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THE 2009 STUDENT GARDEN DESIGN COMPETITION

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									                          THE 2009 STUDENT GARDEN DESIGN COMPETITION

                         • How would you like to win a £6,000 garden design commission?

                           • How would you like to jump start your garden design career?

                    • How would you like your garden design to be seen by up to 80,000 people?

                       • How would you like your winning design to be professionally judged?

                        The Southport Flower Show Student Garden Design Competition
                               gives you the opportunity to do all of the above.




                Submitted design and completed garden by Peter Cowell, 2008 competition winner

 "If you’re a student looking to set up your own garden design business or have already set one up, there is no
better way of getting your name out there than entering this competition and having your garden seen by up to
80,000 people at the Southport Flower Show. After winning a Large Gold Medal this past summer, I have set up
my business, Living Gardens, and have had a steady stream of design & build contracts ever since. Not only are
      the publicity opportunities unbeatable but also the business experience of running a job, dealing with
contractors and sub-contractors, working to a budget and time limit are all invaluable. If you have an idea for a
        show garden then get on and apply for next year’s competition. You won’t regret it.” Peter Cowell

The competition is open to:
Any student in the UK (full or part time) currently studying for a recognised qualification in garden design,
horticulture or landscaping OR any student in the UK that has successfully completed a recognised qualification
during 2008.

The competition will be judge by a senior representative of the Society of Landscape Designers, the horticultural
Trustee Director of Southport Flower Show and one of the previous winners of the competition.

There will be one winner who will be given the commission to build a garden at Southport Flower Show and one
highly commended runner up who will receive an award of £500.
                         THE 2009 STUDENT GARDEN DESIGN COMPETITION - BRIEF

Size
The available plot is 36 sqm - 6m x 6m.

Design Theme
The theme of the 2009 Southport Flower Show is the 1920s. Attached is a short note about major historical
events and horticultural themes from the 1920s.

The task is for you to interpret and incorporate the theme and design a garden of your choice to showcase your
talent, ability and creativity.

Budget
£5,000 for the design and build of the garden, details of how this is paid will be supplied to the winner.
£1,000 personal fee to include all personal expenses.

Timescale
The garden must be completed by 10am Wednesday 19th August to allow for judging. Earliest on site date is
Wednesday 29th July.

Submission
This can be in any style you choose - plan format (minimum A3), isometric drawings, 3D model. The quality,
substance and content of the submission will be used by the judges to decide the winner of the competition.

Included with your design details must be a budget and a work schedule.

Judging
Your entry will be judged using the criteria set out below. Your submission must include as much information as
possible in terms of research, visuals, written rationales, plans, drawings and examples, to enable the judging
panel to accurately assess your ideas and to see how your garden design will be realised in the finished garden.

The completed garden will be eligible to be judged during the flower show using criteria laid down for all
outdoor exhibition gardens, which is very similar to the competition criteria. No additional prize money will be
awarded. 100 points will be awarded in total and breakdown as follows:

Entry submission, budget and work schedule - (15) scope, realisation, practicability of the entry
Overall impression - (15) impact and originality of the entry
Overall design - (20) unity, balance, scale
Hard landscaping – (20) quality/special features used in the overall design
Planting – (20) the design, colour, textures
Theme - (10) representation, understanding and adherence to the show theme


                          CLOSING DATE FOR ALL ENTRIES TUESDAY 31ST MARCH 2009
              THE 2009 STUDENT GARDEN DESIGN COMPETITION - ENTRY FORM




Entrants Name……………………………………………………… College/Uni….……………………………………………………………

Course Details………………………………………………………         Tutor Name……………………………………………………………….


Home Address……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

County. ………………………………………………………………… Post Code………………………………………………………………….


Telephone (entrant)……………………………………………… Email (Entrant)………………………………………………………….

Telephone (Coll/Uni)……………………………………………       Email (Coll/Uni)………………………….................................



                 CLOSING DATE FOR ALL ENTRIES TUESDAY 31ST MARCH 2009
                 THE 2009 STUDENT GARDEN DESIGN COMPETITION – SHOW THEME, 1920S

History:
The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the "Jazz Age" or the "Roaring Twenties", when speaking about the
United States and Canada, and during this time the public showed considerable enthusiasm for cars, air travel,
the telephone, and other technological advances.
In Europe the decade is sometimes referred to as the "Golden Twenties".
The Charleston was one of many popular dances of the time.
The tomb of Tutankhamun is discovered intact by Howard Carter (1922).
December 28, 1922 saw the forming the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics - USSR.
In the history of the United States, Prohibition is the period from 1920 to 1933, during which the sale,
manufacture, and transportation of alcohol for consumption were banned nationally. Gangsters in Chicago such
as Al Capone gained notoriety during this period.
In 1924, George Gershwin composed his first major classical work, Rhapsody in Blue for orchestra and piano.
The First feature-length motion picture with a sound track (Don Juan) is released in 1926. First part-talkie (The
Jazz Singer - Al Jolson) released in 1927, first all-talking feature (Lights of New York) released in 1928 and first all-
color all-talking feature (On with the Show) released in 1929.
Leading ‘stars’ of the day included: Charlie Chaplin, Louis Armstrong, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd.

The US Stock Market collapsed during October 1929 (Black Tuesday) and drew a line under the prosperous
1920s.

Art & Design:
Bauhaus was a school in Germany that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to
design that it publicized and taught. It operated from 1919 to 1933.
The Bauhaus style, also known as the International Style, was marked by the absence of ornamentation and by
harmony between the function of an object or a building and its design.

In the 1920s, modernism, which had been such a minority taste before the war, came to define the age.
Modernism was seen in Europe in such critical movements as Dada, and then in constructive movements such as
Surrealism

Art Deco was a popular international design movement from 1925 until 1939, affecting the decorative arts such
as architecture, interior design, and industrial design, as well as the visual arts such as fashion, painting, the
graphic arts and film. Its popularity peaked in Europe during the Roaring Twenties and continued strongly in the
United States through the 1930s. Although many design movements have political or philosophical roots or
intentions, Art Deco was purely decorative. Popular themes in Art Deco were trapezoidal, zigzagged, geometric,
and jumbled shapes, which can be seen in many early pieces. Art Deco is characterized by use of materials such
as aluminium, stainless steel, lacquer and inlaid wood.

Surrealism is a cultural movement that began in the early-1920s, and is best known for the visual artworks and
writings of the group members.
Surrealist works feature the element of surprise, unexpected juxtapositions and non sequitur.
1920s Literature:
1920 - This Side of Paradise - F. Scott Fitzgerald; The Age of Innocence - Edith Wharton; Women in Love - D. H.
Lawrence
1922 - Ulysses - James Joyce; The Waste Land - T. S. Eliot; Siddhartha - Hermann Hesse;
1924 - Billy Budd, Foretopman - Herman Melville; A Passage to India - E. M. Forster;
1925 - The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald; Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf; Der Prozeß (The Trial) - Franz Kafka
1926 - Winnie-the-Pooh - A. A. Milne; The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway;
1927 - To the Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf; The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle;
1928 - Lady Chatterley's Lover - D. H. Lawrence
1929 - A Farewell to Arms - Ernest Hemingway; All Quiet on the Western Front - Erich Maria Remarque;
Goodbye to All That - Robert Graves; The Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner


Local: 1920’s Southport
In the 1920' and 30's Southport was second to the famous Brooklands Motor racing circuit and many famous
names competed in the races regularly held on the beach.

In April 1926 Henry Seagrave returned to the beach to contest the Land Speed record, then standing at 150.76
MPH. He set a new world land speed record of 153.308 mph on Southport Sands, but due to engine problems
the record was only set for the kilometre and not the mile.

Posters were produced for the London, Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) to promote winter travel to Southport.
The posters were illustrated with paintings of fashionably dressed women and men leaving the Garrick Theatre
on Lord Street. The Artwork was by Fortunino Matania from Naples.

Gardening:
Cottage Garden style was still very popular, along with Herbaceous Borders.
Gardeners of the day included Gertrude Jekyll who championed the Cottage Garden Style, and William Robinson
who, it could be said, was the creator of the mixed herbaceous border, as well as the wild garden.

								
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