Introduction The International Baccalaureate (IB) offers a by oxu11283

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									Introduction


The
International
Baccalaureate
(IB)
offers
a
continuum
of
international
education
for
children
ages
3‐
19.
It
has
been
growing
rapidly
in
recent
years,
with
current
projections
predicting
10,000
authorized

schools
and
2
million
IB
students
by
the
year
2020.
The
IB
Diploma
Program
(DP),
a
college
preparatory

program
offered
during
the
last
two
years
of
high
school,
equips
students
with
a
unique
set
of
skills

necessary
to
succeed
at
college
and
university
and
prepare
them
for
life
in
the
21st
century.
The
IB

Diploma
Program
is
currently
offered
in
more
than
2,000
schools
in
135
countries
worldwide.

In
the
US,

668
schools
offer
the
Diploma
Program.

Students
receiving
an
IB
Diploma
take
exams
in
6
subject
areas

(both
Higher
Level
and
Standard
Level),
write
an
extended
essay
of
4,000
words,
complete
a

requirement
of
150
hours
of
creativity,
action
and
service,
and
a
critical
thinking
course,
Theory
of

Knowledge.

In
a
2006
article
in
Education
Week,
Barmak
Nassirian
of
American
Association
of
Collegiate

Registrars
and
Admissions
Officers
called
the
Diploma
Program
"the
best‐kept
secret
in
high
school

reform"
and
"the
gold
standard
of
high
school
curriculum
in
admissions
circles."



Federal
and
state
governments
have
also
recognized
the
level
of
quality
and
rigor
in
the
IB
programs
and

have
increased
support
for
IB
programs
through
legislation
and
grants.

Within
the
US,
many
universities

offer
up
to
a
year’s
worth
of
credit
for
the
IB
Diploma,
and
17
states
(including
Florida,
Texas,
Colorado,

Georgia
and
others)
have
legislation
or
systemwide
policies
granting
one
year
of
credit
for
students

completing
the
IB
Diploma.





In
November
2007,
the
Thomas
B.
Fordham
Institute
released
a
report,
AP
and
IB
–
Do
They
Deserve

Gold
Star
Status?

The
authors,
Chester
Finn
and
Sheila
Byrd,
and
several
subject
area
experts,
reviewed

the
content
of
AP
and
IB
standard
level
courses
in
4
subject
areas,
math,
English,
biology
and
history
and

found
that
the
IB
program
and
assessments
are
“rigorous,
fair
and
intellectually
richer
than
almost
any

state
standard
and
exam
for
high
school
that
we’ve
seen.”

In
addition,
they
recommended
that
policy

makers
“either
make
state
high
school
exit
requirements
and
assessments
more
like”
IB
or
allow
“credits

to
serve
as
proof
that
students
have
met
rigorous
high
school
exit
expectations.”



Paul
Gross,
one
of
the
reviewers
of
the
science
curriculum
for
the
Fordham
report
mentioned
above,
is
a

former
provost
at
the
University
of
Virginia
and
a
retired
university
professor
in
life
sciences.

Dr.
Gross

wrote
an
article
in
the
Spring
2008
issue
of
the
American
Educator,
stating
“The
IB
program,
a
rigorous,

internationally
monitored
two‐year
curriculum,
is
mature
(40
years
old)
and
highly
organized.

Curriculum
design
is
under
continuous
review
by
experts,
many
of
them
university
faculty
in
relevant

disciplines.
The
courses
are
meant
to
reflect
and,
if
appropriate,
to
substitute
for,
introductory
college

courses
in
each
subject.”



Recently,
David
Conley
and
his
research
team
at
EPIC
reviewed
the
IB
Diploma
standards
and
compared

the
IB’s
standards
to
the
Knowledge
and
Skills
for
University
Success
(KSUS).
They
found
that
IB
meets
or

exceeds
the
requirements
for
the
first
year
of
university.

(Their
report
is
available
at

http://epiconline.org/ib/.)

The
report
states
that
“The
results
of
this
study
clearly
confirm
the
strong

relationship
between
the
IB
Diploma
Programme
and
standards
for
college
readiness
and
success.
The

IB
standards
demonstrate
a
very
high
degree
of
alignment
with
the
KSUS
standards
in
all
subject
areas.



                                                     1



In
addition,
many
of
the
individual
IB
standards
are
at
a
level
more
advanced
than
entry‐level
college

courses.”


Current
research

There
is
currently
very
little
data
on
the
benefits
of
IB
as
preparation
for
college
and
the
trends
among

IB
students
in
university.

A
handful
of
studies,
however,
have
shown
positive
outcomes.
Taylor
and

Porath
(2006)
of
the
University
of
British
Columbia
surveyed
16
IB
diploma
students
to
study

perceptions
of
their
experience
after
they
graduated
from
college.
According
to
the
study,
88%
“felt
that

they
were
better
prepared
for
introductory
level
postsecondary
courses.”

In
addition,
a
similar

percentage
found
that
the
experience
also
helped
them
beyond
college
with
their
career.

When
asked

about
the
“long‐lasting
personal
benefits
to
participating
in
the
program,”
students
believed
they

carried
forward
a
strong
work
ethic;
critical
thinking,
organizational,
time
management
and

communication
skills;
and
a
broader
perspective
of
the
world.


Poelzer
and
Feldhausen
(1996)
interviewed
teachers
who
taught
IB
and
non‐IB
classes.

The
teachers

reported
that
IB
students
"show
relatively
high
levels
of
motivation,
task
commitment,
questioning,

independence,
intelligence,
ability
to
see
connections
among
concepts,
desire
to
understand,

management
skills
and
taking
responsibility
for
their
own
learning.”
To
measure
the
impact
of

participation
in
the
program,
the
authors
assessed
the
performance
of
56
students
(both
IB
and
non‐IB)

on
an
AP
test
at
the
beginning
of
the
academic
year
and
the
end
of
the
academic
year.

Overall,
IB

students
scored
significantly
higher
than
non‐IB
students
in
the
three
subjects
that
were
tested,

Chemistry,
Physics
and
Biology.



William
Kolb,
an
admissions
officer
at
the
University
of
Florida,
noted
anecdotally
that
students
from
IB

programs
appeared
to
arrive
better
prepared
for
college
and
to
outperform
their
peers
in
the
freshman

class.

By
examining
data
on
University
of
Florida
freshmen
during
the
1996‐1997
school
year,
Kolb
and

his
colleague,
Eckhardt
(1998)
identified
that,
among
this
class
of
3,000
students,
IB
students
had
higher

SAT
scores
on
average
and
were
less
susceptible
to
the
decline
in
GPA
that
most
students
experience
in

transitioning
from
high
school‐
to
college‐level
coursework.

In
fact,
the
average
GPA
for
IB
students

during
their
freshman
year
(3.3)
was
notably
higher
than
that
for
standard
college
preparation
students

(2.6)
and
slightly
higher
than
that
of
advanced
placement
(AP)
students
(3.1).




These
findings
are
consistent
with
a
subsequent
study
of
1,816
IB
students
who
entered
the
University

of
Florida
system
from
1998‐2000
(Panich,
2001).
IB
students
were
matched
based
on
SAT
scores
to

non‐IB
students.
Panich
found
that
the
average
first‐year
GPA
of
IB
diploma
students
consistently

exceeded
that
of
the
matched
students,
as
well
as
IB
certificate
students.


A
dissertation
study
conducted
by
Linda
Duevel
(1998)
surveyed
college
registrars
and
IB
diploma

students
and
analyzed
participation
in
the
IB
program
as
a
predictor
of
college
success.

Ninety‐two

percent
of
the
respondents
earned
a
bachelor’s
degree
and
87%
of
IB
diploma
holders
earned
their

degrees
in
five
years
or
less.

In
addition,
59%
of
the
students
receiving
IB
diplomas
advanced
to

graduate
school.

Another
finding
was
that
most
IB
diploma
holders
believed
their
IB
experience
had
a




                                                     2



positive
impact
on
their
global
awareness,
understanding
of
complex
assignments,
critical
thinking
and

time
management
skills.



In
2003,
IB
North
America
conducted
a
student
survey
asking
IB
exam
candidates
about
their
scores
on

the
SAT
and
ACT
exams.
IB
North
America
received
responses
from
6,392
candidates
from
131
schools
in

29
states.

The
mean
SAT
score
for
the
IB
exam
candidates,
1274,
was
significantly
higher
than
the

average
score
for
the
total
population,
1026,
in
2003.

The
mean
score
for
diploma
candidates,
1309,

was
even
higher
than
the
mean
score
obtained
by
certificate
candidates,
1201.




Analysis
of
trends
in
IB
students
in
the
University
of
California
system


IB
worked
with
the
University
of
California
Office
of
the
President
(UCOP)
in
obtaining
a
dataset
of

students
who
first
enrolled
in
the
University
of
California
(UC)
system
during
the
period
of
2000
to
2002.


This
analysis
focuses
on
1,547
IB
students
who
enrolled
at
a
university
in
the
UC
system
between
2000

and
2002,
and
a
matched
comparison
group
of
5,253
non‐IB
students
in
the
UC
system.

Exact
matches

for
year
of
enrollment
and
race/ethnicity
were
made.
In
addition,
cases
were
matched
based
on
family

income
and
high
school
academic
performance,
using
GPA,
SAT
and
ACT
performance.

The
data
and

analysis
presented
below
are
excerpted
from
a
lengthier
and
more
technical
analysis
by
the
IB’s

research
team.


Table
1.
Breakdown
of
the
Number
of
Students
in
the
UCOP
dataset


    

                    2000
     2001
       2002
      Total

    IB
students
           402
      649
        496
      1,547

    Comparison
           1,429
    2,154
      1,670
     5,253

    UC
students
         29,574
   31,519
     32,365
    93,458




The
distribution
of
students
by
race
and
ethnicity
of
IB
students
attending
UC
schools
and
the
overall
UC

population
is
similar
(Table
2).



Table
2.
Breakdown
of
Students
in
the
UCOP
dataset
by
Race/Ethnicity


                                                      Asian/Filipino/

                         American
 African
 Chicano/
     Pacific

    
      
              Indian
  American
 Latino
     Islander
     White
 Other
 Unknown

    2000
 IB
students
     0.7%
       2.2%
       11.2%
           31.8%
     41.8%
    1.7%
     10.4%

      
   Comparison
      0.6%
       2.5%
       11.8%
           32.8%
     40.5%
    1.9%
      9.9%

          UC

      
   students
        0.5%
       3.0%
       12.2%
           37.4%
     36.7%
    1.5%
     7.0%

    2001
 IB
students
     0.6%
       1.2%
       10.8%
           39.1%
     39.0%
    1.4%
     7.9%

      
   Comparison
      0.6%
       1.5%
       10.9%
           39.8%
     38.3%
    1.2%
     7.7%

          UC

      
   students
        0.5%
       2.8%
       13.1%
           38.1%
     36.3%
    1.8%
     6.9%

    2002
 IB
students
     0.4%
       2.0%
       11.3%
           43.8%
     33.5%
    1.0%
     8.1%



                                                     3



        
       Comparison
                    0.4%
            2.0%
      11.7%
      45.4%
     31.6%
   0.9%
      8.1%

                UC

        
       students
                      0.5%
            3.0%
      13.4%
      38.6%
     35.7%
   1.5%
      6.1%




In
California,
state
law
requires
that
public
high
schools
meet
specific
accountability
standards.
The
state

calculates
an
Academic
Performance
Index
(API)
for
each
public
school
in
California,
based
on
a
formula

that
includes
the
performance
of
students
on
various
standardized
tests.
In
addition
to
receiving
API

scores,
schools
are
ranked
in
deciles.

A
school
receives
an
API
school
rank
ranging
from
1
to
10.

A

school
with
an
API
rank
of
10
represents
the
highest
rank,
meaning
that
the
schools
falls
in
the
top
ten

percent,
according
to
the
API
rank.1



A
majority
of
the
IB
students
(60%)
attended
high
schools
with
an
API
rank
of
7
to
10
(Table
3).

Fifty

percent
of
the
UC
students
attended
schools
with
an
API
rank
of
7
or
higher.
(The
API
rank
for
the

comparison
group
was
not
available.)

A
smaller
percentage
of
IB
students
attended
schools
with
an
API

rank
of
1
or
2,
which
represent
schools
in
the
lowest
performing
20%
of
schools
in
the
state.


Table
3.
Distribution
of
high
school
API
rank
of
IB
students
and
UC
students
overall2


                                                        API
Rank

      API
Rank

   API
Rank

   API
Rank

       API
Rank


    
       
                                            1
to
2
         3
to
4
      5
to
6
      7
to
8
          9
to
10

      2000
 IB
students
                                 3.8%
           14.2%
       20.6%
       29.7%
           31.6%

    
       UC
students
                                 7.3%
           10.4%
       13.4%
       14.6%
           34.2%

      2001
 IB
students
                                 4.6%
            9.9%
       22.6%
       25.1%
           37.8%

    
       UC
students
                                 7.0%
           10.1%
       12.9%
       16.8%
           34.1%

      2002
 IB
students
                                 5.3%
           14.3%
       20.4%
       31.8%
           28.2%

    
       UC
students
                                 7.6%
           10.9%
       13.3%
       15.8%
           33.6%




GPA
and
Graduation
Rates
of
IB
Students



IB
students
earned
higher
grade
point
averages
than
both
students
in
the
comparison
group
and

students
in
the
UC
population
overall.3
The
differences
in
the
mean
GPAs
of
IB
students
and
the

comparison
group
were
statistically
significant
for
all
three
cohorts
in
the
first
year,
and
for
the
2000
and

2002
cohorts
at
graduation.

The
graduation
rates
for
the
2000
and
2002
cohort
of
IB
students
were

higher
than
the
comparison
group
and
the
overall
UC
population;
however,
graduation
rates
for
the

2001
cohort
were
virtually
identical
for
IB
students
and
UC
students
overall.

In
2001,
the
UC
system

implemented
a
new
admissions
policy,
Eligibility
in
the
Local
Context
(ELC).

According
to
the
ELC
policy,

a
student
ranking
in
the
top
4
percent
in
their
high
school
class
are
guaranteed
admission
to
one
of
the
































































1
  
A
complete
description
of
API
and
API
rank
can
be
found
online
in
the
State
of
California’s
API
Reports

Information
Guide:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ap/documents/infoguide08.pdf).

2
  
API
rank
for
comparison
group
was
not
provided
by
UCOP
to
the
International
Baccalaureate.

3
  
At
the
time
of
this
writing,
the
University
of
California
has
not
released
grade
point
averages
at
graduation
for
the

2002
cohort.


                                                                             4



campuses
in
the
UC
system.

This
new
policy
did
impact
the
profile
of
all
students
entering
the
student

body
in
that
year.

According
to
a
UCOP
memo,
the
ELC
program
also
accounted
for
5.4%
of
the
increase

in
applications
in
2001.
In
addition,
UC
saw
an
increase
in
both
the
number
of
applications
(8%)
and
the

number
of
students
admitted
(10%)
significantly
in
that
year.

Possibly
as
a
result
of
this
policy,
the
IB

cohort
entering
the
UC
system
looked
more
like
the
overall
UC
population
than
in
either
2000
or
2002
in

terms
of
test
scores,
race/ethnicity,
high
school
API
rank,
and
parent
income.

In
addition,
differences

between
the
IB
and
the
non‐IB
cohort
for
that
year
are
not
as
large
as
in
other
years.





                                    First
year
GPA
and
GPA
at
graduation

                                        IB
students
      Comparison
       UC
overall


    3.50
                                                           3.30
3.22
         3.26
3.24
3.17
   3.28

            3.11
             3.12
              3.10
                        3.16

                 2.93
2.91
        3.00
2.94
         2.93
2.94

    3.00

    2.50

    2.00

    1.50

    1.00

    0.50

                                                                                                                 n/a
 n/a

    0.00

               2000
              2001
                2002
            2000
              2001
            2002


                              After
1
year
                                           At
graduation

                                                                                                                             


IB
students
in
the
UC
system
had
consistently
higher
graduation
rates
than
comparison
group
students.


The
graduation
rates
among
IB
students
ranged
from
1
to
11
percentage
points
higher
than
the

comparison
group.






                                                               5



                                                  4‐Year
Graduation
Rate



              IB
students
                                                                              56%

    2000





              Comparison
                                                             45%


               UC
overall
                                                                       51%


              IB
students
                                                                        52%

    2001






              Comparison
                                                                    49%


               UC
overall
                                                                          54%


              IB
students
                                                                                      60%

    2002






              Comparison
                                                                 48%


               UC
overall
                                                                               56%


                             0%
       10%
       20%
          30%
        40%
          50%
            60%
              70%

                                                                                                                                   






                                              6‐Year
Graduation
Rate



               IB
students
                                                                             88%

     
2000





              Comparison
                                                                        81%


                UC
overall
                                                                      81%


               IB
students
                                                                       82%

     
2001





              Comparison
                                                                        81%


                UC
overall
                                                                      81%


               IB
students
                                                                              89%

     
2002





              Comparison
                                                                        81%


                UC
overall
                                                                       82%


                              0%
   10%
   20%
   30%
   40%
     50%
   60%
      70%
   80%
      90%
        100%

                                                                                                                        


Graduation
rates
in
the
UC
system
were
highest
among
those
students
who
successfully
completed
the

IB
diploma,
compared
to
both
candidates
who
attempted
the
diploma
but
were
not
successful
and
to

certificate
candidates.

In
addition,
the
6‐year
graduation
rate
for
IB
students
in
the
UC
system
is
higher

than
the
rate
for
IB
students
nationally
during
the
same
time
period.

According
to
the
data
obtained




                                                         6



from
the
National
Student
Clearinghouse,
the
graduation
rate
for
IB
students
entering
university
in
the

US
is
69%.

Graduation
rates
for
the
UC
population
overall
are
also
higher
than
the
national
average.


University
Performance
and
High
School
API
Rank


The
GPAs
of
the
IB
students
were
consistently
higher
than
those
of
non‐IB
students
in
both
the
first
year

of
college
and
at
graduation,
regardless
of
the
API
rank
of
a
student’s
high
school.

However,
these

numbers
need
to
be
interpreted
with
some
caution.

The
number
of
IB
students
who
attended
high

schools
with
an
API
rank
of
1
or
2
is
small
(Table
4).
In
addition,
high
school
API
ranks
were
not
available

for
the
comparison
group,
only
for
the
UC
population
overall.


                     Table
4.
Number
of
IB
students
in
the
UC
system,
by
high
school
API
rank


                             API
Rank
                            2000
                    2001
               2002

                             1
to
2
                                12
                      25
                 22

                             3
to
4
                                45
                      54
                 59

                             5
to
6
                                65
                     123
                 84

                             7
to
8
                                94
                     137
                131

                             9
to
10
                              100
                     206
                116




The
six
year
graduation
rate
for
IB
students
was
consistently
higher
across
all
API
ranks,
compared
to
the

overall
UC
graduation
rate,
although
the
data
for
API
rank
1
to
2
should
be
interpreted
cautiously
due
to

the
small
sample
size.


                                          UC
6
‐Year
Graduation
Rate
by
School
API
Rank

                                                                 IB
students
             UC
students

                                                                                                                                     95%
                91%

    100%
             84%
                         83%
      83%
      83%
        84%
      88%
      90%

                                                                                                                 84%

                                                                                                                           90%
                87%

                                82%

            75%
                         76%

     80%
                                                                                                                                   85%
      86%
      85%

                                                                                81%
      80%
      81%
      81%
      82%
      84%

                                       72%
     76%
      76%
      78%

     60%
          72%
      70%


     40%

     20%

      0%

             2000
 2001
 2002
 2000
 2001
 2002
 2000
 2001
 2002
 2000
 2001
 2002
 2000
 2001
 2002


               API
Rank
1
to
2
               API
Rank
3
to
4
                  API
Rank
5
to
6
           API
Rank
7
to
8
              API
Rank
9
to
10

                                                                                                                                                                       


Relationship
between
IB
assessments
and
university
performance


IB
Candidates
that
received
the
Diploma
are
the
most
likely
to
graduate
from
university
and
show

graduation
rates
significantly
higher
than
both
IB
certificate
candidates
and
the
UC
population
overall.


The
chart
below
compares
the
graduation
rates
for
the
different
type
of
IB
candidates
within
the
UC




                                                                           7



system
and
nationwide,
according
to
the
National
Student
Clearinghouse
(NSC)
data.


                   UC
graduation
rates
for
IB
students
enrolling
between
2000‐2002

            Certificate
Candidates
(n=739)
              Diploma
Candidates
(n=808)
                Diploma
Received
(n=643)



    100%
                                                       90.4%
                          91.6%

                                                83.9%
 87.6%
                   85.3%
 88.9%

                                                                                                                       79.6%
 83.5%

     80%
                                                                                                     64.9%

                                  61.7%

                54.3%
 56.8%

     60%

     40%

     20%

      0%

             4
year
graduation
rate
         6
year
graduation
rate
         7
year
graduation
rate
 6/7
year
graduation
rate

                      (UC)
                           (UC)
                           (UC)
                   (NSC)

                                                                                                                                           

NOTE:
Certificate
students
are
defined
as
students
who
have
taken
one
or
more
IB
exams,
but
have
not
enrolled
in
the
full

diploma
programme.


IB
certificate
candidates,
who
earned
a
4
or
above
on
multiple
exams,
were
more
likely
to
graduate
from

the
UC
system
within
6
years.





              UC
graduation
rate
for
certificate
candidates,
based
on
number
of
exams
with

                                             score
of
4
or
above


                                           0
(n=66)
       1
(n=378)
        2
or
more
(n=295)


    100%
                                                                               84.7%
 87.8%

                                                        82.5%
 87.1%

                                               77.3%
                          77.3%
                                         74.7%

     80%
                         64.1%
                                                                             63.4%

     60%
                48.9%
                                                                             48.4%

                40.9%

     40%

     20%

      0%

             4
year
graduation
rate
 6
year
graduation
rate
 7
year
graduation
rate
 6/7
year
graduation
rate

                                                                                              (NSC)

                                                                                                                                       

NOTE:
Certificate
students
are
defined
as
students
who
have
taken
one
or
more
IB
exams,
but
have
not
enrolled
in
the
full

diploma
programme.


IB
Performance
as
a
predictor
of
University
Performance
–
Grade
Point
Average
(GPA)
and
Graduation


A
series
of
regression
analyses
were
conducted
to
examine
how
a
variety
of
IB
assessment
indicators
in

high
school
(the
number
of
IB
exams
taken,
average
scores
on
IB
exams,
diploma
points
earned,
etc.)

predicted
first‐year
college
GPA
and
GPA
at
graduation,
controlling
for
high
school
GPA,
SAT
and
ACT

scores,
parental
income
and
high
school
API
rank.





                                                                        8



    What
is
the
relationship
between
the
number
of
subject
exams
and
GPA
in
university?


    The
average
score
earned
on
subject
exams
is
a
statistically
significant
predictor
of
GPA,
and
is
a

    stronger
predictor
of
college
GPA
than
the
number
of
IB
exams
taken.
High
school
performance,
as

    measured
by
high
school
GPA
and
SAT
or
ACT
scores,
is
also
a
statistically
significant
predictor
of

    GPA
in
university,
while
family
income
and
high
school
API
are
not
strongly
associated
with

    university
GPA.


The
number
of
higher
level
and
the
number
of
standard
level
exams
are
not

    significant
predictors
of
university
performance.




    

    What
is
the
relationship
between
the
score
on
higher
level
exams
and
standard
level
exams,

    respectively,
and
GPA
in
university?


    While
the
number
of
standard
and
higher
level
exams
was
not
a
strong
predictor
of
college

    performance,
the
average
score
on
higher
level
and
standard
level
exams
were
statistically

    significant
predictors
of
college
GPA.
The
performance
on
the
more
challenging
higher
level
exams,

    such
as
chemistry,
physics,
and
math,
was
a
stronger
predictor
of
GPA
in
university
than

    performance
on
any
of
the
standard
level
exams.



    Performance
on
higher
level
exams
was
also
a
better
predictor
of
university
performance
than
any

    other
indicator
of
high
school
performance,
including
scores
of
SAT,
ACT
or
high
school
GPA.


    Performance
on
standard
level
exams
held
less
predictive
value
for
university
performance.

Both

    high
school
GPA
and
scores
on
the
SAT
and
ACT
were
all
better
predictors
of
university
GPA
than

    scores
on
standard
level
exams.



    Which
fields
of
study
do
IB
students
pursue
in
the
UC
system?


    The
fields
of
study
pursued
by
IB
students
are
similar
to
those
of
UC
students
at
large,
though
IB

    students
seem
to
pursue
multi‐disciplinary
areas
of
study
at
somewhat
higher
rates
than
the
UC

    population
at
large.
Data
from
2002
are
used
as
a
representative
benchmark
in
Table
5
below,

    because
no
significant
differences
were
found
between
2002
and
the
other
cohorts.
The
top
10

    chosen
fields
of
study
for
IB
students
are
shown
below.




    Table
5.
Top
10
Chosen
fields
of
study
for
IB
students,
comparison
group
students,
and
UC
students

    overall



                                                             IB
        Comparison
            UC

     Field
of
Study
                                      students
       Group
            Students

     Multi/interdisciplinary
studies
                      21.7%
         22.2%
             14.9%

     Biological
and
biomedical
sciences
                   16.1%
         14.7%
             14.7%

     Social
sciences
                                      13.9%
         14.7%
             14.6%

     Engineering
                                           9.8%
         11.0%
              8.6%

     Psychology
                                            6.7%
          6.7%
              7.6%

     Business,
management,
and
marketing
                   4.5%
          4.8%
              5.4%

     Visual
and
performing
arts
                            4.3%
          4.1%
              4.9%



                                                     9



        English
language
and
literature/letters
            3.7%
           3.7%
              3.2%

        History
                                            3.4%
           2.4%
              2.6%

        Physical
sciences
                                  2.5%
           1.8%
              2.3%

        Computer
and
information
sciences
                  2.1%
           2.5%
              1.8%




Conclusion


The
analysis
of
the
UCOP
data
identifies
several
trends
in
IB
student
performance
in
higher
education:



    •     IB
students
have
higher
GPAs
than
both
the
comparison
group
and
the
UC
student
population

          overall.

This
finding
held
true
for
2
of
the
3
cohorts
(entering
the
UC
system
in
2000
and
2002)

          at
the
end
of
their
first
year
of
study
and
upon
graduation.

Trends
were
also
studied
across
the

          different
demographic
and
socioeconomic
groups.

IB
students
performed
better
as
a
group

          overall.
In
addition,
IB
students
who
attended
schools
with
low
API
ranks
(an
indicator
of
the

          quality
of
public
high
schools
in
California)
and
IB
students
who
came
from
lower
socio‐
          economic
backgrounds
significantly
outperformed
non‐IB
students
in
those
categories.


          

    •     IB
students
consistently
have
higher
graduation
rates.

The
difference
between
IB
students
and

          the
comparison
group
varied
from
year
to
year.

However,
IB
students
were
more
likely
to

          graduate.

California
uses
an
index,
the
Academic
Performance
Index
(API),
to
indicate
the

          performance
of
public
high
schools
in
the
state.

Schools
are
given
a
ranking
based
on
the
decile

          of
their
performance.

IB
students
attending
high
schools
with
low
API
ranks
(of
1
to
2)
have

          graduation
rates
similar
to
students
who
graduated
from
much
higher
ranked
high
schools.

In

          addition,
all
IB
students
who
received
the
Diploma
were
more
likely
to
graduate
at
both
the
4

          year
and
6
year
mark.



    •     The
strongest
predictor
of
performance
in
university
is
the
performance
on
the
Diploma.

The

          students’
score
on
the
Diploma
has
the
strongest
predictive
value
on
the
overall
GPA
in

          university.

Scores
on
the
IB
subject
exams
are
also
a
strong
predictor
of
performance
in

          university,
with
performance
on
the
more
challenging
higher
level
exams,
chemistry,
biology,

          and
math,
having
the
strongest
predictive
value.




The
trends
in
graduation
rates
confirm
earlier
analysis
done
on
a
national
sample
of
IB
students
through

data
obtained
from
the
National
Student
Clearinghouse.

In
addition,
IB
is
also
doing
similar
analysis
of

IB
students
in
university
in
the
state
system
in
Florida.

Early
findings
suggest
similar
patterns
in
GPAs

and
graduation
rates
in
comparison
to
non‐IB
peers.

The
data
from
Florida
will
also
provide
further

insight
into
the
relationship
between
subject
scores
on
IB
exams
and
performance
in
university
in
the

same
subjects.







                                                     10




								
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