LESSON OVERVIEW THE DREADED OUTLINE by zyr10796

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									LESSON OVERVIEW



                                 THE DREADED OUTLINE

GOAL              Wrap up the prewriting process by showing students how to create an outline.
                  Students organize the evidence and arguments on their bubble charts into an outline
                  that acts as a roadmap for their essay. This lesson teaches them to start their outlines
                  from the middle, then shows them how to add information for the introduction and
                  conclusion. Students learn the connection between the chart, the outline, and essay
                  organization.

                  After students have created their outlines, they’ll have everything they need to write a
                  rough draft, edit their work, and produce a final draft according to your own usual
                  practice.

TIME             Two class periods

NUTSHELL          On the first day, use our worksheets to teach the class how to organize the ideas on
                  their bubble chart into an outline. You’ll also guide the class through a color-coding
                  activity that lets them see the relationship between the outline and the essay. On the
                  second day, help students create an outline for each of their bubble charts.

CONCEPTS          Prewriting; making an outline; organizing information


OBJECTIVES        The student will show the connection between an bubble chart and an outline by
                 drawing lines connecting information on each.
                  The student will color-code an outline and matching essay in order to identify the
                    organization of an essay.
                  The student will demonstrate understanding of how to create an outline by making
                    outlines for their bubble charts.



                                LESSON PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS

       Teacher PagePlan with Easy Prep directions                                        2
       “The Dreaded Outline” worksheet                                                   3
       “From Outline . . . To Essay” color-coding worksheet                              5
       Color-Coding Activity Guide                                                       6
       Active Participation Guide                                                        7
PAGEPLAN                                                                     The Dreaded Outline
Time: Two class periods




                                DAY ONE
                                                                                         Easy Prep

                                                                             Copy:
ANTICIPATE            by asking students to think about the evidence
                                                                              “The Dreaded Outline”
                      they saw about band t-shirts at Ben’s school. Ask
                                                                                teaching worksheet. (class set)
                      students to think of which piece of evidence or
                                                                                (2-sided is OK)
                      testimony they think most and least showed that
                                                                              “From Outline… to Essay” color
                      the t-shirts are disruptive. Randomly ask several
                                                                                -coding worksheet (class set)
                      students what they decided.
                                                                             Print:
DISTRIBUTE            one “The Dreaded Outline” teaching worksheet to
                                                                              PagePlan
                      each student.
                                                                              Color Coding Activity Guide
                                                                              Active Participation Guide
READ                  the top of the first page with the class. (Explain
                      that tomorrow they will be using their bubble
                      charts to create their own outlines.)

ASSIST                students as needed as they draw lines from the bubble chart to the outline on the first
                      page.

REVIEW                the answers with the class, emphasizing that the outline has the same information as
                      the bubble chart, but in a planned-out order.

REVIEW                the second page of the teaching worksheet with the class. (The next activity will put
                      all three parts of the outline together.)

DISTRIBUTE            one “From Outline . . . to Essay” color-coding worksheet to each student.

WORK THROUGH          the color-coding activity as a whole class using your Activity Guide.

                                                   DAY TWO

ASK                   students to prepare for class by getting out the two bubble charts they already
                      completed, the “Dreaded Outline” teaching worksheet from Day One, and several
                      sheets of their own paper.

ANTICIPATE            with the quick true/false active participation activity to review the concepts of outlining
                      they learned in Day One.

TELL                  students they will be using their own paper to make one outline for each of their
                      bubble charts. They will follow the same process they learned in Day One.

GUIDE                 students through the outlining process. Tell them to start with the middle, leaving
                      space at the top of the paper to fill in the introduction part later. Help them follow the
                      outlining procedure they learned in Day One. If it helps, have them color-code their
                      own outlines as they go along.
The Dreaded                Outline                      Name:
Putting Everything in Order Before You Write


                          Outlining is dumb.          If you have to write something, you may as well write
                           Why can’t I just           something that makes sense. That’s where the outline
                            start writing?            comes in.


                                 When you transfer your ideas from the bubble chart to an outline, you put
                                 everything in the exact order you will discuss it in your essay. Making an
                                 outline lets you decide in advance which order makes the most sense for the
                                 information you have. Draw lines from the information on the bubble
                                 chart to the matching information in the outline.


                covers most                                                  many hats made of
                of her head                     Susie’s ribbon               soft or thin material
                                                is a hat                                          could protect
        can’t see                                                                                 from wind or dust
        her hair              Covers her                             Protects her
                              head                                   head
                                                                                                  could shield her
not all hats cover a                                                                              eyes from sunlight
person’s whole hair
                          some fancy hats                                 few hats really protect
                          are small                                       from rain anyway



                                       OUTLINE—The Middle

                       I. Introduction
                           (Leave this part blank
                           for now.)

                       II. The ribbon covers her head
                              A. Can’t see her hair
                              B. Not all hats cover a person’s whole hair
                              C. Some fancy hats are small
                              D. Ribbon covers most of her head

                       III. The ribbon protects her head
                               A. Many hats made of soft or thin material
                               B. Few hats really protect from rain
                               C. Ribbon could protect from wind or dust
                               D. Could shield eyes from sunlight

                       IV. Conclusion
                                                             It’s easiest to start your outline in the
                           (Leave this part blank            middle, using information you already
                           for now.)                         have, and fill in the rest later.
                                          Three Steps to an Effective Introduction
                                          Your introduction prepares the reader to understand your essay.
                                          That’s why you want to organize it just right! Give your
                                          introduction these three parts:

                                                 A. What happened
                                                 B. What the rule is
                                                 C. Your main argument


                                                     OUTLINE—The Introduction

                                           I. Introduction
               Don’t get carried away         A. What happened
               telling what happened.             1. Susie wore large ribbon in school
               Keep it short and to the           2. Got in trouble for wearing a hat
               point.                         B. What the rule is
                                                  1. School rule says no hats in the building
                                                  2. Hat is something that covers and
                                                     protects the head
                                              C. Main argument
                                                  1. Susie did violate the rule
                                                  2. Susie’s ribbon is a hat




                 The Quick Wrap-Up
Your conclusion is like the ribbon on a package—it ties your whole essay
together. The conclusion gives you one last chance to make your
argument. It doesn’t have to be long. Give your conclusion these three
parts:

       A. Simple version of your argument in new words
       B. Restate your supporting arguments
       C. Restate your main argument



              OUTLINE—The Conclusion

        IV. Conclusion                                      Finding just the right way to make
           A. Ribbon functions just like a hat              a simple version of your argument
           B. Covers and protects her head                  in new words can be the hardest
                                                            part of the whole essay. Don’t
           C. Susie’s ribbon is a hat                       freak out—just spend a little time
                                                            thinking about it.
                                                                              Name:
Once you’ve got an outline, writing your essay is like connecting the dots. All the ideas are
already in order—all you have to do is flesh them out and make them sound interesting. Follow
your teacher’s directions to color code the outline and essay below.
                                                                        Most people would feel silly with a huge ribbon on
       I. Introduction
                                                                 their head, but not Susie. She thought it looked great. As
              A. What happened
                 1. Susie wore large ribbon in school            soon as Susie came into the classroom, however, she got in
                 2. Got in trouble for wearing a hat             trouble because the school rule says students are not allowed
                                                                 to wear hats inside the building. According to the rule, a hat
               B. What the rule is
                                                                 is something that covers and protects a person’s head. Susie
                  1. School rule says no hats in the building
                  2. Hat is something that covers and            did break the rule when she wore her ribbon in the classroom
                     protects the head                           because the ribbon is a hat.
              C. Main argument                                          First, Susie’s ribbon covers her head. The ribbon is so
                  1. Susie did violate the rule
                                                                 big that you can barely see her hair. Even though you can
                  2. Susie’s ribbon is a hat
                                                                 still see some of her hair, very few hats actually cover a
       II. The ribbon covers her head                            person’s entire head. In fact, some fancy women’s hats
              A. Can’t see her hair                              hardly cover the person’s head at all. By contrast, Susie’s
              B. Not all hats cover a person’s whole hair
                                                                 ribbon covers most of her head and hair.
              C. Some fancy hats are small
              D. Ribbon covers most of her head                         Second, the ribbon protects Susie’s head. Although
                                                                 the ribbon is flimsy, many hats are made out of a soft or thin
       III. The ribbon protects her head                         material. The ribbon probably could not protect Susie’s head
               A. Many hats made of soft or thin material
                                                                 from rain, but very few hats are waterproof. Susie’s ribbon
               B. Few hats really protect from rain
               C. Ribbon could protect from wind or dust         could definitely protect her head from wind or dust. It could
               D. Could shield eyes from sunlight                also shield her eyes from sunlight.
                                                                        Even though Susie’s ribbon does not look like a usual
       IV. Conclusion
                                                                 hat, it functions exactly like a hat. It covers and protects her
             A. Ribbon functions just like a hat
             B. Covers and protects her head                     head. Therefore, Susie’s ribbon is a hat.
             C. Susie’s ribbon is a hat
The Dreaded Outline : Class Activity Guide


                                    Color-Coding Activity


  This activity lets students see the direct relationship between an outline and an essay. As you guide
  students through the activity, focus on both the similarities between the outline and the essay as
  well as the ways the essay fleshes out the outline.

  Read the following instructions to the class one at a time. Discuss and monitor as students color-
  code their papers.


      1) Find the main argument in the introduction part of the outline. Underline it in
         red. Then find it in the introduction of the essay and underline it in red.
      2) Find all parts of the rule in the introduction part of the outline. Underline
         them in purple. Then find them in the introduction of the essay and
         underline them in purple.
      3) Find “what happened” in the introduction part of the outline. Underline those
         parts in brown. Also underline them in brown in the introduction of the
         essay. (Discuss how to create an effective opening line.)
      5) Find the two supporting arguments in the outline. Underline them in blue in
         both the outline and the essay.
      6) Look in the outline to find the evidence and arguments that back up the two
         supporting arguments. Underline the evidence and arguments in yellow.
         Then, in the essay, find the sentences that correspond to each piece of
         evidence or each argument. Underline those in yellow also. (Make sure
         students note how these parts may have been fleshed out.)
      7) Find all places in the essay where the writer used “even though,” “although,”
         or “while.” Circle those words in orange.
      8) Find these words and box them in green:
             * First
             * Second
             * Therefore
             * However
             * In fact
             * By contrast
             * Therefore
             * Also
      9) Find the supporting arguments in the conclusion section of the outline.
         Underline them in blue. Then find them in the conclusion of the essay and
         underline them in blue.
      10)Find the main argument in the conclusion part of the outline. Underline it in
         red. Then find it in the conclusion part of the essay and underline it in red.
The Dreaded Outline : Active Participation Guide


                        True/False Activity—Day One Review


  Anticipate Day Two with the following activity. Read each statement to the class, and have them
  say “true” or “false” as a chorus. Alternatively, have them show “thumbs up” for true and “thumbs
  down” for false, or prepare your own true/false cards in advance using index cards with T written on
  one side and F written on the other (students show the correct side of the card).


  1) When you outline, you should start with the introduction. (F)

  2) You will find the main argument in both the introduction and the conclusion. (T)

  3) Each supporting argument has its own paragraph. (T)

  5) You don’t have to actually state the rule anywhere. (F)

  6) It’s OK to write three paragraphs telling what happened. (F)

  7) The only parts of the conclusion are re-stating your supporting and main arguments. (F)

  8) The point of an outline is to pre-plan the order of your information. (T)

								
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