Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Children_ Physical Activity _ Health by tyndale

VIEWS: 7 PAGES: 17

									‘Objective Measurement of Physical Activity’
  Satellite Meeting of the ICDAM6 Conference




       Programme
           &
        Abstracts
    University of Southern Denmark
               Odense, Denmark

                 26th April 2006




            http://www.eyhs-satellite.sdu.dk/

                http://www.icdam6.dk/


                            1
Organisers 
The Satellite Seminar is organised by the Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, 
University of Southern Denmark in co‐operation with the Institute of Public Health, University of 
Cambridge. 
 
Organising Committee 
Karsten Froberg, University of Southern Denmark (Chair) 
Søren Brage, University of Cambridge, England 
Niels Wedderkopp, University of Southern Denmark 
Jes Bak Sørensen, University of Southern Denmark 
Niels Chr. Møller, University of Southern Denmark 
Peter Lund Kristensen, University of Southern Denmark 
Lone Holm Petersen, University of Southern Denmark 
Anders Grøntved, University of Southern Denmark 
Mathias Ried‐Larsen, University of Southern Denmark 
 
Scientific Committee 
Chris Riddoch, Middlesex University, London, England 
Angie Page, Bristol University, England 
Sigmund Anderssen, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway 
Luís Sardinha, Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal 
Lars Bo Andersen, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway 
Søren Brage, University of Cambridge, England  
Karsten Froberg, University of Southern Denmark 
 
Contact us 
Karsten Froberg, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics 
University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55  
DK‐5230 Odense M. 
Denmark 
E‐mail: kfroberg@health.sdu.dk                                      
Phone: +45 6550 3457       Alt. phone: +45 6550 3450 




                                                 2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




    Programme 




        3
12.00‐13.00     Registration and lunch 
 
13.00‐13.10     Karsten Froberg, University of Southern Denmark. Opening message 
13.10‐13.50     Nick Wareham, University of Cambridge. Why measure Physical Activity better? 
13.55‐14.35     Greg Welk, Iowa State University. Overview of Methods 
14.40‐15.20     Søren Brage, University of Cambridge. The need for individual calibration 
 
15.20‐15.40  Coffee break 
 
15.40‐16.20  Ulf Ekelund, University of Cambridge. Summation of free living physical activity 
             intensity data  
16.25‐17.05  Lars Bo Andersen, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences. Statistical considerations 
             N. C. Møller, University of Southern Denmark. Unit specific calibration of CSA 
             accelerometers model 7164 in a mechanical setting ‐ is it worth the effort? The effect on inter‐
             instrumental reliability in the laboratory and in the field 
17.10‐17.50  Ashley Cooper, University of Bristol. Using accelerometry and GPS to investigate the 
             influence of the environment on physical activity 
 
17.55‐18.45     Oral presentation 
                1. Rusk Z, Metcalf BS, Jeffery AN, Voss LD, Wilkin TC. Demonstration and Validation 
                of a Novel Dashboard to Simplify the Analysis of MTI/CSA  Accelerometer Data (The 
                EarlyBird Study) 
                Poster session 
                1. Besson H, Brage S, Jakes R, Ekelund U, Wareham N. Validation of the Recent Physical 
                Activity Questionnaire (RPAQ) 
                2. Rumo M. Estimating sleeping and waking periods using globally fixed compared to 
                individually assessed time points 
                3. Brandes M, Schomaker R, Möllenhoff G, Rosenbaum D. Physical activity vs. quality 
                of gait and quality of life 
                4. Grant PM, Ryan CG,Tigbe WW, Granat MH. Objective measurement of free‐living 
                physical activity using the activpaltm monitor 
                5. Mäder U, Ruch N, Rumo M, Martin BW. Simultaneous use of heart rate and 
                accelerometry to estimate energy expenditur. 
                6. de Vries SI, Bakker I, Hopman‐Rock M, Remy A. Hirasing RA, van Mechelen W. 
                Selecting an appropriate motion sensor in children and adolescents 
                7. Corder K, Brage S, Wareham NJ, Ekelund U. Comparison of  the Actigraph Models 
                7164 and GT1M during 7 days of free‐living activity in Indian children 
                8. Slinger J, Kruisifikx J, van Breda E, Kuipers H. Validation of the PAM accelerometer in 
                11‐15 year old children 
 
18.45‐19.00     Final remarks 
 
19.00‐          Standing buffet 



                                                      4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




    Abstracts 




        5
Satellite Meeting, April 26th 13.10 – 17.50 

Objective Measurement of Physical Activity
 
Professor Nick Wareham, University of Cambridge
Why measure Physical Activity better? 
 
Previous epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated the importance of physical activity in 
the aetiology of a range of chronic disorders. Although the instruments used in such studies to 
measure activity have some limitations, the fact that the associations observed are strong and 
consistent does rather beg the question ʺWhy bother to measure activity better ?ʺ. This talk will 
consider this question in relation to descriptive epidemiological studies of variation in activity by 
time, place and person, analytical studies focusing on specificity and dose‐response, trials and 
studies of gene‐physical activity interaction.  
 
 
Associate Professor Greg Welk, Iowa State University  
Overview of Methods
 
This session will provide a broad overview of objective assessments of physical activity. Emphasis 
will be placed on the use of accelerometry‐based physical activity monitors but other promising 
technologies will also be described. The presentation will chronicle the evolution of technology for 
activity assessment and describe the strengths and limitations of the various tools. Issues involved 
in the calibration of accelerometers will be described along with recommendations for data 
collection, and the processing and interpretation of accelerometer data. The presentation will 
conclude with an overview of promising new technologies and approaches that will further 
advance research on the assessment of physical activity.
 
 
Career Development Fellow Søren Brage, University of Cambridge 
The need for individual calibration
 
Combining accelerometry with heart rate monitoring may improve precision of physical activity 
measurement. Considerable variation exists in relationships between activity intensity and heart 
rate and accelerometry, which may be reduced by individual calibration. However, the need for 
individual calibration limits the feasibility of these techniques in population studies and thus it is 
important to develop simpler methods for calibration whilst maintaining a high degree of validity. 
In this talk, different alternative procedures for individual calibration are presented in comparison 
with a reference calibration procedure. 
 
 
 
 



                                                  6
Associate Professor Ulf Ekelund, University of Cambridge
Summary of free living physical activity intensity data
 
The development of small, light‐weight activity monitors based on accelerometry or the 
combination of movement sensing and physiological measures has made it possible to assess free‐
living physical activity in large scale epidemiological studies. However, the cleaning, analysis, and 
interpretation of free‐living physical activity data based on movement sensing need consideration. 
The current presentation will summarise and discuss different possibilities to summarise free 
living physical activity intensity data.  
 
 
Professor Lars Bo Andersen, The Norwegian School of Sport Science
Statistical considerations
 
EYHS has pooled data from many culturally diverse countries. These diversities have created 
problems in the assessment of key variables of physical activity, fitness and CVD risk. Patterns of 
activity differ, e.g. cycling, which make comparisons of MTI measurements difficult. Cycling 
habits may affect assessment of fitness assessed by cycle ergometry, and some blood 
measurements are not quite comparable between countries. These problems will be discussed.  ‐  
Secondly, different approaches of analysing longitudinal data will be given. 
 
 
Doctoral Student Niels Christian Møller, University of Southern Denmark 
Unit specific calibration of CSA accelerometers model 7164 in a mechanical setting ‐ is it 
worth the effort? The effect on inter‐instrumental reliability in the laboratory and in the 
field 
 
Introduction 
Quantifying instrument validity and reliability has become an increasingly important issue as the 
use  of  accelerometers  has  become  more  and  more  common.  When  applying  accelerometry  in 
epidemiological  studies  where  multiple  units  are  used,  effective  unit  specific  calibration  seems 
crucial  in  order  to  minimize  the  inter‐instrumental  out‐put  variation  which  has  been  observed 
under standardized conditions in a mechanical setup. 
In the present study, we hypothesised that if calibration factors were applied to accelerometer out‐
put,  a  reduced  random  population  variation  would  be  the  result.  Therefore,  the  purpose  was  to 
calculate unit specific calibration factors in a multiple number of accelerometers in order to test the 
impact on inter‐instrumental reliability.  
Methods 
Considerable  variations  were  observed  across  the  population  of  instruments  in  a  mechanical 
setting  in  the  laboratory  as  53  accelerometers  were  undergoing  a  rather  comprehensive  quality 
check  before,  and  during,  the  data  collecting  period  in  the  Danish  part  of  the  European  Youth 
Heart  Study  II.  Therefore,  individual  calibration  factors  were  calculated  for  all  units  since  our 
intention  was  to  examine  whether  calibration  could  increase  inter‐instrumental  reliability.  The 
effect on inter‐instrumental reliability was analysed by multiplying unit specific calibration factors 



                                                      7
to a) data obtained in a mechanical setup in the laboratory during the field data collecting period, 
and to b) data collected during free living conditions in the field. 
Results 
When  applying  unit  specific  calibration  factors  to  data  derived  in  the  mechanical  setup  in  the 
laboratory,  accelerometer  out‐put  went  from  5025  count*min‐1  to  4927  counts*min‐1.  Calibration 
caused  impact  on  increased  inter‐instrumental  reliability  was  quite  marked  as  the  standard 
deviation  was  reduced  dramatically  from  361  (95%  CI=338;388)  counts*min‐1  to  137  (95% 
CI=128;147) counts*min‐1 (62%). 
When applying unit specific calibration factors to field data collected during free living conditions, 
raw  average  activity  intensity  went  from  446  counts*min‐1  to  440  counts*min‐1.  Calibration  had 
literally  no  effect  on  inter‐instrumental  reliability,  as  the  group  variation  (standard  deviation) 
decreased by a minimum from 162 (95% CI=150;176) to 157 (95% CI=146;171) counts*min‐1 (3%). 
Conclusion 
Unit specific calibration factors shown to be appropriate to increase inter‐instrumental reliability in 
the  experimental  setting  in  the  laboratory  should  be  addressed  as  highly  questionable  when 
applied to field data reflecting more complex and heterogeneous movement of the human body. 
 
 
Associate Professor Ashley Cooper, Bristol University 
Using accelerometry and GPS to investigate the influence of the environment on physical 
activity 
 
The environment, both real (eg access to parks or other green spaces) and perceived (eg beliefs 
about how safe the environment is for play), is suggested to influence childrens levels of physical 
activity. There is some evidence that perceptions of the environment are associated with physical 
activity levels but little data about childrens use of the built environment to be active. Minute by 
minute accelerometry is now a common method of measuring the level and patterns of childrens 
activity, but does not tell you where activity takes place. The global positioning system (GPS) 
allows the location of an individual to be accurately mapped. Integration of these two methods 
will enable us to identify where around the school or home environment physical activity takes 
place. This presentation will describe these techniques and present preliminary data describing use 
of the environment for physical activity by primary school aged children. 
 




                                                      8
Oral and Poster presentations 17.55 – 18.45 
 
Oral presentations 
 
Abstract 1
Demonstration and Validation of a Novel Dashboard to Simplify the Analysis of MTI/CSA 
Accelerometer Data (The EarlyBird Study) 
 
Zoe Rusk, Brad S Metcalf, Alison N Jeffery, Linda D Voss, Terence J Wilkin 
Dept of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Peninsula Medical School, Plymouth, UK 
 
Introduction 
MTI/CSA accelerometers are an objective and accurate means of recording the physical activity 
(PA) of children. However, manual processing of the data is time consuming, vulnerable to error 
and liable to inconsistency. There is pressing need for a user‐friendly ‘dashboard’, a macro based 
on menu choices which set the criteria for the cleaning and capture of data in advance. 
Methods 
The ‘EarlyBird PA dashboard’ is an EXCEL™ macro designed to automate the steps routinely 
taken when manually processing physical activity files. The macro was designed around six 
principles, the dashboard’s menu allowing the user to: 
• Select thresholds to define up to 5 different intensities of physical activity  
• Select up to 7 time periods for analysis.  
• Set threshold for and patch in strings of zeros assumed to be when the monitor is removed 
during waking time.   
• Select earliest time in the morning and latest time in the evening/night where only PA data 
between these times would be considered. 
• Patch in periods of unrealistic intensity i.e. ≥14,000cpm for young children. 
• Display patched‐in data and % contribution it makes to the total data analysed.  
‘Patching in’ means replacing cells with the mean activity recorded during the same time period 
on other equivalent days. 
Results 
We have put together an animated PowerPoint presentation demonstrating the EarlyBird 
dashboard in practice, showing the macro processing a week’s activity file in approximately three 
minutes (manually 10‐15mins). We compared the macro data with manual data obtained from 
processing files of 100 EarlyBird children (7‐10y). The macro‐v‐manual mean differences in: total 
PA counts and minutes spent at low, medium and high intensities were all <3.0% (p<0.05, 
power>99%). E.g. for total PA counts the mean difference between the two methods was 0.5% 
where 95% of individual differences were within 4.5%. The two methods were highly correlated 
(r=0.99) and the slope coefficient from a linear regression analysis was 0.994.  
Conclusions  
The dashboard is reliable in practice, and takes less than a quarter of the time to process the data. It 
is envisaged that an Internet version could be made available for wider use.  
 
 



                                                   9
Posters presentations 
 
Abstract 1 
Validation of the Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire (RPAQ) 
 
H Besson, S Brage, R Jakes, U Ekelund, N Wareham 
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge CB1 9NL, United Kingdom 
 
Introduction 
We previously reported the validity of the EPIC‐Norfolk Physical Activity Questionnaire (EPAQ2) 
assessing usual activity in work, travel, recreation and domestic life using the past year as the 
frame of reference. As the validity was limited, we shortened the frame of reference to develop a 
new Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire (RPAQ) aimed at assessing usual physical activity in 
the past month. We now report the repeatability of RPAQ and its validity in estimating energy 
expenditure compared to objective measures of energy expenditure from the Doubly Labelled 
Water (DLW) method. 
Methods 
Twenty five women and 25 men, aged 21 to 55 years old were recruited. Total energy expenditure 
(TEE) was measured for 14 days with the DLW method. Last month physical activity was reported 
at the end of the DLW measurements. Repeatability was measured for a sub‐sample of 38 subjects 
who completed the questionnaire for a second time 4 months later. Energy costs of activities were 
scored according to the Physical Activity Compendium. 
Results 
Mean body mass index of participants was 24.5 kg/m2 (SD 3.5) and their physical activity level 
ranged from 1.19 to 2.56.  
The partial correlation coefficient for total score of activity (MET‐h/day) adjusted on time between 
administrations was 0.36 (p = 0.03). The lowest level of repeatability in a sub‐domain of activity 
was for activity at work (r=0.24; p = 0.14), whereas the highest was for vigorous activities (r = 0.70; 
p  <  0.0001). Age and gender did not affect these associations.  
Calculated TEE from RPAQ was associated with TEE from DLW (r = 0.72; p < 0.0001). Similarly, a 
correlation was observed between estimated physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE = TEE – 
RMR [resting metabolic rate]) and measured PAEE (r = 0.46; p = 0.0008). None of these associations 
was affected by age and gender.  
Conclusions 
This study suggests that the RPAQ is a valid instrument for estimating TEE and PAEE in healthy 
adults. Although the results from the repeatability study are modest, they reflect more the stability 
of activity rather than test‐retest reliability since the two administrations of the questionnaire did 
not overlap the same time‐period. 
 
 




                                                  10
Abstract 2 
Estimating sleeping and waking periods using globally fixed compared to individually 
assessed time points. 
 
Martin Rumo 
Swiss Federal Office of Sport 
 
Introduction 
Accelerometers  are  widely  used  in  objective  measurement  of  physical  activity.  In  order  to 
adequately  interpret  behavioural  patterns  concerning  physical  activity,  it  is  crucial  to  define 
waking  and  sleeping  periods.  If  no  self‐reports  are  available  from  the  subjects,  two  methods  are 
possible: Either one globally fixes points of time for rising and going to bed or one tries to estimate 
these points of time from the accelerometry data. The application of both methods is compared, by 
using an algorithm to assess sleeping and waking periods from the accelerometry data. 
Methods 
Accelerometry data was recorded from 50 individuals (26 males, 24 females, Age: 39 ± 11 years) 
wearing an Actigraph (Manufacturing Technology Inc. (MTI), Fort Walton Beach, FL, USA) for 4 to 
7 consecutive days. Counts were recorded minute‐by‐minute. For each day the longest time 
period, during which the mean counts over 10 minutes do not exceed 180 were considered to be 
the sleeping period.  For the accordingly assessed waking periods, the lengths of periods of low, 
moderate and vigorous activity as well as the mean counts per minute (mcpm) were compared 
with each other in a paired t‐test with the respective values when the waking period was globally 
set to 7.00 to 23.00.  
Results 
The differences between the two methods did reach statistical significance in all four variables 
(low: p<.001, moderate: p<.001, vigorous: p=.016, mcpm: p<.001).  
Their respective means were 731.1 ± 78.9 min/day , 157.8 ± 55.7, 11.9 ± 10.8, 437.4 ± 143.95 for the 
individually  assessed  method  and  802.4  ±  52.4,  147.5  ±  51.2,  11.0  ±  10.17  380.4  ±  129.29  for  the 
globally fixed method.  
Conclusions 
Globally fixing the waking period can lead to over‐ or underestimation of durations of all activity 
intensities as well as mean counts per minute. Since the automated method identifies the waking 
period with the interval that contains the moderate and vigorous activities, that can be lost by 
using globally fixed time points, it is recommended to use the individually assessed time points 
when no self‐reports are available. 
 
 




                                                       11
Abstract 3 
Physical activity vs. quality of gait and quality of life 
 
Mirko Brandes, Ralph Schomaker, Gunnar Möllenhoff, Dieter Rosenbaum 
Motion Analysis Lab, Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital of Muenster, Germany 
 
Introduction 
This study investigated the relationship between 1. physical activity (quantity of gait) measured 
with objective devices, 2. quality of gait assessed by clinical gait analysis and 3. quality of life. To 
ensure a larger spectrum in the quantity of gait, subjects designated to joint replacement due to 
unilateral osteoarthritis in the knee or hip joint were chosen. 
Methods 
Physical activity (PA) of 26 patients (58.6 years) was assessed with a) The accelerometer‐based 
DynaPort ADL‐monitor measured posture and locomotion for one day and b) The SAM Step‐
Activity‐Monitor, a small microprocessor‐operated acceleration sensor, recorded the number of 
gait cycles in 1‐minute‐intervals for one week. PA was compared to a group of 26 healthy subjects. 
The quality of gait was assessed with a six camera system in combination with two force plates. 
Quality of life was evaluated with the SF‐36 questionnaire. Spearman‐rank‐correlations were 
calculated between PA level, quality of gait and quality of life. 
Results 
The patients had worn the ADL‐monitor for 13.8 ± 1.5 hours and the SAM for 14.0 ± 1.4 hours per 
day. According to the ADL‐monitor, the subjects used 10.5% of the recorded time for locomotion, 
32.6% for standing, 43.9% for sitting and 12.5% for lying. The patients performed 4782 ± 2116 gait 
cycles per day. Nearly 80% of these gait cycles were performed with intensities <21 gait cycles per 
minute. The number as well as the intensity of patients’ gait cycles differed significantly from 
healthy adults. The sub‐categories of the SF‐36 for physical functioning and general health showed 
38 and 56 out of 100 points, respectively. Moderate correlations were found between the PA level 
and the quality of life but not between the PA level and the quality of gait.  
Conclusions 
The PA of the control group was nearly identical with previously reported healthy adults (1), 
whereas patients’ activity level was lower than values reported for hip and knee patients after 
surgery (2). Regarding the poor to moderate correlations between PA, quality of gait and quality of 
life, it appears mandatory for an objective judgement of a subject’s activity level to measure PA 
directly using appropriate methods. 
References 
(1) Busse, M. E., et al.: Quantified measurement of activity provides insight into motor function 
and recovery in neurological disease. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 75:884‐888, 2004. 
(2) Silva, M., et al.: Average patient walking activity approaches 2 million cycles per year: 
pedometers underrecord walking activity. J Arthroplasty. 17:693‐697, 2002. 
 
 




                                                   12
Abstract 4 
Objective measurement of free‐living physical activity using the activpaltm monitor 
 
P. M. Grant, C. G. Ryan, W. W. Tigbe, M. H. Granat 
School of Health & Social Care, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland 
 
Introduction 
Objective information about activity patterns and the amount of physical activity undertaken in 
the population is needed to provide appropriate recommendations for health programmes. 
However, even with recent advances in technology allowing for the use pedometery and 
accelerometery, accurate measurement of physical activity remains problematic. The activPALTM 
professional physical activity monitor (PAL Technologies Ltd, Glasgow, UK), is a single unit 
device, requiring no calibration, that identifies in real time, episodes of walking, sitting and 
standing allowing the measurement of both activity and inactivity. In addition, the monitor 
records step number and instantaneous cadence. 
The studies aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the activPAL monitor as a measure of 
free‐living activity. 
Study 1 
Method 
Ten adults wore three activPAL monitors to carry out everyday activities. Activities were videoed 
and classified by three observers into sitting, standing and walking. Data from the activPAL 
similarly classified and compared to those of observation (criterion method).  
Results 
Inter‐observer reliability [ICC (1)] was excellent (>0.97) and inter‐device reliability [ICC (1)] good‐
excellent (0.78‐0.99). Agreement between activPAL and observation by the Bland‐Altman method 
(2) was good‐excellent, mean difference of ‐2.0% to 0.2% (limits of ‐16.1% to 12.1%). Second‐by‐
second analysis yielded a percentage agreement of 95.9% with sensitivity and predictive values 
88.1% to 99.6% for different activities.  
Study 2 
Method 
Step‐count and cadence in 20 adults (12F, 8M) were evaluated during treadmill walking for five 
different speeds and outdoor walking at three self selected speeds. Trials were videoed and 
observation used as the criterion measure. Each participant wore four activPAL monitors.  
Results 
Inter‐device reliability [ICC (1)] was ≥0.99 for step‐count and cadence. Agreement by Bland‐
Altman method (2), between the activPAL and observation, was excellent for step‐count and 
cadence at all speeds, mean difference of 0% ‐ 1.0% (limits of ‐2.6% to +3.2%). 
Conclusion 
The activPAL activity monitor is a valid and reliable objective measure of free‐living physical 
activity. 
References 
Portney LG and Watkins MP. Foundations of Clinical Research. Applications to Practice. Norwalk, 
Conn.: Appleton & Lange, 1993 
Bland JM, Altmann DG. Measuring agreement in method comparison studies. Stat Methods Med 
Res 1999; 8: 135‐60. 



                                                  13
 
Abstract 5 
Simultaneous use of heart rate and accelerometry to estimate energy expenditure. 
 
Urs Mäder, Nicole Ruch, Martin Rumo, Brian W. Martin. 
Federal Institute of Sports Magglingen, Switzerland 
 
Introduction 
The importance of habitual physical activity for disease prevention is widely recognized. 
However, physical activity remains difficult to be measured accurately and the available 
measurement techniques have inherent limitations. The simultaneous use of heart‐rate and 
accelerometry may be useful to overcome some limitations of those methods, commonly used 
separately. The purpose of this study was to validate an approach that used heart rate and 
accelerometry (HRA) data to estimate energy expenditure (EE). 
Method 
Heart rate and accelerometry (biaxial) data were collected simultaneously by a chest mounted 
device every 10 sec during several activities. 6 of the volunteers were women (30.5 ± 11.6 y, BMI = 
22.8 ± 5.0), 10 were men (37.2 y, BMI = 26.6 ± 3.3). EE was measured by a portable metabolic 
system. Data of walking at 3 velocities on the flat and sitting were used to calibrate all measured 
values before scanning for activity specific data patterns and defining 8 activity classes. Prediction 
equations were developed to calculate EE for each activity class. Estimated EE based on HRA data 
was validated on 12 volunteers (6 females, 41.5  ± 14 y, BMI = 21.4  ± 2.6; 6 males, 39.3  ± 16.3 y, 
BMI = 22.3 ± 1.0) against whole‐body indirect calorimetry (WIC) during 10 h. The protocol 
included walking, biking, playing, and stepping, each for 30 min. Before entering the WIC, the 
volunteers performed the calibration procedure described above. 
Results: Total EE, averaged over 10 h, calculated by HRA and measured by WIC was equal 2.5 ± 
0.3 kcal/min. Average difference between the two method was 4.1 ± 3.1 kcal/min (Min = 0.7 %, Max 
= 10.1 %). There was no significant differences between EE determined by HRA and WIC during 
specified activities (walking: 1.1, p = 0.3; playing: 1.6, p = 0.1; stepping: ‐1.8 kcal/min, p = 0.1) except 
for biking (‐3.9 kcal/min, p= 0.002). 
Discussion 
The simultaneous use of heart rate and accelerometry seems to be a valid approach to estimate EE. 
However, additional comprehensive studies are needed to evaluate the validity of EE 
measurement by (HRA) during longer periods under free living conditions. 
 
 




                                                    14
Abstract 6 
Selecting an appropriate motion sensor in children and adolescents 
 
Sanne de Vries, Ingrid Bakker, Marijke Hopman‐Rock, Remy A. Hirasing, Willem van Mechelen. 
TNO Quality of Life, Department of Physical Activity and Health, Leiden, The Netherlands 
 
Introduction 
In  the  past  decades,  motion  sensors  have  evolved  from  simple  mechanical  devices  to  three‐
dimensional  accelerometers  that  can  be  used  to  assess  physical  activity  or  to  estimate  energy 
expenditure. Because many children and adolescents have difficulties in accurately recalling their 
physical activities, motion sensors are being used with increasing regularity. The purpose of the 
present  study  was  to  systematically  review  published  evidence  on  the  reproducibility,  validity, 
and  feasibility  of  motion  sensors  used  to  assess  physical  activity  in  healthy  children  and 
adolescents (2‐18 yr).  
Methods 
A  systematic  literature  search  was  performed  in  PubMed,  Embase,  and  SpycINFO.  The 
clinimetric  quality  of  two  pedometers  (Digi‐Walker,  Pedoboy),  four  one‐dimensional 
accelerometers  (LSI,  Caltrac,  Actiwatch,  CSA/ActiGraph),  and  three  three‐dimensional 
accelerometers  (Tritrac‐R3D,  RT3,  Tracmor2)  was  evaluated  and  compared  using  a  20‐item 
checklist.  
Results 
Overall,  the  quality  of  the  studies  (n  =  35)  and  therefore  the  level  of  evidence  for  the 
reproducibility, validity, and feasibility of the motion sensors was modest (mean = 6.4 ± 1.6 out of 
14 points). There was strong evidence for a good reproducibility of the Caltrac in adolescents (12‐
18  yr),  a  poor  reproducibility  of  the  Digi‐Walker  in  children  (8‐12  yr),  a  good  validity  of  the 
CSA/ActiGraph  in  children  and  adolescents  (8‐18  yr),  and  a  good  validity  of  the  Tritrac‐R3D  in 
children (8‐12 yr).  
Conclusions 
From  this  study  it  can  be  concluded  that:  1.  The  CSA/ActiGraph  is  the  most  studied  motion 
sensor  in  children  and  adolescents.  There  is  extensive  evidence  for  a  good  reproducibility, 
validity,  and  feasibility  of  the  CSA/ActiGraph  in  healthy  children  and  adolescents 
(reproducibility:  4‐18  yr;  validity:  3‐18  yr);  2.  There  is  no  information  on  the  reproducibility  of 
motion sensors in preschool children (2‐4 yr); 3. There is no information on the reproducibility of 
three‐dimensional accelerometers. 
Researchers and practitioners are strongly encouraged to regularly assess and report the 
clinimetric properties of the motion sensors they use, although not without improving the quality 
of the reported information. 
 
 




                                                       15
Abstract 7 
Comparison of the Actigraph Models 7164 and GT1M during 7 days of free‐living activity in 
Indian children 
 
Kirsten Corder, Søren Brage, Nicholas J. Wareham and Ulf Ekelund 
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, 120 Fulbourn Road, Cambridge, CB1 9NL, 
U.K 
 
Introduction 
The Actigraph (formerly CSA/MTI) is the most commonly used accelerometer in physical activity 
research. It has been proved valid to measure physical activity in children, both in a controlled 
laboratory environment and during free‐living (1,2). The new version (GT1M) replaces the 
discontinued Model 7164 and the two monitors differ substantially. To our knowledge, data from 
these two monitors has not been directly compared. This study aimed to determine whether data 
from the new Actigraph (GT1M) is comparable to that from the commonly used model (7164).  
 
Methods 
30 adolescents (15.8±0.6y) from Chennai, India wore the 7164 and GT1M Actigraph accelerometers 
simultaneously for 7 days. Two time‐synchronised Actigraphs, one 7164 and one GT1M, were 
attached to the same tight elastic waist belt, one monitor placed centrally on each hip. The GT1M 
and 7164 were set to record at 5 and 60 second epochs respectively, the shortest epoch allowing for 
7 days of continuous step and count measurement. All analyses were carried out using mean 
counts per minute (cpm), a measure which is unaffected by the time resolution of the activity data. 
The agreement between monitors was assessed using the Bland‐Altman method (3), Pearson 
correlation coefficients, paired t‐test and regression analyses. 
Results 
The correlation between monitors was r=0.89. The GT1M measured on average 7% higher than 
model 7164 (372.9±19.5 and 347.9±19.0 cpm, P=0.0121). A correction factor of 0.928 is suggested for 
comparison between 7164 and GT1M data. Bland‐Altman plots revealed no evidence of 
heteroscedasticity or trend for the difference between the two monitors to be associated with 
activity level.  
Conclusions 
The correlation between the monitors was high, indicating that data from the GT1M and 7164 
should be comparable using a correction factor. The increased memory capacity and reduced inter‐
monitor variability of the GT1M (unpublished results from mechanical calibration) suggest that the 
GT1M should produce more accurate and standardised physical activity data than the Model 7164, 
which could still be compared to historical data on mean counts per minute.   
References 
1. Trost, S. et al. MSSE 30:629‐633,1998. 
2. Eston, R., et al. JAP 84:362‐371,1998. 
3. Bland, J. and Altman, D. Lancet 8:307‐310,1986. 
 
 




                                                16
Abstract 8 
Validation of the PAM accelerometer in 11‐15 year old children 
 
Jantine Slinger, Liesbeth Kruisifikx, Eric van Breda, Harm Kuipers 
Department of Health Sciences, Maastricht University, 0031‐433881383 
 
Introduction 
It is important to test the validity of accelerometers in children, to be able to use the instruments in 
studying the relationship between physical activity and health. The Physical Activity Monitor 
(PAM) is a new Dutch accelerometer and is valid in use with adults. The aim of this study is to 
examine the validity of the PAM in children 11‐15 years old. 
Methods 
The PAM was validated against VO2 intake in 36 children. The children performed three different 
types of activities: treadmill walking in different velocities, four different exercises on the treadmill 
and cycling on an ergo meter. 
Results 
No significant correlations were found between PAM and VO2 for the tested activities. The linear 
mixed models method produces the following formula to predict the VO2 value from the PAM 
value in the walking part: VO2ij = 452 + 12,5 pamij + αi  + βipamij + eij. It was not possible to analyse 
the variable exercises part with this method. The linear mixed models of the cycling part showed 
that an increasing VO2 value does not affect the PAM value.   
Conclusions 
Contrary to the expectations we did not find significant correlations between PAM and VO2 
values. This is probably due to inter individual differences. The linear mixed models method 
shows a formula to predict the VO2 out of the PAM values, but because of a large error term, this 
formula can not be used in studying the physical activity level with the PAM in children. As 
expected in the cycling part there were no significant correlations, because the PAM is placed on 
the hip and measures movement of the torso and during cycling the torso does not move enough. 
We conclude that the PAM is not valid to evaluate the physical activity level in 11 to 15 year old 
children. 
 
 
 
 
The seminar is supported by: 
The Danish Ministry of the Interior and Health 
The Sports Science Research Council of the Ministry of Culture 
The Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark 
 




                                                   17

								
To top