HUNGER IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY by whitecheese

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									Poorer overall health status and compromised
ability to resist illness

Elevated occurrence of health problems – stomach
aches, colds, fatigue, pneumonia

Greater incidence of hospitalizations

Risk of brain, cognitive and psychological
impairment that, if not corrected, can be
irreversible
Higher levels of aggression, hyperactivity and
anxiety/passivity

Difficulty getting along with others

Increased need for mental health services
Impaired cognitive functioning and diminished
capacity to learn

Lower test scores and poorer overall achievement

Greater risk of dropping out of school

Repeating a grade in school

Increased school absences, tardiness and
suspensions
LAST FISCAL YEAR 42,889 CHILDREN IN
EASTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY WERE ON
FREE OR REDUCED COST BREAKFAST AND
LUNCH             1




    DSUSD                         50% OF STUDENTS
    PSUSD                         72% OF STUDENTS
    PVUSD                         60% OF STUDENTS
    CVUSD                         89% OF STUDENTS
1   2006/07 HARC Study – Nutritional Needs – pages 520 - 524
Local CBO’s Monthly Average Distribution of
Food Through FIND / SECOND HARVEST

 44,917 Adults
 8,836 Seniors
 2,539 Homebound
 3,338 Homeless
 29,618 Children
 9,532 Children under six years of age
   TOTAL – 98,780 persons per month
    This number no doubt includes duplicated numbers of persons;
    but, even if divided by four, the number is still 24, 500 persons
    per month that need assistance with basic food items to feed
    their families.
INCOME
 Approximately 32,568 Seniors at the Federal Poverty
 Guideline of $9,310 annually
 13,191 Seniors are just above the poverty level
 Seniors living on Social Security or Retirement Income
 frequently are forced to pay for housing, insurance,
 prescription drugs rather than food
 3,000 – 6,000 Seniors receive congregate or food assistance
 daily
HEALTH
 Average cost to treat malnourished seniors - $12,683 (4 x
 greater than well-nourished)
 Number of seniors in need of assistance will increase as
 393,597 Baby Boomers in Riverside County age
 Elderly at risk of chronic health conditions that can be
 managed through improved nutrition
FIND / SECOND HARVEST / USDA COMMODITIES
HIDDEN HARVEST
SENIOR CENTERS
MARTHA’S VILLAGE AND KITCHEN
COACHELLA VALLEY RESCUE MISSION
EXTENDED HANDS
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICES SOS HOMELESS SHELTER
THE WELL IN THE DESERT
BLYTHE EMERGENCY FOOD PANTRY
SCHOOLS

AND APPROXIMATELY 90 LOCAL DISTRIBUTION SITES
FIND
 Pounds Distributed 2006/2007
   USDA Commodities – 1,470,487 Pounds
   USDA Freeze Foods – 640,000 Pounds
   Hidden Harvest -1,300,000 Pounds
   Purchased 2,262,621 Pounds
    424,759 Pounds Non-Meat Proteins
    63,048 Pounds Rice
    73,387 Pounds Pastas
    259,889 Pounds Meat/Fish/Poultry
    810,180 Pounds Meal/Entrée Items
    631,358 Pounds Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
 Does not include food purchased for specific organizations
HIDDEN HARVEST – Estimates only 1% of Produce
Available was “Rescued” Due to Lack of Storage

  1,300,000 Pounds of Produce Was Picked or Donated by Growers
    Cabbage
    Bok Choy
    Lettuce (four types)
    Broccoli
    Tomatoes
    Bell Peppers
    Berries
    Grapes
    Corn
    Artichokes
    Melons
    Spinach
    Cauliflower
Inadequate data or tracking of data regarding food recipients and
hunger in the Coachella Valley and Eastern Riverside County

Limited Transportation – Lack of a pick up / delivery coordinated
system across Eastern Riverside County

Quality, quantity and selection of food available in the current
system – USDA, Second Harvest, etc.

Infrastructure issues including poor access to utilities and water
and storage

Geographic distances

Language barriers and cultural issues
Lack of Storage

No Integrated Programs – One Stop Shops

Lack of Sustainable Programs

Programs Without Capacity to Maintain Operations

Special Diet Requirements

Lack of Fund Raising Expertise

Limited Sources of Funding

Number of Programs Providing Service

No Central Organization – Territorial Attitudes
Hunger will never “end” in Eastern Riverside
County
The numbers of hungry in Eastern Riverside
County are growing with no defined reason
Hunger and nutrition are an unmet need that
must be addressed
Funding has not kept pace with inflation and
growth
State and Federal allocations have not been
adjusted to reflect increased numbers
Programs addressing hunger must be
coordinated to achieve leverage of funding
through government, foundation, community
and private sources
Programs addressing nutrition screening,
counseling, nutrition and interventions must
be developed and implemented
Public awareness of the issue needs
improvement
Cost cutting strategies should be developed

								
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