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Disaster Awareness Guide

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					T H E B E S T H O S P I TA L S H AV E T H E B E S T T E C H N O L O GY

IT’S AS IF OUR HEART ATTACK TEAM

RUNS ON ROCKET FUEL.
When it comes to heart attacks, time is of the essence. Results are directly related to how quickly a patient receives treatment. And that’s especially true when it comes to one of the most serious forms of heart attack—the STelevated myocardial infarction, or STEMI. Of all the hospitals in the Inland Valley, Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center was the first designated STEMI Receiving Center, providing the most technologically advanced care for STEMI patients. Our people and procedures are so streamlined that patients who come through our Emergency Department doors can be in the Stead Heart and Vascular Center’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and on the way to a cure in less than 35 minutes. This advanced medical technology and the highly skilled doctors, nurses, and technicians who provide it are the reason Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center is the only designated STEMI Receiving Center in our area. The best tools for the job, in the hands of the best people—just what you expect at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center.
The science of medicine, the art of healing.

1798 N. Garey Avenue, Pomona, CA 909-865-9858 www.steadheart.org

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Trained, Prepared and Ready to Respond

Covina Police and Fire Departments
Th men and The men and women of the Covina P li e f th C i Police Department Department t t s stand ready stand ready to deliver on the department’s vision of Honor, d d Integrity, and Service each and every day. The 59 sworn officers and 52 full and part-time civilian personnel receive the most up to date training available in order to prepare them for their response to critical situations including natural disasters and the everyday routine calls for service. The Covina Police Department prides itself not only on its timely response to both emergency and routine calls for service, but also the quality of work performed by each and every member of its team in order to fulfill our goal of delivering the most complete and efficient service possible.

COVINA Fire & Life safety Services The Los Angeles County Fire Department provides effective fire suppression, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Response, Health HazMat, Urban Search and Rescue (USAR), Lifeguard Services, Swift-water Rescues, Terrorism & Bio Terrorism, Helicopters, Large-animal Rescues, Fire Prevention, Brush Clearance and Abatement, fire cause & investigation services to the residents and visitors of the City of Covina since 1997. Firefighters are strategically deployed into the three (3) fire stations which serve the City on a twenty-four hour basis. Additionally, several neighboring stations, personnel and large variety of resources support the “regional approach” towards fire protection.

City of Covina.125 East College Street, Covina CA 91723.626-331-0114.www.ci.covina.ca.us

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INSIDE
What To Do First ................................22 Triangle of Life: Helpful or Hoax?....28 The SoCal ShakeOut ..........................29 A User’s Guide to Emergencies........30 Vital Documents .................................31 Disaster Supply Inventory ..................32
GENERAL MANAGER Fred Board VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES & MARKETING Randy Heltsley SENIOR EDITOR Frank Pine EDITOR Stan Wawer COPY EDITOR Karen E. Weber

NOVEMBER 13, 2008

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RETAIL SALES MANAGER Robert Gonzales DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Chris Lancaster CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ben Baeder Dan Abendschein Richard Irwin Robert S. Hong George Watson LAYOUT & DESIGN Mary Roy

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features
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The Big One
BY BEN BAEDER

COVER DESIGN Mary Roy, Pedro Garcia

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Floods
BY RICHARD IRWIN

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Wildfires
BY GEORGE WATSON

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Be A Hero: Safety Training
BY RICHARD IRWIN

Disasters: What Can Happen To Us
BY RICHARD IRWIN

Southern California can be a real disaster with earthquakes, fires and floods.

Experts say the aftermath of “the big one” could leave thousands cut off from help, family and public safety workers.
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The flood control act of 1936 authorized the construction of the Santa Fe Dam on the San Gabriel River.
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Southern California’s wildlands are an environmental system that is bred to burn.

L.A. County Fire Departments offer free emergency training for residents.

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Keeping our promise to be prepared
The South Pasadena Police Department is composed of 35 sworn officers, including captains, sergeants and the chief of police, and 15 non-sworn personnel. The department is augmented with an additional 30 reserve police officers. The South Pasadena Police Department has one of the fastest response times in the state. In an emergency, the police can respond from one end of the city to the other in about 3 minutes! The police department operates on a Neighborhood Policing philosophy. The department maintains a School Resource Officer for the middle and high schools.

South Pasadena

Fire The Fire Department provides a full range of fire and life safety services to the residents and visitors of the City of South Pasadena. Staffed with 25 sworn-firefighters and two civilian personnel, the Fire Department provides effective fire suppression, emergency medical care, fire prevention and brush abatement, hazardous materials emergency response and inspection, fire cause investigation, and special services to the community. Firefighters are strategically deployed within the City on a twenty-four hour basis to assist residential and corporate citizens in preventing and controlling fires, treating and transporting the sick and injured, and minimizing losses when unfortunate accidents occur.

City of South Pasadena 1414 Mission Street * South Pasadena CA 91030 PHONE (626) 403-7200 * FAX (626) 403-7211 PG

www.ci.south-pasadena.ca.us

DISASTErS:

A San Gabriel Mountains wildfire rages and threatens homes as residents look on helplessly.

What Can Happen To Us
By Richard Irwin
Staff Writer

and we’re not just talking rush hour traffic. the Golden State has a surprising dark side: residents face a startling number of natural and man-made disasters. the los angeles area has been part of every disaster declared in California since 1950, according to a list compiled by the California office of emer6
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Southern California Can be a real diSaSter,

gency Services. Midway through that threepage list, a typo lists us as the city of Lost angeles. freudian slip or prophecy of doom? in the 1990s, the area was one of the most disaster prone places in the country, according to los angeles County’s office of emergency Management. declared disasters included floods and riots in 1992. More flooding, followed by fires in 1993. the
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northridge earthquake in 1994. floods again in 1995 and fires in 1996. Windstorms in 1997 changed things up a bit, followed by more flooding in 1998. “i was consulting for a firm that worked on disasters, and i never had to leave home,” said Jeanne o’donnell, now a program manager in the county’s office of emergency Management. despite spending every day on

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The

ll e takes its to Sylmar quak

ay overpas on this freew

s.

emergency plans, o’donnell is very upbeat. the Whittier resident makes you want to prepare for any disaster. She thinks we can make it through “the big one” if only by planning ahead. Which is appropriate, because Mother nature tries to flatten Southern California every 150 years or so with a huge earthquake, and experts say we’re way overdue for the next one.

HERE IS A VISUAL ExERCISE to help understand the tremendous forces building up under the earth’s crust:
Make two fists and bring your knuckles together with your arms parallel to the ground. Push inward and try to move your fists sideways. Your knuckles build up the stress until there’s enough force to push your fists apart. The Pacific and North American continental plates are Titan’s fists, pushing together as they try to slide past each other. When these continental knuckles give way, tremendous energy is released in the form of earthquakes.

it’s not a question of “if,” but actually “when.” Would you believe 10 a.m. nov. 13? actually, that’s the date of the Shakeout, the biggest earthquake drill ever held in California. the u.S. Geological Survey has teamed with 200 other partners in science, emergency services and business to build this earthquake scenario, which is modeled on a 7.8 quake along the southern San andreas fault. Geologists picked this area based on the amount of strain stored on that part of the fault with the greatest risk of imminent rupture. “Most scenarios for a 7.8 would involve the San andreas fault, but might involve different segments of it,” explained Kate hutton, a seismologist at Caltech in Pasadena. “the Shakeout scenario was chosen as one reasonable choice that was about the right level of ‘scariness’ desired for the earthquake drill, to catch
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THE BIG ONE

everyone’s interest and participation,” said hutton, who’s nicknamed the earthquake lady. Scientists say Southern California has thousands of earthquakes every year, but almost none are along the San andreas fault. the last large quake on our stretch of the fault was in 1857. “of course, there were no seismometers in those days, but based on the fault rupture, it appears to have been about 7.8 or 7.9,” hutton said. “there was hardly any damage because there was hardly anything here to damage. los angeles was a small settlement of single-story structures. there was an army base at fort tejon that was badly damaged,” said hutton, who consulted on the movie “tremors.” So how much damage would a major quake cause? experts calculate that a 7.8 quake similar to the Shakeout scenario would cause 2,000 deaths, 50,000 injuries and $200 billion in damages. like any near death experience, the quake will seem to last much longer. that’s because much of Southern California is built on sediments, which will cause the basin to reverberate with the seismic waves bouncing back and forth between the mountain ranges. and don’t be surprised if your neighborhood bursts into flames after the big quake. fires seem to be the handmaidens of natural disasters.
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experts predict 1,600 fires large enough to warrant a 911 call will start. as one might expect, wooden structures will be the most vulnerable. Many of the older buildings will have fallen off their foundations, breaking natural gas and water lines in the process. the uS Geological Service notes there were 1,400 gas leaks reported in the Whittier narrows earthquake of 1987. Many fires were ignited. unfortunately, water mains may have been compromised, leaving inadequate pressure for firefighting. So authorities fear that some of the small fires in densely packed neighbors will grow into massive firestorms sweeping hundreds of blocks. the fires following an earthquake can be devastating, as proven in the San francisco quake in 1906, tokyo in 1923 and even Kobe in 1995. in fact, officials figure fires will double the number of fatalities as well as economic losses. assuming no Santa ana winds, their models predict another $65 billion in direct losses and $22 billion in indirect losses from the fires. and speaking of fires ...

like the swallows returning to Capistrano, Super Scoopers recently flew into Southern California for the fire season. the bright yellow planes are a sure sign that wildfires are a serious threat. Some 4,000 structures were lost to such fires in october of 2003 alone. that included 2,820 buildings in the Cedar fire in San diego and 1,003 in the old fire in San bernardino. “More than 90,000 people were evacuated from the local mountains in the 2003 fire,” added tracey Martinez, public information officer for the San bernardino County fire department. at any given time during the fire season, 204,000 people are at risk from wildfires in los angeles County. officials point out that the urban interface with wild lands is growing. More and more homes are being built in areas susceptible to wildfire. Continuing drought conditions make area forests a tinderbox that can turn quickly into a conflagration by a careless camper or, sadly, by an arsonist. add narrow roads, difficult entrances and insufficient water supplies, and it’s
at is out of co ntrol.

THE BuRNING SEASON

easy to see why many communities are threatened by wildfires. “actually, wildfires are a year-round problem. and they’re growing in intensity as well as frequency,” said John Miller, spokesman for the u.S. forest Service in San bernardino. Miller explained that deteriorating forest health and increasing fuel loads have led to more destructive wildfires. under severe weather conditions, such as Santa ana winds, wildfires spread so quickly that firefighters can’t even arrive quickly enough to put them out while they’re small. Wildfires have been particularly devastating in San bernardino County. in october of 2003, the old fire consumed 91,281 acres in the city and surrounding mountains even as the Grand Prix fire burned another 69,804 acres, tearing across the hillsides from fontana to Claremont. last october, the Grass Valley fire and the Slide fire each burned more than 12,000 acres, destroying 174 and 262 buildings respectively. “this fire season might be as severe as last year,” Martinez warned.

lig A firefighter

wildfire th to combat a s a backfire ht

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To control flooding, water

is released from the San

ta Fe Dam area.

Summer rains have allowed the underbrush to grow thicker, while there has been another outbreak of bark beetles that kill the trees, she said. “the good news is the Mountain area Safety task force has removed one and a half million dead or dying trees,” artinez said. “and a lot more people are clearing their property to create a defensible space.”

the same mountains threatened by fire wring a great deal of rain out of the storm clouds in the winter. the western portions of the San Gabriel Mountains rise more than 7,000 feet, often trapping winter storms as they move eastward. While downtown los angeles gets only 15 inches of rain in the average year, parts of the San Gabriels receive more than 40 inches of rain in a year. Cascading down the steep mountain slopes, this rainwater flows rapidly across the coastal plains to the Pacific. the swiftly running water can have disastrous consequences for anything or anyone in its path. and if a recent wildfire has killed off the vegetation holding the mountain soil on the steep slopes, a mudslide or landslide may result. in extreme cases, debris pouring through steep canyons may reach speeds of

WASHED AWAY

40 miles per hour with a wall of mud and water tens of feet high. on Christmas day in 2003, a flash flood killed 15 campers, many children, staying at St. Sophia Camp north of San bernardino. Martinez said another two were killed at the nearby Koa campground in devore. While flash floods can be devastating in the mountains, serious flooding in the los angeles basin potentially affects many more people. indeed, los angeles is a land of extremes when it comes to rainfall. While the average over the past 125 years has been 15 inches, the yearly rainfall has ranged from just 4.35 inches in 2001-2002 to 38 inches in 1883-1884. between 1992 and 2002, the counties of los angeles, orange and San bernardino were declared federal disaster zones five times because of flooding. While massive flood control projects like the Santa fe dam in irwindale and the concrete-lined San Gabriel river have helped, flooding remains a serious threat. the problem is exacerbated by the loss of open land, which soaks up rainwater, to asphalt and concrete. Consider recent trends in homebuilding, where builders tear down older homes that cover 40 percent of a lot and replace it with a home that covers 90 percent of the lot. all the water that used to be
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absorbed by open ground has to go somewhere.

BE PREPARED
despite all this gloom and doom, emergency preparedness officials are surprisingly optimistic about our chances of surviving a major disaster. they insist that we’ll can get through the coming trials if we only prepare for them. once you’ve put together a family earthquake kit or cleared the brush from around your home, your chances of survival skyrocket. “the possibility exists that emergency responders may not be able to respond for hours or even days, and that possibility must galvanize residents to prepare themselves and their communities,” explained denise benson, a division manager for the San bernardino office of emergency Services. the trick is to get ready now. “i carry an emergency survival kit in my car and keep larger supplies in our Whittier home,” o’donnell said. “if everyone would follow some simple advice, they’d be ready for a big earthquake.” then we can all go back to our little daily disasters, such as rush-hour traffic. DA
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THE

W

hen the big one hits, pipes will break, and firefighters won’t have water. Cracked roads will trap police in their stations. hospitals will fill within hours. fires will race through hills. and the San Gabriel Valley — built on top of miles of sand and water — will shake like a bowl full of jelly, geologists said. experts say the aftermath of a 7.0-or-larger earthquake will leave hundreds of thousands of Southern Californians absolutely and indefinitely cut off from help — either from families or public safety workers. “they can’t even call the day care center, they can’t even call their kids where they live,” said dale Cox, an expert with the u.S. Geological Survey (uSGS). “they can’t get in the car to drive home, because the roads will be closed and people will just. . . abandon their cars on the road and move on.” in the last 20 years, scientists like Cox 10
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ONE

By Ben Baeder
Staff Writer

have learned that the San Gabriel Valley and surrounding communities sit on a complex network of faults, many of which could still be undiscovered. When a large earthquake hits, the infrastructure will likely be so damaged that relief from government or charities will not come for days or weeks. Cox is one of the leaders of the uSGS Multi-hazards demonstration Project — a team of 300 experts who studied the likely affects of a magnitude 7.8 earthquake. they are conducting on nov. 13 the Great Shake out, a simulation that will test how well Southern Californians respond to the big one. their scenario calls for a quake
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HElP WIll EvENTuAllY COmE, BuT IT mIGHT TAkE DAYS OR WEEkS.

about 5,000 times larger than the magnitude 5.4 Chino hills earthquake that shook southern California on July 29. “this clips all your lifelines,” said Cox of the simulated quake. the model calls for the quake to strike on the San andreas fault in eastern San diego County. Waves race up the fissure toward San bernardino. it touches off 7.0 aftershocks on the Whittier fault and the Sierra Madre fault along the San Gabriel Mountains. because the San Gabriel Valley has a sandy bottom, waves racing through rocky hills and mountains will amplify when they slam into the valley, shaking us “like a bowl full of jelly,” Cox said. in addition, many areas in the los angeles basin have sandy soils sub-

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ject to liquefaction, which means water will should know how to turn off the main gas seep up out of the ground, causing the earth valve. Make sure all family members know to become soft and mushy as the earth how to shut it off. shakes. officials recommend turning off the gas almost all areas within a few miles of the off if a person smells or hears gas. once the San Gabriel river have liquefaction zones, gas is off, only a professional should turn it according to maps produced by the state. back on. While most of us don’t have the training or after the big quake, gasoline and other the equipment of a professional firemen, flammable liquids may have there are many things we can do to save our spilled from their containers, so homes and families from the fires. the los clean them up immediately by angeles County department of Public covering them with an absorhealth suggests that residents immediately bent material, such as dirt or check for fires and fire hazards. but use a cat litter. Store weed killers, flashlight, not matches or candles, which pesticides and flammable prodcould ignite leaking gas. do not turn on light ucts away from heat sources on switches until after ruling out electrical syslow shelves or the floor. and tem damage. Sniff for gas leaks, beginning have a fire extinguisher. with the water heater. if you smell or hear gas, turn off the main gas valve, A Victorian home, right, is about to tumble open the windows and get everyone during the San Francisco earthqake of outside quickly. everyone in the family 1906. Bottom, a building crushes two cars
in the Whittier quake of 1987.

When the utilities restart the electricity in the hours or days following the earthquake, damaged appliances may spark fires. also, make sure televisions, stereos, computers and microwaves and other heavy appliances are strapped down with flexible nylon straps and buckles that allow easy removal and relocation. a large earthquake could send house-

hold items flying at 45 mph, experts said. “if you have knives laying out, they are going to be flying across the room,” said Cox of the uSGS. it also might be wise to shut off electricity at the main breaker. earthquake Country, which publishes an earthquake-safety Web site, reminds readers to strap down their water heaters. it is also common for chimneys to be damaged during an earthquake. hundreds fell during the 1987 Whittier narrows earthquake. don’t use a fireplace at all after an earthquake, especially if the chimney is damaged. once a home is safe, residents should immediately check on their neighbors. if someone is bleeding, apply pressure to the wound and elevate the injured part. those who are trapped should relax and listen for people who might be able to help. if a dust mask is handy, wear it. and keep the eyes safe. the Centers for disease Control in atlanta note that the most common injuries in natural disasters are eye injuries, sprains, strains and minor wounds. experts also reminded rescuers to not do anything too risky. despite the scary predictions, workers from los angeles County Public Works say they think most of the area’s major bridges will survive an earthquake. rass Ghavimi of the county’s design division said the county has worked hard to make sure major bridges over the San Gabriel river, rio hondo river and other 12
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waterways are able to withstand shaking. Ghavimi said it is likely that many bridges could be damaged, but he thinks at least a few will be strong enough to act as emergency routes. Most importantly, the county is trying to make sure that there are no major collapses that end up with people being crushed or falling to their dooms. “that’s our main goal when retrofitting

these bridges,” Ghavimi said. “We can always go back and repair the bridges. even if the bridge moves quite a bit, it will not fall. it will not collapse.” So, help will eventually come, but it might take days or weeks. experts say families should have plenty of water and food. Most importantly, get to know your neighbors. find out when people are home. Make sure your family knows where elderly people live. as americans learned during the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, it may take days or weeks for help to come. DA ben.baeder@sgvn.com

Only a chimney, left, remains of a home. Below, people go to high ground to watch San Francisco burn after the 1906 earthquake.

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Wildfires Wildfires
Southern California’s wildlands are an environmental system that is scientifically bred to burn. historically, wildfire has provided life to the region’s forests by essentially managing them. 14
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life offers few guarantees, but for those who live in Southern California’s ample woods, there is at least one. the forest around you will catch fire.

By George Watson
Staff Writer

for centuries, wildfire has burned up brush and younger, smaller trees. their elimination enabled forests to thrive. in some cases, the high temperatures of fire are needed to allow trees’ acorns to activate and grow. but decades of suppression tactics have allowed forests to thicken. trees weakened by a lack of water, which is natural in this region’s arid conditions, have been under attack by the bark beetles that kill trees and make them more vulnerable to fire, causing them to burn hotter and faster. that concoction can make the blazes impossible to stop. that’s led the army Corps of engineers to describe the region’s
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mountains as being situated in “one of the most volatile fire-erosion complexes in the world.” to understand how this point has been reached, one must look at how Westerners settled in the area. Spanish explorers first came here in the late 1700s. Mormons followed in 1851 and other settlers arrived a decade later. they all discovered a pristine setting with an arid climate. the pioneers built their homes across the mountains, a choice avoided by the american indians before them who saw the dangers and lived elsewhere. over time, more and more people moved into the mountains. trees grew up, over and even through homes, proliferating to the point that they had to be built so close

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together that firefighters worried about defending them. and many of the buildings were constructed with shake roofs or other wood fiber, making them far more vulnerable to flames. trees grew weaker from development and smog, enabling the beetle infestation to escalate. Warnings from a handful of fire officials went unheeded. these days, officials now describe the influx of development in forested areas as the wildland-urban interface, which essentially are the areas where residents and property are in imminent risk from wildfire. the key, firefighters say, is making sure your home doesn’t become an enabler to the fire. first, consider whether the property is landscaped properly, creating ample defensible space between the home and surrounding vegetation. then, make sure that the building follows codes recommended in urban wildland settings. finally, an adequate water supply is critical. added steps to make homes safer are doubled-paned windows, safer mesh-wiring that covers vents for attics and chimneys, and fire-resistant roofs. in the end, the key is understanding that, at some point, the woods around homes in wildland settings will burn. the next step is to make sure your house doesn’t become part of the wildfire. DA DEADlIEST CAlIfORNIA WIlDfIRES 4oct. 26, 2006: four u.S. forest Service firefighters killed in riverside County. 41933: Griffith Park fire, 47 acres, 25 firefighters killed. 41953: rattlesnake fire, 1,340 acres, 15 firefighters killed. 41943: hauser Creek fire, 13,145 acres, 11 firefighters killed. 41956: inaja fire, 43,904 acres, 11 firefighters killed. Sources: The Associated Press; National Interagency Fire Center; U.S. Forest Service; and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

The County of Los Angeles and the L.A. County Fire Department present

FIREthe Fire Zone EXPO Living in
HELPING YOU PREPARE AGAINST A WILDLAND FIRE

SATURDAY, NOV. 15 11AM-2PM
Fire Station 118 17056 Gale Ave., Industry FREE ADMISSION • REFRESHMENTS

Learn about the 5 important steps to help you get ready
1. Understand your vulnerability 2. Prepare your land 3. Prepare your home 4. Prepare your Wildfire Action Plan 5. Prepare your Evacuation Plan – leave when asked

LAST RESORT
Prepare for your survival Vendors* will be on hand to provide information, products, and/or demonstrations • Emergency supplies • Personal protective equipment • Fire suppression systems

PRESENTATIONS INCLUDE
• Fire Department Operations • Vegetation Management • Building Standards

STATIC DISPLAYS
• Los Angeles County Fire Department, Forestry, Fire Prevention and Operations • Los Angeles County Department of Animal Care & Control • Industry Sheriff’s Station • California Highway Patrol • American Red Cross
*NOTE: The Los Angeles County Fire Department does not endorse the vendors or their products.

By Richard Irwin
Staff Writer

it all started when a light rain began falling on dec. 30, 1933. the storm would turn into a torrent, dropping more than 7 inches of water in the next 24 hours, the heaviest downpour ever recorded by the u.S. Weather bureau since measurements began in 1877. by new Year’s eve, the San Gabriel Mountains began to funnel 20-foot waves down the steep, narrow canyons. according to the Suburban emergency Management Project, the mammoth debris flows buried 200 homes and made another 400 unlivable. a group of 25 men, women and children drowned when the wall of mud tore apart red Cross headquarters in the american legion hall on Montrose avenue in la Crescenta. five more were killed at a new Year’s eve party in Montrose, while the bodies of 10 others were pulled from the debris in la Crescenta.
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IT WAS THE END Of THE YEAR AND THE BEGINNING Of ONE Of THE WORST NATuRAl DISASTERS IN lOS ANGElES.

by Jan. 4, 1934, the los angeles Coroner had collected the bodies of 40 people killed in the flood, while another 75 were missing. thousands of workers dug through the mud covering the foothill cities, searching for survivors and bodies. they reportedly uncovered 800 automobiles that had been buried in the avalanche of debris. the disastrous day marked the point when the federal government took over la’s flood control. City and county officials petitioned Washington, d.C., for reconstruction funds. the flood Control act of 1936 authorized the construction of the Santa fe dam on the San Gabriel river four miles downstream from the mouth of the San Gabriel Canyon. Complete in 1949, the massive earthen dam guards the San Gabriel Valley today. Standing 92 feet above the river, the dam is 23,800 feet long along its crest. the flood control reservoir behind it covers 1,059 acres. the reservoir is designed to hold back any torrent of water cascading from the steep canyons, releasing the floodwaters at a maximum rate of 41,000 cubic feet per second. “the Santa fe dam was designed to handle any conceivable rainfall we would receive in los angeles,” said Jim farley with the army Corps of engineers. the engineer noted that the dam is periodically inspected and remains in excellent condition. “both the Santa fe and the Whittier narrows dams came through the Whittier earthquake in 1987 with no damage,” noted fellow engineer doug Chitwood. “they did so well, we would expect them to stand up well to an earthquake similar to

the one modeled in the Great Shakeout exercise on nov. 13.” the Whittier narrows dam was completed in 1957. it plugs the natural gap in the hills that forms the southern boundary of the San Gabriel Valley. this earthen dam collects runoff from drainage areas upstream as well as from releases from the Santa fe dam. it is 56 feet high and is nearly 17,000 feet long. “anyone who wants to see the flood control system protecting the San Gabriel Valley should take a bike ride along the San Gabriel river from the Santa fe dam down to Seal beach,” said danny Kelly, a public affairs specialist for the army Corps of engineers. “We used to do that while i was going to Charter oak high School in Covina and it’s very interesting,” Kelly commented. DA

The Santa Fe Dam area and the San Gabriel River.

BELOW: Wading through high water after a storm floods the streets.

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The Right Training for The Right Job –

RightNOW!
� � �

Rio Hondo College, a major contributor to Public Safety in our communities since 1964.
Administration of Justice Fire Academy Police Academy
� � � �

EMT Program Wildland Fire Academy Corrections Forensics Program

Using the latest equipment and technology Rio Hondo College Police Academy provides basic law enforcement training for more than 40 law enforcement agencies and advanced training programs for seasoned officers from more than 80 agencies. Rio Hondo College Fire Academy operates the largest community college fire academy in the state and is recognized throughout the firefighting community as one of the best training centers in the area. Rio Hondo College Wildland Fire Academy provides specialized training with United States Forest Service firefighters. Rio Hondo College Emergency Medical Technician Training provides EMT personnel throughout the region.

www.riohondo.edu

RIO HONDO COLLEGE PREPARES FOR EMERGENCIES!
Our campus is participating in today’s “Southern California Great Shake Out” Earthquake Disaster Drill.
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Where will Southern California find water in the event of an earthquake or natural disaster?
The San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority has the answer.
n the event of an earthquake or severe natural disaster, we will find our water supply underground. The San Gabriel Basin is a strategically important source of water supply for the entire Southland. Southern California is heavily dependent on imported water. The aqueducts that today bring water from the Colorado River, the Owens Valley and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta all have to cross the San Andreas Fault. A major earthquake could cut us off from these sources of water. In that case, the Basin could be a lifesaver. “Being able to tap into the natural resource which is the San Gabriel Basin with the millions of gallons of storage that we could create or have created here is very, very important not only to our region but to all of California,” said Bob Kuhn, vice chairman of the San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority, which was established by the state legislature in 1993 to develop, finance and implement groundwater treatment programs in the San Gabriel Basin. A recent state study found that an earthquake in the Sacramento Delta could cut off water from Northern California for up to 11 months. And in Southern Cali-

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fornia, the Metropolitan Water District, which provides water to about 18 million people including the city of Los Angeles, estimated that a quake could knock out the Colorado River supply for up to six months. Then we would be dependent on local groundwater basins, particularly the enormous San Gabriel Basin. The underground aquifer contains an estimated 326 billion gallons. It could provide drinking water for the entire Southland. But the groundwater supply in the San Gabriel Basin is threatened by chemical contamination. The groundwater was contaminated in the 1940s and 1950s when defense industry companies in the San Gabriel Valley disposed of rocket fuel, industrial solvents and other chemicals by pouring them on the ground. Over time, the chemicals seeped down into the groundwater and began showing up in wells pumping drinking water out of the aquifer. To date, the groundwater cleanup effort has been estimated at $1 billion. It is critical that we clean up the basin and secure additional funding from the State in order to be prepared in the event of an earthquake or natural disaster that may disrupt and threatened the state water project or Colorado river.

“We’ve got to work to make sure the Basin remains a ready supply of clean drinking water in the event that Southern California’s imported water supplies are disrupted by an earthquake or drought,” U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, D-California

“There is no question that we have to get the San Gabriel Basin cleaned up,” said Rep. David Dreier, R-Glendora. “Everyone has a stake in maintaining the Basin’s drinking water supply.”

1720 W. Cameron Ave., Suite 100 West Covina, CA 91790 • 626-338-5555 •626-338-5775 • fax www.wqa.com

ISSUES & PRECAUTIONS
POTENTIAl THREATS a terrorist threat can cause many people to become very sick for unknown reasons. this could cause widespread panic and put a strain on hospital and emergency services. Some of these threats include: BIOlOGICAl a biological assault of germs or other biological agents than can make people sick. Some biological agents, such as anthrax, do not cause contagious diseases. others, like the smallpox virus, result in diseases you can catch from other people. Many of these substances must either be inhaled, enter the skin through a cut, or be eaten to make a person sick. although these agents are rarely seen in the united States, we must be prepared because they pose the greatest risk to national security for the following reasons: • Can be easily released into the environment • Have the potential for major public health impact • Cause public panic and social disruption CHEmICAl EmERGENCY a chemical emergency occurs when a hazardous chemical has been released and has the potential for harming people’s health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an industrial accident, or intentional, as in the case of a terrorist attack. RADIATION EmERGENCY explosives, such as dynamite, may be used to make a bomb to contaminate and area with radioactive materials. this is also known as a “dirty bomb.”
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the main danger from a dirty bomb is from the initial explosion which can cause serious injuries and property damage. HOW CAN I PREPARE? everyone should prepare noW for an emergency or unforeseeable event. being prepared in advance can save you and your loved ones. here are some ways you can begin to prepare for yourself and your loved ones. • Make a family emergency plan • Prepare an emergency supply kit • Learn about the different types of emergencies and how to respond to them. • In the event of a terrorist threat, local officials, including the department of Public health, would provide information and instructions to the public as quickly as possible. You will be notified either by radio, television, internet, and any other means necessary. • Do not go to the hospital or emergency room unless you need medical care. to report suspicious substances, people or events, call: 911. Adapted from The Department of Human Health Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention A WORD ON WHAT COulD HAPPEN as we learned from the events of September 11, 2001, the following things can happen after a terrorist attack: • There can be significant numbers of casualties and/or damage to buildings and the infrastructure. So employers need up-to-date information about any medical needs you

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terrorist attack may include the deliberate release of germs or other biological substances, toxic chemicals or radiation materials that can make people sick and poison the environment. the Public health department is part of a team of government and public safety agencies that are working together to respond to terrorism. in the event of an attack, public health officials may not immediately be able to provide information on what you should do. determining the exact illness, treatment, and danger will take time. We can reduce fear by gaining knowledge and being prepared and taking precautions when traveling, learning CPr and first aid.
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may have and on how to contact your designated beneficiaries. • Heavy law enforcement involvement at local, state and federal levels follows a terrorist attack due to the event’s criminal nature. • Health and mental health resources in the affected communities can be strained to their limits, maybe even overwhelmed. • Extensive media coverage, strong public fear and international implications and consequences can continue for a prolonged period. • Workplaces and schools may be closed, and there may be restrictions on domestic and international travel. • You and your family or household may have to evacuate an area, avoiding roads blocked for your safety. • Clean-up may take many months. EvACuATION if local authorities ask you to leave your home, they have a good reason to make this request, and you should heed the advice immediately. listen to your radio or television and follow the instructions of local emergency officials and keep the above simple tips in mind. to keep up with terrorist threat levels, go online to: • www.dhs.gov for Terrorist threat levels; click on be informed, scroll to bio/chemical • www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/ assets/CitizenGuidancehSaS2.pdf • Homeland Security Advisory Systems DA Recommendations at www.ready.gov

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What To Do First
By Richard Irwin |
Staff Writer

While most of us don’t have the training,

or the equipment of a professional firefighter, there are many things we can do to save our homes and families in the event of a major earthquake. the la County department of Public health suggests that you immediately check for fires and fire hazards. use a flashlight, never light matches or candles until you’re sure there are no gas leaks. don’t turn on light switches until you rule out damage. Sniff for gas leaks, beginning with the water heater. if you smell, hear or see gas, or suspect a gas leak, turn off the main gas valve, open the windows and get everyone outside quickly. everyone should know how to turn off the main gas valve. be sure to have a wrench available to shut off the main supply valve. Show everyone where the gas meter is now, as well as how to turn the valve. but officials ask that you turn the gas off only if you see, smell or hear gas. once the gas is off, you’ll need a professional to turn it back on. after the big quake, gasoline and other flammable liquids may have spilled from their containers, so clean them up immediately. Cover them with an absorbent material such as dirt or cat litter. Store weed killers, pesticides and flammable products away from heat sources. and store them on the lower shelves or floor. Place oily polishing rags or waste in covered metal cans.
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Since water may not be available, purchase an a—b—C type fire extinguisher. this type will work on flammable liquids as well as electrical fires. local fire departments will be glad to teach you how use a fire extinguisher properly. the power will probably have popped off in the earthquake. but what will happen if the system becomes reenergized. that broken lamp on the couch may start a smoldering fire. be sure to check the electrical outlets and appliances to make sure they haven’t been damaged. unplug them if they

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Be prepared or you’ll be stuck.
In the first 24 hours, it’s the simple things that matter, such as having a 72-hour pack that includes water, food, clothing and cash because the banks are closed, grocery stores are closed, everything’s closed. Just remember the Scout model:
are broken. broken televisions, computers and monitors may begin that small fire that will destroy your home and potentially the whole neighborhood. tV’s, stereos, computers and microwaves are also expensive to replace. So secure them with flexible nylon straps and buckles that allow easy removal and relocation. Shut off power at the main breaker panel if there is any damage to your home wiring. and keep it off until the damage has been repaired. before the big quake, install flexible connectors on gas appliances to reduce the risk of fire. and strap the hot water heater to the wall to prevent a gas leak and save a valuable source of drinking water. earthquake Country points out that if your water heater does not have two straps around it that are screwed into the studs or masonry of the wall, then it is not secured properly. bracing kits make the installation simple. and have a plumber install flexible (corrugated) copper water connectors if you haven’t done it already. Your chimney may have been damaged in the earthquake. this was a common sight in the Whittier narrows earthquake. don’t use a fireplace with a damaged chimney, it could start a fire
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‘Be prepared;’ and you’ll have nothing to fear.
- Todd Russell, President of TA Russell by Service master
(Disaster Recovery services first on the scene)

or vent poisonous gases into your home. now that you’ve dealt with the immediate threat of fire, you can respond to those screams or more likely moans of those trapped under the rubble. if you are trapped, try to protect your mouth, nose and eyes from dust. if you’re bleeding, apply direct pressure on the wound and elevate the injured part. then signal for help with an emergency whistle if you have one, a cell phone if it’s working or knock loudly on solid parts of the building three times every few minutes. if you’re safe and uninjured, you can start helping others. but first protect yourself by putting on sturdy shoes and work gloves. also make sure to wear a dust mask and eye protection. the Centers for disease Control in atlanta note that the most common injuries in natural disasters are eye injuries, sprains, strains and minor wounds. it points out that eye injuries and irritation can be caused by soot, dirt, even paint chips, as well as the fumes and smoke in the air after an earthquake. taking these simple precautions immediately after an earthquake could save your family, as well your neighborhood. DA
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WANT TO BE A HErO?
The los Angeles County fire Department wants to train you
s anyone with rescue training knows, the object is to become the rescuer and not another victim. that means you have to have enough training to know what you’re doing as well as the proper equipment. after the deadly earthquake that shook Mexico City on Sept. 19, 1985, the city of los angeles sent a team to investigate the disaster. that 8.1 magnitude quake killed more than 10,000 people and injured another 30,000. at the time Mexico City had no training program for citizens, but a large number of volunteers formed light search and rescue teams. these untrained teams rescued 800 people, but in the process 100 of the volunteers died during the 15-day rescue operation. Sacrificing one uninjured volunteer for every eight trapped victims freed was a disturbing statistic gathered by the la investi24
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By Richard Irwin |

Staff Writer

We want to teach you how to take care of yourself and your family

before a disaster strikes,
gators. one of the big lessons that the los angeles fire department learned from the Mexico City quake was the need for a plan to train volunteers to help themselves and others in a disaster. in february of 1985, la fire and city officials had visited Japan to study its extensive earthquake preparedness plans. they learned that entire neighborhoods had been trained to help out after a major earthquake. neighborhood teams had been trained in fire suppression, light search and rescue and first aid, as well as evacuation procedures. los angeles decided to develop a similar program to train citizens to safely handle a variety of simple emergencies associated with earthquakes and other natural disasters. in 1986, the city trained its first group of 30 volunteers. the Whittier earthquake of 1987 underscored the threat of a major disaster and demonstrated the need to greatly expand the Community emergency response teams (Cert). in 1993, the federal emergency Management agency decided to make the program available nationwide. the la County fire department began offering the feMa-approved training program in June 2003. through 20 hours of free instruction as well as exercises, Cert volunteers learn how to protect their families and neighborhoods. in July and august, the Cert course was offered over three Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the rowland heights County Park. another class began Sept. 18 at Schabarum regional Park in rowland heights. Classes were also offered this summer in la Mirada and la habra. “We want to teach you how to take care of yourself and your family before a disaster strikes,” said Capt. Jeff Vrooman, Cert coordinator for the county. “i always ask people how many firefighters they think are on duty in their community at one time. then i ask them the population and tell them to do the math. the fire department can’t be everywhere in a major disaster.” instead, la County fire wants to help people learn how to help

Firefighters train for a variety of emergencies.
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themselves in an emergency. Vrooman planned 65 classes this year, with each class averaging 40 students. “We’re looking for leaders. We’ll teach you the basic skills so you can help take charge of your street in an emergency,” Vrooman said. the San bernardino fire department also has a very active Cert program. “it’s going really well. We have more than 6,000 trained volunteers in the county now,” noted Megan blaney, spokeswoman for the county’s office of emergency services. blaney said the program has been building over the past couple years, covering 10 cities as well as 15 unincorporated areas. When Wrightwood lost its telephone service on aug. 15, Cert teams were activated in the mountain community. Many residents have undergone Cert training and formed an amateur radio network. the teams spread throughout the community, ready to help any citizens in need. their radios formed a backup system for the failed phone lines. “this was a fine example of a positive and coordinated effort by the Cert team here in the Wrightwood area. it appears they will be of great assistance in the future for local emergency and disaster situations,” said Capt. Steve roeber, a paramedic in Wrightwood. for more information about Cert, call (888) Cert 939. DA richard.irwin@sgvn.com

Be prepared. Download forms for your family communication plan at www.socalready.com
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‘Triangle of Life’ debunked by emergency agencies
By Robert S. Hong
Staff Writer

THE “TRIANGlE Of lIfE” COulD RESulT IN PEOPlE GETTING SERIOuSlY HuRT.
emergency agencies joined the Pasadena fire department recently to debunk an internet theory of earthquake safety known as the “triangle of life.”

officials urge people to only follow the classic “drop, cover and hold on” method when the ground starts shaking. the best way to survive an earthquake is to duck under a sturdy object and hold on to it, officials said. other rumored methods of protection, including triangle of life, are not safe, officials emphasized. the clarification comes as area emergency and law enforcement officials prepare to join quake experts for the “Great Southern California Shakeout.” the nov. 13 quake drill will simulate a 7.8 earthquake. as the date of the drill approached, an e-mail about the alleged triangle of life has been circulating widely on the internet. the relatively new quake-protection method calls for people to lie down next to — instead of under — a sturdy object. it theorizes that if a building crumbles, large debris will hit the object and fall, creating a triangular space where a person would be protected. the theory is proposed by doug Copp, founder of american rescue team international. “this viral e-mail has been going around for several years and there has never been any other basis besides the assertions of this one guy,” said lucile Jones, chief scientist for the 28
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u.S. Geological Survey Multi-hazards demonstration Project, who works with Caltech. “this is an internet phenomenon.” Jones and other local officials say there is no evidence that this method works; it could even put people in harm’s way, officials said. “things are literally flying through the air,” during an earthquake, said Jones. “i think i’d be a lot safer under a sturdy table than beside it.” Jones also questions a statement by Copp, saying that in the Mexico City earthquake, children were found crushed under their desks. She said the earthquake struck before children were in school and called his statement invalid. other emergency service officials also decried the triangle of life as potentially dangerous.

“every major authority disputes what (Copp) has to say,” said april Kelcy, Ceo of Monrovia-based earthquake Solutions. “in most cases, the preferred standard behavior is drop, cover and hold on if you have cover immediately available.” Cathy Sproule of the american red Cross, San Gabriel Pomona Valley Chapter said, the “drop, cover and hold on” method is also the most efficient protocol in an earthquake. “You only have the slightest amount of time to get into a position that will afford the greatest protection,” she said. “People don’t get hurt because something shakes; they get hurt because something falls on them.” to find out more about earthquake preparedness, visit www.earthquakecountry.info/ dropcoverholdon. DA

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The Great Southern California

By Dan Abendschein
Staff Writer

magnitude-7.8 quake could leave Southern California isolated from the rest of the West Coast.rippling west along the San andreas fault from the Coachella Valley, it would sever power lines, cut a hole in the 15 freeway and knock out rail tracks. all part of a scenario that a group of Caltech geologists will be studying this month as part of a quake drill – the Great Southern California Shakeout – that will simulate how authorities will respond to the massive earthquake they say is likely to hit the region sometime in the next 30 years. a major focal point of concern is the Cajon Pass, the 4,500-foot saddle between the massive San bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains, officials said. Speaking from directly on top of the San andreas fault line in the pass, near an open desert vista crossed by rail lines, power transformers and the nearby freeway, lucy Jones, the chief scientist at Caltech’s earthquake center, laid out what the infrastructure destruction could mean for los angeles County. Power transformers, rail lines, the 15 freeway, oil pipelines and fiber-optic cables all run through the Cajon Pass, one of the few low passes in the mountains to the north and east of los angeles County that infrastructure can easily pass through. the area could be without power for days, or in some cases weeks, Jones said. People on the other side of the pass, in the Victorville area, could be isolated from los angeles if the 15 freeway was breached, she added. “Most of our lifeline crossings, infrastructure come through the Cajon Pass,” said dale Cox, a government geologist. “and all of them will sever in a quake of that magnitude.” the county’s economy could suffer a hit of around $200 billion as shippers struggle to

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ShakeOut
find a way to get goods out of the long beach port, said Jones. the area would not suffer immediate gas shortages, since much of the West Coast’s gas is refined in los angeles County. but natural gas pipelines that provide gas to homes would likely be severed, resulting in massive shortages, she added. Parts of the 210 and 10 freeways in the San Gabriel Valley could also collapse, said Caltrans spokesman Ken Matsuoka. or, short of that,landslide debris could cover sections of freeway, shutting them down for several days as crews work to clear them out. though the worst impact of the quake in the scenario would be to the San bernardino area, the quake would also cause direct damage to the San Gabriel Valley, knocking down structurally unsound buildings and cutting water pipelines. homes would be left without fresh water, said Jones. fires caused by the quake would be the biggest concern, she said. “there simply would not be enough firefighters to put out all the fires that were blazing all over the county,” said Jones. the scenario estimates about 53,000 injuries requiring emergency room assistance – far too many for hospitals to handle, she added. Scientists have also estimated that one in 16 buildings in the county would suffer serious damage in a magnitude-7.8 quake along the San andreas fault line. the Cajon Pass scenario, however, is only one possibility: a major quake could rupture along another fault line, although that would mean less damage to the critical Cajon Pass
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area. additionally, the quake could come from the northern direction of the fault line, rather than the Coachella Valley to the southeast of los angeles, said Jones. that quake could have more of an impact on the San Gabriel Valley, though it could be less dangerous to the county as a whole, since it would not hit the Cajon Pass as hard, she said. the best thing residents can do to prepare, said Jay alan of the state office of homeland Security, is to be prepared to survive on their own for several days. that means having drinking water, food, a fire extinguisher and first aid kit – at minimum, he added. “taking care of yourself for 72 hours should be your goal,” said alan. “if you can do that, you will be helping your community and helping first responders by allowing them to deal with people in serious trouble.” DA
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A user’s guide to an emergency
from staff reports

If THE GREAT SOuTHERN CAlIfORNIA EARTHquAkE SHAkEOuT on nov. 13 didn’t generate enough
attention, there’s a workbook written by an upland woman and her sister, which invites readers to consider whether they’d like a wake at their funeral, whether there’s fuel for the generator or, for that matter, when family pets last had their shots. “the Plan ahead handbook,” written by Sharon hanks and Jennifer Snyder of upland, is a collection of fill-in-the-blank pages, which prompt the reader to collect and prepare vital data and materials that would be needed in case of health, fire, natural disasters or evacuation emergencies. it’s not exactly bedtime reading, but more of a participatory project, which will serve a family in good stead should the need arise. “You can sit down and do it in a day,” says Snyder. the idea for the book actually came about a few years ago when Snyder and hanks had to find information an emergency room needed to care for their mother. from that a “crisis file” emerged with a driver’s license number, medical information and even a dnr (do not resuscitate) form. the handbook came a few years later, and the pair were sending it out to publishers when Katrina hit new orleans. in addition to forms for personal account, safe-deposit and financial information, medical information pages are included
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along with the suggestion that users keep multiple copies of this master document at different locations – a particularly good idea when one realizes that an earthquake or family emergency is not likely to occur at a convenient moment when everyone is gathered at home. and because of the open-ended nature of the booklet, the thinking should help readers to better discern needs for their own specific situations. for instance, adult children of older parents likely would need their senior’s primary care physician numbers and contacts for neighbors, as would parents of children in college need landline numbers for dorm supervisors and campus advisors. “Plan ahead” means what it says – and the work of gathering important information is much easier in the comfort of home as opposed to by cell phone in a frantic evacuation. Published by Seaboard Press of rockville, Md, the handbook retails for $8.95 and may be ordered through barnes & noble or found online at amazon.com. DA

in waterproof Vital Documents: Placeordocuments andastore in storeplastic grab-and-go bag a fire-safe box in a freezer. Scan and on Have them ready several Cds, flash drives, and external backup devices.
Documents to include: 4 Copies of Homeowners Insurance policy 4 Copies of Medical insurance cards/policies 4 Copies of Grant deed, titles, property taxes 4 Copies of Rental agreements 4 Copies of important household bills 4 Copies of Wills and living trusts 4 Copies of loan documents 4 Income tax records (2 years) 4 Copies of DMV titles, registration, insurance policies 4 Copies of driver’s license 4 Copies of major purchases, receipts and warranties 4 Copies of bank account numbers, safe deposit numbers 4 Copies of credit cards, membership cards 4 Backups of computer software programs, files, hard drives 4 Family photos, copies of documents and certificates 4 Inventory list of valuables, furniture, appliances, jewelry, electronics, serial numbers 4 Photos of every room in the house, pool/spa, cars, watercraft, valuables, antiques 4 Homeowner’s Insurance information 4 Automobile insurance information 4 Vehicle registration information

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Disaster Supply 4 Inventory
Store in a large plastic tub several locations; home closet, garage, car trunk and at work. do not store your supplies in hard-toaccess places. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ready-to-go backpack (suggestions below) food (suggestions below) baby items: formula/ food, bottles, diapers Pet items: food, disaster kit, extra water Sanitation supply kit: small bucket toilet paper, wipes, trash bags (more suggestions below) Water (suggestions below) Water purification kit household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper Cds, dVds and external back up devices Cash, credit card, extra checks first aid kit, medications Prescriptions, copy of refills eye drops, eye washes Personal hygiene kit, feminine supplies notebook, paper, pens, stamps tools: axe, shovel, hacksaw, duct tape, knife, small tool kit
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• • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

extra batteries Wind-up flashlight auxiliary powered generator Garden hose for siphoning noaa weather or wind up radio hard land-line phone extra house and car keys Mess kits, cookware, plastic serving ware, paper towels, foil, plastic zip bags Campfire stove, charcoal grill, canned heat Candles and matches in waterproof container extra clothing (see suggestions below) Games, books, puzzles Whistle filter/dust mask

• •

blankets, sleeping bags Complete set of clothes for each family member • heavy gloves • Cotton shirts, warm jackets/sweatshirts • Jeans, sturdy pants • rain gear, umbrella, poncho • hats, bandanas, handkerchief • boots, shoes, socks • extra glasses, contacts/ cleaning fluids For more information on disaster supply kits, go to www.arceinlandempire.org READY-TO-GO BACKPACK every family needs to keep the following items in a backpack or duffle bag in order to be ready if an emergency situation forces them to leave home. • one gallon of water per person

• • • • • •

• • • •

food that does not have to be refrigerated and a manual can opener Plastic/paper plates, cups and utensils flashlight and extra batteries battery-operated radio Change of clothes Card with your contact information and the number of someone out of state to call Small first-aid kit Personal identification card Personal hygiene items, soap and hand sanitizer Store medicine you usually take near your “ready-to-Go” Kit

SHELTER AND CLOTHING CHECKLIST • tent
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READY TO STAY IN YOUR HOME it is equally important for families to have extra supplies on hand in the event an emergency situation

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Disaster Supply 4 Inventory
forces them to remain in the home for several days. a “ready-to-Stay” kit contains all of the items in the “ready-to-Go” kit plus a few others. Prepare a “ready-to-Stay” kit with the following items stored in a plastic tub or a special cabinet. • three gallons of water for each family member • Canned food and snacks for at least three days and a manual can opener • toilet paper • Pet food and supplies for three days • non-scented bleach • blankets • books and games to keep busy • Paper and pencils HOW MUCH WATER DO I NEED? You should have at least a three-day supply of water and you should store at least one gallon of water per person per day. a normally active person needs at least one-half gallon of water daily just for drinking. additionally, in determining adequate quantities, take the following into account: • individual needs vary, depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet, and cli• • • mate. Children, nursing mothers, and ill people need more water. Very hot temperatures can double the amount of water needed. a medical emergency might require additional water. ers that have had milk or fruit juice in them. Milk protein and fruit sugars cannot be adequately removed from these containers and provide an environment for bacterial growth when water is stored in them. Cardboard containers also leak easily and are not designed for long-term storage of liquids. also, do not use glass containers, because they can break and are heavy. if storing water in plastic soda bottles, follow these steps: • thoroughly clean the bottles with dishwashing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap. • Sanitize the bottles by adding a solution of 1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water. • Swish the sanitizing solution in the bottle so that it touches all surfaces. • after sanitizing the bottle, thoroughly rinse out the sanitizing solution with clean water. HOW TO PURIFY DRINKING WATER • boil for 1 minute,
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HOW SHOULD I STORE WATER? to prepare safest and most reliable emergency supply of water, it is recommended you purchase commercially bottled water. Keep bottled water in its original container and do not open it until you need to use it. observe the expiration or “use by” date. Preparing your own containers of water? it is recommended you purchase food-grade water storage containers from surplus or camping supplies stores to use for water storage. before filling with water, thoroughly clean the containers with dishwashing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap. follow directions below on filling the container with water. if you choose to use your own storage containers, choose two-liter plastic soft drink bottles — not plastic jugs or cardboard contain-

•

keeping in mind that some will evaporate, cool before drinking add 8 drops (or 1/4 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water add 16 drops or one teaspoon per gallon of cloudy water and let stand for 30 minutes use water purification tablets per manufacturer’s instructions

FOOD Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking and little or no water. if you must heat food, pack a can of Sterno. Select food items that are compact and lightweight. avoid foods that will make you thirsty. Choose salt-free crackers, whole grain cereals, and canned foods with high liquid content. also, be sure to include a manual can opener. include a selection of the following foods in your kit. DISASTER SUPPLIES KIT: • ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits and vegetables • Canned juices, milk, soup (if powdered, store extra water)
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Disaster Supply 4 Inventory
• • • • Staples: sugar, salt, pepper high energy foods: peanut butter, jelly, crackers, granola bars, trail mix Vitamins foods for infants, elderly persons or persons with special dietary needs Comfort/stress foods: cookies, hard candy, sweetened cereals, lollipops, instant coffee, tea bags • • water for reconstitution. Snack-sized canned goods are good because they generally have pull-top lids or twistopen keys. beverages packaged in foil packets and foillined boxes are suitable for a disaster supplies kits because they are tightly sealed and will keep for a long time. food stores such as health food stores or food storage supply houses as well as sporting goods stores may have foods prepared especially for this purpose. FOOD STORAGE TIPS • Keep food in the driest and coolest spot in the house — a dark area if possible. • Keep food covered at all times. • Seal cookies and crackers in plastic bags and keep in tight containers. • open food boxes and cans carefully so that they can be closed tightly after each use. • Store packages susceptible to pests, e.g., opened packages of sugar, dried fruits and nuts in screw-top jars or airtight cans. • Store wheat, corn and beans in sealed cans or sealed plastic buckets. • buy powdered milk in nitrogen-packed cans for long term storage. • Keep salt and vitamins in their original packages. • inspect all items periodically to make sure there are no broken seals or dented containers. EMERGENCY COOKING in an emergency, food can be cooked using a fireplace or a charcoal grill or camp stove, outdoors only. food can also be heated with candle warmers, chafing dishes, and fondue pots. Canned foods can be heated and eaten directly out of the can. Completely remove the lid and label before heating the can to prevent internal combustion or the label catching fire. STORAGE AND UPKEEP • Store the items in plastic boxes that are waterproof and pest-proof. • Stash emergency supplies near your front door or in your bedroom, somewhere you can easily grab them on your way out in an emergency. • don’t keep supplies in areas not easily accessible. • replenish kits annually when you reset your clocks at daylight saving time. • toss outdated foods and cans that are dented and rusted. restock as your family’s needs change. DA

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EMERGENCY FOOD SUPPLIES • Compressed food bars: they store well, are lightweight, taste good, and are nutritious and high in calories. • trail mix: blends of granola, nuts, seeds, and dried fruits are available prepackaged, or assemble your own. • dried foods are nutritious and satisfying, but they have salt content, which promotes thirst. • freeze-dried foods are tasty and lightweight but need water for reconstitution. • instant meals such as cups of noodles or cups of soup are also a good addition to kits, although they too need
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FOOD OPTIONS TO AVOID • Commercially dehydrated foods require a great deal of water for reconstitution and require extra effort in preparation. they also are inedible unless they are reconstituted. • bottled foods are too heavy and bulky and break easily. • Meal-sized commercially canned foods are also bulky and heavy. • Whole grains, beans and pasta. Preparations of these foods could be complicated under the circumstance of a disaster. Most of the foods appropriate for a disaster Supplies Kit are available at local supermarkets. Specialty
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It is Time to Get Serious about Saving Water
5 Simple Things You Can Do
1. Replace a portion of your lawn with beautiful native and California friendly® plants. SAVE 12,000 to 21,600 gallons of water a year. 2. Install a new “smart” sprinkler controller that figures out the right amount of water for your landscape based on information about your plants and garden environment. Adjust your sprinklers so they hit your lawn and garden, not walkways. SAVE 6,000 gallons of water a year. 3. Run only full loads in the washing machine and dishwasher. SAVE 3,600 to 8,600 gallons of water a year. 4. Fix that leaky faucet, cut your shower by two minutes and turn off the water while brushing your teeth. SAVE 364 gallons of water a year. 5. Don’t use the toilet as a wastebasket. SAVE 4,800 to 7,200 gallons of water a year.

Doing these 5 simple things can save the average family over 43,000 gallons of water a year.

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D I S A S T E R AWA R E N E S S

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posted:11/13/2008
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Description: San Gabriel Valley Newspaper group Disaster Awareness Guide