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									Revised 2/22/2010                                                             Page 1 of 5


Circuits for Middle School
NEOCEx Lesson Plan

Course:       Middle School Physical Science
Students:     Middle School Students


Prepared by: Neil Parrot, Matthew Weinstein

Adopted from
Lesson Prepared by:           J.T. Gleeson, S.N. Sprunt, M.A. Lee, Neil Parrot


Date Developed:       March 2005             Last Updated:         February 22, 2010


A. Concepts/Big Idea
   1. Primary: transport of charge through circuits


B. Learning Objectives
   1. Sketch a series and a parallel circuit
   2. List an application of a series circuit
   3. List and application of a parallel circuit
   4. Recognize the function of circuit breakers and fuses.

   Required Prior Knowledge
      Current, Resistor

C. Anticipated Prior Misconceptions
   1. All electric circuits are the same.
D. Methods
   1. Instructor provides brief explanation of schematics (shorthand for drawing
      circuits).
   2. The instructor provides the students with the following “Lab Challenges”
      a. Given a bulb, a bulb holder, 2 wires, and a battery:
          (1) Can you get the bulb to light?
          (2) Create a statement indicating why you think the bulb did or did not light.
          (3) If the bulb lit, did it matter where the wires touched the battery? Explain.
          (4) If the bulb lit, did it matter which end of the battery the wires had to be
              connected to the bulb holder?
          (5) Draw a schematic of your second challenge.
      b. Given a bulb, 2 wires, and a battery:
          (1) Can you get the bulb to light?
          (2) Create a statement indicating why you think the bulb did or did not light.
          (3) If the bulb lit, did it matter where the wires touched the battery? Explain.
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          (4) If the bulb lit, did it matter which end of the battery the wires had to be
               connected to the bulb?
          (5) Draw a schematic of your first challenge.
      c. Given a bulb, 1 wire, and a battery:
          (1) Can you get the bulb to light?
          (2) Create a statement indicating why you think the bulb did or did not light.
          (3) If the bulb lit, did it matter where the wires touched the battery? Explain.
          (4) If the bulb lit, did it matter which end of the battery the wires had to be
               connected to the bulb?
          (5) Draw a schematic of your third challenge.
      d. Given a bulb and a battery:
          (1) Can you get the bulb to light?
          (2) Create a statement indicating why you think the bulb did or did not light.
          (3) If the bulb lit, did it matter where the wires touched the battery? Explain.
          (4) If the bulb lit, did it matter which end of the battery the wires had to be
               connected to the bulb?
          (5) Draw a schematic of your fourth challenge.
   3. The instructor has an opportunity to stop after each challenge and discuss the
      findings with the entire class. For “advanced” groups, the discussion could wait
      until all groups have completed all of the challenges. An alternative would be to
      stop the entire class after the first challenge and then save the remaining
      discussion until all of the challenges have been completed. The instructor must
      provide consistent monitoring of groups.


E. Materials and Technology

   1.   Batteries (D-Cell)
   2.   Hookup wires
   3.   Flashlight light bulbs
   4.   Light bulb base holders


F. Management and Safety Issues
   1. Safety glasses
G. Assessment
   1. Laboratory write-up.
   2. Monitoring of groups.
   3. Discussion
H. Applications
   1. Simple household item circuits (i.e. flashlights)
I. Equity
   1. Because groups are key for the lab, equity issues factor in.
      a. Recent research indicates that in mixed gender groups boys dominate the
          interaction, manipulate the equipment, and relegate the girls to more passive
          roles.
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   2. In the group discussion participation required planning on the part of the teacher.
      This includes:
      a. Having students prepare for whole class discussions by providing them time
          to clarify their thoughts through writing before the group meets.
      b. Giving sufficient wait time to allow all students to feel prepared to contribute.
          By having them write before speaking you can monitor the readiness of the
          class to participate. After a minute you might say, “I see three people have an
          answer. I’ll wait for a few more ideas before starting.”
J. Additional Resources\
   1. General science resources.
K. Standards


Physical Science Content Standard (Ohio)
   Students demonstrate an understanding of the composition of physical systems and
   the concepts and principles that describe and predict physical interactions and events
   in the natural world. This includes demonstrating an understanding of the structure
   and properties of matter, the properties of materials and objects, chemical reactions
   and the conservation of matter. In addition, it includes understanding the nature,
   transfer and conservation of energy; motion and the forces affecting motion; and the
   nature of waves and interactions of matter and energy. Students demonstrate an
   understanding of the historical perspectives, scientific approaches and emerging
   scientific issues associated with physical sciences.

Ohio Academic Content Standards

Physical Science Grades 9-10, Benchmark F - Explain how energy may change form or
        be redistributed but the total quantity of energy is conserved.
Physical Science Grades 9-10, Benchmark H - Trace the historical development of
        scientific theories and ideas, and describe emerging issues in the study of physical
        sciences.
Scientific Inquiry Grades 9-10, Benchmark A - Participate in and apply the processes of
        scientific investigation to create models and to design, conduct, evaluate and
        communicate the results of these investigations.
Scientific Inquiry Grades 6-8, Benchmark A - Explain that there are differing sets of
        procedures for guiding scientific investigations and procedures are determined by
        the nature of the investigation, safety considerations and appropriate tools.
Scientific Inquiry Grades 6-8, Benchmark B - Analyze and interpret data from scientific
        investigations using appropriate mathematical skills in order to draw valid
        conclusions.

NSTA Standards

NSTA Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, Standard 1, B.2.10 In relation to the
     physical sciences, science specialists at this level should have all of the
     competencies described for the elementary generalist, but also should be prepared
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       in chemistry and physics to lead students to understand:10. Properties and
       applications of sound, light, magnetism, and electricity.

NSTA Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, Standard 2, C - Engage students
     successfully in studies of the nature of science including, when possible, the
     critical analysis of false or doubtful assertions made in the name of science.

NSTA Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, Standard 3, B - Engage students
     successfully in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop
     concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a
     scientific manner.

NSTA Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, Standard 5, A-F
a. Vary their teaching actions, strategies, and methods to promote the development of
        multiple student skills and levels of understanding.
b. Successfully promote the learning of science by students with different abilities, needs,
        interests, and backgrounds.
c. Successfully organize and engage students in collaborative learning using different
        student group learning strategies.
d. Successfully use technological tools, including but not limited to computer technology,
        to access resources, collect and process data, and facilitate the learning of science.
e. Understand and build effectively upon the prior beliefs, knowledge, experiences, and
        interests of students.
f. Create and maintain a psychologically and socially safe and supportive learning
        environment.

NSTA Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, Standard 8, A-C
a. Use multiple assessment tools and strategies to achieve important goals for instruction
        that are aligned with methods of instruction and the needs of students.
b. Use the results of multiple assessments to guide and modify instruction, the classroom
        environment, or the assessment process.
c. Use the results of assessments as vehicles for students to analyze their own learning,
        engaging students in reflective self-analysis of their own work.

NSTA Standards for Science Teacher Preparation, Standard 9, A-D
a. Understand the legal and ethical responsibilities of science teachers for the welfare of
        their students, the proper treatment of animals, and the maintenance and disposal
        of materials.
b. Know and practice safe and proper techniques for the preparation, storage, dispensing,
        supervision, and disposal of all materials used in science instruction.
c. Know and follow emergency procedures, maintain safety equipment, and ensure safety
        procedures appropriate for the activities and the abilities of students.
d. Treat all living organisms used in the classroom or found in the field in a safe, humane,
        and ethical manner and respect legal restrictions on their collection, keeping, and
        use.
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Praxis Series for Ohio Middle School Science Teachers (0439) – Topics Covered

   I.     Scientific Methodology, Techniques, and History
          A. Methodology and Philosophy
          B. Mathematics, Measurements & Data Manipulation
          C. Laboratory Procedures and Safety
   II.    Basic Principles
          A. Matter & Energy
   III.   Physical Sciences
          A. Physics
                    2. Electricity & Magnetism
   VI.    Science, Technology, and Society

								
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