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Its better to be simple and understandable then to be thorough

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Its better to be simple and understandable then to be thorough Powered By Docstoc
					                                                  Trainers Should …

     1. Make a good first impression
          a. Enthusiasm
          b. Remove any fear
          c. Have an informal environment
     2. Inform learners of objectives (and how they’ll be evaluated)
           a. Relate all parts of training to objectives regularly
     3. Adults relate their learning to what they already know
          a. Use realistic examples
     4. Adults learn by doing
          a. Variety in techniques spices up the day
          b. Use repetition
          c. Allow them to discover through exercises instead of through listening
              or watching
     5. Trainer is a facilitator, NOT an expert
           a. Guide and prompt – do not tell
     6. Use the audience to give feedback and to direct learning


(The above comes from First-Time Trainer: A Step-By-Step Quick Guide for Managers,
Supervisors, and New Training Professionals by Tom W. Goad 1997)




Trainer Personality Traits
There are skills related to working with people and trainers need to have them all.
        Friendly
        Good listener
        Able to make mistakes in front of people
        Able to deal with everyone individually and equally
        Calm when things go wrong
        Have the technical expertise required for the topic
        Can think on one’s feet
        Sense of humor
        Enthusiasm in voice and gesture
        Excellent communicator in writing and speech


Train the Trainer Library Workshops: Presentation Skills Fall 2004 - This material has been created by Cheryl Gould for the
Infopeople Project [infopeople.org], supported by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library
Services and Technology Act, administered in California by the State Librarian. Any use of this material should credit the author and
funding source.
     Presentation Do’s and Don’ts
           1. It’s better to be simple and understandable then to be thorough. Accuracy is
              important but it’s better to make sense, then to be perfectly accurate.
           2. Purpose of going through training material with learners – Make sure everyone has
                everything – don’t need to discuss each item in depth at this time. If there is something in
                there that you WON’T use during the class, this is the time to tell them about it since they
                may never look at the material again unless you let them know how valuable it is.
           3. Try explaining the problem/issue; then ask the group for the solution. They often
              know, and if they’re off track you can then tell them the solution or answer.
           4. Don’t assume knowledge – start from the ground up; it’s quicker than backing up or
              confusing people. It’s not Ok to say things like:
                  a. “You all know about”
                  b. “Everyone knows about”
                  c. “I don’t have to tell you”
                  d. “You’ve all seen this before”
           5. When using ANY word that could be considered jargon, it’s worth explaining the
              word rather than letting them spend brain energy being confused or taking time out
              to answer a question. This is also true when you want to use an acronym for
              something you think is familiar; you need to say the acronym and what it means.
           6. You can't teach everything, and people can't learn it all, so it's MORE important to
              get them thinking and energized. Don’t worry about not having enough material –
              they’ll be happy if you’re done early and pissed off if you waste their time to stretch
              things out.
           7. Stress makes you tired and requires energy. Some of that is good; too much is bad.
           8. In each section of the workshop be sure to give the “big picture” in your talk and on
              the PowerPoint slides, but let them learn some of the details while doing your well-
              thought-out exercises. Then let them ask questions after (or you ask them
              questions) to be sure they understood the details you wanted.
           9. If something is really important you should say it, show it, and have them have
              personal experience with it through an exercise.

     Give Structure to Your Day
           10. It communicates that you care, that you are prepared, and that the material is
               important.
           11. Participants don’t have to spend time figuring out what is asked of them but can do
               the learning task.
                   a. It’s like being in a hotel room with nothing to do but read or watch TV – it’s
                       relaxing to be clear and not to have too many choices.
                   b. “Please take out your handouts and take two minutes to look over X”
           12. Giving the class structure minimizes confusion. Confusion requires brain activity
               and takes away from their energy to learn.
           13. State the breaks’ start and end time; breaks aren’t optional and aren’t exercise time.
           14. Tell them when you want them to watch you, when to follow your clicks on their
               screen, and when they should be working on their own.
           15. Give an overview of the topic, how it’s organized, and then drill down – repeat the
               process. Go from concept to detail and back and forth. The PowerPoint
               presentation should support your points and help you stay focused.

Master Trainer Program - July 2002 - This material has been created by Cheryl Gould for the Infopeople Project
[http://www.Infopeople.org/], supported by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services
and Technology Act, administered in California by the State Librarian. Any use of this material should credit the author and funding source.
     Efficiency Tricks
           16. Teach to the middle of the class. Help extremes by adding bonus questions to the
               bottom of each exercise or having an advanced exercise they can work on if they
               finish others early.
           17. Show off new features or efficient ways of doing things as a demonstration instead
               of letting the whole class follow on their own computer, then have a step-by-step
               exercise.
           18. Help slow learners during exercises; don’t slow the whole class down.
           19. Remember they can’t learn everything that you know. You just want to move them
               one step forward in their thinking and to get them more confident either doing the
               task or approaching software and the computer in general.

     Stress Reducers
           20. Let learners know they may not finish the entire exercise.
           21. When giving advanced tips, let the group know that’s what you’re doing so they
               don’t feel like they have to get everything.
           22. The “tone” of the class is set in the first half hour or so. You should be modeling
               the behavior you want from your students. Relaxed, patient, good listener,
               concerned with their learning, understand that there are varied abilities in the room.
           23. Have people succeed in the beginning and at the end.
           24. Make them get their hands off the mouse, and make them stretch or stand up.
           25. If audience is tired ask them some questions, work in small groups, switch seats, or
               take a break.

     Question Asking Skills
           26. Only ask questions for which you want an answer.
           27. Give time for a response (at least count to five, if not 10).
           28. If you really want an answer but no one speaks up, try to rephrase the question.
           29. Open-ended questions are more useful than yes or no questions. If it’s a yes or no
               question, ask for a show of hands. Examples: “How did that go? What part of it
               was difficult? What new thing did you learn? What are the steps to do X? What
               would you do in situation X?
           30. Asking questions of the group gives you time to assess what’s going on and hear
               their concerns.
           31. Be open to the fact that you’ll learn something from their answers.




Master Trainer Program - July 2002 - This material has been created by Cheryl Gould for the Infopeople Project
[http://www.Infopeople.org/], supported by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services
and Technology Act, administered in California by the State Librarian. Any use of this material should credit the author and funding source.

				
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