Red Book Edit 2004

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					                 PRIMARY PARTNERSHIP




             ‘The Red Book’

        Formative and Summative
               Assessment
           Guidance & Support

       Achieving the Standards for
        Qualified Teacher Status




         Lesson Observation, Target-Setting &
         Summative Grading Support - A guide
        for school and university-based tutors.



Updated Autumn 2007
                                 CONTENTS

                                                                                  Page
Introduction                                                                       2
Section 1    Characteristics of Good Lessons ~ Observation and Target-Setting      5
             Checklists by Curriculum Area
                        English                                                    6
                        Mathematics                                                8
                        Science                                                   11
                        ICT                                                       14
                                                  ICT lessons                     15
                                                  ICT across the curriculum       18
                        Religious Education                                       20
                        Art                                                       22
                        Design & Technology                                       24
                        Drama                                                     26
                        Geography                                                 29
                        History                                                   30
                        Modern Foreign Language                                   31
                        Music                                                     34
                        Physical Education                                        36
Section 2    Assessing the Standards ~ Generic Grading Grids                      38
                        Professional Attributes (Q1-Q9)                           39
                        Professional Skills: Team Working & Collaboration (Q32-   40
                        Q33)
                        Professional Knowledge & Understanding (Q10-Q15 &         41
                        Q17-Q21)
                        Professional Skills: Planning (Q22-Q24)                   42
                        Professional Skills: Teaching (Q25a-d) & Learning         43
                        Environment (Q30-Q31)
                        Professional Skills: Assessment, Monitoring & Giving      44
                        Feedback (Q26-Q28) & Reviewing Teaching & Learning
                        (Q29)
Section 3    Professional Standards for Teachers - QTS (full version)             45
Section 4    Assessment Criteria for Placements other than Final Placements       49
                        Level 1                                                   50
                        Level 2                                                   51
                        Level 3                                                   52




                                            1
Introduction

This booklet provides both a framework for assessing student teachers against the
Professional Standards for QTS and subject-based checklists which should help to inform
judgements on individual lessons. The purpose of the booklet is to support mentors in both
the formative and summative assessment of student teachers so that there is as much
consistency as possible across the primary partnership. It is both an Assessment Guide
and a Developmental Tool that may help Associate Tutors and Link Tutors to develop
greater confidence in the validity and consistency of their judgements.

The booklet has undergone reviews in 2002, 2004 and 2006 and in its present form was
subject to a major review in 2007 following the Training and Development Agency’s work to
bring coherence to the professional and occupational standards for the whole school
workforce.




Key Changes

The Professional Standards for QTS have been reduced in number to 33. In many respects
this is a helpful development although several of the standards (Q3, Q7, Q21, Q25 and Q26)
are sub-divided – making 40 discrete statements in total. The arrangement of this booklet
remains as it was in the 2006 edition but it is important to understand that Section 2 (the
generic grading grids) is rearranged with groupings of standards that reflect the way that
University of Cumbria placements are conceived. All of the sections have been edited to
reflect some of the major themes that underpin the standards and particularly the five key
outcomes identified in Every Child Matters and the six areas of the Common Core of skills
and knowledge for the children’s workforce.




How to use the booklet

Section 1: The checklists in this section are subject-specific and should provide support for
the formative assessment of student teachers on placement. They have been produced
by university subject tutors. Because it is specific to an individual subject, a checklist focuses
attention on elements of the Standards that are especially significant in relation to that
subject; it will also reflect, where appropriate, relevant national strategies. The checklists
reflect the content of the Standards but are not necessarily organised in the same format as
the Standards; the various elements – Professional Attributes, Professional Knowledge and




                                                2
Understanding, and Professional Skills – are embedded within the checklist. The checklists
refer, not only to features of practice that might be identified by observing teaching, but also
to elements that may be evidenced in other ways such as examining a student teacher’s
lesson plans, assessments / records and evaluations.

The checklists are most likely to be of value when observing individual lessons;
they provide an indication of features of good practice, which subject tutors
would look for in a good lesson, and also specify features which might indicate
areas of weakness that might lead to a cause for concern.

This section should be useful in providing feedback to student teachers on lesson observation
proformas. It may also be helpful in the process of individual target setting for student
teachers.

Section 2: The grid contained in this section is generic and should provide support for the
summative assessment of student teachers at the end of final block placements. It
consists of descriptions for each of four grades: very good, good, satisfactory and
unsatisfactory.

The award of a particular grade is made using a ‘best fit’ model. The student
teacher would not need to demonstrate achievement against every element of the
grade description but would need to demonstrate that their practice as a whole
most nearly matches the description for that grade.

This section should be used in arriving at judgements of student teachers on final block
placements only; assessment criteria for other placements are provided in Section 4.

Section 4: The grids contained in this section are similar to the generic grid in Section 2
and are intended as support for the summative assessment of student teachers at the
end of placements other than final placements. There are three levels of criteria which
reflect the increasing expectations of student teachers within different year groups.

Although these grids contain descriptions for very good, good and satisfactory
students, these placements will continue to be assessed on a Pass / Fail basis.
However, Associate Tutors may wish to use the descriptions when writing summative reports
on placements.




                                               3
The booklet has been produced by the Partnership Manager (ITE), working closely with
Programme Leaders, Primary Subject Coordinators and a wide range of subject tutors.
Headteachers and school-based mentors have also been consulted. We hope that the
revised booklet continues to be of help in supporting the vital work done across the primary
partnership.



An on-line version of this booklet can be found in Education Partnership web-area at:

                    http://www.cumbria.ac.uk/schoolpartnership



The TDA have developed guidance supporting the Professional Standards, including those for
QTS, which is available at:

                 http://www.tda.gov.uk/partners/ittstandards/guidance




                                              4
      Section 1
Characteristics of Good
Lessons ~ Observation
  and Target-Setting
    Checklists by
   Curriculum Area




          5
                       What Makes A Good English Lesson?
               A checklist to support observations and target setting

Planning
    Is explicitly planned to take account of PNS/NC requirements; but also shows flexibility
     to meet individual/class needs.
    Demonstrates effective progression and continuity of knowledge, skills and
     understandings;
    Integrates formative assessment approaches identified from previous
     evaluations/assessments;
    Structures each stage of the lesson, including the use of ICT, adult support and guided
     group work;
    Caters for specific learning needs, e.g. EAL, G&T, SEN;

Shared Learning and Teaching
    At Foundation and KS1 the discrete teaching of engaging and multi-sensory
     phonics to develop early reading skills;
    An emphasis on the development of comprehension and inferential understanding,
     once early reading skills are established; including teacher modelling, whole-class
     readings to appreciate speech patterns and rhythms;
    Sentence and/or Word level objectives, using appropriate technical
     language which are used to enhance children's response to the text and
     understanding of its structural features;
    A clear focus on one or two aspects of the writing process, e.g. planning, drafting,
     revising, editing, using ICT where appropriate;
    Clear start which makes objectives explicit, meaningful and purposeful, including
     reference to previous learning and appropriate use of subject-specific terminology;
    Brisk pace which allows for thinking time, including ability to ‘pick up’ on
     misconceptions and incorporate them into the session;
    An interactive approach (including speaking & listening, e.g. drama) which engages
     and involves all the children and which ‘taps’ into their interests and experiences;
    Use of a range of questioning techniques, including why/how questions. These should
     show an interest in what the children think and why and should not just focus on what
     they know;
    Use of cross curricular links, as much as possible, e.g. a Study of a Distant Place with
     poetry of that culture;

Guided Reading [develops work begun in shared work, where appropriate]
    Clear focus and task/text is well matched to the reading ability of the group and each
     child has a copy; a clear structure that incorporates:
    Introduction: what do we know about this text/text type/writing texts like these?
     What is outcome? What are the main features of this kind of text? Shall we say it
     aloud before we begin to write it?
    Cue In/Strategy Check: how might you begin? How will you link the ideas? What
     will you do if you don’t know how to read/spell a word?
    Independent reading/writing: in which each child reads or writes independently…
     might be a sentence, a paragraph etc. There is a clear focus to what they are thinking
     about as they do this with the teaching monitoring individual readers;
    Review: why do you think…[character] did that? How did that chapter help you to
     understand…? What three things did you learn about life in Victorian England? What
     parts didn’t you like/were unrealistic, why?




                                              6
Guided Writing
    Review: What’s the task in hand? What are the main features of this kind of text?
     How did the author in yesterday’s shared reading tackle it?
    Cue In: How might you start? Let’s try starting with action/dialogue this time.
    Try, improve, share, appraise: What I noticed about…? When else does this
     happen? What can we add/leave out? Why doesn’t this part seem to work? That
     connective works well. You could try… Say a little more about.
    Recapitulate: What worked? What helped? What can we use again?

Independent Learning/ Focus Group
    Should normally build on previous work undertaken and develop the topic from the
     shared learning part of lesson;
    Tasks should have a common theme or starting point, which enables the teacher to
     make expectations explicit to the whole class;
    Differentiation should meet the needs of all ability levels and provide: support [e.g.
     another adult, key words provided, writing frames etc]; or challenge [giving deeper
     insight or moving onto the next level]; or by outcome;
    Opportunities for children to work collaboratively in pairs/small groups, and utilises ICT
     technology to enhance learning e.g. computer programs, digital camera or video,
     audio equipment.

Plenary
    Builds on the common task that has been the focus of the ‘independent learning’ part
     and engages interest through interaction; or reviews understanding and may apply it
     to a different context.
    Review of objectives and reinforcement of key concepts, vocabulary etc - uses
     misconceptions and targeted key questions as teaching;
    Take learning forward in the next lesson, not just a ‘show and tell’ time;

Assessment
    Focused on small group of children [4-6] to specifically assess their understanding and
     skills;
    Achieved by one of a range of appropriate strategies, [e.g. observation & note-taking,
     targeted questioning, use of targets, marking work and giving feedback, audio/video
     recording], to capture the breadth of achievement and be inclusive;
    Is systematic and rigorous; and is used to inform future planning and action;


            Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
    Lack of challenge and low-level expectations of learning as shown by learning
     objectives and outcomes; and the inability to pick up misconceptions in pupils;
    Lack of appreciation of the importance of oral work and interaction, including Drama;
    Poorly matched and poorly differentiated planning and teaching, possibly due to a lack
     of flexibility in interpretation of the PNS and/or poor subject-knowledge;
    Didactic, unvaried approach, e.g. over reliance on teacher talk, worksheets etc. and
     lack of variety of teaching and learning approaches
    Lack of attempt to contextualise learning and make it meaningful and purposeful;
    Lack of focused assessment, record-keeping and evaluation and assessment
     approaches and which do not influence future planning and action;
    Inadequate feedback to pupils (oral or written) which is not linked to the learning
     objectives.




                                               7
                    What Makes a Good Mathematics Lesson?
               A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.

Planning
    Shows precise learning objectives for each lesson and sequence of lessons
    Is linked to medium term plans/unit plans to ensure progression and continuity
    Identifies what different groups will learn and the designated ‘target’ group for the
     whole, or main, part of the lesson
    Evidences that it has been reviewed and amended in the light of assessments of
     pupils’ progress
    Identifies opportunities for assessment across all parts of the lesson
    Indicates how other adults will support teaching and learning throughout all parts of
     the lesson
    Specifically caters for individual need eg SEN, More Able , EAL
    Identifies vocabulary to be introduced/consolidated and key questions to extend
     thinking/support assessments
    Block plans and unit plans incorporate the use and application of mathematical
     knowledge and skills, making cross curricular links where relevant
    Unit plans demonstrate a good range of resources to be used, including ICT, which
     take account of different learning styles
    Shows good subject knowledge by identifying expected misconceptions and likely
     difficulties

Mental and oral work
    Clear start, stating objectives which should, as much as possible, relate to work to be
     covered in the main part of the lesson
    Brisk pace, allowing thinking time and involvement of all children
    Variety of activities with time for interaction, rapid recall of known facts, targeted
     questions for individuals/groups and children explaining their strategies
    Good use of visual aids and resources
    Appropriate involvement of other adults in supporting groups/individuals
    Develops vocabulary and correct use of terminology

The main part of the lesson
    Objectives for the main part of the lesson shared and made visible to children via eg
     poster/whiteboard/Interactive Whiteboard
    Success criteria statements discussed/shared with children
    Prior learning focus of first lesson in the sequence/unit of work
    Evidences appropriate direct interactive teaching which engages the interest of all
     children and shows ability to model, demonstrate and explain concepts, ideas and
     activities clearly to pupils
    Incorporates group or paired discussions
    Uses a variety of questioning techniques including higher order questioning and
     targeted questions
    Allows time for children explaining their strategies, discusses effective strategies and
     uses such as teaching points
    Makes effective use of varied resources including visual aids, ICT, mathematical
     equipment, appropriate worksheets/text book activities
    Addresses misconceptions
    Caters for specific needs
    Has consistent high expectations in terms of mathematical challenge, levels of work
     and amount of work



                                               8
    Gives good feedback both verbally and written which allows pupils to consolidate
     learning and move forward in understanding
    Reviews homework activity if appropriate

Whole class, group, paired or individual work
   Varied classroom organisation to match objectives eg whole class, groups, paired and
    individual
   Manageable, differentiated tasks covering similar content
   Maximum of four groups working at three levels
   Target group in evidence for group work
   Clear focus for support staff/other adults
   Children set time limits for paired, group or individual work
   Emphasis on learning rather than recording
   Written algorithms to reflect understanding
   Effective provision and use of resources including ICT

Plenary/Reviews
Sufficient time allowed for and value given to reviews of learning at appropriate parts of the
lesson-strategies could include some of the following:
    Reinforcement of key facts/ideas/vocabulary
    Assessment of pupil learning linked to lesson objectives
    Sharing of ideas and strategies
    Use of misconceptions as teaching points
    Targeted key questions
    Reflection on what has been learnt
    Activity which reinforces lesson objectives
    Extension activities
    Links to future work and setting of homework task where appropriate

Assessment, Evaluation and Record Keeping
    Assessment should focus on mathematical learning linked to lesson objectives and
     pupil targets, not on children’s behaviour
    Records should focus mainly on children not yet achieving learning objectives and
     those working beyond the level of their peers, indicating appropriate ‘next steps’ in
     pupil progress
    Should take account of children with specific needs in mathematics
    Should evidence that a range of appropriate strategies have been used
    Should be used to inform and/or amend future planning

             Indicators of weaknesses and potential ‘cause for concern’
    Teacher talk dominates resulting in children being too passive
    Explanations are not sufficiently clear to enable pupils to work independently
    Tasks are ill-matched to pupils’ needs
    Lesson plans are ‘lifted’ directly from Unit Plans or Commercial Schemes with no
     attempt at modification to meet the needs of the children in that particular class
    Activities dominated by worksheets
    Is unable to cope with questions that pupils raise and plans only closed questions
    Little attempt to plan for or instigate pair or group discussion/work
    Demonstrates inadequate subject knowledge and makes insufficient use of the NC, the
     Primary Framework for mathematics and, where appropriate, the Foundation Stage to
     plan for the next step in pupils’ progress.
    A lack of recognition of children’s mathematical misconceptions and/or shows little
     attempt to address them during the lesson


                                              9
   Demonstrates little awareness of how and when ICT could be used effectively in
    mathematics teaching and learning.
   Pupils are rarely challenged mathematically and teaching fails to motivate pupils
   Makes little attempt to use a wide range of mathematical resources to suit age range,
    interests or learning styles
   Assessment does not link to objectives or inform future plans.




                                           10
                       What Makes a Good Science Lesson?
              A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.

The adapted SciCentre material below provides a model of ‘good’ planning and ‘good’
teaching.

Lesson Plan Discussion
Context
    Has the lesson been appropriately linked to the National Curriculum or Early Learning
     Goals?
    Is it clear which science skills will be developed?
    Is it clear which elements of science knowledge and understanding will be covered?
    Is the context of the plan accessible, fun and interesting for the children?

Children’s Learning
 Is there an opportunity at the start of the lesson to find out what the children already
     know?
 Have likely misconceptions and alternative frameworks been considered?
 Have the NC statements/Foundation Guidance been turned into clear and realistic
     learning outcomes?
 Are appropriate questions and scientific vocabulary planned for?
 Does the plan support differentiation appropriate to the children concerned?
 Is it clear what will be assessed and how this links with the stated learning outcomes?
 Is there adequate opportunity at the end of the lesson to review and summarise the
     learning?

The Activities
 Is sufficient detail given to make it clear how the activities will be run?
 Do the activities suit the learning outcomes?
 Are the suggested timings likely to be realistic?
 Has safe practice been considered?
 Is it clear what resources are to be used and how they will be organised?
 Does the plan demonstrate the student’s subject knowledge is adequate?


Lesson Observation
Introduction
 Does the student link the lesson to the children’s previous work?
 Are children encouraged to bring their own scientific experiences to the lesson in a
     non-threatening way?
 Are suitable resources and equipment prepared, well organised and efficiently
     presented?
 Does the student show a clear understanding of the science covered?
 Is the students’ language, particularly science language, at an appropriate level for the
     pupils?

Main Activities
   Does the student allow the children appropriate freedom in planning their science
    activities?
   Are opportunities made to allow children to use particular science specific skills? Are
    the children given focused help in developing these skills?




                                              11
    Are productive questions used to move children on in their scientific thinking
     throughout the lesson?
    Do questions encourage pupils to give a variety of responses? Are both open and
     closed questions used?
    Are the children’s scientific responses to questions valued, explored and developed?
    Are the children’s alternative scientific views or misconceptions noticed? Is there a
     response to them?
    Do the children use the scientific equipment appropriately and safely?
    Do the children use science specific language appropriately and with understanding?
    Is the method of recording science appropriate and matched to the children’s abilities
     (English, mathematics and ICT)?

Conclusion
 Do the children evaluate, interpret and share their science findings?
 Is there evidence that the children have made progress in their scientific knowledge
    and skills? Have they achieved the expected science learning outcomes planned for
    that lesson?
 Has the student aroused the children’s interest in science?

Medium Term Plan Discussion
Context
 Is it clear which science skills will be covered?
 Have science skills been sufficiently emphasised and investigative work included?
 Is it clear which elements of science knowledge and understanding will be covered?
 Does the work have appropriate and well-defined cross-curricular links?
 Is the context of the plan accessible and meaningful to the children?
 Is the context of the plan fun and interesting for the children?

Children’s Learning
 Does the plan take account of the children’s previous work?
 Are there activities to establish the children’s current scientific thinking at the start of
     the plan?
 Have likely misconceptions and alternative frameworks been considered?
 Are there clear and appropriate learning objectives?
 Do the objectives show progression in both skills and knowledge and understanding?
 Does the plan support differentiation appropriate to the children concerned?
 Is there adequate formative assessment?
 Is there adequate summative assessment? (Should include evidence gathering.)

The Activities
 Is sufficient detail given to make it clear how the activities will be run?
 Is there a range of teaching styles? Do they best fit the activities?
 Are the suggested timings likely to be realistic?
 Has safe practice been considered?
 Have resources and their availability been checked?
 Does the plan demonstrate the student’s subject knowledge is adequate?


            Indicators of weakness and potential for ‘cause for concern’
We understand that not all the criteria will be met for each lesson. However, the following
aspects of planning and teaching are so central to good science teaching that if a student
teacher fails consistently to show awareness of these issues then they would be a cause for
concern.


                                              12
   Failure to recognise, or teaching of, significant misconceptions;
   Poor subject knowledge and use of scientific vocabulary;
   Over-reliance on didactic teaching, closed questioning, worksheet-based activities etc;
   Unsafe practice or unanticipated safety hazards;
   Failure to use assessment to determine possible misconceptions;
   Failure to plan for significant development of scientific enquiry;
   Content consistently mismatched to children’s age, ability or interests




                                            13
                             What Makes A Good ICT Lesson?
              Checklists To Support Lesson Observations and Target Setting.

    ICT Education tutors at the University of Cumbria have developed these checklists to
    support mentors and link tutors. They draw on their professional experience but have also
    been influenced by ideas about ‘good practice’ derived from TDA, OFSTED, DfES, BECTA
    and other documents.
    The checklists are not exhaustive, nor is it expected that a good lesson will
    necessarily embody all the items listed.
    There are two checklists:
           the first is intended to be used in ICT lessons i.e. where the learning outcomes are
    wholly or mainly concerned with the development of ICT skills rather than subject-based
    outcomes;
           the second is intended to be used in lessons where the role of ICT is primarily to
    support teaching and learning in other subject areas.
    Patterns of delivery of the ICT curriculum vary from school to school. Although ICT is a
    National Curriculum subject in its own right, it may not always be taught as a discrete
    subject. However, planning should always identify where ICT skills are to be taught and
    developed even where this may be in the context of other curriculum areas – it is in these
    situations that the first checklist is appropriate.
    Students should identify opportunities to use ICT throughout their teaching. However, it is
    recognised that ICT resource levels and patterns of organisation vary from school to school
    and so students may be constrained to some extent in how and when they use ICT.
    Judgements on a student’s use of ICT to support subject teaching should be
    made in the context of the level of ICT provision and range of ICT resources
    available.
    The expectation is that students will make use of ICT with individuals, groups and the whole
    class. This implies a variety of approaches which should ideally include the use of ICT as a
    teaching tool with groups or whole classes as well as computers and other resources being
    used independently by individuals, pairs or small groups.




                                                 14
                          What Makes A Good ICT Lesson?
          A Checklist To Support Lesson Observations and Target Setting.

ICT Subject Knowledge and Personal Skills
 Student has a good knowledge and understanding of the National Curriculum
     Programme of Study for ICT.
 Student has a sound understanding of a range of "content-free" applications such as
     word processors, graphics, spreadsheets, databases, Internet browsers and turtle
     graphics
 Student uses ICT confidently and has the technical competence to manage the lesson
     effectively including, if necessary, the ability to adapt activities to meet unplanned
     circumstances.
 Student consistently uses accurate and appropriate ICT terminology.
 Student has a good understanding of Health and Safety (including Internet Safety)
     issues in relation to ICT use.

Planning
 Planning reflects the National Curriculum requirements for ICT.
 ICT lesson planning relates to a medium-term plan for ICT.
 If planning is based on the QCA Scheme of Work, this has been adapted if necessary
     to meet the specific needs of the children and to reflect the particular school context.
 ICT lesson planning makes explicit the ICT concepts or skills to be developed or
     consolidated. Links with other subjects are noted.
 Planned activities are stimulating, challenging and set high but achievable
     expectations.
 ICT learning outcomes are differentiated to take account of children's abilities and
     experience, where possible drawing on available formative assessments.
 Planning indicates clearly how the access to and use of ICT resources will be organised
     and managed, including (if appropriate) how teaching assistants and other adults will
     support children using ICT.
 Planning provides opportunities for both the student and the children to assess
     progress towards learning goals.

Teaching and Classroom Management
 The lesson has a stimulating and motivating introduction which identifies clearly what
     children will learn and sets the learning in context.
 Student provides clear explanations of tasks, making it clear what children will do and
     what they will learn.
 ICT activities use a variety of approaches including individual tasks, paired work and
     collaborative group work.
 ICT activities are stimulating, challenging and imaginative; they are not confined to
     simple text or data entry, nor are they merely on-screen duplicates of paper-based
     activities.
 ICT tasks have a clear and real purpose; there is a context for activities which make
     tasks meaningful for children.
 Challenging tasks encourage children to engage actively with ICT concepts and skills
     and make use of exploration, problem-solving and group discussion to develop
     children’s understanding and competence.
 ICT activities encourage children to be creative and to explore a variety of styles of
     communication and expression.
 ICT activities cater for children with differing needs; for example, children with SEN,
     the more able and children with EAL.



                                             15
    Children are encouraged to become more independent in their use of ICT; they make
     choices about their learning and show initiative in the selection of ICT tools and
     techniques.
    Student uses a range of approaches to support children working on ICT activities
     including personalising learning through individual support and focussed, intensive
     group work.
    If teaching assistants and other adults are used to support children in their use of ICT,
     they have been briefed beforehand and are clear about their roles.
    There is systematic monitoring of children using ICT and teacher intervention where
     appropriate. Dialogue with children reinforces high expectations and encourages
     higher order skills: reflection, evaluation, revision, analysis, interpretation etc.
    Student gathers children together for further support where necessary, either as a
     small group, or as a whole class.
    Student encourages children to share effective practice, to raise questions about ICT
     processes, and ask quality questions e.g. ‘How might we improve...?’
    Children are encouraged to transfer their ICT learning to other contexts both within
     and outside the classroom, for example, when using ICT at home.
    Children are given opportunities to consider their use of ICT, assess its value to their
     work, compare ICT approaches with other methods and relate their experiences to
     uses of ICT in the community.
    An appropriately timed plenary reviews the learning and encourages children to
     evaluate their own progress against the learning outcomes.
In high resource settings (e.g. computer suites or class set of laptops)
      Teaching style and strategies reflect the purpose of the activity. For example, a
       teacher demonstration of a discrete technique might be followed by children
       practising individually, or open-ended exploration of a new piece of software might
       be followed by paired or small group discussion or a short focussed task.
      A range of strategies is used to manage children’s behaviour so that children are
       focussed and attentive during teacher explanations and demonstrations.
In low resource settings (e.g. a small number of classroom computers)
      Teaching style and grouping strategies reflect the purpose of the activity. Practical
       ICT experience will normally necessitate small group or individual work but activities
       should be introduced and discussed in whole class or large group situations.
      Student provides sufficient initial explanation, guidance and resources (e.g. help
       sheets) for children so that they are able to work independently and develop
       autonomy.
      Time is used effectively to provide maximum access to and use of the ICT resources
       available. Clear routines are established for access to computers and other
       resources.
      Children's use of the computer is systematically organised to ensure all children are
       given equal opportunities. For example, a rota system is established or a recording
       sheet near the computer is used to show who has completed an activity. Using ICT
       simply to reward or occupy children who complete other tasks is not appropriate.
      Management routines ensure that grouping, rotas and peer tutoring encourage
       inclusion and equal opportunities. If children are working in groups, they should all
       have active roles.

Assessment and Evaluation
 Assessment for learning approaches are used: there is a shared understanding of
     criteria for assessment.
 Interaction with children is used to assess progress, check understanding and to
     encourage children to evaluate their own work.


                                              16
   Observation and discussion with children is used to complement product based
    assessment, especially where children have been paired or grouped for activities.
   Student provides sensitive, constructive feedback to children engaged in ICT activities
    both verbally during the lesson and, if appropriate, via written comments following the
    lesson.
   Where appropriate the student is able to accurately assess children's work against
    National Curriculum level descriptions, identifying and recording levels of attainment
    exhibited.
   Effective use of ICT tools such as spreadsheets is made to support assessment and
    record keeping.
   Student’s evaluations identifies areas in which their own ICT knowledge might develop
    in order that learning outcomes might be better addressed.

           Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
   The explanation of ICT tasks is minimal and lacking in clarity so that children are
    unsure what they are doing and unable to work independently.
   ICT activities consist largely of low-level tasks such as text/data entry or ‘copying up’
    previously done work and reproducing it in electronic form.
   ICT tasks are contrived and have no clear purpose or context. Children are unclear
    why they are doing the work.
   ICT resources are not managed effectively so that children have inadequate or
    unequal access to ICT opportunities.
   Student is unable to respond to ICT questions raised by children.
   Technical problems with ICT arise as a result of resources not being checked in
    advance of the lesson.
   ICT activities are not monitored effectively. (At worst, the computer area becomes a
    ‘teacher free zone’.)




                                             17
                  Using ICT to Support Teaching and Learning
                in Other Subjects - What Makes a Good Lesson?
          A Checklist to Support Lesson Observations and Target Setting

ICT Subject Knowledge and Personal Skills
 Student uses ICT confidently in the classroom and is able to adapt activities to meet
     unplanned circumstances.
 Student is aware of the key characteristics of ICT (speed, automatic functions,
     capacity and range, interactivity, ease of editing) and how these can support inclusion
     and learning in core/main subjects.
 Student is able to identify hardware, software, CD-ROMs and websites suitable for
     learners.
 Accurate and appropriate ICT terminology is used with the children.

Planning
 The ICT activities planned are in accord with accepted ideas of ‘good practice’ in the
     subject area which is supported.
 Lesson plans identify clear and precise subject-based learning outcomes and the ICT
     provides direct support for these.
 ICT use is linked clearly to medium term plans rather than being planned on an ‘ad
     hoc’ basis. Ideally, medium-term planning should identify a range of possible ICT
     activities from which students select.
 Planning takes account of the ICT skills required by the children to engage with the
     ICT activity planned. The skill level required is appropriate in relation to the
     age/ability of the children.
 Planning indicates clearly how the access to and use of ICT resources will be organised
     and managed, including (if appropriate) how teaching assistants and other adults will
     support children using ICT.

Teaching and Classroom Management
 The use of ICT in the lesson clearly supports, enhances or extends learning: it allows
     the student or the child to achieve something that could not be achieved without it; or
     allows the student to teach or the children to learn something more effectively and
     efficiently.
 Children employ ICT to reach beyond the classroom and gain access to experiences,
     information or resources in ways that are not possible with other media.
 Student makes it clear to children why ICT is being used and compares ICT
     approaches with other methods.
 Time is used effectively to provide maximum access to and use of the ICT resources
     available. Clear routines are established for access to computers and other resources.
 ICT use caters for children with differing needs; for example, children with SEN, the
     more able and children with EAL.
 ICT activities are stimulating, challenging and imaginative; they are not confined to
     simple text or data entry, nor are they merely on-screen duplicates of paper-based
     activities.
 ICT activities make use of appropriate software and resources which have been well
     chosen to meet the specific needs of the children and the learning outcomes of the
     lesson. e.g. suitable web-based material has been selected and, if appropriate,
     modified to fit the lesson objectives and context.
 If the student is using ICT resources which they have created themselves, appropriate
     software has been chosen to develop the resource and it has been designed in ways
     which support or enhance the learning.



                                             18
    Where possible, the school’s VLE/learning platform has been used to facilitate access
     to resources beyond the lesson.
    If teaching assistants and other adults are used to support children in their use of ICT,
     they have been briefed beforehand and are clear about their roles.
    Student provides sufficient initial explanation, guidance and resources (e.g. help
     sheets) for children so that they are able to work independently.
    There is systematic monitoring of children using ICT and teacher intervention where
     appropriate. Dialogue with children reinforces high expectations and encourages
     higher order skills: reflection, evaluation, revision, analysis, interpretation etc.
    Student provides sensitive, constructive feedback to children engaged in ICT activities
     both verbally during the lesson and, if appropriate, via written comments following the
     lesson.

Assessment and Evaluation
 Interaction with children is used to assess progress, check understanding and to
     encourage children to evaluate their own work.
 Assessment focuses on subject-based learning outcomes, not on the way that ICT may
     have enhanced the presentation of work.
 Effective use of ICT tools such as spreadsheets is made to support assessment and
     record keeping.
 In evaluations student critically considers the role of ICT in achieving, or failing to
     achieve, the objectives of the learning activity.
 Student identifies areas in which their own ICT knowledge might develop in order that
     learning outcomes might be better addressed.

            Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
    Planning (overall) does not identify opportunities for ICT use.
    ICT use is largely ‘ad hoc’, unplanned or is simply a ‘bolt-on’ to the main lesson
     activities.
    ICT is used simply to reward or occupy children who have completed other tasks.
    The explanation of ICT tasks is minimal and lacking in clarity so that children are
     unable to work independently.
    ICT activities consist largely of low-level tasks such as text/data entry or ‘copying up’
     previously done work and reproducing it in electronic form.
    ICT activities derived uncritically from CD-ROMs or websites are not well matched to
     the needs of specific children or to the lesson learning outcomes.
    Choice of software for ICT activities is poor, reflecting a lack of knowledge of
     appropriate primary ICT applications.
    The ICT skill level required for the activity is unrealistic in relation to the age/ability of
     the children and they are unable to engage with the task without significant,
     unplanned, adult support.
    Student is unable to respond to ICT questions raised by children.
    Technical problems with ICT arise as a result of resources not being checked in
     advance of the lesson.
    ICT activities are not monitored effectively. (At worst, the computer area becomes a
     ‘teacher free zone’.)




                                                19
                          What Makes A Good RE Lesson?
              A Checklist To Support Observations and Target Setting.

Planning
 Is explicitly planned to take account of Local Agreed Syllabus or Diocesan Guidelines
     requirements
 Has clear learning objectives;
 Indicates the balance between AT1 and AT2;
 Identifies key terms/vocabulary/questions;
 Identifies what different groups will learn as appropriate to ability and learning needs
     and specifically caters for individual needs, e.g. EAL, SEN;
 Indicates cross-curricular links where appropriate eg PSHE, Citizenship, SMSC etc
 In the case of cross-curricular learning – ensures that the key questions/concepts are
     well grounded in RE terms and not built on spurious links eg Noah’s Ark is not a
     suitable story for a topic on water.
 Is carefully tailored to the key stage/age/ability range and the learning needs of the
     pupils;
 Is linked to medium term plans that ensure continuity and progression and building on
     previous learning;
 Identifies opportunities for assessment – bot h as they teach as well as for more
     formal assessment
 Picks up on issues identified in previous evaluations or in the light of assessment of
     pupils’ learning;
 Demonstrates appropriate structure/timing within each stage of the lesson;
 Indicates effective preparation for use of adult support;
 Takes account of different learning styles;
 Specifically caters for individual needs, e.g. EAL, SEN;
 Takes into account the varying interests and experiences of all learners, including SEN
     and EAL, gifted and talented, etc.
 Takes account of the faith backgrounds of pupils where appropriate eg does the plan
     avoid asking Muslim pupils to role play Muhammad or does the planning for the story
     of Holy week consider the feelings of the Jewish pupils in the class?

The Lesson Itself demonstrates:
 Clear starter which makes objectives explicit, meaningful and purposeful, including
     reference to previous learning and appropriate use of subject specific terminology and
     religious vocabulary that is faith specific;
 A good pace to stimulate and motivate and when appropriate, time for
     reflection/stillness/quiet time;
 Opportunities to ‘pick up’ on misconceptions or unhelpful responses in the case of
     sensitive issues eg in relation to religious belief/practice - and use them as
     opportunities for learning in the session;
 Use of appropriate resources for engaging and involving all children, e.g. religious
     artefacts, visual aids, visitors from faith communities and effective use of other
     resources including ICT;
 Readiness to employ a range of teaching and learning strategies and an interactive
     approach including collaborative work/ problem solving/ investigation/ role-play/
     creative work/ stilling/ meditation/ etc.
 Use of a range of questioning techniques, including why/how questions which take
     account of what the children think and provide opportunity for drawing on their
     experiences and reflections;




                                            20
    A readiness to employ the different approaches to learning in RE eg. experiential,
     ethnographic, concept cracking, and the philosophy for children or community of
     enquiry approach.
    Effective development of meaningful cross curricular links where appropriate;
    Develops skills such as interpretation, application and enquiry as well as knowledge
     and understanding;
    Develops religious vocabulary and correct use of terminology;
    Reflects a balance between AT1 and AT2;

Plenary
 Returns to the learning objectives, reinforces key concepts and vocabulary of the
     lesson and gives pupils a sense of achievement and direction – looking forward where
     appropriate to the next lesson;

Assessment and Evaluation
 Focuses on learning and relates clearly to the learning outcomes/objectives;
 Includes a range of appropriate strategies;
 Is systematic and manageable as well as inclusive;
 Takes account of the needs of particular children, inc SEN and EAL, G and T and pupils
     of different faiths and cultural backgrounds – eg does not ask a Muslim to draw a
     picture of Jesus;
 Is used to inform action;
 Planning for assessment in the longer term shows awareness of the National
     Framework for Religious Education levels/expectations;

            Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
    Poor expectations in terms of learning;
    Evidence of misconceptions or failure to pick up misconceptions/unhelpful or
     insensitive responses in pupils;
    Poorly matched and poorly differentiated planning and teaching;
    Focus on management rather than learning;
    Lack of awareness of learning styles/interests/religious backgrounds etc;
    Didactic, unvaried approach, e.g. over reliance on teacher talk, worksheets etc;
    Lack of attempt to contextualise learning and make it meaningful and purposeful;
    Lack of focused assessment, record keeping and evaluation;
    Inadequate feed back to pupils (oral and written);
    Lack of reflection and analysis;
    Poor expectations in terms of behaviour etc
    Poor subject knowledge
    Emphasis on AT1 and failure to grasp AT2
    Limited resources, ineffective use of resources, insensitive use of religious artefacts;
    Lack of awareness of the danger of reinforcing stereotypes in RE;
    Meaningless or inappropriate cross curricular links – eg the story of the flood does not
     fit withcross curricular work on water
    Failure to motivate or stimulate the pupils and failure to relate the content of the
     lesson to the pupils’ experience or interests.




                                             21
                          What Makes A Good Art Lesson?
              A Checklist To Support Observations and Target Setting.

Planning/teaching
 Is imaginative, purposeful and linked to a progressive scheme of work, which allows
     for a variety of outcomes
 is continuously modified, based upon lesson analysis, and reflects an integrated
     approach to the different elements of the curriculum
 demonstrates high expectations, appropriate to the identified level of conceptual
     understanding and ability range of the children
 demonstrates sensitive and insightful comprehension of the nature of Art and Design
     education, and its appropriate cross-curricular links (taking into account particular
     opportunities for links with SMSC and citizenship)
 focuses on process as much as end-product, encouraging the inclusion of all members
     of the group
 demonstrates the ability to make use of an imaginative and appropriate range of
     teaching approaches (including ICT), which motivate and stimulate curiosity and
     enthusiasm in children
 includes the thoughtful organisation of the classroom and materials to make best use
     of the space available, facilitating the progression of children within a safe and
     stimulating environment
 includes the creation of a reflective and engaging atmosphere, which allows frequent
     and appropriate discussion, valuing the individual approaches of the children
 includes ample time for a plenary in which children will have the opportunity to
     celebrate their work and share it with their peers
 includes the use of appropriate art vocabulary to extend the conceptual understanding
     of the children
 includes the appropriate use/choice of artists and artefacts to enrich the learning
     experience of the children
 shows involvement of support staff in the planning and expected support within the
     lessons

Assessment
 is seen as an integral part of the planning process, based on the aims and objectives
     of the schemes of work
 shows the ability to identify appropriate assessment (both formative and summative)
     and recording criteria (making use of National Curriculum criteria) and use them in a
     systematic way to inform future planning and to monitor progression, continuity and
     inclusion
 demonstrates confidence in the use of the above to form a basis for constructive and
     informative feedback to children, colleagues and parents

            Indicators of weaknesses and potential causes for concern
    there is little evidence of lessons being linked to a progressive scheme of work
    there is little evidence of reflection on the lessons taught
    expectations are not high and planning does not reflect an understanding of the
     conceptual level of the children
    cross-curricular links are not exploited
    the end-product is focused upon, with little emphasis on the learning take place during
     the process of working
    the range of teaching methods is limited and inappropriate
    ICT is not used appropriately nor imaginatively


                                            22
   the organisation of the classroom and materials has not been thought-out/prepared
   the teaching environment does not allow for discussion and reflection
   there is no plenary in which to discuss the achievements/findings of the children
   appropriate art vocabulary has not been used
   support staff have not been involved in any meaningful way with the planning or
    support of the children
   there is no evidence of the use of a variety of methods of assessment




                                          23
              What Makes A Good Design & Technology Lesson?
              A Checklist To Support Observations and Target Setting.

Planning and Teaching

    there is good evidence of setting clearly defined learning objectives based on sound
     and appropriate medium term plans ensuring progression and continuity
    it is imaginative, engaging and purposeful, building on the children’s previous
     learning
    demonstrates high expectations, appropriate to the identified range of levels of
     conceptual development and understanding
    demonstrates a sensitive and enabling understanding of, and attitude towards, the
     essential nature of Design and Technology
    actively fosters the development of a D&T Capability
    identifies and addresses the particular needs for inclusivity and individuality, eg; SEN,
     A&G, G&T,EAL and ECM
    focuses on the process skills and not solely the end-product
    demonstrates the ability to make good use of an appropriate range of teaching
     approaches, including ICT, that motivate and enthuse the children
    includes an intelligent organisation of the room, the resources and the materials, so as
     to maximise the value of the time and space. Ensuring a safe and healthy working
     environment
    fostering a cooperative and considerate climate where autonomous problem solving is
     encouraged and can flourish
    appropriate cross-curricular links are exploited, including to PSHE&C
    includes the effective use of appropriate vocabulary specific to the subject, by both the
     adult and the child
    time is provided for evaluations and an effective plenary that reinforces the key
     learning points and indicates the direction of future work
    support staff are fully integrated within the whole experience, they share the learning
     objectives and are prepared so as to work effectively with their children.

Assessment
 has a clear understanding of what constitutes a developing D&T Capability
 assessment is seen as an integral part of the planning process, based on the aims and
     objectives of the schemes of work
 shows the ability to identify appropriate assessment and recording criteria, and to use
     them in a systematic way so as to inform future planning and to monitor progression,
     continuity and inclusion
 demonstrates confidence in the use of the above to form the basis for constructive
     and informative feedback to the children, the parents and colleagues

              Indicators of weakness and potential cause for concern
    there is little evidence of lessons being planned appropriately, as part of a unit of work
    there is little evidence of the children being challenged
    the lesson appears to have been lifted from some published source without the
     appropriate interpretation
    expectations are too low and indicate a lack of awareness of the actual capacity of the
     children
    cross-curricula links remain unexploited
    there is a lack of provision for SEN, A&G, G&T or EAL pupils
    the teacher has dominated the discussions


                                              24
   the has been excessive emphasis upon the completion of the end product rather than
    the learning process
   the range of teaching methods employed has been limited and/or inappropriate
   ICT has either been used inappropriately, or not at all
   the organisation and management of the classroom has been ineffective and/or unsafe
   the working environment has discouraged independence of dialogue or design
   appropriate D&T vocabulary was absent
   there was a lack of evidence of appropriate assessment strategies support staff were
    under-utilised




                                          25
                        What Makes a Good Drama Lesson?
              A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.

Professional attributes
Students will…
 reflect on their practice;
 be creative and critical in approach to drama, integral to the subject;
 act on advice and feedback about their drama practice;
 demonstrate by using role themselves the value and commitment to the subject;

Professional Knowledge and Understanding
The student should demonstrate the ability to employ subject knowledge of the art form so
that…
 making of drama is effective for the class;
 relating drama to enable learning in
               drama as a subject in its own right
               across the wider curriculum:
               for oracy & literacy
               for social learning (PSHE)
 strategies are used appropriately, e.g. thought-tracking at a moment where the
     thoughts of a role are important;
 the spectra of movement & stillness, light & dark, sound & silence are employed
     effectively;
 use of language, verbal and non-verbal is understood by the class;
 Appropriate signing and symbolism are used;

The student should demonstrate the ability to employ subject knowledge of Teacher-in-Role
by…
 adopting and sustaining a role effectively herself to build a productive dialogue with
     the class.
 adopting the appropriate Role(s) for promoting the Drama and correctly using the
     status/ behaviour of that Role(s);
 responding in Role to promote reflection, e.g. "I wonder why we should do that?"
 properly communicating going in and out of Role by the use of appropriate signifiers
     and clarity in setting up how the drama will work;
 working in a role similar to the children and operating with them to model what is
     wanted in terms of language at any point;
 adopting a challenging role to elicit specific role play responses;
 showing knowledge of the range of Speaking and Listening demands possible.

The student should demonstrate knowledge and skills in assessment and monitoring by…
 showing awareness of what is happening in the drama and promoting clear
     development;
 stopping work to reflect appropriately on the learning;
 keeping running records of individuals’ contributions outside of the drama.
 using drama to promote written outcomes that demonstrate learning of individuals;

Students should reflect understanding of achievement and diversity by…
 using an appropriate range of drama strategies and approaches to enable different
     learning styles to feeling successful;

    planning for inclusivity by using role to ‘give a voice’ to a variety of viewpoints;



                                               26
Professional Skills - Planning & Teaching
The student should demonstrate the ability to…

plan effectively by:
 setting clearly defined objectives based on sound medium term plans and building on
      children’s previous learning through drama lesson evaluations;
 setting high expectations for pupils’ learning and setting assessment indicators that
      describe their learning;
 choosing significant material and focusing it well in the choice of roles for the children
      and for the teacher;
 structuring the work effectively, selecting appropriate drama strategies and techniques
      for the material and the pupils;
 building in constraints that define and focus the drama, limitations on the options
      possible;
 building into the structure opportunities for pupils to invest in and embellish the
      content of the drama through their ideas and understanding without detracting from
      the central learning intentions;
 giving the class appropriate roles and viewpoints for the planned learning objectives;

operate effectively for teaching by…
 taking appropriate teacher/ leader role, to enable an effective working environment at
     all times, starting effectively and pacing well;
 maintaining a level of commitment and seriousness to the task that encourages pupils
     to mirror the teacher's behaviour;
 enhance the learning by reflecting effectively both in role and out of role;
 structuring learning possibilities from outside the drama, e.g. setting tasks, reviewing
     work in progress with the whole group or sub-groups, looking at outcomes of tasks
     with the group, discussing possible decisions, choices or outcomes as they occur in the
     drama;
 knowing when it is appropriate to allow the children to make decisions and when the
     teacher must decide and define;
 using appropriate forms of verbal and non-verbal communication;
 managing the creative responses of the children to enhance the Drama
 creating tension, challenging thinking, raising expectations.

Structure the drama to enable listening and speaking by…
 signalling the importance of the contribution of a quiet child who might not usually
      offer ideas in front of other pupils;
 reinforcing the need to listen to each other;

Control the drama effectively by…
 contracting the use of drama, its rules and structures;
 creating a very good relationship with the class through the drama, making clear
     expectations through making explicit consequences of actions and being consistent in
     responses.
 valuing the contributions of pupils and generating a culture of support to ideas and
     possibilities
 raising interest, using role or stimulus material to produce tension, e.g. highlighting a
     danger the children had not seen, producing news in speech or in the form of a letter;
 contracting and, if necessary, the re-contracting of the use of space, with high
     expectations and giving positive affirmation of the pupils throughout the work, to
     include everyone.



                                             27
    making explicit the conventions and rules of drama so that pupils not only learn about
     how drama works but also feel secure in their knowledge of teacher expectations;
    understanding whenever drama is not working and can take the right action.

Initiate an idea at a point where focus is needed by…
 picking up on a child's point and directing the Drama so that the most is made of the
       situation;
 picking up children's signals and responding appropriately;
 following through valuably the consequences of decisions made;
 closing down an unprofitable direction;
 listening intently to the ideas and viewpoints offered by pupils.


           Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
A student will demonstrate behaviours such as…
 lack of awareness of how to create opportunities to teach using drama:
           as an art form,
           across the curriculum,
           for oracy & literacy,
           for social learning (PSHE);
 setting objectives, but without proper focus;
 lack of ability to contract properly for control and shaping of the lesson;
 understanding the need to communicate drama concepts and skills but lacking the
     proper knowledge of them;
 not listening to the pupils very carefully;
 not planning the spaces for pupils ideas but dominating with the teachers agenda to
     the exclusion of the pupils’ responses;
 not moving from the particular to illustrate and examine the universal;
 failing to use Teacher in Role handle it properly promote the children's involvement;
 lacking confidence in use of drama strategies;
 failing to reflect on the drama process with any consistency either in or out of role;
 recording pupils' achievements either not at all or with lack of understanding;
 not giving proper feed-back to pupils in and out of the drama;
 showing lack of proper contracting of the use of space and lack of clear expectations
     in drama;
 not seeing when drama is not working and failing to stop to exam the issues that need
     to be resolved;
 beginning to develop a relationship with the children but not enhance it effectively
     through drama




                                            28
                    What Makes a Good Geography Lesson?
              A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.
Enquiry
 Uses and develops enquiry skills in structured and progressive plans
 Recognises the importance of, and makes opportunities for, questioning in lessons.
 Uses place as a context to develop both skills and knowledge
 Extends enquiry over several lessons based on key questions an using a variety of
     approaches

Lesson Delivery
 Conveys enthusiasm for the subject
 Able to use a range of lesson stimuli with resources including the outdoor environment
     and ICT
 Recognition of key geographical concepts
 Uses strategies for differentiation which engage children at a number of levels.

The Wider Curriculum
 Identifies opportunities to develop understanding of interrelationships between
     geography and the wider curriculum including citizenship.
 Demonstrates an understanding of good cross-curricular planning such that the
     subjects rigour is maintained alongside appropriate themes
 Looks for opportunities to link the local to the global
 Where QCA units are used they are clearly developed to account for context and for
     other subjects being taught.

            Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential Cause for Concern
Enquiry
 An over reliance on teacher centred provision of knowledge
 Evidence of misconceptions or failure to pick up misconceptions in pupils
 Assessment of children’s geographical skills tends to be based on their writing or
     drawing ability

Lesson Delivery
 Teaches in a manner which demonstrates lack of enthusiasm or dislike of the subject
 Fails to take advice from those with subject responsibility and expertise in geography.
 Demonstrates inaccuracies /misconceptions in subject knowledge to the extent that it
     specifically reduces quality of learning

The Wider Curriculum
 Lack of attempt to contextualise learning and make it meaningful and purposeful
 Little awareness of the integrating potential of geography
 Subject rigour lost through vague or inadequate lesson objectives.




                                           29
                    What Makes a Good History Lesson?
          A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.

Planning
 Is confident in constructing imaginative schemes of work
 Is aware of the varied requirements of the National curriculum and is able to
     plan appropriate links to other subject areas
 Has clear objectives for lessons but may also seize opportunities to go beyond
     these objectives
 Has planned for a creative approach
 Is aware of the cultural context of the periods studied
 Has conducted formative assessment and is aware of the current
     understanding of learners

Development of Skills
 Has high expectations based on pupils’ previous learning
 Uses personal subject knowledge to inspire and challenge pupils
 Utilises a range of interactive strategies designed to promote learners’ historical
     skills and conceptual understanding
 Bases these strategies, where possible, on evidence-based tasks
 Is able to pick up on learners’ misconceptions to develop understanding
 Uses an appropriate historical vocabulary
 Conveys a sense of the drama and emotion inherent in the subject
 Is able to use analogy to relate the present to the past
 Creates a link between the people and periods studied and the personal
     experiences of the learner

Assessment and Evaluation
 Is able to adjust and modify tasks to ensure all children are challenged
 Identifies tasks appropriate for assessment purposes
 Encourages children by providing constructive and positive responses

          Indicators of Weakness and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
    Does not have adequate historical knowledge and may therefore mislead pupils
    May reinforce rather than unravel misconceptions
    Uses a limited and/or inappropriate range of resources
    Lacks an understanding of the range and types of evidence available
    Is not using a sufficiently creative approach to the subject
    Lacks an understanding of the key historical skills and concepts basic to the
     subject
    Concentrates on subject content rather than developing understanding
    Provides little opportunity for pupils to be physically and mentally involved in
     their learning
    Provides little opportunity for pupils to express their interest, enthusiasm and
     newly acquired learning




                                         30
           What makes a good Modern Foreign Language lesson?
            A checklist to support observations and target setting

Planning
     Shows precise – and possibly differentiated - learning objectives; those
       learning objectives may be linguistic, cultural, attitudinal or strategic or a
       combination of all of these; expectations are high but realistic;
     Identifies how those learning objectives will be met (nature of activities) and
       how pupils’ learning will be assessed; focuses on progression and avoids the
       plateau effect; where possible, planning includes references to other subject
       areas (including citizenship and the international dimension);
     Lists all language to be recycled and / or taught, including the language of
       interaction and routine language;
     Demonstrates good subject knowledge by identifying expected
       misconceptions and likely difficulties;
     Addresses, in medium term plans, the need to develop pupils’ oracy and
       literacy skills, their knowledge about language and their intercultural
       understanding as per the KS2 Framework;
     Lesson planning takes into account previous learning, fits into medium term
       planning and makes reference to the KS2 Framework as well as the
       recommended Scheme of Work for Key Stage 2;
     Caters for different learning styles and for different abilities and backgrounds
       (SEN, G&T, EAL…);
     Is structured so as to offer a variety of modes of working (teacher-led, pair /
       group work / independent study) and has realistic timings;
     Demonstrates on-going evaluation which informs future planning.

Context – setting / Recycling
    Engages pupils’ attention and curiosity, makes them speculate or guess new
       topic;
    Enables recycling of previous structures and drip-feeding of new ones.

Routines
    Introduction and development fit into medium-term planning but trainee
       demonstrates the ability to exploit unexpected ‘linguistic events’;
    Show potential (in their vocabulary or grammatical structure) for some future
       inter-linking with topical language;
    Are carefully selected so as to provoke pupils’ reactions / opinions (e.g.
       language of disagreement, language of justification, of error-spotting and
       correcting…).

Resources
    Are varied and engaging over the course of medium term plan;
    Cater for different learning styles (e.g. visual support, tactile material, use of
      classroom lay out or wall space linked to grammatical concepts, use of
      consistent mimes or gestures to indicate structures, etc.);
    Make wise use of ICT;
    Bring in an authentic cultural dimension to the learning (use of video-
      conferencing, realia, letters from exchange schools, etc.).




                                          31
Delivery
     Vocabulary is introduced within a stem / structure and not in isolation, the
       trainee has carefully judged the number of items that can be introduced
       within a lesson and paid attention to potential misconceptions or phonological
       difficulties;
     The use of the target language is generally appropriate, carefully prepared
       and supported by a variety of techniques to get the message across;
     Pupils’ use of the target language with the teacher and with each other is
       continuously encouraged, promoted and engineered through the use of
       routines and / or team competitions;
     Manner of delivery is engaging and lively, pace is maintained throughout,
       delivery involves all pupils in guessing and extrapolating what new language
       may mean and how it links in with previously taught language; it models and
       encourages the use of language learning strategies;
     Care is taken to vary the modes of working and to monitor and engage all
       pupils in pairs, groups, as a whole class or individually;
     The nature of activities corresponds to the learning objectives and helps
       assess whether pupils’ have achieved them (i.e. they contain a diagnostic
       element);
     Activities contain elements of Challenge, Relevance to pupils’ lives, a sense of
       Audience in order to make them more communicative and motivational, are
       Purposeful in pupils’ eyes, Personal and with an element of Incentive to
       invite pupils to take part (Crappi);
     In medium term plans, activities show potential to be multi-skilled so as to
       promote pupils’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.

Assessment and Evaluation
    Demonstrates an understanding of what constitutes language competence
      and progression;
    Is manageable and able to highlight cases of children not achieving or
      achieving beyond expected levels;
    Demonstrates that a range of assessment strategies have been used and that
      a range of skills and understandings have been assessed; understands that
      assessment should not necessarily be taken to mean ‘test’ and can be
      delivered through projects;
    Fits in with school’s practice and policy and is also informed by the European
      Portfolio and the Languages Ladder;
    Is seen as an integral part of the planning process and is therefore used to
      inform and / or amend future planning, monitor progression and inclusion;
    Forms the basis of constructive and informative feedback to children, parents
      and colleagues, in line with school policy.

         Indicators of weaknesses and potential ‘cause for concern’
    Subject knowledge is not secure, trainee makes mistakes in the use of target
     language or fails to spot and correct pupils’ errors; accent and pronunciation
     is so weak as to be detrimental to children’s phonological mastery of the
     target language;
    The use of the target language by the trainee is not thought through, the
     trainee struggles to make him/herself comprehensible, fails to use other
     techniques to get the message across and resorts to code-switching;




                                         32
 The use of the target language by pupils is not encouraged, pupils are asked
  to understand but not produce the language nor use it to interact with their
  peers; trainee may tend to dominate the interaction;
 Cultural element perpetuates clichés and stereotypes and fails to invite pupils
  to explore their own culturally-biased environment;
 Tasks do not match learning objectives and are selected for their potential to
  be fun rather than on the basis of their pedagogical merits; there is little
  evidence of progression over the course of medium term planning;
 Delivery is monotonous, teaching is one-dimensional and does not cater for
  different learning styles, activities are not ‘crappi’ nor suitable and pupils are
  disengaged;
 Lesson fails to promote learning, pupils are not invited to think about the
  language, spot patterns, extrapolate the use of structures across contexts or
  reflect on their learning, children remain intellectually passive, activities may
  be enjoyable but cognitively undemanding;
 Trainee fails to evaluate lesson or trusts impressions rather than conducts a
  systematic review of pupils’ learning.




                                       33
                     What Makes a Good Music Lesson?
           A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.

General indicators of successful music-making
A successful teacher of music…
 Establishes clear guidelines for stopping and starting
 Understands and can demonstrate the musical concepts being taught
 Creates ‘listening quality’ in the classroom before rushing into any practical
     work
 Adopts a clear speaking voice for delivery of instructions and information
 Balances the activities of performing, composing, listening and appraising over
     a series of lessons
 Uses demonstration before the children are asked to perform a task
 Starts with simple activities first; looking to build confidence and skill through
     these
 Often uses ‘warm-up’ at the beginning of a session, (e.g. voices, physical
     activities, instrumental skills, clapping)
 Values different approaches, cultures, and abilities
 Uses a mixture of small group, whole class, and where appropriate, individual
     activities
 Encourages creativity
 Uses effective questioning to extend children’s understanding and address
     misconceptions
 Uses differentiation where appropriate
 Develops opportunities for cross curricular work
 Makes effective use of an appropriate range of observation, assessment,
     monitoring and recording strategies

In instrumental work, depending on the level, the teacher…
 Establishes ground rules for using instruments
 Encourages children to use the correct names for instruments, and to adopt
      suitable methods of playing them
 Will not be in a hurry to progress to instrumental work too soon and will lay
      down firm expectations, making sure that basic skills have been developed first
 Encourages the use of varied dynamics, textures and timbres etc in activities,
      according to the musical outcome sought
 Keeps the children actively involved
 Keeps sessions dynamic and lively

In vocal work, the teacher…
 Uses song material which is both familiar and unfamiliar to the children
 ‘Counts in’ at the beginning of a piece/song. Gives a starting note
 Introduces new songs carefully, with repetition, paying attention to length
     (duration) of notes, ends and beginnings of words and, in particular,
     characteristic or particularly featured rhythms and dynamics

Assessment, when employed should arise out of the activity itself and not be the
prime focus of the activity. Assessment in music should take into account the
skill/knowledge development from an individual’s starting point.




                                         34
        Indicators of Weakness and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
   There is little evidence of lessons being linked to musical concepts, or the
    musical concepts are clearly not understood
   Subject knowledge is not secure
   Appropriate musical vocabulary is not used
   Children’s misconceptions are not addressed
   The range of teaching methods is limited and inappropriate to the subject
   There is little variety of pace/content/material through the lesson or in a group
    of music sessions as a whole
   Poor classroom/behaviour management leads to inappropriate use of
    instruments or voices
   Expectations are not high and planning does not reflect an understanding of
    the conceptual level of the children
   Reflection and self-evaluation are not present or poorly developed
   Assessment fails to recognise the individual’s acquisition of skills/knowledge




                                         35
             What Makes a Good Physical Education Lesson?
           A Checklist to Support Observations and Target Setting.

Planning
 Is explicitly planned to take account of NC requirements and the specific needs
     of the pupils;
 Is linked to medium term plans that ensure effective progression and
     continuity;
 Identifies opportunities for assessment;
 Picks up on issues identified in previous evaluations/assessments;
 Demonstrates appropriate structure within each stage of the lesson, including
     the use of adult support;
 Takes account of health and safety issues and organisation;
 Takes account of different learning styles and potential for cross-curricular
     learning;
 Specifically caters for individual needs, e.g. SEN;
 Takes into account the varying aptitudes and experiences of all learners,
     including SEN, gifted and talented, etc.

Introduction/Warm up
 Clear start, which makes objectives explicit, meaningful and purposeful,
      including reference to previous learning and appropriate use of subject specific
      terminology;
 Demonstrates enthusiasm, promoting a positive attitude towards exercise;
 Gives clear expectations for behaviour and safety;
 Gradual build up of pace to increase pulse rate, followed by appropriate
      stretching and mobilising exercises;
 Clear link made between warm up activity and development of skills.

Development of Skills
 Sets high expectations, objectives made explicit and connections with previous
     lessons/learning established;
 An interactive approach which engages and involves all the children, using clear
     instruction, demonstration and a range of questioning techniques, and
     awareness of safety issues;
 Clear evidence of the four aspects of progression; Acquiring and Developing
     Skills, Selecting and Applying Skills, Tactics and Compositional Ideas,
     Evaluating and Improving Performance, Knowledge and Understanding of
     Fitness and Health;
 Encourages good spatial awareness;
 Appropriate pace;
 Clear progression of skills and development of individual, pair and group work
     in that order;
 Variety in tasks and resources to meet individual needs;
 Use of cross curricular links, where appropriate;

Cool Down/Plenary
 Safe management of equipment and clearing away;
 Clear physical cool down/calming exercises;
 Review of objectives and reinforcement of key concepts, vocabulary etc - uses
     misconceptions and targeted key questions as teaching;


                                          36
    Used as a basis from which to take learning forward in the next lesson;

Assessment and Evaluation
 Uses good observation to give immediate and positive feedback;
 Is able to adjust and modify tasks to ensure appropriate challenge for all
     children;
 Identifies target pupils/group for formal assessment;
 Demonstrates knowledge of level descriptors and can apply appropriately;
 Is used to inform future targets;

        Indicators of Weaknesses and Potential ‘Cause for Concern’
    Does not have adequate Physical Education subject knowledge;
    Has limited understanding of progression in planning and teaching;
    Has poor understanding of how to establish a safe and purposeful learning
     environment;
    Sets low expectations in terms of learning and behaviour;
    Sets poor role model, in terms of dress, attitude and active participation during
     lesson;
    Inadequate knowledge and awareness of health and safety, poor management
     of space, pupils and equipment;
    Rarely uses cross-curricular links;
    Poor understanding of physical maturation, aptitudes, inclusion and equal
     opportunities;
    Evidence of misconceptions or failure to pick up misconceptions in pupils;
    Inadequate feed back to pupils (oral and written);
    Demonstrates little or no knowledge of assessment and reporting
     requirements;
    Lack of reflection and analysis.




                                          37
                            Section 2
   Assessing the Standards ~
     Generic Grading Grids

The grids in this section are arranged with groupings of standards that reflect
the way that University of Cumbria placements are conceived. Accordingly, the
standards are arranged into the following groupings:

Professional Attributes (Q1-Q9)
Professional Skills: Team Working & Collaboration (Q32-Q33)
Professional Knowledge & Understanding (Q10-Q15 & Q17-Q21)
Professional Skills: Planning (Q22-Q24)
Professional Skills: Teaching (Q25a-d) & Learning Environment (Q30-Q31)
Professional Skills: Assessment, Monitoring & Giving Feedback (Q26-Q28) &
    Reviewing Teaching & Learning (Q29)


Standard Q16 is not included here - it refers specifically to student teachers’
need to have passed the professional skills tests in numeracy, literacy and ICT
to achieve QTS.




                                    38
                                                             PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES (Q1 - Q9 of the QTS Standards)
                                                        Very Good                Good                     Satisfactory                                                                      Unsatisfactory
                                                         GRADE 1                GRADE 2                    GRADE 3                                                                            GRADE 4
                                           In addition to                                    Consistently                              Regularly                                    Rarely
This standard is demonstrated:                 Conscientiously                              Independently                             Sometimes with a teacher’s support           Generally with a teacher’s support
                                               Imaginatively                                Carefully                                 With developing confidence                   With difficulty
                                               Creatively                                   Thoughtfully

                                                                                        When assessing student teachers’ professional attributes you should consider:

Relationships with children and
young people Q1-2
Q1 By having high expectations of all              How effectively has the student used Assessment for Learning, to identify how they will address learners’ needs? Do the selected classroom resources
pupils enabling them to achieve their              indicate that diversity is valued and that the student is sensitive to the needs of their pupils? Do their lessons motivate pupils and encourage them to
full educational potential; establishing                 engage in learning? Do they use positive reinforcement effectively? Do they prioritise developing rapport with their colleagues and pupils?
fair respectful, trusting, supportive &
constructive relationships.
Q2 By modelling the positive values,
attitudes and behaviour they expect                   The extent to which the student is fair in their dealings with pupils and colleagues, do they recognise and take account of differences and seek
from pupils.                                      opportunities to celebrate diversity? Do they avoid showing favouritism? Are the student’s responses to pupils’ and colleagues respectful, courteous and
                                                                                                                         constructive?
                                                                                       Do they promote a positive and self affirming ethos in the class and the school?
Frameworks Q3
Q3a Through awareness of their                     Does the student model appropriate behaviour in school indicating their awareness of the responsibilities and roles associated with being a teacher? Do
professional duties and the statutory            they see themselves as members of a school community with shared responsibilities to support the implementation and maintenance of school polices and
framework.                                                                                                               practices?
Q3b By sharing in collective
responsibility for school policies and
practices.
Communication Q4-6
Q4 By communicating effectively with              Do they use verbal and non verbal language appropriately when engaging with other adults and pupils? Do they adapt their methods of communication
pupils, colleagues, parents and                                                         when appropriate? Are their interactions courteous, respectful and clear?
carers.

Q5 By respecting and recognising
the contribution that colleagues,                Does the student recognise the contribution that can be made to children’s well being and learning by those responsible for their care in and out of school?
parents and carers can make to
pupils holistic development.

Q6 Through a commitment to
collaborative and co-operative                                    Does the student work co-operatively with other adults? Do they work collaboratively in a team to secure a shared outcome?
working.                                                             How effectively do they promote cooperative and collaborative approaches to learning and classroom management?




                                                                                                        39
                                                          PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES (Q1 - Q9 of the QTS Standards)
                                                     Very Good                Good                     Satisfactory                                                                     Unsatisfactory
                                                      GRADE 1                GRADE 2                    GRADE 3                                                                           GRADE 4
                                        In addition to                                   Consistently                              Regularly                                    Rarely
This standard is demonstrated:              Conscientiously                             Independently                             Sometimes with a teacher’s support           Generally with a teacher’s support
                                            Imaginatively                               Carefully                                 With developing confidence                   With difficulty
                                            Creatively                                  Thoughtfully

                                                                                    When assessing student teachers’ professional attributes you should consider:

Personal & Professional
Development Q7-9                               Does the student engage effectively with the lesson evaluation process? Does the student review and analyse past practice and identify how this learning
Q7 Through reflective practice that                              can inform their future planning and teaching? Does the student have a sound grasp of the reflective practice cycle?
informs their professional
development.


Q8 Through creative and
                                                How willing is the student to take risks, to experiment with new and innovative approaches to teaching and learning? Are they informed and discerning
constructively critical approaches
towards innovation.                                              about new educational initiatives? Do they apply appropriate criteria when evaluating new initiatives and approaches?
By being willing to adapt their
practice when benefits and
improvements are identified.

Q9 By acting upon advice and
feedback and by being open to
coaching and feedback.                         How do students respond to the feedback they receive from others? Are they aware of their own teaching styles and learning preferences? Do they seek
                                               out opportunities to review their own performance? To what extent are they developing their pedagogical understanding and professional attitudes and
                                                                                   skills by sharing and discussing their own practice with colleagues and mentors?




                              PROFESSIONAL SKILLS ~ TEAM WORKING & COLLABORATION (Q32-Q33 of the QTS Standards)
                        Very Good                      Good                    Satisfactory                  Unsatisfactory
                         GRADE 1                      GRADE 2                   GRADE 3                         GRADE 4
32      Proactive team member, able to identify           Works as an effective team member & identifies        Developing as a team worker & identifies            Poor team working skills and/or fails to identify
         opportunities for working with range of            opportunities for working with colleagues, sharing     opportunities for working with colleagues,           opportunities / need for working with
         colleagues, sharing development of effective       development of effective practice with them            increasingly sharing development of practice         colleagues – possibly poor at sharing
         practice with them                                                                                                                                             development of practice
33      Ensures that colleagues working with them         Ensures that colleagues working with them are         Ensures that colleagues working with them are       Underutilises colleagues available for
         are consulted, clearly briefed & meaningfully      clearly briefed & meaningfully involved in             appropriately involved in supporting learning &      supporting learning and/or underappreciates
         and creatively involved in supporting learning     supporting learning & understands their roles          understands the roles they are expected to           the roles they are expected to fulfil
         & understands their roles within the wider         within the wider team                                  fulfil
         team




                                                                                                     40
                             PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING (Q10 – Q15 & Q17 – Q21 of the QTS Standards)
        (Teaching and learning; Assessment and monitoring; Subjects and curriculum; Literacy, numeracy and ICT; Achievement and diversity; Health and well-being)
                      Very Good                                                  Good                                                  Satisfactory                                        Unsatisfactory
                       GRADE 1                                                  GRADE 2                                                 GRADE 3                                              GRADE 4
10     Has a creative range of teaching, learning &        Has a range of teaching, learning & behaviour              Has a developing range of teaching, learning &       The range of teaching, learning and/or
        behaviour management strategies with clear           management strategies & adapts & personalises               behaviour management strategies & adapts &            behaviour management strategies is minimal &
        adaptation & personalisation of learning such        learning such that all learners achieve their               personalises learning such that learners achieve      adaptation & personalisation of learning does
        that all learners achieve their potential            potential                                                   their potential                                       not ensure that learners achieve their potential
11     Has a proven good understanding of relevant         Demonstrates good understanding of relevant                Demonstrates developing knowledge of relevant        Demonstrates little working knowledge of
        subject-specific assessment requirements &           subject-specific assessment requirements &                  subject-specific assessment requirements &            relevant subject-specific assessment
        arrangements including public exams                  arrangements including public exams                         arrangements including public exams                   requirements & arrangements for public exams
12     Has creative and effective approaches to            Has a good range of approaches to assessment               Has a number of approaches to assessment             Assessment approaches are narrow and
        assessment including effective formative             and uses formative assessment                               including use of formative approaches                 formative assessment is weak
13     Demonstrates effective working use of local &       Demonstrates working use of local & national               Demonstrates growing knowledge of local &            Has weak knowledge of local and/or national
        national statistics in evaluating teaching and       statistics in evaluating teaching and monitoring of         national statistics and recognises link to            statistics and doesn’t recognise link to
        monitors pupil progress to raise achievement         pupil progress to raise achievement                         evaluation of teaching and monitoring of pupil        evaluation of teaching and monitoring of pupil
                                                                                                                         progress to raise achievement                         progress to raise achievement
14     Has very secure subject knowledge &                 Has secure subject knowledge & related pedagogy            Has necessary minimum subject knowledge &            Subject knowledge and/or pedagogy is weak
        creatively applies pedagogy across                   across appropriate age and ability range                    necessary pedagogy across appropriate age and         across all or part of appropriate age and ability
        appropriate age and ability range                                                                                ability range                                         ranges
15     Has sound applied understanding of relevant         Demonstrates good knowledge of relevant                    Has appropriate knowledge of relevant statutory      Has partial or weak knowledge of relevant
        statutory / non-statutory curricula /                statutory / non-statutory curricula / frameworks,           / non-statutory curricula / frameworks, including     statutory / non-statutory curricula / frameworks,
        frameworks, including Nat. Strats across full        including Nat. Strats across appropriate age and            Nat. Strats across appropriate age and ability        including Nat. Strats across all or part of
        age and ability range                                ability range                                               range                                                 appropriate age and ability range
17     Skills in literacy, numeracy & ICT creatively       Skills in literacy, numeracy & ICT effectively             Can use skills in literacy, numeracy & ICT to        Skills in literacy, numeracy & ICT either weak or
        support teaching & wider prof. activities            support teaching & wider prof. activities                   support teaching & wider prof. activities             fail to support teaching & wider prof. activities
18     Good understanding of child dev’t & links           Understands child dev’t & link between progress /          Developing understanding of child dev’t & link       Limited or poor understanding of child dev’t
        pupil progress & well-being to developmental,        well-being & developmental, social, religious,              between progress / well-being & developmental,        and/or link between progress / well-being &
        social, religious, ethnic, cultural & linguistic     ethnic, cultural & linguistic influences                    social, religious, ethnic, cultural & linguistic      developmental, social, religious, ethnic, cultural
        influences                                                                                                       influences                                            & linguistic influences
19     Personalises provision creatively to include        Can personalise provision including for EAL, SEN or        Has developing strategies for personalising          Has limited / weak strategies for personalising
        EAL, SEN or disabled pupils, accounts for            disabled pupils, accounts for diversity, promotes           provision eg for EAL, SEN or disabled pupils,         provision for EAL, SEN or disabled pupils, poor
        diversity, promotes equality & inclusion in          equality & inclusion in teaching                            accounts for diversity, promotes equality &           consideration of diversity, equality or inclusion
        teaching                                                                                                         inclusion in teaching                                 in teaching
20     Has effective working knowledge of roles of         Has good knowledge of roles of colleagues with             Has developing knowledge of roles of colleagues      Has weak knowledge of roles of colleagues with
        colleagues with specific responsibilities            specific responsibilities including SEN, disabilities &     with specific responsibilities including SEN,         specific responsibilities eg SEN, disabilities &
        including SEN, disabilities & indiv. need            indiv. need                                                 disabilities & indiv. need                            indiv. need
21a    Can apply understanding of legal                    Has good awareness of legal requirements,                  Is aware of legal requirements, policies &           Has limited / poor awareness of legal
        requirements, policies & guidance on                 policies & guidance on safeguarding                         guidance on safeguarding                              requirements, policies & guidance on
        safeguarding                                                                                                                                                           safeguarding
21b    Demonstrably identifies & supports children         Can identify & support children affected by change         Can identify & help support children affected by    Identification of & support for children affected by
        affected by change / difficulties in personal        / difficulties in personal circumstances and when           change / difficulties in personal circumstances     change / difficulties in personal circumstances
        circumstances and when to refer                      to refer                                                    and recognises referral may be needed               and/or recognition of need to refer is poor




                                                                                                         41
                                                 PROFESSIONAL SKILLS ~ PLANNING (Q22 – Q24 of the QTS Standards)
                    Very Good                                  Good                        Satisfactory                                                                         Unsatisfactory
                     GRADE 1                                 GRADE 2                        GRADE 3                                                                               GRADE 4
22    Planning demonstrates personalised              Planning clearly accounts for progression within &       Plans for progression across appropriate age &    Planning fails to demonstrate pupil progression
       consideration of progression within & across     across appropriate age & ability ranges and is            ability ranges                                     across appropriate age and/or ability ranges
       appropriate age & ability ranges and is          informed by assessment
       clearly informed by assessment
22    Designs effective and creative learning         Designs effective, meaningful learning sequences         Designs effective learning sequences within       Effective learning sequences within lessons
       sequences within lessons and series of           within lessons and series of lessons                      lessons and series of lessons                      and/or series of lessons are often lacking clear
       lessons                                                                                                                                                       design
22    Planning demonstrates up-to-date, creative      Planning demonstrates secure subject /                   Planning demonstrates secure subject /            Planning demonstrates subject / curriculum
       application of subject / curriculum              curriculum knowledge with demonstrable sound              curriculum knowledge                               misconceptions and/or fails to identify / use
       knowledge with demonstrable creative             application in any specialist area                                                                           appropriate accepted subject / curriculum
       application in any specialist area                                                                                                                            knowledge
23    Designs well embedded and creative              Designs well embedded and meaningful                     Designs opportunities for learners to develop     Opportunities for learners to develop their
       opportunities for learners to develop their      opportunities for learners to develop their literacy,     their literacy, numeracy & ICT skills              literacy, numeracy and/or ICT skills are
       literacy, numeracy & ICT skills                  numeracy & ICT skills                                                                                        regularly missed in planning
24    Plans stimulating homework or other out-of      Plans stimulating homework or other out-of class         Plans homework or other out-of class work to      Planning for homework or other out-of class
       class work to sustain learners’ progress &       work to sustain learners’ progress & extend /             sustain learners’ progress & extend /              work to sustain learners’ progress & to extend /
       extend / consolidate learning being mindful      consolidate learning                                      consolidate learning                               consolidate learning is weak, poorly conceived
       of pupils’ home circumstances                                                                                                                                 or non-existent




                                                                                                   42
      PROFESSIONAL SKILLS ~ TEACHING (Q25a-d of the QTS Standards) & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT (Q30 – Q31 of the QTS Standards)
               Very Good                       Good                         Satisfactory                Unsatisfactory
                GRADE 1                      GRADE 2                         GRADE 3                      GRADE 4
       In teaching lessons and sequences of lessons across the appropriate age and ability range, the student teacher:
25a       Uses a creative range of teaching strategies        Uses a good range of teaching strategies &           Uses teaching strategies & resources,                 Has a limited range of teaching strategies
           & resources, including developed use of e-           resources, including e-learning                       including e-learning                                   and/or limited use of resources – use of e-
           learning                                                                                                                                                          learning may be undeveloped
25a       Demonstrates clear practical account of             Takes good practical account of diversity &          Takes account of diversity & promotes                 Doesn’t always consider diversity issues /
           diversity & clear promotion of equality &            promotes equality & inclusion                         equality & inclusion                                   promotion of equality & inclusion
           inclusion
25b       Builds effectively on individual pupils’ prior      Takes good consideration of pupils’ prior            Builds on pupils’ prior knowledge                     Doesn’t satisfactorily build on pupils’ prior
           knowledge                                            knowledge                                                                                                    knowledge
25b       Develops pupils’ concepts & processes in a          Develops all pupils’ concepts & processes,           Develops pupils’ concepts & processes,                Has limited ability at developing pupils’
           personalised way, enabling them to apply             enabling them to apply new knowledge,                 enabling them to apply new knowledge,                  concepts & processes, - pupils’ application of
           new knowledge, understanding & skills and            understanding & skills and meet clear &               understanding & skills and meet learning               new knowledge, understanding & skills and
           meet clear & assessable learning objectives          assessable learning objectives                        objectives                                             meeting of learning objectives may be poor
25c       Makes carefully considered adaptations to           Makes good adaptation of their own language to       Adapts their own language to suit learners            Often fails to adapt their own language to suit
           their own language to suit learners                  suit learners                                                                                                learners
25c       Has a very clear and creative approach to           Introduces new ideas & concepts clearly              Can introduce new ideas & concepts to pupils          Is not clear in their introduction of new ideas
           the introduction of new ideas & concepts                                                                                                                          & concepts to pupils
25c       Makes creative use of explanations,                 Makes effective use of explanations, questions,      Makes satisfactory use of explanations,               Makes limited or poor use of explanations,
           questions, discussions and plenaries                 discussions and plenaries                             questions, discussions and plenaries                   questions, discussions or plenaries
25d       Can very creatively manage learning of              Demonstrates good ability in managing learning       Can satisfactorily manage learning of                 Demonstrates problems in managing learning
           individuals, groups & whole classes                  of individuals, groups & whole classes                individuals, groups & whole classes                    of individuals, groups or whole classes
25d       Modifies teaching creatively to suit the            Makes careful modifications to teaching to suit      Modifies teaching to suit the stage of the            Tends to allow lessons to progress without
           stage of the lesson                                  the stage of the lesson                               lesson                                                 modifying teaching to suit lesson stages
30        Creatively ensures a purposeful & safe              Takes care to establish a purposeful & safe          Maintains a purposeful & safe leaning                 Can fail to consider safety of leaning
           leaning environment conducive to learning            leaning environment conducive to learning             environment conducive to learning                      environments and/or how conducive they are
                                                                                                                                                                             to learning
30        Creatively explores opportunities for               Makes good identification of opportunities for       Can identify opportunities for learners to learn      Fails to identify opportunities for learners to
           learners to learn in out-of-school contexts          learners to learn in out-of-school contexts           in out-of-school contexts                              learn in out-of-school contexts
31        Establishes a very clear framework for              Establishes a clear framework for classroom          Establishes an acceptable framework for               Doesn’t establish a framework for classroom
           classroom discipline to manage learners’             discipline to manage learners’ behaviour              classroom discipline to manage learners’               discipline to manage learners’ behaviour
           behaviour intelligently & constructively             constructively                                        behaviour
31        Very effectively promotes learners’ self-           Promotes learners’ self-control & independence       Supports learners’ in their self-control &            Fails to support learners’ in their self-control &
           control & independence                                                                                     independence                                           independence




                                                                                                       43
                  PROFESSIONAL SKILLS ~ ASSESSMENT, MONITORING AND GIVING FEEDBACK (Q26 – Q28 of the QTS Standards)
                                    & REVIEWING TEACHING AND LEARNING (Q29 of the QTS Standards)
                    Very Good                     Good                      Satisfactory                 Unsatisfactory
                     GRADE 1                    GRADE 2                      GRADE 3                        GRADE 4
26a      Makes very good use of assessment,                 Makes effective use of assessment, monitoring          Makes satisfactory use of assessment,               Application of assessment, monitoring and/or
          monitoring and recording strategies to              and recording strategies including a developing         monitoring and recording strategies used in          recording strategies is limited or inconsistent
          support a personalised approach including           range of own approaches                                 the setting
          a range of own approaches
26b      Very effectively links assessment of               Effectively links assessment of learning needs of      Assesses learning needs of those they teach         Assessment fails to link effectively to the
          learning need to the setting of challenging,        those they teach to the setting of challenging          in order to set learning objectives                  setting of learning objectives
          personalised learning objectives                    learning objectives
27       Provides timely, clearly personalised,             Provides timely, accurate & constructive               Provides appropriate feedback on learners’          Provides limited or poor feedback on learners’
          accurate & constructive feedback on                 feedback on learners’ attainment, progress &            attainment, progress & areas for development         attainment, progress and/or is weak at
          learners’ attainment, progress & areas for          areas for development                                                                                        identifying areas for development
          development
28       Supports & guides learners in reflecting on        Supports & guides learners in reflecting on their      Supports learners in reflecting on their            Supports of learners in reflection on their
          their learning, identifying progress made &         learning, identifying progress made & identifying       learning, identifying progress made &                learning, identification of progress made
          clearly linking to learners’ identifying            emerging learning needs                                 identifying emerging learning needs                  and/or identification of emerging learning
          emerging learning needs                                                                                                                                          needs is limited or poor
29       Evaluates impact of their teaching on              Evaluates impact of their teaching on progress of      Evaluates impact of their teaching on progress
          progress of individual learners & has a clear       learners & is effective at modifying planning and       of learners & demonstrates some modification
          approach to modifying planning and                  classroom practice where necessary                      of planning and classroom practice where
          classroom practice where necessary                                                                          necessary




                                                                                                      44
                        Section 3
      Professional Standards
          for Teachers ~
     Qualified Teacher Status


For reference, the QTS Standards are listed below. They are available as
a pdf document at:
        http://www.tda.gov.uk/teachers/professionalstandards

Please also consult the very helpful TDA guidance on the standards
available as a MS Word document at:
        http://www.tda.gov.uk/partners/ittstandards/guidance




                                 45
Professional Standards for Teachers – Qualified Teacher Status

Those recommended for the award of QTS (Q) should meet the following standards.

Professional Attributes
Those recommended for the award of QTS should:

Relationships with children and young people
Q1     Have high expectations of children and young people including a commitment to
       ensuring that they can achieve their full educational potential and to establishing fair,
       respectful, trusting, supportive and constructive relationships with them.
Q2     Demonstrate the positive values, attitudes and behaviour they expect from children
       and young people.

Frameworks
Q3     (a) Be aware of the professional duties of teachers and the statutory framework
       within which they work.
       (b) Be aware of the policies and practices of the workplace and share in collective
       responsibility for their implementation.

Communicating and working with others
Q4     Communicate effectively with children, young people, colleagues, parents and carers.
Q5     Recognise and respect the contribution that colleagues, parents and carers can make
       to the development and well-being of children and young people, and to raising their
       levels of attainment.
Q6     Have a commitment to collaboration and co-operative working.

Personal professional development
Q7     (a) Reflect on and improve their practice, and take responsibility for identifying and
       meeting their developing professional needs.
       (b) Identify priorities for their early professional development in the context of
       induction.
Q8     Have a creative and constructively critical approach towards innovation, being
       prepared to adapt their practice where benefits and improvements are identified.
Q9     Act upon advice and feedback and be open to coaching and mentoring.

Professional knowledge and understanding
Those recommended for the award of QTS should:

Teaching and learning
Q10    Have a knowledge and understanding of a range of teaching, learning and behaviour
       management strategies and know how to use and adapt them, including how to
       personalise learning and provide opportunities for all learners to achieve their
       potential.

Assessment and monitoring
Q11    Know the assessment requirements and arrangements for the subjects/ curriculum
       areas they are trained to teach, including those relating to public examinations and
       qualifications.
Q12    Know a range of approaches to assessment, including the importance of formative
       assessment.




                                               46
Q13    Know how to use local and national statistical information to evaluate the
       effectiveness of their teaching, to monitor the progress of those they teach and to
       raise levels of attainment.

Subjects and curriculum
Q14    Have a secure knowledge and understanding of their subjects/curriculum areas and
       related pedagogy to enable them to teach effectively across the age and ability range
       for which they are trained.
Q15     Know and understand the relevant statutory and non-statutory curricula and
       frameworks, including those provided through the National Strategies, for their
       subjects/curriculum areas, and other relevant initiatives applicable to the age and
       ability range for which they are trained.

Literacy, numeracy and ICT
Q16    Have passed the professional skills tests in numeracy, literacy and information and
       communications technology (ICT).
Q17    Know how to use skills in literacy, numeracy and ICT to support their teaching and
       wider professional activities.

Achievement and diversity
Q18    Understand how children and young people develop and that the progress and well-
       being of learners are affected by a range of developmental, social, religious, ethnic,
       cultural and linguistic influences.
Q19    Know how to make effective personalised provision for those they teach, including
       those for whom English is an additional language or who have special educational
       needs or disabilities, and how to take practical account of diversity and promote
       equality and inclusion in their teaching.
Q20    Know and understand the roles of colleagues with specific responsibilities, including
       those with responsibility for learners with special educational needs and disabilities
       and other individual learning needs.

Health and well-being
Q21    (a) Be aware of the current legal requirements, national policies and guidance on the
       safeguarding and promotion of the well-being of children and young people.
       (b) Know how to identify and support children and young people whose progress,
       development or well-being is affected by changes or difficulties in their personal
       circumstances, and when to refer them to colleagues for specialist support.

Professional skills
Those recommended for the award of QTS should:

Q22    Plan for progression across the age and ability range for which they are trained,
       designing effective learning sequences within lessons and across series of lessons and
       demonstrating secure subject/curriculum knowledge.
Q23    Design opportunities for learners to develop their literacy, numeracy and ICT skills.
Q24    Plan homework or other out-of-class work to sustain learners’ progress and to extend
       and consolidate their learning.

Teaching
Q25    Teach lessons and sequences of lessons across the age and ability range for which
       they are trained in which they:
       (a) use a range of teaching strategies and resources, including e-learning, taking
       practical account of diversity and promoting equality and inclusion




                                              47
       (b) build on prior knowledge, develop concepts and processes, enable learners to
       apply new knowledge, understanding and skills and meet learning objectives
       (c) adapt their language to suit the learners they teach, introducing new ideas and
       concepts clearly, and using explanations, questions, discussions and plenaries
       effectively
       (d) demonstrate the ability to manage the learning of individuals, groups and whole
       classes, modifying their teaching to suit the stage of the lesson.

Assessing, monitoring and giving feedback
Q26    (a) Make effective use of a range of assessment, monitoring and recording strategies.
       (b) Assess the learning needs of those they teach in order to set challenging learning
       objectives.
Q27    Provide timely, accurate and constructive feedback on learners’ attainment, progress
       and areas for development.
Q28    Support and guide learners to reflect on their learning, identify the progress they
       have made and identify their emerging learning needs.

Reviewing teaching and learning
Q29    Evaluate the impact of their teaching on the progress of all learners, and modify their
       planning and classroom practice where necessary.

Learning environment
Q30    Establish a purposeful and safe learning environment conducive to learning and
       identify opportunities for learners to learn in out-of-school contexts.
Q31    Establish a clear framework for classroom discipline to manage learners’ behaviour
       constructively and promote their self-control and independence.

Team working and collaboration
Q32    Work as a team member and identify opportunities for working with colleagues,
       sharing the development of effective practice with them.
Q33    Ensure that colleagues working with them are appropriately involved in supporting
       learning and understand the roles they are expected to fulfil.




                                              48
                        Section 4
       Assessment Criteria for
       Placements other than
          Final Placements


There are 3 levels of assessment criteria. Cohort Leaders will have decided,
in conjunction with Programme Leaders, which levels apply to which
particular year cohorts within individual programmes. The gradings ‘very
good’, ‘good’, ‘satisfactory’ and ‘unsatisfactory’ are not used to label
students on placements before final blocks, but the grade descriptors will
help school and university-based tutors in their provision of feedback and
in the preparation of placements reports.




                                 49
                                                      Level 1 Block Placement Assessment Descriptions
                                    Very Good                                               Good                                               Satisfactory                                 Unsatisfactory
                                    GRADE 1                                                GRADE 2                                              GRADE 3                                       GRADE 4
PROFESSIONAL        Makes appropriate reference in their planning,       Makes appropriate reference in their planning,         Makes appropriate reference to NC                 In general, fails to make
KNOWLEDGE &          and shows a detailed knowledge of NC                  and shows a good knowledge of NC PoS/QCA                PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks in                         appropriate reference to NC
UNDERSTANDING        PoS/QCA ELGs/ frameworks for core/specialist          ELGs/frameworks in core/specialist subject;             core/specialist subject planning;                  PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks in
(Q10-21)             subject;                                             When teaching, demonstrates a good subject             When teaching, demonstrates a                      core/specialist subject planning;
                    When teaching, demonstrates a depth of                knowledge, with evidence of some research               satisfactory subject knowledge with               Demonstrates a lack of subject
                     subject knowledge with evidence of thorough,          beyond the school;                                      evidence of seeking supplementary                  knowledge;
                     independent research;                                Shows that they are familiar with specialist/core       information within the school;                    Teaches lessons, some of which
                    Shows that pupil health and safety is a               subject health and safety requirements relevant        Independently plans and teaches lessons            fail to take appropriate safety
                     foremost consideration; plans/teaches lessons         to their lessons; plans/teaches lessons which           which take appropriate safety                      precautions;
                     which take appropriate safety precautions;            take appropriate safety precautions;                    precautions;
PROFESSIONAL        Consistently and independently sets specific         Consistently and independently sets focused            Is usually independently able to set              Is generally unable to set
SKILLS: PLANNING     and focused DLOs in core/ specialist subject;         DLOs in core/specialist subjects;                       focused DLOs in core/specialist subjects;          focused DLOs;
(Q22-24)            Consistently sets appropriate tasks for whole        Consistently sets appropriate tasks for whole          Generally sets appropriately matched              Generally sets inappropriate
                     class, groups and individuals in the                  class, groups and individuals in the                    tasks for whole class, groups and                  tasks for pupils;
                     core/specialist subjects, which challenge and         core/specialist subjects which interest pupils;         individuals in the core/specialist subjects
                     interest pupils;                                                                                              some of which interest the pupils;


PROFESSIONAL        Uses a range of strategies to consistently and       Consistently and independently assesses how            Can usually independently assess how              Is generally unable to assess
SKILLS:              independently assess how well learning                well learning objectives in the core/specialist         well learning objectives in the                    children’s learning against
ASSESSMENT,          objectives in the core/specialist subjects have       subjects have been met;                                 core/specialist subjects have been met;            teaching objectives;
MONITORING AND       been met;                                            Consistently marks and monitors pupils’ work           Consistently marks and monitors pupils’           Sometimes fails to mark or
                    Consistently marks and monitors pupils’ work          and provides constructive oral/written feedback         work and provides constructive                     monitor pupils’ work consistently;
GIVING FEEDBACK      and provides constructive oral/written feedback       and is beginning to set targets for pupils;             oral/written feedback;                             oral/ written feedback is absent
(Q26-28) &           which sets clear and achievable targets for          Consistently uses assessment of pupil                  Can use assessment of pupil                        or inappropriate;
REVIEWING            some pupils;                                          achievement of lesson DLOs to inform                    achievement of lesson DLOs to inform              Struggles to use assessment of
TEACHING AND        Consistently uses assessment of pupil                 planning;                                               planning;                                          pupil achievement of lesson
LEARNING (Q29)       achievement of lesson DLOs to inform planning                                                                                                                    DLOs to inform planning;
                     which meets class and some individual pupil’s
                     needs;
PROFESSIONAL        Sets clear expectations for pupils’ behaviour,       Sets clear expectations for pupils’ behaviour,         Establishes and maintains a purposeful            Struggles to maintain discipline
SKILLS: TEACHING     establishes and maintains a purposeful working        establishes and maintains a purposeful working          working atmosphere when managing the               with the whole class;
(Q25a-d) &           atmosphere, demonstrates good discipline, and         atmosphere, demonstrates good discipline and            whole class and is beginning to establish         Gives explanation/ instruction/
                     positive relationships;                               is developing positive relationships;                   positive relationships with pupils;                demonstration that may be
LEARNING
                    Gives clear accurate, well-paced explanation/        Gives clear, accurate, well-paced                      Gives clear, accurate                              unclear or inappropriate.
ENVIRONMENT          instruction/ demonstration which interests and        explanation/instruction/demonstration which             explanation/instruction/demonstration.
(Q30-31)             enthuses pupils; manages transitions well and         interests and enthuses pupils.
                     summarises key points as the lesson
                     progresses.
STANDARDS FROM ‘PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES’ &                             A Level 1 student is aware of issues relating to the Professional Attributes element of the QTS Standards and is beginning to incorporate
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: TEAM WORKING & COLLABORATION                      aspects into their own work in school. A Level 1 student will be fully prepared and behave professionally in school. A Level 1 student will build
                                                                       professional relationships with pupils and other colleagues.




                                                                                                   50
                                                                Level 2 Block Placement Assessment Descriptions
                                       Very Good                                                Good                                            Satisfactory                               Unsatisfactory
                                       GRADE 1                                                 GRADE 2                                           GRADE 3                                     GRADE 4
PROFESSIONAL        Demonstrates a thorough knowledge of NC                   Demonstrates a good knowledge of NC                 Demonstrates a general awareness of           Demonstrates little awareness of
KNOWLEDGE &          PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks in the core/ non-core              PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks in the core/                 NC PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks in the              NC PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks
UNDERSTANDING        subjects for the areas in which they are planning          non-core subjects for the areas in which             core/ non-core subjects for the areas          in the core/ non-core subjects
                     and beyond;                                                they are planning;                                   in which they are planning;                    for the areas in which they are
(Q10-21)
                    Promotes pupil questioning and copes confidently          Promotes pupil questioning and copes                Copes securely with core/specialist            planning;
                     and securely with core/specialist subject-related          confidently and securely with core/specialist        subject-related questions pupils raise;       On a number of occasions has
                     questions pupils raise, responding constructively          subject-related questions pupils raise;             In pupil profiles demonstrates an              struggled to cope with
                     in order to take pupils learning forward;                 In pupil profiles, demonstrates a good               understanding of how pupils’ learning          core/specialist subject-related
                    In pupil profiles, demonstrates a sound                    understanding and reflects upon how pupils’          is affected by their physical,                 questions pupils have raised;
                     understanding and reflects upon how pupils’                learning is affected by their physical,              intellectual, emotional and social            Struggles, even after support, to
                     learning is affected by their physical, intellectual,      intellectual, emotional and social                   development.                                   understand how pupils’ learning
                     emotional and social development.                          development.                                                                                        is affected by their physical,
                                                                                                                                                                                    intellectual, emotional and social
                                                                                                                                                                                    development.
PROFESSIONAL        Consistently identifies clear structures for lessons      Generally identifies clear structures for           Generally identifies clear structures for     Short, and medium term
SKILLS: PLANNING     in the short term, and where appropriate, medium           lessons in the short term, and where                 lessons in the short term, and where           planning (where appropriate)
(Q22-24)             term, with DLOs which build on previous                    appropriate, medium term, with DLOs which            appropriate, medium term, with DLOs            may lack clear structure and/or
                     experiences, and are conveyed to pupils; future            build on previous experiences, and are               which build on previous experiences,           detail; DLOs do not build on
                     planning is firmly grounded in assessment;                 conveyed to pupils; makes use of                     and are conveyed to pupils. Indicates          previous experiences and are
                    Sets tasks for the whole class, groups and                 assessment that informs future planning;             how lessons be taught and assessed;            not usually conveyed to pupils;
                     individuals which challenge pupils and ensure             Sets tasks for the whole class, groups and          Sets tasks for the whole class, groups        Struggles to set appropriately
                     high levels of pupil interest;                             individuals which challenge pupils and               and individuals which are well                 matched tasks for the whole
                                                                                consistently foster pupil interest;                  matched to pupils’ abilities and often         class, groups and individuals
                                                                                                                                     foster pupil interest;

PROFESSIONAL        Is systematic in their use of assessment,                 Consistently makes accurate assessments             Is usually able to make accurate              struggles to assess pupils’
SKILLS:              consistently make accurate assessments of pupil            of pupil achievement, and uses a variety of          assessments of pupil achievement,              achievement using some of:
ASSESSMENT,          achievement, and uses a variety of methods                 methods including: observation, questioning,         and uses a variety of methods                  observation, questioning, testing
                     including: observation, questioning, testing and           testing and marking;                                 including: observation, questioning,           and marking;
MONITORING AND
                     marking;                                                  Can successfully use/adapt                           testing and marking;                          Records of pupil progress may
GIVING FEEDBACK     Can successfully use/adapt school/LEA/university           school/LEA/university recording formats to          Can successfully use/adapt                     be inappropriate, lack detail, or
(Q26-28) &           recording formats or is beginning to devise own            keep detailed records of pupil progress.             school/LEA/university recording                be absent;
REVIEWING            formats to keep thorough and detailed records of          Consistently uses records to inform planning         formats to keep satisfactory records of       Has difficulty using records to
TEACHING AND         pupil progress                                             and target-setting for profile children.             pupil progress.                                inform planning and target-
LEARNING (Q29)      Records are used effectively to inform planning,                                                               Makes use of records to inform                 setting for profile children.
                     ensure progression and set well-matched targets                                                                 planning and target-setting for profile
                     for profile children.                                                                                           children.
PROFESSIONAL        Consistently sets high expectations for pupils’           Sets high expectations for pupils’ behaviour        Usually sets clear expectations for          Usually fails to set high
SKILLS: TEACHING     behaviour and demonstrates excellent discipline             and achieves sound discipline through well          pupils’ behaviour and achieves sound          expectations for pupils’
(Q25a-d) &           through positive relationships and well focused             focused teaching which sustains the                 discipline when managing the whole            behaviour; teaching may fail to
                     teaching which sustains the momentum of their               momentum of their work; encourages                  class; encourages positive                    sustain the momentum of their
LEARNING
                     work;                                                       positive relationships;                             relationships                                 work or encourage positive
ENVIRONMENT         manages transitions effectively whilst maintaining        manages transitions effectively and can             manages transitions effectively..             relationships;
(Q30-31)             pace and flow of the lesson and summarises key              summarise key points as the lesson                                                               transitions may be poorly
                     points as the lesson progresses.                            progresses.                                                                                       managed.
STANDARDS FROM ‘PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES’ &                                   As per Level 1 and…A Level 2 student has an informed and reflective view of issues relating to the Professional Attributes element of
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: TEAM WORKING & COLLABORATION                            the QTS Standards and incorporates key aspects into their own work in school. A Level 2 student will demonstrate, through practice,
                                                                             knowledge and understanding of pupil diversity and equal opportunities. A Level 2 student will demonstrate, through practice, the ability
                                                                             to develop meaningful, professional relationships with parents, carers and other members of the wider school community.




                                                                                                   51
                                                      Level 3 Block Placement Assessment Descriptions
                                      Very Good                                               Good                                           Satisfactory                                 Unsatisfactory
                                      GRADE 1                                                GRADE 2                                          GRADE 3                                       GRADE 4
PROFESSIONAL        Demonstrates a detailed knowledge and                    Demonstrates a good knowledge and                 Demonstrates knowledge and                    Does not seem to have adequate
KNOWLEDGE &          understanding of NC PoS/QCA ELGs/frameworks;              understanding of NC PoS/QCA                        understanding of NC PoS/QCA                    knowledge of NC PoS/QCA
UNDERSTANDING        level and key stage descriptions in the core/             ELGs/frameworks; level and key stage               ELGs/frameworks; level and key stage           ELGs/frameworks; level and key
                     specialist subjects, e.g. in planning and profiling       descriptions in the core/ specialist               descriptions in the core/ specialist           stage descriptions in the core/
(Q10-21)
                    Demonstrates a very good understanding of how             subjects, e.g. in planning and profiling           subjects, e.g. in planning and profiling       specialist subjects, e.g. in planning
                     ICT can be used to support teaching and learning         Demonstrates a good understanding of              Demonstrates an understanding of               and profiling; use of level and key
                     in the core subjects                                      how ICT can be used to support teaching            how ICT can be used to support                 stage descriptions e.g. in
                                                                               and learning in the core subjects                  teaching and learning in the core              planning/profiling, is weak,
                                                                                                                                  subjects.                                      inaccurate or absent
                                                                                                                                                                                Struggles to understand how ICT
                                                                                                                                                                                 can be used to support teaching
                                                                                                                                                                                 and learning in the core subjects.
PROFESSIONAL        Consistently sets clear DLOs and can motivate            Consistently sets clear DLOs and                  Sets clear DLOs and usually ensures           Struggles to set clear DLOs;
SKILLS: PLANNING     pupils when communicating the substance and               ensures that pupils are aware of the               that pupils are aware of the substance         opportunities for pupils’ learning
(Q22-24)             purpose of what they are to do; plans learning            substance and purpose of what they are             and purpose of what they are to do;            may lack sufficient differentiation;
                     activities in which they thoughtfully deploy a range      to do; plans learning activities which             plans learning activities which utilise a     Does not use displays to support
                     of differentiation options including task, outcome,       utilise a range of differentiation options         range of differentiation options               student learning;
                     resource, response, and support;                          including task, outcome, resource,                 including task, outcome, resource,
                    Classroom displays are presented to a high                response, and support;                             response, and support;
                     standard and support learning or indicate pupil          Classroom displays are well presented             Presentation of classroom displays is
                     achievement; content shows thoughtful and                 and support learning or indicate pupil             satisfactory and gives some support
                     appropriate selection;                                    achievement;                                       for learning or indicates pupil
                                                                                                                                  achievement;
PROFESSIONAL        Is systematic in their use of assessment, and            Uses a variety of assessment methods              Uses a variety of assessment methods          Insufficient awareness and use of
SKILLS:              uses a variety of assessment methods and is able          and is able with support to recognise the          and is able with support to recognise          the variety of assessment methods
ASSESSMENT,          with support to recognise the NC level at which a         NC level at which a pupil is achieving in          the NC level at which a pupil is               available; has difficulty, even with
                     pupil is achieving in core/specialist subjects;           core/specialist subjects;                          achieving in some of the                       support, in recognising the NC level
MONITORING AND
                    Has a thorough awareness of pupils’ errors and           Pays careful attention to pupils’ errors           core/specialist subjects;                      at which a pupil is achieving in
GIVING FEEDBACK      misconceptions and can remedy them;                       and misconceptions and can remedy                 Pays attention to pupils’ errors and           core/specialist subjects;
(Q26-28) &          Devises clear and practical formats to keep               them;                                              misconceptions and can usually                Little or no attention paid to pupils’
REVIEWING            thorough and detailed records of pupil progress;         Devises practical formats to keep                  remedy them;                                   errors and misconceptions;
TEACHING AND         Records are consistently and effectively used to          detailed records of pupil progress;               Can devise own formats to keep                Records of pupil progress may be
LEARNING (Q29)       ensure progression of all pupils;                         records are consistently used to help              detailed records of pupil progress;            inappropriate, lack detail, or be
                    Monitors pupils’ strengths and weaknesses and             promote progression of all pupils;                 records are generally used to help             absent;
                     makes timely and sensitive interventions to              Monitors pupils’ strengths and                     promote progression of pupil learning;        Has difficulty in recognising pupils’
                     promote pupils’ learning.                                 weaknesses and makes purposeful                   Monitors pupils’ strengths and                 strengths and weaknesses.
                                                                               interventions to promote pupils’ learning.         weaknesses and is beginning to make
                                                                                                                                  purposeful intervention to promote
                                                                                                                                  pupils’ learning.
PROFESSIONAL        Sets high expectations for pupils’ behaviour and         Sets high expectations for pupils’                Sets high expectations for pupils’            Expectations for pupils’ behaviour
SKILLS: TEACHING     promotes these through well managed lessons               behaviour which and promotes these                 behaviour and promotes these through            may be absent, lack clarity or be
(Q25a-d) &           and positive and productive relationships;                through well managed lessons and                   well managed lessons and positive               ambiguous; sound discipline is not
LEARNING            establishes an environment in which pupils feel           positive and productive relationships;             and productive relationships;                   always achieved.
ENVIRONMENT          secure;                                                  makes timely and appropriate                      can intervene to ensure sound
(Q30-31)            makes timely, appropriate interventions to ensure         interventions to ensure sound discipline.          discipline.
                     sound discipline whilst maintaining lesson flow.
STANDARDS FROM ‘PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES’ &                                  As per Level 2 and…A Level 3 student has an in depth understanding of the Professional Attributes element of the QTS Standards and
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS: TEAM WORKING & COLLABORATION                           embeds into school practice. A Level 3 student will demonstrate, through practice, an ability to contribute to, and share in, the corporate
                                                                            life of the school (dependent upon constraints of placement location and travel). A Level 3 student will recognise, through evaluation of
                                                                            own practice, the need for continual professional updating and recognise that professional development is their own responsibility.




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