Docstoc

COPY - DOC

Document Sample
COPY - DOC Powered By Docstoc
					IMIT Business & Technical Vocational School                                       www.imitschool.com
00100 - CUT, COPY & PASTE
We always begin here with cut, copy & paste because these techniques will GREATLY speed up
our progress in later lessons.

COPY
(1) To copy a piece of data to a temporary location. In word processing, for example, copying refers to
duplicating a section of a document and placing it in a buffer (sometimes called a clipboard). The term copy
differs from cut, which refers to actually removing a section of a document and placing it in a buffer. After
cutting or copying, you can move the contents of the buffer by pasting it somewhere else.
(2) In file management, the term copy refers to making a duplicate of a file.

A duplicate of a piece of data, such as a file or a directory.

CUT
To remove an object from a document and place it in a buffer. In word processing, for example, cut means
to move a section of text from a document to a temporary buffer. This is one way to delete text. However,
because the text is transferred to a buffer, it is not lost forever. You can copy the buffer somewhere else in
the document or in another document, which is called pasting. To move a section of text from one place to
another, therefore, you need to first cut it and then paste it. This is often called cut-and-paste.

Most applications have only one buffer, sometimes called a clipboard. If you make two cuts in succession,
the text from the original cut will be replaced by the text from the second cut.

Graphical user interfaces, such as MS-Windows and the Macintosh interface, allow you to cut and paste
graphics as well as text.

PASTE
To copy an object from a buffer (or clipboard) to a file. In word processing, blocks of text are moved from
one place to another by cutting and pasting. When you cut a block of text, the word processor removes the
block from your file and places it in a temporary holding area (a buffer). You can then paste the material in
the buffer somewhere else.

Modern operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows, allow you to cut an object from one application
and paste it into another. Depending on how the object is pasted, it can be either linked or embedded.



CLIPBOARD
A special file or memory area (buffer) where data is stored temporarily before being copied to another
location. Many word processors, for example, use a clipboard for cutting and pasting. When you cut a
block of text, the word processor copies the block to the clipboard; when you paste the block, the word
processor copies it from the clipboard to its final destination. In Microsoft Windows and the Apple
Macintosh operating system, the Clipboard (with a capital C) can be used to copy data from one
application to another.

The Macintosh uses two types of clipboards. The one it calls the Clipboard can hold only one item at a time
and is flushed when you turn the computer off. The other, called the Scrapbook, can hold several items at
once and retains its contents from one working session to another.




                                                        1
Copy, Cut, Paste
Exercise objectives:

   After completing this exercise you will:

        understand common principles of cut, copy & paste
        understand similarities and differences between working with graphics and text
        feel comfortable copying and pasting text and graphics within a document
        feel comfortable copying and pasting between documents in the same application
        feel comfortable copying and pasting between documents in different applications

1. Text must be highlighted to be copied or cut.

2. Graphics must have handles or be active with "marching ants" to copy or cut.
        Note: active graphics or highlighted text can also be deleted by using the delete key.

3. Copy, cut, paste can be done within an application and between applications.
         Keys:
         Copy – CTRL+C
         Paste – CTRL+V
         Cut – CTRL+X

         Note: CTRL is the key to the left or right of the spacebar.
               Use the Command key on Macintosh.

4. Copy, cut & paste works the same on Windows as on Mac computers.

5. Copy and paste text from a Browser into Word in order to avoid saving/printing more than you need.

6. To acquired a Web graphic, right click the mouse button over the graphic, select Save Image/Picture As.

7. Whenever you copy or cut something it goes to the clipboard. Whatever is copied or cut stays in the
clipboard until you turn the computer off or copy or cut something else or clear it with the clipboard editor.




                                                      2
Exercise #1:

  1.   Open a text editor program. Click on the Start Button, Programs, Accessories, Notepad.

  2.   Open another text editor program. Click on the Start Button, Programs, Accessories, WordPad.

  3.   Make sure you are in WordPad, look up to the top of the screen of the active window, does it state
       WordPad in the Blue Bar at the Top of the Screen? Yes – Good No – Move your mouse to the
       bottom of the screen to the Taskbar, notice the button for WordPad, click on it.

  4.   Open a text file in a text editor (e.g.. WordPad). For example,
       A) Click on the File menu, Open, type C:\WINDOWS\NETWORK.TXT then click Open.

  5.   Using your mouse, select/highlight the first four lines of text.
       (e.g.. press and hold the left mouse button, then drag the mouse to the end of the first line of
       text, then drag the mouse down to finish selecting the four lines of text.)

  6.   Now that something is selected or highlighted, we can copy or cut it.
       Go up to the MENU called Edit and click it, next click on the word Copy. You have now copied
       the selected text to the clipboard.

  7.   Next, switch to the other text editor.
       (e.g.. Move your mouse to the bottom of the screen to the Taskbar,
       notice the button for Notepad, click on it.)

  8.   Finally, Go up to the MENU called Edit and click it, next click on the word Paste.

  9.   Navigate back to the WordPad Screen, Stay in this screen for the next exercise.




                                                    3
Exercise #2:
No Mouse Lesson, all Keyboard.


    1.   Make sure you are in WordPad, look up to the top of the screen of the active window, does it state
         WordPad in the Blue Bar at the Top of the Screen? Yes – Good No – Move your mouse to the
         bottom of the screen to the Taskbar, notice the button for WordPad, click on it.

    2.   Using your keyboard, select the line of text.
         (e.g.. Using the “Arrow Keys”, located on the keyboard between the main keys or “QWERTY
         keys” & the “10 Keys”, arrow key down to the 7th line or so. Now instead of using your mouse to
         select the text as we did in exercise 1, we’re going to select our text using the keyboard. Hold
         down the SHIFT key and then use the right arrow key to move your cursor to the end of this line
         to finish selecting the line of text. Notice that the line of text is now selected or highlighted.)

    3.   Now that something is selected or highlighted, we can copy or cut it.
         Go up to the MENU called Edit by holding down the ALT key and the letter E, this opens the
         Edit menu. Next using the down arrow key move your cursor down to the word Copy then press
         the Enter key. You have now copied the selected text to the clipboard.

    4.   Next, switch to the other text editor.
         (e.g.. Hold down the ALT key and do not let it up. Next press the TAB key once. Notice the
         program selected is the Notepad icon, if it is not, then press TAB again until you’ve reached the
         Notepad icon. Once you have then let the ALT key go and the window will switch to Notepad.)

    5.   Finally, Go up to the MENU called Edit by holding down the ALT key and the letter E.
         Next, using the down arrow key, move your cursor down to the word Paste then press the Enter
         key. You have now pasted the selected text from the clipboard to Notepad.

    6.   Navigate back to the WordPad Screen, Stay in this screen for the next exercise.




                                                     4
Exercise #3:
No Mouse Lesson, all Keyboard again.


    1.   Make sure you are in WordPad, look up to the top of the screen of the active window, does it
         state WordPad in the Blue Bar at the Top of the Screen? Yes – Good No – Move your mouse to
         the bottom of the screen to the Taskbar, notice the button for WordPad, click on it.

    2.   Using your keyboard, select a line of text.
         (e.g.. Using the “Arrow Keys”, located on the keyboard between the “QWERTY keys” & the
         “10 Keys”, arrow key down to the 10th line or so. Now instead of using the Edit menu as we did
         in exercise 2, we’re going to select our text using the keyboard again. Hold down the SHIFT key
         and then use the right arrow key to move your cursor to the end of this line to finish selecting the
         line of text. Notice that the line of text is now selected or highlighted.)

    3.   Now that something is selected or highlighted, we can copy or cut it.
         Press and Hold the CRTL key, then press the letter C. Nothing apparently happens. You have
         now copied the selected text to the clipboard.

    4.   Next, switch to the other text editor.
         (e.g.. Hold down the ALT key and do not let it up, next press the TAB key once, notice the
         program selected it the Notepad icon, if it is not, then press TAB again until you’ve reached the
         Notepad icon, once you have then let the ALT key go and the window will switch to Notepad.)

    5.   Finally, using the down arrow key move your cursor down to a blank line. Press and Hold the
         CTRL key, then press the letter V. Notice what happens. You have now pasted the selected text
         from the clipboard to Notepad.




                                                      5
Dragging Icons/Items with the Mouse…..

   1.    In My Computer or Windows Explorer, find a file or folder you want to move.

   2.    Make sure the place you want to drag the file or folder to is visible.

   3.    Drag the file or folder to the destination.



Notes:

        If you drag a file or a folder to a location on the same disk, it will be moved.
         If you drag it to another disk, it will be copied.


        You can create a copy of a file and move it at the same time by pressing CTRL while you drag the
         file to a new location.


        If you right-click to drag, a menu appears with the available options (Move, Copy, Shortcut).
         This is a SAFE way of Dragging Items!




                                                       6

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:166
posted:2/17/2010
language:English
pages:6