is our
first and never forgotten priority, and it shows. We employ some of the best
trekking/biking/climbing & rafting guides in the world. These men and
women are professionals, trained in emergency wilderness first aid and can
get a person out of trouble faster than anyone else.
Our leaders are selected for their personality, their experience in adventure
travel and their wealth of knowledge of the area within which they work.
They are well -trained and have the ability to provide the support you
should expect when you visit remote areas of the country.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Group and individual:You will find a variety of itineraries in this site for
both groups and individuals. Our group tours are enjoyed travelers from
children to 75 years old enthusiasts, the wide variety of itineraries generally
means that those travelling together, share common interests, irrespective
of age differences.
We also recognize the fact that group travel does not suit everyone, whether
it is because you prefer to travel alone or because none of the departure
dates fits in to your travel plans. Whatever the reasons, our choice of
holiday for individual travelers may be just what you are looking for. Most
of the tours featured in this site are possible to travel individual without
joining group so please check out for the different possibility.
Whether you are travelling with a group or as an individual, you will be
able to relax in the knowledge that all your travel arrangements have been
taken care for and that you will be looked after by our staff and the
representatives throughout your travels http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Friendly, helpful and Professional staff: All the technical wizardry and
networking at our disposal would mean nothing if it weren't for our
friendly and helpful staff who will look after you right from the moment of
your arrival to the time of your departure in legendary Nepalese style.
Whether it is a case of miss-directed baggage on arrival or shipping of your
shopping on departure, a case of finding directions to the right restaurants
or finding the doctor after visiting the wrong one, a case of having to be
evacuated from high altitudes or not being able to catch your connecting
flight due to bad weather, our office and field staff will help you every step
of the way during your stay in this region, whether you are in Kathmandu
city or in the High Himalaya. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Our leaders are selected for their personality, their experience in adventure
travel and their wealth of knowledge of the area within which they work.
They are well -trained and have the ability to provide the support you
should expect when you visit remote areas of the country. They are able to
cope with most emergency situations including those requiring evacuation
and hospitalization. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Porters are mostly hired locally in the trekking area, and most of them have
remained with our company season after season, climbing to higher
positions by learning in the field and under going training.
Staffs Insurance & well paid:Staffs are the back bone of the company and
we have understood it very well. Without happy staff you can‟t operate nice
trek and your trek will be not succeed. Therefore we have tried our best to
make our staffs happy and tried to keep them with us as long as possible.
All our staffs (including porter and driver) are insured against personal
accidents throughout the year and they are well paid. Other incentives and
facilities are also given such as tour allowance, festival allowance, paid
holiday. WE have also opened staff fund incase somebody has problem at
home with unforeseen circumstances such as flood, Landslide etc. They
can take certain money from this fund and don‟t have to pay it back.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Responsible Tourism/Environment Friendly: Nepal, for all its massive
mountain peaks and impressive geography, is actually an incredibly fragile
environment. At TREKKING/RAFTING TEAM NEPAL our lives have
revolved around the Mountain & free flowing river. We feel an increased
responsibility to protect and preserve these wild places. Not only do we
leave every campsite cleaner than when we've arrived, we've taken steps to
protect Nepal's Mountain & rivers and the people who live along them.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
We pioneered the use of kerosene and LPG gas on all of our adventure
trips in the Himalaya/River and virtually wrote the manual on effective
waste disposal on treks/raft so as not to degrade the environment. All of our
vehicles meet the emission standards in the cities, towns and other areas
that they ply in.
Pollution takes away the beauty and threatens the fragile ecosystem of the
country. We will leave therefore nothing behind us except footprints and
take with us only good memories and photographs.
Respect for Local Cultures & give back to the communities: Our field staff
and guides have been taught to respect the local cultures of the places that
they visit and guide our clients into. We believe in travel as a learning
experience and hope that you will be able to learn from the people of the
Himalaya about their way of life, their cultures, their customs and their
beliefs. To that end, most of our programmes are designed so that you will
have opportunities to meet the local people and interact with them but, we
do ask that you be sensitive to their way of life. Carry pictures from home.
These work wonders in bridging the language barrier.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Beside that TREKKING TEAM NEPAL knows the importance of giving
back to the mountain communities; we therefore have been building Water
Tap, School and Health post in the rural area of the country.
Education is the most important wealth of the children; therefore we aim to
provide education for those children who are not able to go to School
because of many reasons. We have begun a child sponsorship program for
the placement of street children, orphans and other homeless or very poor
children in boarding schools in Kathmandu. We are now sponsoring 9
childrens of different place of Nepal. We have been donating almost 10% of
our profit in the different activities and we are proud ourselves to be able to
share these things with communities.
Strongly follow IPPG (International Porter Protection Group) Five
Guidelines "Working towards a Sustainable and Ethical Trekking
Industry." http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
A) Adequate clothing should be provided to porters for their protection in
bad weather and at altitude. This means windproof jacket and trousers,
fleece jacket, long johns, suitable footwear (leather boots in snow), socks,
hat, gloves and sunglasses.
B) Above the tree line, porters should have a dedicated shelter, either a
room in a lodge or a tent (the trekkers' mess tent is not good enough as it is
not usually available till late evening), a sleeping pad and a blanket (or
sleeping bag). They should also be provided with food and warm drinks, or
cooking equipment and fuel.
C) Porters should be provided with the same standard of medical care as
you would expect for yourself, including insurance.
D) Porters should not be paid off because of illness/injury without the
leader or the trekkers assessing their condition carefully. The person in
charge of the porters must let their trek leader or the trekkers know if a
porter is about to be paid off; failure to do this has resulted in many deaths.
Sick/injured porters should never be sent down alone, but with someone
who speaks their language and understands their problem, along with a
letter describing their complaint. Sufficient funds should be provided to
cover cost of rescue and treatment.
E) No porter should be asked to carry a load that is too heavy for their
physical abilities. Weight limits may need to be adjusted for altitude, trail
and weather conditions; good judgement is needed to make this decision.
30 kg load should be a maximum. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Responsible Tourism
Environment Friendly: Nepal, for all its massive mountain peaks and
impressive geography, is actually an incredibly fragile environment. At
TREKKING TEAM NEPAL our lives have revolved around the Mountain
& free flowing river. We feel an increased responsibility to protect and
preserve these wild places. Not only do we leave every campsite cleaner
than when we've arrived, we've taken steps to protect Nepal's Mountain &
rivers and the people who live along them. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
We pioneered the use of kerosene and LPG gas on all of our adventure
trips in the Himalaya/River and virtually wrote the manual on effective
waste disposal on treks/raft so as not to degrade the environment. All of our
vehicles meet the emission standards in the cities, towns and other areas
that they ply in.
Pollution takes away the beauty and threatens the fragile ecosystem of the
country. We will leave therefore nothing behind us except footprints and
take with us only good memories and photographs.
Respect for Local Cultures & give back to the communities:Our field staff
and guides have been taught to respect the local cultures of the places that
they visit and guide our clients into. We believe in travel as a learning
experience and hope that you will be able to learn from the people of the
Himalaya about their way of life, their cultures, their customs and their
beliefs. To that end, most of our programmes are designed so that you will
have opportunities to meet the local people and interact with them but, we
do ask that you be sensitive to their way of life. Carry pictures from home.
These work wonders in bridging the language barrier.
Beside that TREKKING TEAM NEPAL knows the importance of giving
back to the mountain communities; we therefore have been building Water
Tap, School and Health post in the rural area of the country.
Education is the most important things for the children; therefore we aim
to provide education for those children who are not able to go to School
because of many reasons. We have begun a child sponsorship program for
the placement of street children, orphans and other homeless or very poor
children in boarding schools in Kathmandu. We are now sponsoring 9
childrens of different place. WE have been donating almost 10% of our
profit in the different activities and we are proud ourselves to be able to
share these things with communities.
Strongly follow IPPG (International Porter Protection Group) Five
Guidelines "Working towards a Sustainable and Ethical Trekking
Industry." http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
For your kind information we follow all this five guide line of IPPG on our
all the trips.
A) Adequate clothing should be provided to porters for their protection in
bad weather and at altitude. This means windproof jacket and trousers,
fleece jacket, long johns, suitable footwear (leather boots in snow), socks,
hat, gloves and sunglasses. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
B) Above the tree line, porters should have a dedicated shelter, either a
room in a lodge or a tent (the trekkers' mess tent is not good enough as it is
not usually available till late evening), a sleeping pad and a blanket (or
sleeping bag). They should also be provided with food and warm drinks, or
cooking equipment and fuel.
C) Porters should be provided with the same standard of medical care as
you would expect for yourself, including insurance.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
D) Porters should not be paid off because of illness/injury without the
leader or the trekkers assessing their condition carefully. The person in
charge of the porters must let their trek leader or the trekkers know if a
porter is about to be paid off; failure to do this has resulted in many deaths.
Sick/injured porters should never be sent down alone, but with someone
who speaks their language and understands their problem, along with a
letter describing their complaint. Sufficient funds should be provided to
cover cost of rescue and treatment.
E) No porter should be asked to carry a load that is too heavy for their
physical abilities. Weight limits may need to be adjusted for altitude, trail
and weather conditions; good judgment is needed to make this decision. 30
kg load should be a maximum. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Financial Security
Trekking Team Nepal is a fully licensed and bonded trek/tour operator. We
hold License from Office of Company Register (Ministry of Industry) Rgd.
NO: 929/106. Department of Tourism, (Ministry of Culture, Tourism and
Civil Aviation) Tourism Industry Devision Rgd.No: R 729 (202).
Department of Tax (Ministry of Finance) PAN No. 500076477 regional
office Babarmahal, Depart of Foreign Currency Exchange, National Bank
of Nepal, Authorization No: NRB (FX) TK 186.We are proud to be a
member of TAAN (Trekking Agents Association of Nepal), NMA (Nepal
Mountaineering Association), NARA (Nepal Association of Rafting
Agents) KEEP (Kathmandu Environmental Educational Project), HRA
(Himalayan Rescue Association) and IPPG (International Porter
Protection group).Our registration and membership of this organisation
means that our accounts are subject to regular and stringent independent
scrutiny, which, although it cannot prevent failure, certainly makes it less
likely. You can book with TREKKING TEAM NEPAL in complete
confidence that all monies paid to us for trips are fully protected. If you
make a booking through our Agent, world wide, all monies that you pay to
the Agent are at all times held by them on behalf of TREKKING TEAM
NEPALWe are also among the 25 agents recommend by Lonely Planet
(Trekking In Nepal Himalaya) from nearly 600 Agencies of Kathmandu.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Most if not all of this equipment will be needed for any TREKKING TEAM
NEPAL trip that crosses steep, snow-covered ground, or which includes
sections of glacier travel. Our recommendation that you take no more than
15 kilos (33 pounds) of trekking equipment does not include your plastic
boots, ice axe, crampons or harness/carabineers. (During the trek, climbing
hardware will be carried separately from your personal trek bag, in group
bags until needed). http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
FIRST AID MEDICINE- Bandage for sprains - Plasters/Band-aids -
Iodine or water filter (optional) - Moleskin/Second skin - for blisters -
Antiseptic ointment for cuts - Anti-bacterial throat lozenges (with
antiseptic) - Aspirin/paracetamol - general painkiller - Oral rehydration
salts - Broad-spectrum antibiotic (norfloxacin or ciprofloxin) -
Anti-diarrhea medication (antibiotic) - Diarrhea stopper (Imodium -
optional) - Antibiotic for Giardia or similar microbe or bacteria - Diamox
(altitude sickness - can be bought in Kathmandu) - Sterile Syringe set
(anti-AIDS precaution) - For more details please see our staying healthy
topic.
EXTRA/LUXURIES - Binoculars - Reading book - Trail Map/Guide book -
Journal & Pen - Walkman - Travel game i.e. chess, backgammon, scrabble
TOILETRIES- 1 medium sized quick drying towel - Toothbrush/paste
(preferably biodegradable) - Multipurpose soap (preferably biodegradable)
- Deodorant - Nail clippers - Face and body moisturizer - Feminine hygiene
products - Small mirror
Talk about the equipment1) Footwear: This is one of the most important
considerations, as blisters and sore feet will spoil your trek. We recommend
that you take a pair of lightweight trekking boots, suitable for walking over
rough terrain and comfortable over long distances. Good quality fabric
boots are recommended. If you are considering a trek where you are likely
to encounter a couple of days of snow-covered trails, you should opt for a
waterproof trekking boot - either a Gore-Tex-lined fabric boot or a leather
boot. If you prefer to do your walking in a more substantial pair of leather
boots, that's OK, but make sure that they are well worn-in prior to the trek.
Choosing a pair of trekking boots is a very individual process, and you
should be guided by your own experience and preferences. A good outdoor
equipment store will be able to advise you as to the fitting of your boots.
For wearing about camp and walking the easier sections of trail we
recommend gym shoes or similar. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Mountaineering Footwear (Trekking Peak trips only): For modern day
climbers, plastic boots are now standard equipment. They are lighter in
weight, warmer and more waterproof than leather mountain boots. Also,
you can sleep in the removable inner boots to ensure warm toes in the
morning! Climbing and trekking at altitudes of up to 6000 meters/20,000
feet, the temperatures can be very cold indeed (as low as minus 10 degrees),
and leather boots are really not suitable for these cold conditions. Plastic
boots are also designed to take step-in crampons, quickly and efficiently,
and this combination of plastic boots and step-in crampons is by far the
most sensible option when considering a trekking peak climb. Asolo and
Koflach are examples of excellent plastic boot manufacturers, and each of
these companies make models of plastic boots which have been designed
primarily as winter walking boots. Recommended - Asolo Supersoft and
Koflach Viva Soft. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Gaiters: Gaiters are an important piece of equipment, which will help to
keep your feet warm and dry in wet and snowy conditions. The simple
"alpine" style of gaiter which hooks onto the bootlaces and is held under
the instep by a strap or lace is fine for most trekking applications. These
"alpine" gaiters are widely available.
Socks: If you prefer to wear two pairs of socks, your inner socks should be
thin cotton, wool-based or a mixture - natural fibers are best. Bring 2 pairs.
If you prefer to wear a single pair of thicker socks (and some sock
manufacturers are producing excellent socks which are designed to be used
without a liner or inner sock) then these should also be mainly natural
fibers and of loopstitch construction for maximum warmth and comfort.
Take 2 or 3 pairs. Thor-Lo is an example of a sock manufacturer, which
markets a wide range of technically advanced trekking/walking
socks.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
2) Clothing: Your clothing needs to be adaptable to suit a wide range of
conditions, including extremes of weather and varying levels of physical
activity. Modern thinking supports the adoption of the principle of
"layering" which involves the use of several thin layers of thermally
efficient clothing, which can be worn in a number of combinations,
according to the prevailing circumstances. Where it is warm enough you
can trek in either shorts or lightweight trekking trousers (natural fibers) (a
long skirt is an option for the ladies) and a long sleeve cotton shirt or
T-shirt. For colder conditions, you can add layers of thermal clothing.
Patagonia Capilene thermal clothing is very good and comes in three
weights - lightweight, midweight and expedition weight. On top of these
thermals you should add layers of fleece. Patagonia, Marmot, The North
Face and many other manufacturers make a wide range of fleece
garments, jackets, pullovers, pants and vests. These are generally made
from Polartec 200 and 300 fabric, which is warm, light and quick drying.
Warmer still, are the new windproof fleece garments. Extremely, if it starts
to rain, or if you are making a high, cold climb or pass crossing, you will
have your waterproof shell outerwear, jacket and pants, to fall back
on.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Active outdoor pursuits such as trekking and climbing require protection
from the chill of the wind more often than protection from rain, especially
in mountain ranges such as the Himalaya. Shell garments made from
breathable fabrics (GoreTex or equivalent) are to be preferred for the
following reason. Thermal underwear or base layers work on a 'wick-dry'
principle, wicking the perspiration away from the skin to where it can
evaporate without cooling the body. A non-breathable shell garment
prevents this drying process from being effective, by trapping the moisture
as condensation on the inside of the shell material. The enclosed thermal
layers remain wet, and their insulating properties are reduced as a result.
There is an enormous range of waterproof and breathable outerwear on the
market. This includes technical mountaineering shells as well as simpler
(and less expensive) garments which are ideal for general outdoor use and,
at the same time, perfectly suited to trekking holidays.
Extremities: It is important to keep your extremities warm, and you should
not neglect your head and hands when selecting the equipment for your
trip. A balaclava and inner gloves are thin and lightweight and make
excellent base layers for your head and hands. As additional protection,
you should take a fleece hat or cap, which has earflaps, a fleece lining and
a waterproof shell. You should also select a pair of warmer gloves or
mittens to go over the inner gloves.
Most people will find that they will be warm enough with their thermal
clothing and two layers of fleece, and then the windproof outerwear.
However, on our highest trips, with camps at altitudes approaching 5000
meters/16,500 feet, a down jacket is recommended. Without doubt the best
insulator in terms of warmth for weight is pure down - it is at least 100%
more efficient than the best synthetics when dry. (Its performance when wet
is not so good, so if you have a down sleeping bag or jacket, keep it dry!) In
fact, down clothing is often too warm to wear while climbing and a
lightweight synthetic jacket is ideal. On cold nights at base camp, however,
a down jacket is a welcome luxury.
3) Sleeping bag: For any of our treks, you will need a 4-season sleeping
bag rated to at least zero degrees. A full-length side zip is essential to
facilitate ventilation on warmer nights. A cotton or fleece liner adds to the
warmth and comfort of a bag and prevents it from becoming excessively
soiled. A mattress is needed primarily to insulate you from the cold ground,
and you should take a quality closed-cell foam mat or you should consider
the more expensive self-inflating Thermarest pads. We advise everyone to
bring cotton or fleece sleeping bag liner. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
4) Sun protection: In a land where the air temperature may be only 75
degrees, a thermometer left in the sun can reach 120 degrees, so sun
protection is to be taken seriously! A wide-brimmed sunhat is a very good
idea, or an Arab-type headscarf to keep the sun off your head. At altitude,
the sun's rays are particularly strong, and sunglasses with 100% ultraviolet
and infrared filtration are recommended, such as Vuarnet PX5000, Cebe
2000/3000 or Bolle Irex 100. These glasses are available with detachable
leather or plastic side pieces, which give increased protection, especially
from reflected glare, and you should give serious consideration to such
''glacier glasses'' for any trek which includes walking or climbing on snow.
You should bring a plentiful supply of suncream - a couple of large tubes
of factor 6-10 (depending on your skin sensitivity) for lower down, and
some total block (factor 15-20) for above the snowline. Lipsalve of a
suitable filter factor is also necessary.
5) (A) Daypacks for trekking: A 2500 cubic inch pack should be large
enough to carry the following items on trek. a) shell jacket and pants. b)
fleece jacket, pants, extra pair of socks, gym shoes. c) Two waterbottles,
with at least 2 quart total capacity. d) camera plus accessories, binoculars,
etc. e) first aid kit. You should test-pack your daypack before leaving home.
http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
(B) Daypacks for climbing trips: 3000-4000 cubic inches. For climbing
trips, you will be required to carry more warm clothing during the climbs
and also your personal climbing gear. For this reason, you will need a
slightly bigger daypack than for a trekking-only trip. If you have any
questions about gear, please do not hesitate to telephone our office for
advice.
MOUNTAIN BIKING CHECKLISTThe following basic equipment
checklist should help you with your packing. Please remember that you
should always try to keep the weight of your equipment down to a
minimum. NB. This is just a check-list. We are not asking you to bring
everything on this list; much will depend on personal preference. As a
general rule, cyclists will need similar clothing to trekkers. The one
additional (essential) item is good quality padded cycling shorts (loose and
baggy, as previously discussed).
- Cycling helmet - Fleece headband (to keep your ears warm) - Lightweight
long sleeved thermal shirt - Lightweight windproof biking jacket - T-shirts
(3) - Padded cycling shorts - baggy style - Underwear (4 pairs) -
Lightweight trekking boots - Sandals - Camelbak or 2 x 1 litre water bottles
& cages - Sleeping bag - Small padlock & spare keys - Toiletries -
Thermarest - Sunglasses - Fingerless biking gloves - Waterproof
(breathable) jacket - Fleece jumper (eg Polartec 200) - Light weight
„trekking style‟ pants - Warm cycling tights - Socks (4 pairs) - Cycling
shoes - Spare laces - Small towel - First aid kit (See first Aid medicine
above) - Head lamp eg. Petzl Zoom (spare bulb & battery) - 4 large plastic
bags (for keeping items dry in kitbag) http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Mountain bikesYour Bike must be at least an “entry level” Mountain Bike.
For example, Kona Fire Mountain, Trek 4500, Scott Yecora, Specialized
Hardrock Comp, Claud Butler Cape Wrath - or similar. Front suspension
is highly recommended. If you are in any doubt about the suitability of your
bike, please contact the TREKKING TEAM NEPAL office.
EQUIPMENT RENTAL In order to minimize your expense outlay for
trekking and climbing equipment you may never use again, equipment
Rental and buying is possible in Kathmandu. You find them lot cheaper
than you find in Europe or in US. Shops in Thamel offer a wide range of
equipment available for rent and buy. Here is some cost which gives you an
idea of thecost to rent in Kathmandu.
Sleeping bag 30-60 RS a day Mattress 20-40 RS a day. All purpose
mountaineering Ice axe (60-70 cms) 50-150 RS a day. Climbing harness
75-150 RS a day. 2 locking carabineers, climbing sling 20-50 RS a day.
12-point crampons 50-100 RS a day.
Special Interest Trek
Nepal provides an abundance of learning opportunities. In this regards, we
are proud to be known for organizing special interest tours around the
country. We can put together educational tours for students of colleges and
university. We can also provide assistance for doctors, teachers and project
people who are going to more remote areas and, at the same time, help
them to establish a relationship of mutual trust with the villagers they have
to come to work with. http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Similarly, we can also organize trip for people involved in environment
awareness campaigns that are regularly set up to educate villagers on way
to preserve and conserve their natural surroundings and resources. We
have organized study tours as well as for those conducting research on
particular subject such as flora and fauna, ethnic groups of the country, or
specializing in photography and filming.
Depending on your request, we can let you know where, when and how to
go and provide all necessary assistance from experts in your field of
interest.
Altitude Sickness
This info is taken from "Trekking in the Everest Region", 3rd edition.
When trekking or climbing above 3000m/10,000ft it is important to take
into account the effect of altitude on your body. The thinner air affects you
in many ways and if you go high too fast you can kill yourself. Read how
not to!
This was written for our Nepal treks but applies almost equally for our
India/Bhutan/Tibet treks also.
AMS - Acute Mountain SicknessCommonly called altitude sickness, this
has the potential to affect all trekkers from 2500m and higher. Your body
needs days to adjust to smaller quantities of oxygen in the air - at
5500m/18,044ft the air pressure is approximately half that of sea level, ie
there is half the amount of oxygen (and nitrogen). This is approximately
equivalent to the top of Kala Pattar, in the Everest region, and the top of
the Thorung La on the Annapurna Circuit.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
For treks below an altitude of about 3000m/10,000ft it is not normally a
problem. AMS is caused by going up high too fast and can be fatal if all the
warning signals are ignored. Note that it is not the actual altitude, but the
speed at which you reach higher altitudes which causes the problems.
Altitude sickness is preventable. Go up slowly, giving your body enough
time to adjust. These are the 'safe' rates for the majority of trekkers: spend
2-3 nights between 2000m/6562ft and 3000m/10,000ft before going higher.
From 3000m sleep an average of 300m/1000ft higher each night with a rest
day every 900-1000m/3000ft. ultimately it is up to you to recognize the
symptoms, and only ascend if you are relatively symptom-free.
Normal symptoms at altitudeDon't expect to feel perfect at altitudes of more
than 3000m. These are the normal altitude symptoms that you should
expect BUT NOT worry about. Every trekker will experience some or all of
these, no matter how slowly they ascend.
- Periods of sleeplessness (The need for more sleep than normal, often 10
hours or more) - Occasional loss of appetite - Vivid, wild dreams at around
2500-3800m in altitude - Unexpected momentary shortness of breath, day
and night - Periodic breathing that wakes you occasionally – (consider
taking Diamox The need to rest/catch your breath frequently while
trekking, especially above 4000m) - Your nose turning into a full-time snot
factory - Increased urination - many trekkers have to go once during the
night (a good sign that your body is acclimatising: at Gokyo, one guy from
Canada's record, 18 times in one day).http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Mild SymptomsYou only need to get one of the symptoms to be getting
altitude sickness, not all of them.
Headache - common among trekkers. Often a headache comes on during
the evening and nearly always worsens during the night. Raising your head
and shoulders while trying to sleep sometimes offers partial relief. If it is
bad you may want to try taking a painkiller: aspirin (dispirin), paracetamol,
Ibuprofen (Aduil) or acetamenophen (tylenol). Never take sleeping tablets.
You could also take Diamox: see below. Headaches arise from many
causes, for example, dehydration, but if you develop a headache assume it
is from the altitude.
Nausea (feeling sick) - can occur without other symptoms, but often nausea
will develop with a bad headache. If you are better in the morning take a
rest day, or if you still feel bad descend.
Dizziness (mild) - if this occurs while walking, stop out of the sun and have
a rest and drink. Stay at the closest teahouse.
Lack of appetite or generally feeling bad - common at altitude due to too
rapid an ascent.
Painful cough or a dry raspy cough.
In other words anything other than diarrhoea or a sore throat could be
altitude sickness. Assume it is, because if you have a headache from
dehydration, ascending further is not dangerous, but if its due to AMS, the
consequences could be very serious. You cannot tell the difference, so
caution is the safest course.
Do not try to deceive yourself and accept that your body needs more time to
adapt.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Basic rule:
Never go higher with mild symptomsIf you find mild symptoms developing
while walking, stop and relax with your head out of the sun and drink some
fluids. If the symptoms do not go away completely then stay at same
altitude. Or if symptoms get worse, GO DOWN. A small loss of elevation
(100-300m/328-984ft) can make a big difference to how you feel and how
you sleep - descend to the last place where you felt good. If symptoms
develop at night then, unless they rapidly get worse, wait them out and see
how you feel in the morning. If the symptoms have not gone after breakfast
then have a rest day or descend. If they have gone, consider having a rest
day or an easy days walking anyway.
Continued ascent is likely to bring back the symptoms. Altitude sickness
should be reacted to, when symptoms are mild - going higher will definitely
make it worse. You trek to enjoy, not to feel sick.
Note also that there is a time lag between arriving at altitude and the onset
of symptoms and in fact it is common to suffer mild symptoms on the
second night at a set altitude rather than the first night.
Serious Symptoms- Persistent, severe headache. - Persistent vomiting -
Ataxia - loss of co-ordination, cannot walk in a straight line, looks drunk -
Losing consciousness - cannot stay awake or understand things very
wellLiquid sounds in the lungs - Very persistent cough - Real difficulty
breathing - Rapid breathing or feeling breathless at rest - Coughing blood
or pink goo or lots of clear fluid - Marked blueness of face and lips - High
resting heart beat - over 120 beats per minute - Severe lethargy and
drowsiness - Mild symptoms rapidly getting worse
Ataxia is the single most important sign for recognising the progression
from mild to severe. This is easily tested by trying to walking a straight line,
heel to toe. Compare with somebody who has no symptoms. 24 hours after
the onset of ataxia a coma is possible, followed by death, unless you
descend.
Basic rule:
Immediate and fast descentTake as far down as possible, even if it is during
the night. (In the Everest region: if you are above Pheriche, go down to the
HRA post there. From Thorung Phedi or nearby: take to the Manang HRA
post.) The patient must be supported by several people or carried by a
porter - his/her condition may get worse before getting better. Later the
patient must rest and see a doctor. People with severe symptoms may not be
able to think for themselves and may say they feel OK. They are
not.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Medical ConditionsHigh Altitude Cerebral Oedema (HACE) - this is a
build-up of fluid around the brain. It causes the first 4 symptoms of the
mild, and the severe symptom lists.
High Altitude Pulmonary Oedema (HAPE) - this is an accumulation of
fluid in the lungs, and since you are not a fish, this is serious. It is
responsible for all the other mild and serious symptoms.
Periodic breathing - the altitude affects the body's breathing mechanism.
While at rest or sleeping your body feels the need to breathe less and less, to
the point where suddenly you require some deep breaths to recover. This
cycle can be a few breaths long, where after a couple breaths you miss a
breath completely, to being a gradual cycle over a few minutes, appearing
as if the breathing rate simply goes up and down regularly. It is
experienced by most trekkers at Namche, although many people are
unaware of it while sleeping. At 5000m/16,404ft virtually all trekkers
experience it although it is troublesome only for a few. Studies have so far
found no direct link to AMS.
Swelling of the hands, feet, face and lower abdomen - remove rings. An
HRA study showed that about 18% of trekkers have some swelling, usually
minor. Females are definitely more susceptible. It is not a cause for
concern unless the swelling is severe, so continuing ascent is
OK.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Altitude immune suppression - at base camp altitudes cuts and infections
heal very slowly so for serious infections descent to Namche level is
recommended. The reasons are not well understood.
Drugs you can take - Diamox (Acetazolamide)This is a mild diuretic
(makes you pee a lot) that acidifies the blood which stimulates breathing.
Previously it was not recommended to take it as a prophylactic (ie to
prevent it, before you get it) unless you ascend rapidly, unavoidably (eg
flying to Lhasa or rescue missions), or have experienced undue altitude
problems previously.
However, now some doctors are coming around to the idea that many
people trekking above 3500m should take it using the logic that it has the
potential to reduce the number of serious cases of AMS: the benefits may
outweigh the risks. This topic still requires in depth research. Diamox is a
sulfa drug derivative, and people allergic to this class of drugs should not
take Diamox. People with renal (kidney) problems should avoid it too. (It
also apparently ruins the taste of beer and soft drinks). The side effects are
peeing a lot, tingling lips, fingers or toes but these symptoms are not an
indication to stop the drug.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
The older accepted recommendations are to carry it and consider using it if
you experience mild but annoying symptoms, especially periodic breathing
that continually wakes you up. The dosage is 125 to 250 mg (half to a
whole tablet) every 12 hours. Diamox actually helps the root of the
problem; so if you feel better, you are better. It does not simply hide the
problem. However this does not mean that you can ascend at a faster rate
than normal, or ignore altitude sickness symptoms - it is quite possible still
to develop AMS while taking it. Note that it was recommended to start
taking the drug before ascending for it to be most effective. This is not
necessary, but it does help.
Doctors NotesHACE - can occur in 12 hours but normally 1-3 days. At first
sign of ataxia begin descent. If it is developed try 4mg of dexamethazone 6
hourly, Diamox 250mg 12 hourly and 2-4l/min O2 or a Gamow bag (if
available).
HAPE - descend, Diamox 250mg 12 hourly, Nifed orally, 10mg 8 hourly
and 2-4l/min O2 or a Gamow bag.
Oxygen - supplementary O2 does not immediately reverse all the symptoms
although it does help significantly. Descent in conjunction with O2 is more
effective.
Gamow bag/PAC bag/CERTEC bag - the latest devices to assist with severe
AMS. Basically it is a plastic tube that the patient is zipped into. A pump is
used to raise the pressure inside the bag simulating going to a lower
altitude. It is very effective.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
HAF - high altitude farts - slang for HAFE.
HAFE - high altitude flatulence emission. The cure - let it rip! You're not a
balloon that needs blowing up.
AMS practicalsRates of AcclimatisationIndividual rates of acclimatisation
vary enormously but ascending very rapidly and staying there will
ALWAYS result in problems. Even Sherpas who live in Kathmandu upon
returning to the Khumbu occasionally get AMS. Studies have shown that
people who live at moderate altitudes (1000-2000m/3281-6562ft are
acclimatised to those altitudes. They are much less susceptible to AMS
when ascending to around 3000m/9842ft (ie going to Namche).
However the benefits decrease once higher and they should follow the same
acclimatisation program as others. This has implications for people who
have spent a week or two in Kathmandu (at an altitude of 1400m/4593ft):
they are becoming acclimatised to that altitude. For trekkers that fly from
sea level to Kathmandu then almost immediately walk to Namche, they
have no advantage and are more likely to suffer AMS. Unfortunately it is
usually these people who are in a hurry to go higher. This is perhaps why it
appears that group trekkers are initially more susceptible to troublesome
AMS than individual trekkers, who often walk from Jiri or spend time in
Kathmandu beforehand.
The Acclimatisation ProcessIn a matter of hours your body quickly realises
that there is less oxygen available and it first reaction is to breathe more -
hyperventilate. This means more oxygen (O2) in but also more carbon
dioxide (CO2) is breathed out and with the O2-CO2 balance upset the pH
of the blood is altered.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
Your body determines how deeply to breathe by the pH level (mainly the
dissolved CO2 in your blood) - at sea level a high level of exertion means
your muscles produce a lot of CO2 so you breathe hard and fast. While
resting, your body is using little energy so little CO2 is produced,
demonstrating that you only need to breathe shallowly.
The problem is at altitude this balance is upset and your body often believes
that it can breathe less than its real requirements. Over several days your
body tries to correct this imbalance by disposing of bicarbonate (CO2 in
water) in the urine to compensate, hence the need to drink a lot because it
is not very soluble. Diamox assists by allowing the kidneys to do this more
efficiently therefore enhancing some peoples ability to acclimatise. In
addition, after a day or two, the body moves some fluid out of the blood
effectively increasing the haemoglobin concentration. After 4-5 days more
new red blood cells are released than normal.
Individual rates of acclimatisation are essentially dependent on how fast
your body reacts to compensate the altered pH level of the blood. For slow
starters Diamox can provide a kick-start but for people already adapting
well the effect often less noticeable.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
If you stay at altitude for several weeks there are more changes, your
muscles' mitochondria (the energy converters in the muscle) multiply, a
denser network of capillaries develop and your maximum work rate
increases slowly with these changes. Expeditions have often run medical
programs with some interesting results.
Climbers who experience periodic breathing (the majority) at base camp
never shake it off and have great difficulty maintaining their normal body
weight. Muscles will strengthen and stamina is increased but not the
muscle bulk. Interestingly Sherpas who have always lived at altitude, never
experience periodic breathing and can actually put on weight with enough
food.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
How long does acclimatisation last?It varies, but if you were at altitude for
a month or more your improved work rates can persist for weeks meaning
you still feel fit upon returning to altitude. You still should not ascend
faster than normal if you return to sea level for a few days, otherwise you
are susceptible to HAPE.
If you have been to 5000m/16,404ft then go down to 3500m/11,483ft for a
few days, returning rapidly to 5000m/16,404ft should cause no problems, ie
having been to Lobuche and Kala Pattar, and then rested for two days in
Namche you should be able to ascend to Gokyo quickly without problems.
Sleeping at altitudeMany people have trouble sleeping in a new
environment, especially if it changes every day. Altitude adds to the
problems. The decrease of oxygen means that some people experience wild
dreams with this often happening at around 3000m. Compound this with a
few people suffering from headaches or nausea, a couple of toilet visits, a
few snorers and periodic breathers, and it takes someone who sleeps like
the proverbial log (or very tired trekker) to ignore all the goings on at night
in a large dormitory. Smaller rooms are a definite improvement, and tents,
although not soundproof are still manage to be relatively
peaceful.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
AppetiteSome people lose appetite and do not enjoy eating. Sometimes
equally worrying, although it is a good sign is a huge appetite. Your energy
consumption, even at rest is significantly higher than normal because your
body is generating heat to combat the constant cold, especially while
sleeping. Energetic trekkers, no matter how much they eat will often be
unable to replace the huge quantities of energy used.
Day trips and what to do if...The normal accepted recommendations are to
go high during the day and sleep low at night, the sleeping altitude being
the most important. This is fine for trekkers experiencing no AMS
symptoms whatsoever, and will probably aid the acclimatisation process, for
example in the Everest region, going up to Chukhung from Dingboche or
Pheriche, or visiting Thame from Namche. However if you are
experiencing mild or even very mild AMS then this is not the best advice.
Instead your body is already having trouble coping so it doesn't need the
additional stress of more altitude. Instead stay at the same elevation. Mild
exercise is considered beneficial, rather than being a total sloth but take it
as a rest day.http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
If you have troublesome mild symptoms then descent for a few hours may
even be more beneficial, for example:
AMS Elsewhere in the WorldIn other parts of the world some climbs to
high altitude are routinely attempted by unacclimatised people, for
example, volcanoes in Hawaii and Mexico, and Kilimanjaro in Africa, and
there doesn't appear to be the problems found in the Khumbu. This is
because the time at high altitude is short. Generally severe AMS takes
about two days to develop (although not always!) and therefore the people
climb to a high elevation and return lower before coming to serious harm
although most suffer a severe headache. In the Khumbu you stay at
altitude, the reason great caution is needed.
Altitude Sickness http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
This info is taken from "Trekking in the Everest Region", 3rd edition.
When trekking or climbing above 3000m/10,000ft it is important to take
into account the effect of altitude on your body. The thinner air affects you
in many ways and if you go high too fast you can kill yourself. Read how
not to!http://ackabir.blogspot.com/
This was written for our Nepal treks but applies almost equally for our
India/Bhutan/Tibet treks also.
AMS - Acute Mountain SicknessCommonly called altitude sickness, this
has the potential to affect all trekkers from 2500m and higher. Your body
needs days to adjust to smaller quantities of oxygen in the air - at
5500m/18,044ft the air pressure is approximately half that of sea level, ie
there is half the amount of oxygen (and nitrogen). This is approximately
equivalent to the top of Kala Pattar, in the Everest region, and the top of
the Thorung La on the

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