NY5 Central Avenue State Street The Future of the Corridor

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NY5 Central Avenue  State Street The Future of the Corridor Powered By Docstoc
					     Advanced Planning
for Better Transportation and
    Land Use Integration
             Presentation by
     John P. Poorman, Staff Director
    Capital District Transp. Committee
                Albany, NY
               April 29, 2003
               518-458-2161
                                 Old Approach
                           Transportation in Old Context



Land use, economy is an external “given”
Transportation needs can be forecast
Engineering standards are central to all aspects of system
and facility design
Negative impacts are to be minimized
                                New Approach
                           Transportation in New Context

True engineering issues:
load limits, life cycle costs
construction specifications
Societal choices:
LOS standards (vs. land use compatibility)
design speed (85th percentile, etc.)
bike, pedestrian accommodations
design volumes
                                New Approach
                          Transportation in New Context



Examples of Similar Societal Choices
Vehicle priority / pedestrian priority
Highway design standards/development design standards
Snow removal / incident management
Level of Service / Level of Compatibility
                                New Approach
                          Transportation in New Context



Transportation is only about quality of life
 economic vitality / jobs access
 environmental health / enhancement
 social connectivity / community health
 physical health / security
Transportation projects are often the principal public
means of achieving other objectives
                                  Broader Context
                                    Revised Project Objectives

Moving away from:
    transportation as an end
    rule and standards-based decisions
     – 2034 queue lengths and Level of Service

Moving toward:
    transportation as a means to an end
    multiple objectives and tradeoff analysis
     – traffic flow improvements, not “solutions”
     – improved community structure
     – sense of place, viability
     – operational reliability
                      Advanced Planning
            Asking the right questions at the right time



State, Regional policies
                           • system design
Community planning
                           • funding priorities
Corridor design
                           • modal roles
Project development
                           • economic strategy
                           Advanced Planning
             Asking the right questions at the right time



State, Regional policies
                             • community identity
Community planning
                             • streets and land use
Corridor design
                             • development approach
Project development
                             • preservation needs
                           Advanced Planning
             Asking the right questions at the right time



State, Regional policies
                             • place identity / gateways
Community planning
                             •street design concept
Corridor design
                             • access management
Project development
                             • site design
                           Advanced Planning
             Asking the right questions at the right time



State, Regional policies
                             • engineering design
Community planning
                             • operations plans
Corridor design
                             • implementation
Project development
                         Advanced Planning
                                                    Goals



Determine desired development, transportation structure
Resolve direction outside project glare
Seek opportunities to implement over time
Refine, keep vision current
                         Advanced Planning
                                                   Benefits



Prepares community to guide private development
Saves time in eventual transportation project design
Can save $ (tradeoff between LOS and compatibility may
yield more modest project)
                 Advanced Planning
                            Continuous Interaction


                 Regional




Transportation                      Land Use




                 Community,
                  Corridor
                 Advanced Planning
                            Continuous Interaction


                 Regional




Transportation                      Land Use




                 Community,
                  Corridor
                                Simple Example
                                                   Wolf Road

Wolf Road Study, GEIS, Regional Plan, NYSDOT policy
    cumulative development analysis
    funding package
    service road system
    sidewalk project, pedestrian priority
    ITS system

Wolf Road Rehab Project
    full sidewalks, countdown pedestrian signals
    driveway consolidation
    ITS signal tie-in
    relocated intersection
            CDTC’s Linkage Program
                    Linking Transportation and Land Use



Key recommendation of regional plan: local assistance in
integrating transp. and land use
Locally-initiated community-based studies
Shared funding (MPO + local)
Annual solicitation
     Connection to regional plan
     Advance local planning agenda
     Prioritized by regional impact
            CDTC’s Linkage Program
                                           Significant Impact



Thirty-six studies authorized in 4 years
$1.5 to $ 2.0 million invested
23 different sponsors (county, city, town, village, housing
authority, non-profit)
Major influence on local plans
Clarified vision for some state highway corridors
Results seen in TIP candidate list
           CDTC’s Linkage Program
                                          Examples

Urban projects
minority area commercial revitalization
minority area gateway development
inner city residential parking issue
neighborhood traffic calming
urban “village” redevelopment
truck access for industrial development
waterfront redevelopment
           CDTC’s Linkage Program
                                             Examples

Suburban projects
mixed use master plans
conversion of strip area to “town center”
“downtown” driveway, street, bike, ped standards
architectural standards
industrial zone master plan
corridor land use, street design visioning
           CDTC’s Linkage Program
                                                 Examples



Rural projects
hamlet preservation, traffic calming
village business district parking, circulation
                                                    NY 5 Study
                                          What was the NY5 Study?

Recommendation in regional plan re: rail transit
Policy stance:
   1. Rail + dense development = regional benefit

   2. Rail w/o dense development unwarranted.

   3. No need to explore rail further unless:

     a.     Development is feasible (market realities)

     b.     Development is desired (community visioning)

   4. If feasible and desirable, undertake MIS.
                                                   NY 5 Study
                                         What was the NY5 Study?



Addressed the following:
   1. Regional function for the 16-mile Corridor

   2. Market potential for development / redevelopment

   3. Community vision for the corridor and surrounding neighborhoods

   4. Community actions to achieve the preferred future

   5. Highway and transit investments to achieve the preferred future




                          www.ny5.org
Existing NY 5 Conditions
          The Corridor in the Region




       16.5 miles from Albany to
       Schenectady.
       Through 5 communities.
       15% of households &
       30% of jobs are
       within 1/2 mile of the Corridor.
       Higher transit ridership than some
       light rail lines (8,000 per day)
       25% transit dependent
                                 Corridor Issues
Reduced Economic Strength

Traffic Backups & Safety Concerns




                             Lack of identity, cohesiveness
                             lead to “anywhere” character
                             of much of the corridor



Auto-oriented development
 and roadway design are
       “unfriendly” to
pedestrians and bicyclists
                   Corridor Opportunities
Traditional character of
downtowns and
some corridor neighborhoods

High quality & affordable
residential neighborhoods

                                Central location within
                                Region supports
                                jobs and retailing



Existing bus service provides
 frequent & reliable service
                                                  Process
                                            Community Visioning



Principal Questions Were Not Transportation
Questions:
Is intense corridor development feasible?
Is intense development desirable?
If yes to both, then consider light rail.
If no to either, consider alternatives.
In any case, determine the vision for community
structure.
                           Community Input
Charettes, Open Houses, Newsletters, Surveys
to shape a vision
                                                 Survey Results
               Are today's traffic levels and congestion acceptable if transit,
                     walking, and bicycling are improved on Route 5?



Not Sure




     No




    Yes



           0     50      100      150      200      250      300      350     400
                                          Survey Results
               Does the Newsletter illustrate a Vision we should
                             work to achieve?



Not Sure




     No




    Yes


           0         100        200       300       400        500
                                              Specifics
Analysis of Existing Conditions, Future Trends and
Community Input


    Modest regional growth expected

    Work needed to preserve corridor’s role

    Community support for:
       reconfiguration/restructuring

       but not::
        intensification/densification

    Respect for street rights-of-way limitations
                                                         Results
Preferred Future Not Dependent Upon Growth


Desired design strategies work under all circumstances
       mixed-use development
       place identity (gateways, etc.)
       community structure : revitalization + linkages
Multi-modal improvements can work under all circumstances
       Incremental BRT improvements
       pedestrian, bicycle, safety, landscaping
       signal coordination, other ITS technology
   Achieving the Preferred Future
                                                   Implementation Paths

Transportation Funding
  Immediate:       Corridor-Wide Signal Coordination ($5 M)
  ($12 M)          Bus Hardware for Priority Treatment ($4 M)
                   State Street: Fehr Ave. to Furman St. ($3 M)
  Next 5 Years:   New "BRT" stations ($2 M) ($3 M)
  ($32 M) ($44 M) New BRT buses ($6 M) ($8 M)
                   New shuttle buses (up to $2M) ($4 M)
                   Central Ave: Everett to Albany city line ($12 M) ($16 M)
                   Downtown State Street Redesign ($10 M) ($13 M)
                   Revise Zoning, Site Design Standards
  Over 20 Years:   Reconstruct many of the remaining sections
  ($120+ M)        Boulevard treatment in limited locations
                   Bus lanes and bypasses where needed
                   More stations, buses, greater bus frequency
                   Utility relocation/undergrounding
                   Further local efforts for economic revitalization
                  Implementation Steps
Municipal Endorsement of Study Recommendation
(completed)
MPO adoption (completed)
Street Design Guidebook (completed)
BRT plan (underway);
Zoning Revision Analysis (underway);
Architectural Standards (underway)
Neighborhood Planning (underway)
Construction projects (in design)
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
          Corridor-wide Transportation Improvements

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Features
    Improved Shelters
    Electronic Rider Information Systems
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
           Corridor-wide Transportation Improvements

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Features
    Dedicated Transit Infrastructure
      – Dedicated Lanes
      – Queue Jumper Lanes
      – Signal Preference
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
          Corridor-wide Transportation Improvements
Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)
    Faster boarding
    Smart-Cards
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                                             Urban Strip
Swinburne Park




                        Existing Condition
                 Preferred Future Scenario
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                                      Suburban Strip
Albany Auto Row - Urban Design and Streetscape
Character
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                        Suburban Strip

BRT in dedicated lane
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                                    The Suburban Strip
Colonie Village Center

                         Infill of parking lot with mixed-use
                         buildings, village green, and Bus
                         Rapid Transit (BRT) transfer station

                         Local access lane separates local and
                         through traffic

                         Mixed-use buildings with retail on
                         the ground floor with potential for
                         cafes fronting onto the village green

                         Strong pedestrian connections
                         between retail and adjacent
                         neighborhoods
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                              The Suburban Strip
Colonie Village Center




                                     Existing Condition
                                      Future Scenario




                                           Village Green


            Transit Station
         A Tour of the Preferred Future
                              Regional Mixed-Use District
    New Karner Road




Future Build-out
 Existing Condition
Initial Street Improvements
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                                 Suburban Strip

Lisha Kill - a rural separator
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                          Urban Core
Vale Neighborhood




                            Full Build-Out
   A Tour of the Preferred Future
                          Urban Core
Nott Terrace
                    Resource Allocations
                    Of every $100 in federal project dollars:


Metropolitan Planning
Community Planning Assistance
Corridor Planning
                                         ~$0.81
Project Development, Engineering
                    Resource Allocations


Metropolitan Planning
Community Planning Assistance
Corridor Planning
                                   ~$5.00 -
Project Development, Engineering    15.00
                 Concluding Remarks

Transportation in Context
Asking right questions at right time
Advanced Planning at community, corridor
level
Cost savings in project development
Shift resources to achieve better results?
                 Concluding Remarks

Transportation in Context
Asking right questions at right time
Advanced Planning at community, corridor
level
Cost savings in project development
Shift resources to achieve better results?
                 Concluding Remarks

Transportation in Context
Asking right questions at right time
Advanced Planning at community, corridor
level
Cost savings in project development
Shift resources to achieve better results?
                 Concluding Remarks

Transportation in Context
Asking right questions at right time
Advanced Planning at community, corridor
level
Cost savings in project development
Shift resources to achieve better results?
                 Concluding Remarks

Transportation in Context
Asking right questions at right time
Advanced Planning at community, corridor
level
Cost savings in project development
Shift resources to achieve better results?