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Fashion pop artop art photographic styling

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Fashion pop artop art photographic styling Powered By Docstoc
					Joanne Elliott.


 The impact of op art and 60’s colour in contemporary design.
Pop art, op art and 60‟s style references are currently being reintroduced to contemporary
design at all levels. Ranging from subtly striking black and white patterned imagery to
the garish tones heralded by Vogue as „Ibiza colour‟, this movement represents a bold
contrast of linear detail and eye-popping prints.

Rather than a vintage „flash in the pan‟ throwback, this ideology takes aspects of pattern
and colour to create modern statements through imagery and designs. Within the next
few months this development will have profound implications within the design industry
as a whole; from couture fashion, to book cover and album design, interior design and
photographic styling in advertising.




 The impact of op art and 60’s colour in contemporary design.

Pop art, op art and 60‟s style references are currently being reintroduced to contemporary
design at all levels. Ranging from subtly striking black and white patterned imagery to
the garish tones heralded by Vogue as „Ibiza colour‟, this movement represents a bold
contrast of linear detail and eye-popping prints.

Autumns‟ couture catwalk shows illustrated this new take on psychadelia beautifully. Op
art influenced garments designed by Alexander McQueen, Dior by John Galliano, Eley
Kishimoto, Celine and Moschino, to mention but a few. Jonathan Saunders, a new
designer who is beginning his rise to the fashion fore, began his career as a furniture
designer before achieving an MA in print at Central St Martins. In a recent interview he
revealed his interest in the head turning prints of Pucci, Cardin and Rudi Gernreich. His
own designs demand an eighteen colour printing process, and of this Saunders said “It‟s
painstakingly complicated, but very rewarding. The clash is so important, otherwise the
effect would be too vintage.”

At present, the 60‟s vintage influence is more of a select reference than a direct
duplication. It is colour, rather than silhouette, which appears to be the primary focus.
Designers who have recently employed 60‟s inspired colour include Alberta Ferretti,
Marc Jacobs and DKNY, whilst Paul Smith is producing bold graphic geometric prints of
leaves. Meanwhile, Harvey Nichols stocks include Marc Jacobs designs in bold red and
turquoise overlaid circles. With contemporary fashion palettes becoming increasingly
opulent, it is easy to trace these influences to other design areas.
The most recent publication of the popular Sunday Times fashion supplement „Style‟
projects these contemporary directions on its front cover. A female model poses on a flat
backdrop of fluorescent pink, lime green and burnt orange, with a sobering flash of white.
Burberry‟s current advertisements have employed similar photographic styling through
bold „action shot‟ imagery in tonal black and white, framed by stills in pale yellow with
silver circles, bright pink, and vivid dark forest green. Meanwhile, makeup giant
M.A.C‟s viva glam IV campaign features Elton John in a slick black and white twist
patterned outfit on a neutral backdrop, alongside Shirly Manson and Mary J Bilge. In the
same image, the bold black and white stripe on Mary J Blige‟s mini dress is echoed in the
top corner of the room, transforming the photograph into a powerfully balanced
conceptual image overall.

And this designer influence is not only restricted to the top level of the marketplace. In
the high street, Top Shop are distributing gift voucher cards with Warhol-esque prints in
pink, yellow, and blue with a bold overlay black. This is a direct reference to the
famously popular Marilyn Monroe pop art paintings, modernized in ambiguous reversed
images of a male model. In book cover design, the Granta referenced novelist Monica
Ali‟s new book, „Brick lane‟, is similarly simple in intent. The cover is bright white with
the title featuring in an opulent palette of rainbow stripes of reds greens, marbled blue,
and speckled pink. Correspondingly, the album cover of Suede‟s „Coming Up‟ album is
a creation by Chris Ofili, and is entitled „Afro Love‟. This simple image appears on a
computerized backdrop which blends fluorescent yellow to black. In the midst of the
dirty tones is a black and white stripy bed, where a monotone photograph of a man
strikingly overlaps with outlines of woman rendered in fluorescent graphic rainbow
colouring. This influence in 60‟s graphic prints is also echoed in interior design and
ceramics. Sweet and straightforward, 1960‟s pop art prints are being revamped by the
Finnish ceramics design company Marimekko. New additions to their lines include
beautiful singular images of a bold poppy in flat red and black, with a splash of warm
orange on a white dinner service.

It‟s groovy baby!



Links.

For more information on op art:
http://www.artlover.org/more_art/arthistory/pages/opart.html

To see op art influenced designs by Eley Kishimoto:
http://www.londonfashionweek.co.uk/designers/index.asp?section=catwalk_shows&desi
gnerid=429

For examples of Jonathan Saunders‟ use of colour:
http://www.londonfashionweek.co.uk/designers/index.asp?section=catwalk_shows&desi
gnerid=636
To see the current examples of Marimekko‟s interior design prints:
http://www.marimekko.fi/index_eng.html



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