earthquake An by halimatunsadiah

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									An  earthquake          (also known as a quake, tremor, or temblor) is the result of a sudden release of
energy in the Earth's crust that creates seismic waves. Earthquakes are recorded with a seismometer,
 also known as a seismograph. The moment magnitude (or the related and mostly obsolete Richter
magnitude) of an earthquake is conventionally reported, with magnitude 3 or lower earthquakes being
mostly imperceptible and magnitude 7 causing serious damage over large areas. Intensity of shaking is
                                measured on the modified Mercalli scale.

   At the Earth's surface, earthquakes manifest themselves by shaking and sometimes displacing the
ground. When a large earthquake epicenter is located offshore, the seabed sometimes suffers sufficient
displacement to cause a tsunami. The shaking in earthquakes can also trigger landslides and occasionally
                                           volcanic activity.

A third of Haiti's population of nine million were in the capital Port-au-Prince at 16:53 local time on
January 12th when the devastating earthquake struck.

According to government estimates some 250,000 houses and 30,000 commercial buildings collapsed
with people inside. The death toll is thought to be around 230,000, although the exact figure is disputed,
with 300,000 more believed to have been injured and 1.2 million left needing emergency shelter.

Haiti earthquake has been devastating and at this point in time, it is not possible to give accurate details
regarding the Haiti earthquake damage. A stage will come when the Haiti earthquake damage will be
reduced to mere statistics- X number of people have died, Y number of people have been left homeless
and Z amount of wealth has been lost. But with that will come injuries of Haiti victims that can't be seen,
nor can they be discussed in terms of statistics.

Haiti's devastating earthquake will leave emotional wounds, which will be the slowest to show up and
the most challenging to heal. Remember how you felt (and still fell) about 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina?
The post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that includes sleep disorders, depression, emotional numbing,
substance abuse and so on, all come into picture.
A number of relief teams and aid workers are pouring into Haiti from all corners of the world. These
include some excellent doctors and mental health professionals too. Psychologist Raymond F. Hanbury,
a trauma expert at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in Manasquan, N.J says, "They first have to see what
people's more basic needs are. The victims aren't equipped for counseling now and the psychologists
will be doing mostly assessment"

								
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