Riverhead High School Course Offering Booklet

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					Riverhead High School
Course Offering Booklet

      2007-2008
                              *******

            HIGH SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION
                      James J. McCaffrey, Principal
                   Stanley Pelech, Associate Principal
Shirley Cepero, Assistant Principal for Academic Supervision Grades 7-12
 Jeanne Grim, Assistant Principal for Academic Supervision Grades 7-12
            Charles Regan, Assistant Principal for Operations
         Michael J. Winfield, Assistant Principal for Operations
              Joseph W. Connolly, Guidance Director
                    William Groth, Athletic Director
                  David Loddengaard, Music Director



                  GUIDANCE COUNSELORS

                            Craig Korobow
                          Christopher Martin
                           Suzanne Maurino
                          Anastasia Mouyiaris
                            Christy Salerno



                  GUIDANCE SECRETARIES

                           Patricia Contino
                           Jeanne D’Alsace
                             Kathy Smith



                               *******
                           RIVERHEAD HIGH SCHOOL
                                 700 HARRISON AVENUE
                                 RIVERHEAD, N.Y. 11901
                           Phone (631-369-6727 Fax (631)-369-5164




Dear Students, Parents/Guardians,


The 2007-2008 course offering booklet should serve as a reference in the planning of your
educational blueprint for your future at Riverhead High School. It is offered to assist students
and parents in planning for the upcoming academic year. You will see many changes
implemented to meet the New York State Learning Standards. As you face the challenges of the
future, Riverhead High School is prepared to assist in selecting the curriculum that will afford
every opportunity to reach your academic potential, while providing the capability to pursue
areas in which you are especially interested.

The Guidance Counselors, Administrators and Faculty are available for the selection process.
Feel free to call upon them for aid and/or assistance.

Together, let’s ensure a successful year of study at our High School.

Sincerely,



James J. McCaffrey
Principal
              TABLE OF CONTENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ………………………………………………………….. 1

NY STATE LEARNING STANDARDS ……………………………………………………… 2

NCAA REQUIREMENTS …………………………………………………………………….. 4

GUIDELINES FOR COURSE PLACEMENT ……………………………………………… 8

YEARLY CREDIT REQUIREMENTS / GRADE WEIGHTING…………..………...…… 9

SCHEDULING ...……………………………………………………………………………… 10

ACADEMIC PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE…………………………………………… 12

ART – FINE AND APPLIED…………………………………………………………………. 13

BUSINESS EDUCATION…………………………………………………………….………..17

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS………………………………………………………………. 21

FOREIGN LANGUAGE/ESL………………………………………………………………… 25

HEALTH (Required)………………………………………………………………… ………. 32

HOME AND CAREER SKILLS……………………………………………………….……. 34

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY……………………………………………………………. . 35

MATHEMATICS………………………………………………………………………........... 38

MISCELLANEOUS…………………………………………………………………………... 44

MUSIC……………………………………………………………………….…………… …... 45

NJROTC…………………………………………………………………….………………… 47

OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION…………………………………………………………… 49

PHYSICAL EDUCATION …………..………………………………………………….. … 52

SCIENCE………………………………………………………………………………… ….. 55

SOCIAL STUDIES……………………………………………………………………………. 63

SPECIAL EDUCATION………………………………………………………………… … 70

HALF CREDIT COURSES ………………………………………………………………… 72
                                    GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
                          (Subject to change based on NYS Board of Regents Approval)
                                 Class of 2007 through 2011
                           (Entered 9th grade in September 2003 – 2007)
                     Regents Diploma                                                 Regents Advanced Diploma
                       Required Courses                                                      Required Courses
English                      4 Credits                                  English                      4 Credits
Social Studies                        4 Credits                         Social Studies                        4 Credits
Math                                  3 Credits                         Math                                  3 Credits
Science                               3 Credits                         Science                               3 Credits
Foreign Language                      1 Credit                          Foreign Language**                    3 Credits
Art/Music                             1 Credit                          Art/Music                             1 Credit
Health                                .5 Credit                         Health                                .5 Credit
Physical Education                     2 Credits                        Physical Education                    2 Credits
Electives                             3.5 Credits                       Electives                             1.5 Credits

Total                                  22 Credits                       Total                                  22 Credits

                      Required Exams                                                         Required Exams
               (Passing score of 65 and above)                                        (Passing score of 65 and above)

English Language Arts                                                   English Language Arts
Math A Regents/Integrated Algebra Regents                               Math A/Integrated Algebra Regents & Math B Regents
Regents Global History                                                  Regents Global History
Regents U. S. History                                                   Regents U.S. History
Regents Science                                                         Two Regents Science Exams – 1 life & 1 physical
                                                                        Regents Foreign Language Exam **


                                                     LOCAL DIPLOMA OPTION
Note: Even though this option is available to students, Riverhead High School and the New York State Board of Regents are encouraging
                                         students to achieve a 65 or better on all Regents exams.

                       Required Courses                                 Required Exams             (Passing score of 55 and above)
English                                4 Credits                        English Language Arts
Social Studies                         4 Credits                        Math A Regents
Math                                   3 Credits                        Regents Global History
Science                                3 Credits                        Regents U. S. History
Foreign Language                       1 Credit                         Regents Science
Art/Music                              1 Credit
Health                                 .5 Credit
Physical Education                     2 Credits
Sequence/Electives                     3.5 Credits
               Total                           22 Credits
General education students entering 9th grade in 2005 must have at least two scores at 65 or above on the five required Regents exams and
all scores at 65 or above.

General education students entering 9th grade in 2006 must have at least three scores at 65 or above on the five required Regents exams
and all scores at 55 or above

General education students entering 9th grade in 2007 must have at least four scores at 65 or above on the five required Regents exams
and all scores at 55 or above.

** Students acquiring 5 units of credit in Art, Music, Business, Technology or vocational education may be exempt.

NOTE: Students are now required to have completed one unit of credit in a Foreign Language by the end of their freshman year or pass
a New York State Proficiency exam.
                 NEW YORK STATE LEARNING STANDARDS
The Board of Regents has adopted New Learning Standards which incorporate changes in the Content
Standards and Performance Indicators. New Graduation Assessments and Requirements are based upon
these standards.


                           ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA)

   1.    Read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.
   2.    Read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.
   3.    Read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.
   4.    Read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.


                                            THE ARTS

   1. Actively engage in the processes that constitute creation and performance in the Arts (Dance,
      Music, Theater, and Visual Arts) and participate in various roles in the Arts.
   2. Be knowledgeable about, and make use of, the materials and resources available for participation
      in the Arts in various roles.
   3. Respond critically to a variety of works in the Arts, connecting the individual work to
      other works and to other aspects of human endeavor and thought.
   4. Develop an understanding of the personal and cultural forces that shape artistic
      communication and how the Arts, in turn, shape the diverse cultures of past and present society.


        HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND FAMILY AND CONSUMER
                              SCIENCE
                           (Health, PE, FCS)

   1. Have the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain physical fitness, participate in
      physical activity, and maintain personal health.
   2. Acquire the knowledge and ability necessary to create and maintain a safe and healthy
      environment.
   3. Understand and be able to manage their personal and community resources.


        CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES (CDOS)

   1. Be knowledgeable about the world of work, explore career options, and relate personal skills,
      aptitudes, and abilities to future career decisions.
   2. Demonstrate how academic knowledge and skills are applied in the workplace, and other
      settings.
   3. A) Demonstrate mastery of foundation skills and competencies essential for success in the
      workplace.
      B) Choose a career major and acquire career-specific technical knowledge/skills necessary to
      progress toward gainful employment, career advancement, and success in postsecondary
      programs.



                                                  (2)
                   LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE)


1. Be able to use a language other than English for communication.
2. Develop cross-cultural skills and understandings.

              MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (MST)



1.   Use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose
     questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.
2.   Access, generate, process, and transfer information using appropriate technologies.
3.   Understand Mathematics and become mathematically confident by communicating and
     reasoning mathematically, by applying Mathematics in real-world settings, and by solving
     problems through the integrated study of number systems, geometry, algebra, data analysis
     probability, and trigonometry.
4.   Understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical
     setting and living environment, and recognize the historical development of ideas in Science.
5.   Apply technological knowledge and skills to design, construct, use, and evaluate products and
     systems to satisfy human and environmental needs.
6.   Understand the relationships and common themes that connect Mathematics, Science, and
     Technology, and apply the themes to these and other areas of learning.
7.   Apply the knowledge and thinking skills of Mathematics, Science, and Technology to address
     real-live problems and make informed decisions.


                                     SOCIAL STUDIES (SS)


1. Use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes,
   developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
2. Use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes,
   developments, and turning points in world history, and examine the broad sweep of history from
   a variety of perspectives.
3. Use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the
   interdependent world in which we live – local, national, and global – including the distribution of
   people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.
4. Use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of how the United States
   and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce
   resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national
   economies and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and non-market
   mechanisms.
5. Use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for
   establishing governments; the governmental system of the United States and other nations; the
   United States Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the
   roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.




                                             (3)
               NCAA REQUIREMENTS CORE COURSES


For the class of 2007-2008, to play sports as a freshman in NCAA Divisions I & II, you must meet
specific standards. You must graduate from high school and make at least a 2.0 grade–point average
(based on a 4.0 scale) in 14 core academic courses for Division II and 16 core courses in Division I.


           NCAA DIVISION I CORE ACADEMIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS
                              (2008 AND LATER)

        4 years English
        3 years of mathematics courses at the level of Algebra 1 or higher
        2 years social science
        2 years natural or physical science (including one lab course, if offered by your high
           school)
        1 year of an additional course in English, Math or natural or physical science
        4 additional years of academic courses in any of the above areas, or in foreign language,
           computer science*, philosophy or nondoctrinal religion.
        Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core-course grade point
        average and test score sliding scale on page 6.

Note: Computer science courses can be used as core courses only if you high school grants graduation
credit in math or natural or physical science for them, and if the courses appear on your high school core-
course list as math or science courses.


           NCAA DIVISION II CORE ACADEMIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS
                               (2005 AND LATER)
        3 years English
        2 years math at the level of Algebra 1 or higher
        2 years social science
        2 years natural or physical science (one must be a lab science)
        2 years additional courses in English, math or natural or physical science
        3 additional years of academic courses in any of the above areas, or in foreign language,
           computer science*, philosophy or nondoctrinal religion
        Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum sore of 68. There is no sliding scale
        in Division II.

* Note: Computer science courses can be used as core courses only if your high school grants graduation
credit in math or natural science for them, and if the courses appear on your high school core-course list
as math or science courses.


REMEMBER: The grade-point average requirements are for the 14/16 core courses, not your overall
GPA. Work with your school counselor and your coach to make certain your class schedule is on track to
meet the NCAA guidelines.




                                                 (4)
You will be a qualifier if you meet the academic requirements listed above. As a qualifier, you:

    •   Can practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college.
    •   Can receive an athletic scholarship during your first year of college
    •   Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

You will be a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the academic requirements listed above, but you
have graduated from high school and meet one of the following:

    •   The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68 OR
    •   Completion of the 14 core courses with a 2.000 core-course grade-point average.

As a partial qualifier you:
    • Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first year of college.
    • Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college.
    • Cannot compete during your first year of college.
    • Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

Remember: Meeting the NCAA academic rules does not guarantee your admissions into a college. You
must apply for admission.




                                                 (5)
            NCAA New Core GPA/Test Score Index
           (to be used with 16 core courses in Division I)


Core                     ACT                      SAT
GPA                      new:                     new
                        sum of                    scoring
                        scores                    system

3.550 & above           37                         400
3.525                   38                         410
3.500                   39                         420
3.475                   40                         430
3.450                   41                         440
3.425                   41                         450
3.400                   42                         460
3.375                   42                         470
3.350                   43                         480
3.325                   44                         490
3.300                   44                         500
3.275                   45                         510
3.250                   46                         520
3.225                   46                         530
3.200                   47                         540
3.175                   47                         550
3.150                   48                         560
3.125                   49                         570
3.100                   49                         580
3.075                   50                         590
3.050                   50                         600
3.025                   51                         610
3.000                   52                         620
2.975                   52                         630
2.950                   53                         640
2.925                   53                         650
2.900                   54                         660
2.875                   55                         670
2.850                   56                         680
2.825                   56                         690
2.800                   57                         700
2.775                   58                         710
2.750                   59                         720
2.725                   59                         730
2.700                   60                         730
2.675                   61                        740-750
2.650                   62                         760
2.625                   63                         770



                                 (6)
                      New Core/Test Score Index Cont’d
          Core                       ACT                             SAT
          GPA                        new                             new
                                     sum of                          scoring
                                     scores                          system

         2.600                       64                             780
         2.575                       65                             790
         2.550                       66                             800
         2.525                       67                             810
         2.500                       68                             820
         2.475                       69                             830
         2.450                       70                            840-850
         2.425                       70                             860
         2.400                       71                             860
         2.375                       72                             870
         2.350                       73                             880
         2.325                       74                             890
         2.300                       75                             900
         2.275                       76                             910
         2.250                       77                             920
         2.225                       78                             930
         2.200                       79                             940
         2.175                       80                             950
         2.150                       80                             960
         2.125                       81                             960
         2.100                       82                             970
         2.075                       83                             980
         2.050                       84                             990
         2.025                       85                            1000
         2.000                       86                            1010




NCAA Division II Grade and Test Score Requirements

You must have a combined score on the SAT Verbal and Math sections of 820 or a 68 sum score on the
four individual tests on the ACT.




                                               (7)
     GUIDELINES FOR ADMISSION INTO AND CONTINUATION IN HONORS,
             ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND REGENTS COURSES



I.      HONORS COURSES

       A.    Basic Admission Guidelines
             1. final report card grade of 90 in previous Regents class or 80 in previous honors class
             2. department recommendation
             3. score of 3 or 4 on 7th grade assessments for placement in English, Social Studies,
                Math and Science Honors courses.


II.      ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

        A.   Basic Admission Guidelines
             1. final report card grade of 90 in previous Regents class or 80 in previous honors class
             2. department recommendation

       B.    Students may accelerate and take appropriate Regents exam at the end of the AP course,
             if applicable.

       C.    Students enrolled in AP classes must take the AP exam


III.     REGENTS COURSES

         The standard course of study at Riverhead High School is at the Regents level. Students
         who are not in honors or advanced placement courses will be enrolled in Regents level
         courses unless there is a reason for placement in any remaining non-Regents courses.


IV.      REGENTS RX COURSES

         This program is an extended version of a Regents level course, designed for students who
         can benefit from additional instruction to meet Regents standards. Students participate in a
         Regents class as described in each department area, as well as in an additional instructional
         period per cycle.



         Note: In all levels of courses, extenuating circumstances can place a student in a course
         following a review by Administration and Academic Supervisor.




                                              (8)
                             YEARLY CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

                                 For the graduating class of 2005 on:

                        10th Grade                                6 credits
                        11th Grade                                12 credits
                        12th Grade                                18 credits


                               WEIGHTING AND CLASS RANK

Different course levels of the same course may be weighted so that a student is not penalized by taking a
more difficult level of a course. These weights are included only in the student rank averages, and do not
appear on the report card or in the transcript for information purposes. Weights are determined in the
following manner.

Course with no Level designation         = 1.00          General/elective not culminating in a
                                                         Regents exam.

R, RX Level course                       = 1.04          Regents course ending in Regents exam.

Honors Bridge                            = 1.06          Honors Incentive Program

H Level course                           = 1.08          Strongly enriched version of a Regents
                                                         Level course.

College Level/AP Level course            = 1.18          Terminates in an Advanced Placement
                                                         Exam. Weighting is based upon sitting
                                                         for AP exam.

Class rank for college transcripts will be computed early in the senior year. Class rank will be computed
at the end of the 7th semester for seniors only, projecting the semester averages as final averages for all
courses. All subjects graded on a numerical basis, excluding physical education, will be used to determine
the rank. The transcript reflects a weighted grade point average and weighted class rank.




                          INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM

The purpose of the Independent Study Program at Riverhead High School is to provide an opportunity for
students who have interest areas beyond or outside the Curriculum. When the student exhibits
achievement of an amount of knowledge equivalent to that normally obtained in a course, credit may be
given for the work, according to a scale of ½ credit or 1 credit. Grades are excluded from class rank.

The burden of obtaining approval of an Independent Study Program rests on the student. The student
should approach a teacher to sponsor the Program. The teacher should clarify the student’s objectives,
and help the student complete an Independent Study Program Request which can be obtained in
Guidance. The request is then forwarded to the Academic Supervisor, or, if there is none, the
Administrator in charge of the subject area, after both the student and a parent have signed the request.




                                                  (9)
                                      EARLY GRADUATION

Students who wish to graduate early must:
   1. Petition the building principal or his designee by the first day of the beginning of the senior year.
   2. Complete a form in the Guidance Office after discussing with the counselor and parents an
      appropriate plan for the senior year and beyond.
   3. To be considered for valedictorian and salutatorian, this decision must be made and documented in
      writing by October 1st of the senior year.




                       CREDIT FOR COURSES TAKEN OUTSIDE OF
                             RIVERHEAD HIGH SCHOOL


Students requesting credit for courses taken in local colleges or universities must obtain approval from the
Riverhead High School Principal prior to the first day the student attends these classes. A one semester,
three-credit college course would be considered equivalent to a one-credit high school course. Generally
speaking, unless these courses were required for graduation, they would not be entered on the student’s
transcript. A copy of the student’s college transcript may be kept in the student’s file.



                                              SCHEDULING


Riverhead High School offers its students a comprehensive and varied curriculum in preparation for
college, technical school, and other types of post-high school education, the armed forces or employment.

A great deal of time, care, and effort is devoted to assuring that each student is placed into an educational
program that will best meet his or her individual needs. Input is sought from students, parents, teachers,
and counselors. The scheduling process is a lengthy one, starting in December and ending in July. It is
the goal of the staff, through this process, to insure a smooth opening of the new school year, one marked
by a minimum of disruptions due to schedule changes. To attain this goal, the following guidelines have
been established:

    1.   Preliminary course selections based on teacher recommendations are made in January.

    2.   From January through April, upon request, students will meet with their guidance counselor to
         discuss the selection of classes for the upcoming school year. This Course Offering Booklet,
         developed by the high school administration and academic departments, details the New York
         State graduation requirements and gives a comprehensive listing of the courses offered by each
         department in Riverhead High School.

    3.   The Middle School guidance counselors will be available to meet with each eighth grade parent
         and student to review classes for the upcoming school year. Due to the nature of the ninth
         grade schedule, students will only make choices in the elective areas. In addition, if a student
         is an accelerated science student in the eighth grade, a choice will be made in the area of science.



                                                  (10)
    4.   All students will be enrolled in a full schedule of classes including physical education.


    5.   Any changes in these course selections must be submitted in writing by the student and parent to
         his/her guidance counselor prior to June 1st.

    6.   In August, an updated course list will be mailed to each student. This course list will reflect
         changes due to:

             A.      Prior requests from student/parent submitted before June 1st.

             B.      Results on June or summer school report card. It is also possible that the school may
                     discontinue a course due to low enrollment or staffing considerations.

             C.      Conflicts in the master schedule.

   7. Be aware that courses are to be offered only if a sufficient number of students register for the
      course. Some courses listed may not be given if registration is too low. There are additional
      administrative reasons that a course may not be offered.

         Please note: After June 30th, any schedule change or course request change must be submitted
         in writing to the student’s guidance counselor. These requests will be handled in a timely manner,
         but there is no guarantee these requests will be effective for the first day of school. In addition,
         time will be provided in late August for schedule changes to be addressed. These changes will be
         made only for the most serious reasons which include health/safety, inappropriate placement or
         graduation issues.




                                SCHEDULE CHANGE POLICY



1. Once school begins, schedule changes will be honored only for educational reasons (i.e., graduation
    requirements, sequence requirements, and incorrect placement). To be honored, a schedule change
    request must have written approval by a student’s parent/guardian, teacher and academic supervisor.
    The last date for students to initiate schedule changes is one week after the 1st quarter progress report
    is mailed home. STUDENTS MUST REPORT TO THEIR ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED
    CLASSES UNTIL A CHANGE IS FORMALLY APPROVED.

2. Students requesting a change because of a mechanical error on their schedule, a schedule conflict or
    because they have had the same teacher more than once for the same course, or a sibling has had the
    same teacher, can meet with their counselor to remedy the situation.

3. After the deadline, students who, in exceptional circumstances, drop a course will be given a
   “WP”(withdrawn passing) or a “WF” (withdrawn failing) on their H.S. transcript.

4. At no time will schedule changes be made merely to effect a teacher change or a class period change.




                                                  (11)
                    ACADEMIC PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE


It is generally agreed that there are four factors for the students to consider in the college admissions
process:

                            1. Course selection – as rigorous as possible

                            2. Grades – an excellent predictor of future success

                            3. Standardized testing

                            4. Activities

It is generally accepted that the best indicator of success in college is a student’s high school record – a
combination of courses, grades, and examinations. Students who plan to attend any college should take
during their high school years at least four years of English, four years of social studies, three years
Regents science, three years of mathematics including the Math B exam and three years of foreign
language with satisfactory completion of the Regents examinations.

Students frequently ask counselors and other professionals questions related to “protecting their GPA” by
taking easier courses. It is the position of Riverhead High School and the Guidance Department that there
is another way of approaching this decision – take the most demanding academic program and make the
commitment to the work necessary to get the best grades. Colleges prefer students to take academically
oriented courses and, given appropriate grades, place great emphasis on the quality of the educational
program in their admissions decisions.

Each student in connection with his or her guidance counselor should begin to develop a four year plan in
the first year of high school. Courses should be taken with the overall objectives of the plan and modified
where necessary.

Given the fact that students frequently change their minds, it is our unequivocal recommendation that
each year students are in high school they should take the most academically rigorous program available
given their abilities. To discontinue academic subjects (especially math, science and foreign language) is
to limit choices available to students beyond high school.



                           ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES



As part of our active approach to raising academic standards and providing access for students to
the best academic programs and diplomas, Riverhead High School offers a number of academic
support programs in English, Social Studies, Math and Science. Included in these programs are
extended (“X”), test prep and reading (AIS) classes. These classes support instruction and help
prepare students for required state examination.

In addition, there is a program for incoming ninth grade students (Transitional Learning Center)
which is offered to selected ninth grade students who need the additional academic support of
smaller class size and specially trained teachers to provide the opportunity for a successful
adjustment to high school.

                                                 (12)
                       ART –FINE AND APPLIED
The two over-all objectives for students in the art program are to (1) gain a deeper appreciation for
various forms of the visual arts and (2) to develop expertise in as many technical skills as possible.

Each year, a number of students plan to go into some field of art as a vocation or as an avocation. These
students will select a sequential program of art and will take advantage of as many advanced level art
courses as possible during their high school tenure. These courses impart a wealth of technical
knowledge, ranging from an exposure to photography and painting through an application of three-
dimensional design in the ceramic studio.

The majority of students, who may take only one year of art, will certainly gain a deeper insight into art
theory. Visits to places of art interest, exposure to reproductions of great work, and the actual creation of
art objects will provide enriching experiences. Such experiences should result in an enjoyment and
appreciation of art that will last a lifetime.

                                           5-UNIT SEQUENCE

                                      1 Unit of Credit in Studio In Art
                                     4 Units of Credit in Advanced Art

                                               ELECTIVES
                       Creative Crafts 1/II                        Studio Photo I/II
                      Studio in Ceramics                        Studio in Graphic Arts
                        AP Art History                     AP Studio Art: General Portfolio and
                  Studio in Drawing & Painting                               Drawing Portfolio
                      Computer Graphics                      Advanced Computer Graphics

STUDIO IN ART (701)
Grade Level 9-12                          Full year/1 credit                                weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
This is the foundation course for many of the course offerings in the art department.

Students will make works of art that explore different kinds of subject matter, topics, themes and
metaphors. Students will understand and use sensory elements, organizational principles and expressive
images to communicate their own ideas in works of art. A variety of art materials, processes, mediums,
techniques and appropriate technologies will be used for creating and exhibiting visual art works. This
course satisfies the art/music graduation requirement.

STUDIO IN DRAWING AND PAINTING (702)
Grade Level 10-12           Full year/1 credit                                              weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio In Art

Description:
Drawing and painting is divided into two sections. Drawing is taught first so that the student will not
have to struggle with this skill while trying to master the difficulties of painting. Drawing involves a
series of design problems. It is followed by an in-depth study using 6B pencil drawings of real objects,
and then lessons in matting, graphics, scratchboard, and India ink. Figure drawing from live models is
interwoven in the drawing projects, as is the use of still life.

Painting consists of the mastery of watercolor, pastel, acrylic and oil paints.

                                                   (13)
ADVANCED DRAWING AND PAINTING (703)
Grade 11-12                           Full year/1 credit                                     weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio In Art and Studio in Painting

Description:
Advanced art is designed to give experienced students an opportunity to do in-depth work in areas of their
choice. Each student must do six to ten projects each quarter. The projects are weighted for the purpose
of grading according to their difficulty. Students are encouraged to try new art experiences and to reach
new levels of expertise.

CREATIVE CRAFTS I (704)
Grade Level 9-12                          Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
Crafts is designed to offer the student a wide variety of mixed-media art experiences. Mediums such as
printmaking, sculpture, fiber art, ceramics, mosaics, and found object design will be explored in this
course. Students who enjoy expressing themselves in a wide variety of art mediums should enroll in this
course.

CREATIVE CRAFTS II (705)
Grade Level 10-12                         Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Creative Crafts I

Description:
This is an upper level art course that will offer the student the opportunity to continue to create with a
wide variety of mixed media art experiences. The student will continue to express his or herself in various
mediums that were introduced in the basic crafts class (i.e. printmaking, paper making, sculpture, fiber
art, ceramics, mosaics, stained glass and found object design). This course satisfies the art/music
graduation requirement.

STUDIO IN CERAMICS (706)
Grade Level 10-12                         Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio in Art

Description:
In order to be eligible for this introductory course, students should have successfully completed a year of
basic art. Hand building methods – coil, slab, pinch and block – will be practiced. The joining of clay
bodies, techniques of underglazing and overglazing, and introduction to the potter’s wheel will be
covered. Field trips, slides, and other visuals will be utilized in order to gain a deeper appreciation of the
art form. Students may take this for one semester and earn ½ credit, with department permission.

STUDIO PHOTO I (708)
Grade Level 10-12                     Full year/1 credit                                     weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio Art or Creative Crafts with departmental approval

Description:
This course is a beginning black and white photography class. Students will learn how to use the photo
medium as a form of art, documentation and self-expression. They will learn how to expose their film
according to the artistic rules of composition while concentrating on the elements and principals of art and
design. In addition, students will learn all technical aspects of photography including working with and
mastering a 35mm SLR camera, developing film and making prints from that film. All shooting
assignments will be the student’s responsibility to complete for homework; class time will be utilized for
lab work. Students must have access to a 35mm camera for the duration of the year. Cameras are not
provided for each student.

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STUDIO PHOTO II (709)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio Photo I

Description:
Students will build on their knowledge of photography to create photographs of advanced, professional
level. Students will be exposed to advanced techniques of photography which will include alternative
processes, toning and studio lighting. Students should have a strong sense of self-motivation and
determination for this class as the amount of acceptable photos required will increase. High quality is
emphasized in the class, therefore students must be willing to persevere.

Students must have a 35mm camera to work with as cameras will not be provided for them.


COMPUTER GRAPHICS (712)
Grade Level 10-12                        Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio in Art

Description:
This full year course is designed to expose students to several different methods of creating electronic art.
The computer will be used as a tool to create drawings, commercial artwork and animations. Previous
computer experience is helpful, but not necessary. Each quarter, students will be expected to complete
six to ten pieces of computer-generated artwork. Students will earn one art credit upon successful
completion of this full-year course. This course satisfies the Computer Literacy requirement.


ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS (713)
Grade Level 11-12                   Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio in Art and Computer Graphics

Description:
Students will build on their knowledge of Computer Graphics to create artwork on a professional level.
Areas of study include: using photo-realistic three dimensional programs while concentrating on
creativity and imagination; scanning photographs to manipulate and to experiment with image retouching;
using programs to create advertisements and package products; experimenting with animation and full use
of video and audio manipulation to create videotapes and commercials; and experimenting with
architectural and interior designs. This course satisfies the Computer Literacy requirement


STUDIO IN GRAPHICS ARTS (715) (Printmaking)
Grade Level 11-12             Full year/1 credit                                            weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Studio Art

Description:
This course is designed for students who have completed a full year of Studio in Art and desire to take
advanced work in the area of printmaking. Printmaking is concerned with the art of using lines, solid
masses, tones and textures in such a manner that many proofs may be produced or pulled from an
original. The course covers a variety of processes and materials for exploration including monotype,
relief printing (linoleum blocks and woodblocks), intaglio printing (line etching, solarplate etching,
drypoint engraving on plastic), lithography and silk screen. Since it would be impossible for the student
to work in depth in all of the various areas of study introduced, the teacher will introduce all processes
early in the course and the student may select his/her own special processes to pursue and master.



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ADVANCED PLACEMENT ART HISTORY (716)
Grade Level 10-12        Full year/1 credit                                                 weight 1.18
Prerequisite: None

Description:
The Advanced Placement offering in the History of Art is designed to provide the same benefits to
secondary school students as those provided by an introductory college course in art history: an
understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within historical and
cultural contexts. In this course, students examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and
the present from a variety of cultures. They learn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and
sensitivity, and to analyze what they see. Many colleges and universities offer credit to students who
have performed successfully on the required AP History of Art Examination.

Students
No prior experience in the history of art is assumed for those students who take the course. Students who
have done well in other courses in the humanities, such as history and literature, or in any of the studio
arts are especially encouraged to enroll. It is hoped that the experiences of students in the practice of art
and in other humanities courses will prove useful in enriching the context of the history of art course.
While the course does not assume prior training or seek primarily to identify students who will major in
art history in college, it does require a high degree of commitment to academic work and to the purposes
of a program designed to meet college standards.


AP STUDIO ART: GENERAL PORTFOLIO AND DRAWING PORTFOLIO (718)
Grade Level 11-12                   Full year/1 credit       weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Studio Art and department permission

Description:
The two Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical
experience of art. Advanced Placement Studio Art is not based on a written examination; instead,
students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. This allows students to earn
college credit and/or advanced placement while still in high school. The AP program is based on the
premise that college-level material can be taught successfully to secondary school students. The
Development Committee in AP Studio Art has had the counsel of both secondary school and college
faculty in defining the scope of work that would be equivalent to that of introductory college courses in
studio art.
AP courses should address three major concerns that are constants in the teaching of art: (1) a sense of
quality in a student’s work; (2) the student’s concentration on a particular visual interest or problem; and
(3) the student’s need for breadth of experience in the formal, technical, and expressive means of the
artist. AP work should reflect these three areas of concern: quality, concentration, and breadth. This
course may be offered in alternating years with AP Art History.




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                         BUSINESS EDUCATION
The purpose of Business Education is to prepare students for the world of work by providing skills and
knowledge that are necessary to obtain and succeed at a job. Eight out of every ten workers earn their
living in the business world; so why wait? Start now to prepare yourself for a rewarding career by
electing a business sequence.

                                        5-Unit Sequence
                         ½ Unit Career and Financial Management
½ Unit of Keyboarding, Business Communications, Web Page Design or Computer Applications
                         4 Units of other Business Department courses



CAREER AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (602)
(formerly Introduction to Occupations)
Grade Level 9-12                     Full year/ ½ credit                                  weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None                     Alternate days

Description:
Deciding on a career is not an easy thing to do. Before you can make a decision you need to know a bit
about yourself. What are your goals, interests, skills, likes and dislikes? This course will give students
the opportunity to answer these questions and explore the many career choices available to them.
Students will also learn how to manage their personal finances sucessfully. Find out what it takes to rent
and furnish an apartment, grocery shop, buy a car and obtain insurance. Topics to be covered: budgets,
banking, applying for credit and filing tax returns.

This course is required for all students following an Occupational Education sequence.


KEYBOARDING I (606)
Grade Level 9-12                        Full year/½ credit                                weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None                        Alternate days

Description:
Develop a lifetime skill that is needed in every career. This course will introduce students to the
computer keyboard and to touch typing using word processing on computers. Students will learn how to
format business and personal documents, how to use features available in word processing software and
how to communicate using correct formats in a business setting.

This course satisfies the additional ½ credit required for an Occupational Education sequence.


BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (623)
Grade Level 9-12          Full year/½ credit                                              weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None            Alternate days

Description:
Prepare yourself for the future by developing your written and oral communication skills. Listening,
speaking, reading, writing and nonverbal communication skills are emphasized, developed and applied to
real world business situations.

This course satisfies the additional ½ credit required for an Occupational Education sequence.


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BUSINESS OWNERSHIP/ ENTREPRENEURSHIP (614)
Grade Level 9-12           Full year/1 credit                                             weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
This course Introduces students to the important role that entrepreneurship and small business play in our
economic system. Students will learn important elements in starting and running a small business.
Business Ownership will also allow students the opportunity to apply to work in the school store. Some
topics discussed include:
    1. management of small businesses
    2. financial aspects of a small business
    3. government regulations
    4. social responsibility
    5. purchasing and inventory


PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (615)
Grade Level 9-12                        Full year/1 credit                              weight 1:00
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course will introduce students to the important part that marketing plays in our economic system.
Topics include:
    1. advertisin, promotion and lifestyle trends in society.
    2. product development and management
    3. sales
    4. retail operations and management
    5. trends and innovation in marketing using the internet
    6. careers in marketing


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (624)
Grade Level 9-12            Full year/1/2 HS credit             weight 1.00
                            3 SUNY Farmingdale credits optional
Prerequisite: None          Alternate days

Description:
Prepare yourself for the future. Whether you plan to go to college or enter the workforce after high
school this course is for you. Students are introduced to the software programs available in the Microsoft
Office Suite. Utilizing Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Publisher and Access, students will create various
documents and presentations which relate to college and business projects.

This course satisfies the additional ½ credit required for an Occupational Education sequence.


BUSINESS & PERSONAL LAW (610)
Grade Level 10-12           Full year/1 credit                                            weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
This course emphasizes contractual law. Students are given a practical knowledge of their rights and
obligations in contract transactions and are acquainted with law as it is related to business in general.
This is an especially good course for those interested in a career in law or for those interested in making
intelligent business decisions throughout their lives.



                                                 (18)
ACCOUNTING I (612)
Grade Level 10-12                      Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Average of 75 or better in Math courses

Description:
Accountants work in every type of business from coast to coast. This introductory course is designed for
students who are interested in the field of Accounting and are numbers oriented. Accounting I offers
beginning vocational preparation for a career in accounting and a foundation on which to continue
studying business and accounting at the college level.


ACCOUNTING II (ADVANCED) (613)
Grade Level 11-12           Full year/1 credit                                            weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Accounting I

Description:
Activities are directed toward the knowledge and skills needed by students preparing for an accounting
position following high school and those students who desire advanced preparation for the study of
accounting in college. Topics include: forming a partnership, payroll accounting, cost accounting,
financial analysis and reporting of a corporation, and departmentalized accounting. Realism is created by
using standard accounting forms and procedures as well as improved business practice


INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE DESIGN (603)
Grade Level 10-12                       Full year/1/2 HS credit                weight 1.00
                                        3 SUNY Farmingdale credits optional
Prerequisite: None                      Alternate days
Description:
Web Page Design is an exciting and fast growing field. This course will enable students to become
familiar with the World Wide Web, browsers, copyright laws and how to evaluate information found on
the web. They will learn to create web pages utilizing HTML language, Cascading Style Sheets(CSS)
and basic JavaScript. As a final project students will create a personal web-page using graphics, links,
table, frames and more.

This course satisfies the additional ½ credit required for an Occupational Education sequence.




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                                        SCHOOL TO WORK




WORK STUDY PROGRAM (9906)
Grade Level 9-12    Fall and/or Spring Semester/½ and/or 1 credit                            weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
School to Work is a federal initiative that gives students opportunities for expanded career awareness and
exploration. All students will have opportunities to develop the skills workers need to survive and thrive
in a high performance workplace. All students will learn to relate their academic work to careers and
their roles in the world. During grades 9-12, all students will experience career awareness programs and
work based learnings by having the opportunity to participate in shadowings, internships and work-study.

JOB-SHADOWING – Students visit a worksite for one day, observing a craftsperson, businessperson or
professional in their daily activities.

INTERNSHIP – A paid or unpaid work experience that exposes students to an occupation in a career
cluster for school credit. An internship can be done during the school day, after school or on weekends.
Credits may be earned by interning 15-50 hours in a semester for ½ credit or 30-100 hours over a year for
1 credit.

WORK STUDY – A paid (on the books or work in the family business) work experience with an
academic component for students wishing to learn and perform occupational skills on a job. Credit may
be earned by working 150 hours in a semester for ½ credit or 300 hours over a year for 1 credit. The
student may earn a maximum of 2 credits while in high school. The appropriate forms must be obtained
from the teacher, filled out by the students and handed in to the teacher prior to being put on the roster for
the Work Study program

SN WORK STUDY – A two-year program for the Special Education Student. For the first year the
student will study appropriate work skills and do voluntary work within the school district. The second
year they will be placed in the real work world if they have exhibited approprate skills in the past year.
The appropriate forms must be obtained from the teacher, filled out by the student and handed in to the
teacher prior to being put on roster for the Work Study Program.




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          ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS DEPARTMENT
      Children acquire language through practice, direct instruction, and numerous encounters with exemplary
      models. Research on language learning makes it very clear that language achievement depends upon the
      extent to which the learner is engaged in actual acts of reading, writing, listening, and speaking for
      meaningful purposes.

                   Accelerated/Honors                                   Regents
                      English 9H                                        English 9R


                      English 10H                                       English 10R


      English 11H or AP English Language/Comp.                          English 11R


      AP English Lit/Comp.   College Reading/                   English 12R           College Reading/
   AP English Language/Comp.    Preparation Honors                                         Preparation

In order to meet with success, Regents level students requiring additional preparation will be enrolled in an
appropriate Regents “X” program that meets the equivalent of 7.5 periods per week.

ENGLISH 9R (109)
Grade Level 9                             Full year/1 credit                                    weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
The English 9R program continues the foundation in the language arts skills established in the 7th and 8th grades.
Writing assignments will emphasize extended written response essays required on the 11th grade Comprehensive
English Regents. Students will participate in the writing process, keep a reading log, complete a research paper,
and complete a literary profile portfolio. Original writing may include journal entries, personal responses to
literature, expression of opinions, short stories, character studies, and poems. Short stories, essays, biographical
excerpts, speeches, plays, and novels form the literature component and provide a formwork for writing
assignments. Outside reading during the summer, as well as during the school year, is also required.

ENGLISH 9 HONORS (114)
Grade Level 9                             Full year/1 credit                                    weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
The honors course draws on its counterpart in the regular curriculum for a framework, and as a result, similar
assignments in reading, writing, speaking, and listening are undertaken. The difference between the honors and
regular program is one of intensity. Students are expected to demonstrate a high degree of self-discipline and
initiative, as well as insight and fluency in writing assignments. Writing assignments will emphasize extended
written response essays required on the 11th grade Comprehensive English Regents.




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ENGLISH 10R (110)
Grade Level 10                            Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
The English 10R program continues the development of students’ abilities in all of the language arts areas.
Students will participate in the writing process, keep a reading log, and complete a literacy profile portfolio.
Writing assignments will emphasize extended essays required of students on the Comprehensive English Regents
examination. Students will complete a creative project related to the literature, an oral presentation or argument,
and a 5 to 7 page research paper.


ENGLISH 10 HONORS (115)
Grade Level 10                            Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
The Honors course draws on its counterpart in the regular curriculum for a framework, and as a result, similar
assignments in reading, writing, speaking, and listening are undertaken. The difference between the honors and
regular program is one of intensity. Students are expected to demonstrate a high degree of self-discipline and
initiative, as well as insight and fluency in written assignments. Students will continue working on the extended
essay tasks required on the new Comprehensive English Regents administered in English 11.


ENGLISH 11R (111)
Grade Level 11                            Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
The English 11R curriculum focuses primarily on American literature, incorporating such varied genres as novels,
biographies, plays, short stories, speeches, poetry, and selected prose. The relationships among the historical,
social, and literary developments in this country from the Colonial period to the present are stressed. Writing
assignments emphasize journal entries, compositions, research assignments, and a short story. Intensive instruction
in the four extended essay tasks prepare students for the Comprehensive English Regents. Students must pass the
English Regents in order to graduate. Eleventh grade Regents projects designed to expand students’ language arts
abilities include a written/oral presentation reflecting an understanding of a literary era and a 5 to 10 page research
paper. Students will participate in the writing process, keep a reading log, and complete a literary profile portfolio.


ENGLISH 11 HONORS (116)
Grade Level 11                            Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
The honors course draws on its counterpart in the regular curriculum for a framework, and as a result, similar
assignments in reading, writing, speaking, and listening are undertaken. The difference between the honors and
regular program is the number of works studied and the depth in which they are examined. Writing assignments
will emphasize the four Regents extended essay tasks required of student on the Comprehensive English Regents
examination. Students will also be required to complete the Regents project. Students are expected to demonstrate
a high degree of self-discipline and initiative, as well as insight and fluency in written assignments.



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ENGLISH 12R (112)
Grade Level 12                            Full year/1 credit                                       weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
English 12R completes the sequence of literature and language arts skills studied in previous years. Varied genres
of literature are explored. Writing activities are varied and include letters, essays, and compositions. All students
must complete an independent research paper.

COLLEGE READING AND PREPARATION R or H (113) (132)
Grade Level 12                            Full year/1 credit                                  weight 1.04/1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
This year long course is designed to introduce college-bound students to college-level texts from various
disciplines. Skills in reading, studying, thinking, speaking, and writing will be developed to enable a college
student to cope with the academic demands of a rigorous schedule. Difficult textual materials are studied in a
manner that encourages student self-motivation toward extensive reading assignments. The students are expected
to read the texts with interest, precision, and insight, and to write about the texts with clarity and sophistication. A
notebook is mandatory, tests and quizzes are given on a regular basis, and midterm and final examinations are
lengthy papers. Books include: The Silent Language, I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, Grendel, Walden Two,
Invisible Man, and The Catcher in the Rye.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (117)
Grade Level 12                            Full year/1 credit weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
Advanced Placement English is a program designed for students who wish to pursue college-level studies in high
school. While it is not necessary to have taken honors English at the ninth, tenth, or eleventh grade levels, an
average of 90 in a Regents class and 80 in an Honors class and teacher recommendation are prerequisites.

The AP course engages students in careful reading and critical analysis of prose and poetry from different time
periods and cultures. Students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both
meaning and pleasure, in terms of the work structure, style, themes, and literary elements. There is a heavy
emphasis on writing and revision. AP students are also expected to read three works of literature during the
summer and to submit written responses to these works.

Many colleges grant up to six hours of English credit for satisfactory work on the Advanced Placement
Examination. Students who enroll in the program are expected to take this exam, which is given in May. Students
are required to pay all related fees. An acceptable score on the exam represents the equivalent of a year’s work in
college English, normally a semester of composition and a semester of literature.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (102)
Grade Level 11 - 12                        Full year/1 credit weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of
periods, disciplines and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.
Through their writing and their reading, students will become aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes,
audience expectations and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute
to effectiveness in writing.
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COMPUTER JOURNALISM (118) (Elective)
Grade Level 10-12             Full year/1 credit                                                weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
Journalism offers students experiences in sharpening critical thinking and expression, making decisions, gathering
information, investigating conditions, and working effectively in group situations. Students practice all major
forms of writing for publication: news, editorials, features, interviews, and sports. With guidance from editors and
the instructor, they have first-hand experience in copy reading, layout, and preparation of advertising. They have
the opportunity to learn the word processing and graphics capabilities of the computer and actively participate in
one of the school’s publications: yearbook, newspaper, or literary journal. This course satisfies the Computer
Literacy requirement.


AIS/ELA (Reading or English)
Grade Level 9-12                          Full year/0 credit                                    weight 0.00
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
This program is an individualized full-year course designed to improve a student’s reading, writing, and study
skills. Appropriate diagnostic tests may be administered to determine each student’s strengths and weaknesses. An
instructional program is then developed to meet the needs of each student. The students work on a one-to-one basis
with the teacher. The classes are small, and all work is carefully monitored. Instruction will emphasize the four
Regents essays and preparation for the English Regents Comprehensive Examination.


SAT PREPARATION (108)
Grade Level 11-12

There are three sections on the SAT: critical reading, which has sentence completion and passage-based questions;
writing, which has multiple-choice questions and a written essay; and math, which is based on the math that
college-bound students typically learn during three years of high school.

The SAT Preparation Course in Mathematics will be devoted to addressing math skills that college bound students
have been exposed to. Test taking strategies will also be reviewed. This course will meet outside the regular school
day.




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                                               (24)
                       FOREIGN LANGUAGE
                                     Sequence Examples
                      French 1R               Spanish 1R                  Latin 1R


                      French 2R or H          Spanish 2R or H             Latin 2R or H


                      French 3 R or H         Spanish 3 R or H            Latin 3 R or H


                     French 4                 Spanish 4           Latin 4         Ancient Greek
                   (Adelphi Univ.)           (C. W. Post)      (SUNY Albany)


                    French 5                  Spanish 5                   Latin 5
                  (Adelphi Univ.)            (C. W. Post)              (SUNY Albany)



Students will take the appropriate Regents examinations at the end of the third unit of High School level
French, Spanish or Latin.

To meet the challenges of a radically shifting population base in the United States, and to keep pace with
the increasingly multi-lingual international business and cultural scene, we Americans are now more than
ever required to expand our language and cultural abilities beyond English alone. To meet these
challenges, the Riverhead High School Foreign Language Department offers comprehensive beginning
and intermediate training in two of today’s most widely spoken foreign languages, French and Spanish.
Additionally, to meet the need for an understanding of the common origin of the Romance languages and
Western culture, a full program of Latin as well as Ancient Greek is offered.

As mandated by the New York State Board of Regents, language training at Riverhead High School
cultivates the four proficiencies of communication: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. One unit of
credit is awarded for the successful completion of each level of study in the Regents sequence up to and
including the Level III year. Following this Regents year of study, students may pursue more
sophisticated coursework and earn college credit while enriching their understanding of their chosen
foreign language and culture.

FRENCH I R (510)
Grade Level 9-12                         Full year/1 credit                                weight 1.04
Prerequisite: None

Description:
Level I represents the beginning phase of learning a second language. The students are exposed to four
skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The emphasis is on conversational skills, listening and
speaking. Reading and writing are limited to materials covered orally. Realistic dialogues are heard and
imitated. Vocabulary and cultural topics center on customs, school, food and everyday life. This course
may be combined with French II.


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FRENCH II R (511)
Grade Level 9-12                           Full year/1 credit                                weight 1.04
Prerequisite: French I

Description:
This is the second level of language study in a sequential program. The four basic skills are developed
further. The basic conversational approach is emphasized in this course. Additional sources are
introduced to improve and increase the reading of French. All work is introduced orally through
conversational situations. Civilization topics such as geography, art, history, and literature are included.

If French IIR students complete additional specific independent study projects and the required portfolio,
they may be eligible to receive Honors Bridge weighting of 1.06. A minimum 90% average for each
quarter and a final average of 90% will be required for this Honors Bridge weighting.

FRENCH III R (512)
Grade Level 10-12                         Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.04
Prerequisite: French II

Description:
This is the third level of language study. This course is a continuation of forms and structures to facilitate
listening, speaking, reading, and writing French. Short compositions and speeches are encouraged. The
reading material becomes longer and is used as a basis for oral discussions. French is spoken as much as
possible in the classroom. Magazines, books, and tapes are used to increase oral comprehension skills.
The art, music, and literature of France are explored and discussed in French. This course culminates in a
State Regents Examination.

If French IIIR students complete additional specific independent study projects and the required portfolio,
they may be eligible to receive Honors Bridge weighting of 1.06. A minimum 90% average for each
quarter and a final average of 90% will be required for this Honors Bridge weighting.

FRENCH IV (513) (College French)
Grade Level 11-12    Full year/1 HS credit/(6 Adelphi credits-optional)                     weight 1.18
Prerequisite: French III and a passing grade on the Regents Exam

Description:
The student may elect to take French IV for either/both high school and college credit through Adelphi
University. The class may satisfy the requirement for one high school sequence and/or six college credits.
Students are responsible for paying the tuition and related fees. This cannot be done retroactively. First
semester is a review of all French grammar; second semester is an instructive course on how to read
French without using a dictionary. Both semesters are taught in French.

Students are required to do identical work whether they take the course for college credit or not. The
grades are weighted on the AP scale. The AP exam is not allowed due to overlap of credit.

FRENCH V (515) (College French)
Grade Level 11-12 Full year/1 HS credit /(6 Adelphi credits-optional)                        weight 1.18
Prerequisite: French IV

Description:
This is an introductory course in French literature. It includes prose, poetry, films and other types of
French literature. Some works will be read in their entirety while others are read in abbreviated versions,
but all items will be authentic. The class will be taught in French with only necessary explanations in
English.

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The student may elect to take French V for either/both high school and/or 6 college credits through
Adelphi University. Students are responsible for paying the tuition and related fees. Students are required
to do identical work whether they take the course for college credit or not. The grades are weighted on
the AP scale. The AP exam is not allowed due to overlap of credit.


LATIN I R (501)
Grade Level 9-12                         Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: None

Description:
In this first year of study, students are introduced to the formal study of language, and work with the
“language of languages,” applicable to the study of all verbal communication. A highly rigorous and
rewarding program of formal grammar and syntax, as well as introductory work in translation and
composition, Latin I will prepare the student for further work with the language of the Romans, Middle
Ages, and Renaissance, as well as for later study of the Romance languages. This course may be
combined with Latin II.



LATIN II R (502)
Grade Level 9-12                         Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Latin I

Description:
This is the second level of language study in a sequential program. Students concentrate on reading
extended passages of Latin while studying vocabulary, forms, and syntax. Students gain additional
familiarity with their own native English, and are introduced to many formal aspects of language study,
including etymology and basic principles of linguistics. Classical mythology is the additional component
in this level.

If Latin IIR students complete additional specific independent study projects and the required portfolio,
they may be eligible to receive Honors Bridge weighting of 1.06. A minimum 90% average for each
quarter and a final average of 90% will be required for this Honors Bridge weighting.


LATIN III R (503)
Grade Level 10-12                        Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Latin II

Description:
This is the third level of language study, and the final year mandated by the New York State Regents
Action Plan. Students do intensive work on vocabulary, forms and syntax to facilitate reading extended
passages of original Latin. Ancillary readings in ancient history, mythology, and culture round out the
students’ exposure to the Roman world. The year culminates with the New York State Regents
Examination.

If Latin IIIR students complete additional specific independent study projects and the required portfolio,
they may be eligible to receive Honors Bridge weighting of 1.06 A minimum 90% average for each
quarter and a final average of 90% will be required for this Honors Bridge weighting.



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LATIN IV (504)          LATIN V (505)
Grade Level 11-12               Full year /1 credit each                                  weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Latin III

Description:
These elective courses offer advanced study of language and literature of various authors in alternating
years. These courses provide to students the fruits of the previous three years of language study, and the
broad curricula allow the opportunity for in-depth study and appreciation of the ancient epic and other
major styles of classical poetry and oratory. Metrics, thematic analyses, poetic devices, literary history,
and related topics are covered, and students are introduced to secondary scholarship in addition to the
primary texts. SUNY Albany undergraduate credits are awarded for successful completion of each course
(4 credits 11th grade, 3 credits 12th grade).


ANCIENT GREEK I (556)
Grade Level 11-12              Full year/1 credit                 weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Passing grade on any State Comprehensive Regents Exam in Foreign
Language

Description:
At the heart of so many of our Western intellectual traditions lies the culture of ancient Greece. In this
course we begin an exploration of the fascinating language and literature of that brief, fertile moment of
our heritage which saw the birth of history, philosophy, drama, and democracy.

Using the Reading Greek text for our language study, and a selection of translation and history readings,
we will come to terms with some of the most important and the longest-lasting, intellectual and cultural
achievements of the ancient Greeks. We also study Ancient Greek art, philosophy and culture in a variety
of formats. This course culminates in a State Proficiency exam.


SPANISH I R (525)
Grade Level 9-12                         Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: None

Description:
It is expected that within the next generation and a half, nearly one-third of the population of the United
States will speak Spanish as its primary language. The first year of the Spanish program lays the
foundation for students who wish to be ready to participate fully in this emerging society. The students
are introduced to the full range of Spanish sounds and speech patterns, and through oral and written
practice develop an initial familiarity with the fundamentals of Spanish vocabulary and grammar. This
introduction to the Spanish language is complemented by a full range of cultural activities, including
exploration of holidays, cuisine, and music. This course culminates in a State Proficiency exam.


SPANISH II R (526)
Grade Level 9-12                         Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Spanish I R

Description:
In this second level of language study, the four basic skills are considerably developed. Oral expression
is regularly encouraged, more sophisticated reading passages are read, authentic audio-visual materials
are used, and students take their first steps in writing short compositions in Spanish. Students’
vocabularies widen, and their cultural understanding is enhanced through the study of the similarities and
differences among the world’s Spanish-speaking countries.

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If Spanish IIR students complete additional specific independent study projects and the required portfolio,
they may be eligible to receive Honors Bridge weighting of 1.06. A minimum average of 90% for each
quarter and a final average of 90% will be required for this Honors Bridge weighting.


SPANISH III R (527)
Grade Level 10-12                        Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Spanish II R

Description:
Emphasis is clearly placed on a comprehensive understanding of the grammatical and syntactical
structures of Spanish. Students are now developing competence in the spoken language, and,
accordingly, classes are often conducted primarily in Spanish. Reading ability is improved through
practice with extensive authentic passages. Through coordination with a more formal study of Spanish
civilization and heritage, students’ vocabularies are increased significantly. This course culminates in a
State Regents Examination.

If Spanish IIIR students complete additional specific independent study projects and the required
portfolio, they may be eligible to receive Honors Bridge weighting of 1.06. A minimum average of 90%
for each quarter and a final average of 90% will be required for this Honors Bridge weighting.


SPANISH IV (528) (College Spanish)
Grade Level 11-12               Full year/1 HS credit                                      weight 1.18
                                6 C. W. Post University credits optional

Prerequisite: Spanish III and a passing grade on the Regents Exam.

Description:
This elective course class is taught primarily in Spanish. The students review previously learned grammar
and learn more advanced grammatical concepts. Students are introduced to the study of history, literature
and culture of Spanish speaking countries. The student may elect to take Spanish IV for either/both high
school credit and/or 6 college credits. Students are responsible for paying the tuition and related fees to
the college. Students are required to do identical work whether they take the course for college credit or
not. The grades are weighted on the AP scale. The AP exam is not required.


SPANISH V (530) (College Spanish)
Grade Level 12                   Full year/1 HS credit               weight 1.18
                                 6 C. W. Post University credits optional
Prerequisite: Spanish IV or Department approval

Description:
This elective course is taught primarily in Spanish with only necessary explanations in English. Students
expand their understanding of complex grammatical concepts, history, literature and culture of Spanish
speaking countries. The student may elect to take Spanish V for either/both high school credit and/or 6
college credits. Students are responsible for paying the tuition and related fees to the college. Students
are required to do identical work whether they take the course for college credit or not. The grades are
weighted on the AP scale. The AP exam is not required.




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                         ENGLISH, SECOND LANGUAGE


LITERACY FOR ESL STUDENTS WITH INTERRUPTED FORMAL EDUCATION (SIFE)
Grade Level 9-12                 Full year/1 credit         weight 1.00

This course is for the newly arrived English Language Learners with interrupted formal education in their
native language. These students will be provided with basic reading and math in English so that they can
be successful in regular ESL and mainstream classes.



ESL BEGINNER SP/LIS (123)
Grade Level 9-12                                 Full year/1 credit                           weight 1.00

This course is an introduction to the most basic communication concepts and vocabulary necessary to
succeed in an English speaking community. Grammar concepts will be introduced primarily to enhance
newcomers’ understanding of what is going on around them.



ESL BEGINNER RD/WR (127)
Grade Level 9-12                                 Full year/1 credit                           weight 1.00

This course will focus on reading comprehension and basic sentence structure. New vocabulary will be
introduced to provide practice in effective reading strategies. A basic understanding of conventional
written English will also be established through the study of grammar.



ESL INTERMEDIATE (Content Area) (126)
Grade 9-10                            Full year/1 credit                                     weight 1.00

The content area of this course focuses on the vocabulary and skills necessary for success in the
mainstream. Students study current events as well as reading, writing, speaking and listening in English.
The curriculum is based on social studies content and prepares students for Global Studies classwork.



ESL INTERMEDIATE (Language Arts) (122)
Grade 9-12                            Full year/1 credit                                     weight 1.00

This course is considered a bridge between the basic grammar and vocabulary of the beginner course and
the literature and Regents preparatory focus of the advanced course. Students in this class will develop the
preliminary skills necessary to complete literary analysis and participate in writing as a process.
Knowledge of correct grammar and writing style will also be a main focus in order to help students
express their reactions to literature, as well as relate their own thoughts and experiences to what they’ve
read. All of these aspects will be developed in an effort for the students to achieve academic excellence in
all their subjects.




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ESL ADVANCED (124)
Grade 9-12                                      Full year/1 credit                          weight 1.00

This course is for those students who have tested at an advanced level on the New York State ESL
Achievement Test. The course is designed to provide the reading and writing instruction students need in
order to pass the English Regents exam. While the focus is on literature and
Regents type essays, the course will also address advanced grammar.



ESL SKILLS/STRATEGIES (121)
Grade 9-12                                       Full year/ 1 credit                      weight 1.00

This course is an instructional period for students who are in need of extra support in their content area
classes. Lessons are specific to individual student needs and emphasize homework skills as well as test-
taking strategies. Opportunities are also provided for cooperative learning and “hands-on” explanations to
content material. This course may be taken everyday or every other day depending on the need of the
student.



ESL MATH (128)
Grade 9-12                                       Full year/1 credit                       weight 1.00

The ESL Math class is a grant class designed to help English language learners with math. The goal of the
course is to teach and reinforce math concepts and vocabulary needed to succeed in a high school math
course. The ESL math course is taught bilingually and ESL methodology is used to foster learning.




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                                           HEALTH

HEALTH (1120) (Required)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/ ½ credit                              weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None                       Alternate days

Description:
The curriculum is focused on the discussion of the aspects of health including: the individual and his
personality, mental illness, stress management, child abuse, suicide, drug abuse, alcohol, tobacco, human
sexuality, nutrition and physical fitness, and values clarification. Emphasis is placed upon student
discussion and group participation in an atmosphere where students are encouraged to express their
feelings, attitudes, and behavior patterns. The ultimate goal of health education is to develop within, and
enhance in each individual, the ability to render sound, reasonable decisions based on available
information. Parenting Education requirement will be satisfied in this course.



SKILLS FOR LIVING (1121)
Grade Level 9-12                         Full year/ ½ credit                              weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None                       Alternate days

Description:
The Skills for Living curriculum, the Skills for Living Student Journal and the companion book for
students, You Are Somebody Special, grew out of an informal survey of more than 2,000 high school
students to determine the things that concern them most. The responses fell into ten areas of concern.
Each area is dealt with in this curriculum, as well as in the total program.
        SELF CONCEPT (liking and accepting oneself)
        FEELINGS (dealing constructively with loneliness, fear, etc.)
        ATTITUDES (developing a more positive mental attitude)
        FRIENDS (building constructive relationships)
        FAMILY (preparing students to build strong families)
        MARRIAGE (building trust, loyalty, commitment)
        PARENTING (blending ingredients of successful parenting)
        MONEY (understanding financial management)
        CAREERS (goal setting and life planning)
        PHILOSOPHY (discovering meaning in life and personal perspective)

The Skills for Living curriculum is an exciting and successfully tested series of activities, exercises and
experiences for high school age students. It has been implemented in hundreds of school systems by
thousands of teachers. Students are given many opportunities to gain new skills and apply them in family
and community situations. They are encouraged to use their abilities to make a contribution to their
community. The course outlined in this curriculum is useful in schools, churches, temples and agencies. It
is offered as a yearlong course that meets every other day.

The Skills for Living program believes that parents should be the primary educators of their children. The
program encourages and supports this role in a variety of ways. For instance, parents are interviewed by
students on important topics used in class discussion. Assignments are taken home for family
involvement. Student readings can be shared with parents for family discussion. Parents are encouraged to




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attend special class presentations where students and teachers demonstrate course activities. In this
setting, students, parents and the teacher discuss how they can work together to achieve mutually desired
goals.

In addition, students are encouraged through regular assignments to make meaningful contributions to the
well being of their own families. This is done through a variety of means, such as focusing on the
strengths of the family, expressing appreciation, practicing newly learned communications skills and
doing action projects which benefit family members.

This course does not satisfy the health requirement for graduation.




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                                    HOME AND
                                  CAREER SKILLS

The Home and Career Sciences curriculum prepares students for successful personal, family, and
community living. The courses encourage student creativity and resourcefulness. All students have the
opportunity to experience a sense of accomplishment and pride. It is hoped that the knowledge and skills
developed by the students will carry throughout their lives.


FOOD PREP & NUTRITION (803)
Grade Level 9-12                        Full year/1 credit                             weight 1.00

Description:
Students will perform the basic skills and techniques for food preparation in food labs. Laboratory
experience will reinforce the need and know how of making healthy food choices within the confines of a
budget incorporating a wide variety of menu items including; appetizers, soups, salads, main course
entrée, side dishes and deserts. They will apply nutrition concepts to daily living and apply the steps of
the process in selecting and preparing food for good nutrition and health including recipe selection, menu
planning, food purchasing, food preparation and service. During the course students will describe the role
of food in growth, maintenance and functioning of the body. Students will also examine how culture
affects choices and identify why food patterns differ from region to region and country to country.
Throughout the course students will explore the employment opportunities related to food preparation and
nutrition.


CHILD DEVELOPMENT (805)
Grade Level 9-12                        Full year/ ½ credit                           weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None                      Alternate days

Description:
In this course students will explore how to help all children, prenatal through school age, establish an
optimal physical, emotional, social and intellectual foundation. Students will study the types of
development that begin in the early years and learn what activities help children grow. Students will have
an ongoing opportunity to plan and participate in group activities for and with preschool and elementary
school-age children.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CORE (804)
Grade Level 9-12         Full year/ ½ credit                                          weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None       Alternate days

Description:
Human Development is focused on the discussion of issues facing teens and young adults. You will learn
about yourself and ways of coping with the problems and stresses you face. You will develop effective
ways of dealing with peers, family members, young children, and adults. The goal is to further develop
the student’s ability to make sound, reasonable decisions. Students will plan and implement group
activities for young children and others.




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                    INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

What is technology? It is the use of knowledge, tools, and skills to solve practical problems and extend
human capabilities. It is our hope that each student will experience satisfaction and creativity through the
courses we offer and carry these throughout his/her life.


PRODUCTION SYSTEMS (851)
Grade Level 9-12                                  Full year/½ credit                         weight 1.00
Co-requisite: Transportation Systems              Alternate days

Description:

Production can be defined as the process of combining materials and knowledge to make products. The
process can be divided into two categories: manufacturing and construction. Students will learn about
product design and marketing skills as they relate to manufacturing. The construction aspect will focus
on the building systems including: input, resources, processes, and output. The course is designed to
maintain a 75% hands-on activity setting. Because this is an exploratory course, the content has been
carefully selected to represent only basic concepts.


TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (852)
Grade Level 9-12                                  Full year/½ credit                         weight 1.00
Co-requisite: Production Systems                  Alternate days

Description:
The development of transportation systems throughout the world has a tremendous impact on the
intellectual and economic growth of society. Transportation systems allow people to move not only
themselves but also cargo in a fast and efficient manner. This course will explore transportation systems
from three perspectives: land, marine, and aerospace.



MATERIALS PROCESSING (871)
Grade Level 9-12                                  Full year/ ½ credit                        weight 1.00
Prerequisite: none                                Alternate days

Description:
The processing of materials is the foundation of industry. Students in this class will experience a variety
of hands on activities aimed at converting materials into something useful. Raw materials such as metal,
plastic, fiberglass and wood are used to allow students to develop skills in the different areas of materials
processing.

RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES (856)
Grade Level 9-12                                  Full year/ ½ credit                        weight 1:00
Prerequiste: None                                 Alternate days

Description:
This course is a comprehensive and innovative course in construction technology. Its main purpose is to
acquaint students with plot layouts and surveying, foundation and masonry work, framing, sheathing and
roofing, siding and exterior trim, insulation, interior finishing and trim work, heating, plumbing and
electrical considerations. A small scale framework for a house will be constructed over the year. It is
recommended that students have a year of high school math prior to enrolling in this course.

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COMPUTER REPAIR /NETWORKING (858)
Grades 9-12                     Full year/1 credit                                         weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
The Industrial Technology Department has combined the best of it’s computer and networking classes to
offer you an interesting as well as interactive hands on class. This class will provide students with the
opportunity to repair and upgrade computers, as well as investigating the world of networking. Students
will work with an interactive training module leased from the Testout Corporation that contains a virtual
classroom setting as well as hands on lab activities that relate to the programming of routers and switches.
Modules provided by LJT Technical Systems will also be used to explore Computer Maintenance and
Repair, A+ Theory, Virtual Computer Trouble Shooting and Introduction to Networking. Students will
also work in groups to build new computers in the form of bare bones kits as well as computers
throughout the Riverhead School District. We will also explore CNC Machining by designing and
producing plastic tags and signs with our new computer controlled engraving machine. This class is
designed to provide something for everyone. Come enjoy and learn!


COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I (869)
Grade Level 9-12                                 Full year/½ credit                        weight 1.00
                                                 Alternate days

Description:
Computer Aided Design is the standard for drawing in industry today. In this class, students will learn
the basics of Computer Aided Design using AutoCAD 2000 LT & Mechanical Desktop in order to
understand and construct working drawings. Knowledge from this class will help students become active
and productive members of today’s computerized workforce.


DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION (857)
Grade level 9-12               Full year/1 credit                                          weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
Students will construct practical drawings using standard drafting equipment. Exposure to these processes
will allow students to draw and read plans in order to fabricate their own hands-on woodworking projects
in class. The class will construct two projects following plans given to them, as well as an independent
project they decide on. This course satisfies the art/music graduation requirement.


PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (868) (Elective) Full year/1 credit                              weight 1.00
Grade Level 11-12
Prerequisite: Regents or General Chemistry or department approval

Description:
This course will expose students to the principles of engineering including: design, modeling, systems,
ergonomics and ethics in science. Students will use a hands-on approach to study how topics in physics
and chemistry apply to the six elements of engineering. Students will design products based on these
topics, then build models and test the designs.

Principles of Engineering will be designed to give students a basic understanding of physics and help
them apply it to real-life situations. Projects will include, but are not limited to, designing egg crash
vehicles, winter shelters, solar vehicles and resources for the physically challenged.

This course will be excellent for regents and non-regents as well as those interested in careers in
engineering. It will meet five times a week.

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WORLD OF CONSTRUCTION (872)
Grade Level 11-12                              Full year/½ credit                      weight 1.00
Prerequisite: none                             Alternate days

Description:
This course will introduce students to the world of construction as a potential career path. If you are
hardworking and conscientious but are not really sure what you would like tot do after graduating High
School this course is for you. The World of Construction will assist you with applying to trade specific
apprenticeships and beginning a construction related career. Course content will include:

   1. OSHA and First Aide/CPR Certification as well as Job Readiness Training.
   2. Lectures from current apprentices enrolled in at least six specific trades, as well as speakers
      involved in Construction in both the public and private sectors.
   3. Blueprint reading, Traffic Zone Safety and Trades Math.
   4. Potential hands on projects may include on site greenhouses construction, working with Habitat
      for Humanity and the Town of Riverheads Small Works Program for Needy Seniors.
   5. A means of meeting the requirements for a five unit sequence in Industrial Technology.
   6. Field trips to various construction sites.




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                            MATHEMATICS

                                                                         Regents with
Honors/Accelerated                         Regents                       Extra Period
                                                                         (Dept. Recommendation)

   Math 10AB-H                           Integrated Algebra              Integrated Algebra


   Math 11B-H                             Math 10AB-R                       NYS 2A


   Math 12H                                Math 11B-R                        NYS 1B


 AP Calculus BC                              Math 12                         NYS 2B



                                     Statistics      AP Calculus AB



                                              Electives
                                         AP Computer Science
                                        Computer Programming
                                           Survey of Math


The mathematics program includes courses ranging from remedial instruction to college preparatory
programs. Computer instruction is also available in a variety of courses. Ninth grade students are placed
in the course that best meets their individual needs based on previous achievement and mathematical
ability. Achievement is monitored through regular homework assignments, quizzes, lab assignments
(where applicable) and tests. Teachers are available on a regular basis for extra help and the Math
Resource Center (Room 132) is used as a center for the learning of mathematics.




MATH LAB – TEST PREP (301)
Grade Level 9 - 12                  Full year/0 credit                                  weight 0.00
Prerequisite: Falling below state reference on required assessment

Description:
This course is designed for the student who has had considerable difficulty passing required state
assessments. Emphasis will be on individualized instruction at the pupil’s level of understanding.




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INTEGRATED ALGEBRA (350)                          Full year/1 credit                        weight 1.04
Grade Level 9

Description:
Integrated Algebra provides tools and ways of thinking necessary for solving problems in a variety of
disciplines. This course will assist students in developing skills and processes using a variety of
techniques to solve problems in a variety of settings. Problem situations may result in all types of linear
equations in one variable, quadratic functions with integral coefficients and roots as well as absolute value
and exponential functions. Coordinate geometry will be integrated into the investigation of these
functions allowing students to make connections between their analytical and geometrical representations.
Problem situations resulting in systems of equations will also be presented and alternatives discussed.
Measurement within a problem-solving context will include calculating rates using appropriate units and
converting within measurement systems. Data analysis including measures of central tendency and visual
representations of data will be studied. An understanding of correlation and causation will be developed
and reasonable lines of best fit will be used to make predictions. Students will solve problem situations
requiring right triangle trigonometry. Elementary probability theory will be used to determine the
probability of events including independent, dependent and mutually exclusive events.

NYS 2A (353)
Grade Level 9 – 10                       Full year/1 ½ credits each                weight 1.04

Description:
This course is designed as a two-year sequence to assist students to meet the new NYS mandates known
as “The Standards”. The content of this course meets the commencement level requirements (Math A) of
NYS K-12 Math Core curriculum. The major emphasis will be placed on developing problem solving
skills and will include many topics which are relevant to real life applications. The frequent use of
calculators will allow students to solve problems more common in their daily lives. The New York State
“Math A” Regents exam is required at the conclusion of this two-year sequence.

NYS 1B (369)
NYS 2B (370)
Grade Level 11 – 12                      Full year/ 1 ½ credits each                        weight 1.04

Description:
This course is designed as a two-year sequence to assist students to meet the new NYS mandates for the
second level examination. These courses will cover advanced topics including mathematical reasoning,
number and numeration, operations, modeling/multiple representation, measurement, probability,
patterns/functions, complex numbers, trigonometry, exponential/logarithmic functions, and
transformational geometry. These courses are problem centered and involve extensive written
communication. A Regents Exam (Math B) is required at the conclusion of the second course.

MATH 10 A/B-R (373)
Grade Level 9 – 12                                Full year/1 credit                        weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math A.

Description:
This course is the second in a Regents sequence of three unified courses – Math A, Math A/B, and Math
B. The course covers the final third of eight key math areas: Mathematical Reasoning, Number and
Numeration, Operations, Modeling/Multiple Representation, Measurement, Uncertainty, and
Patterns/Functions. The course is problem centered and involves extensive written communication. A
Regents Exam (Mathematics A) is required at the conclusion of the first semester of this course.
The second semester covers more advanced topics involving the initial third of Math B (key ideas:
Mathematical Reasoning, Number and Numeration, and Operations). The course incorporates the new
technology of a graphics calculator.


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MATH 10 A/B-H (374)
Grade level 9-12                               Full year/1 credit                         weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to guidelines in front of book.

Description:
This is the second in a series of honors courses designed to attract students with very strong mathematical
and analytical abilities who possess excellent work ethics. Students will explore enrichment topics
beyond the content covered in Math A/B. Students will be required to write research papers and work on
assigned projects for possible entry into the Long Island Math Fair. The Mathematics A Regents Exam is
required at the conclusion of the 1st semester of this course.


MATH 11B-R (375)
Grade level 10-12                                Full year/1 credit                       weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math A/B

Description:
This course is the third in the Regents sequence of three unified courses – Math A, Math A/B, and Math
B in a rigorous 3-year Regents sequence in mathematics. The course covers advanced topics of the final
two-thirds of eight key math areas: Mathematical Reasoning, Number and Numeration, Operations,
Modeling/Multiple Representation, Measurement, Uncertainty, and Patterns/Functions. Work on real and
complex numbers, trigonometry, exponential, and logarithmic functions, transformation geometry, and
uncertainty (probability) will be analyzed. The course is problem centered and involves extensive written
communication. This course incorporates the new technology of a graphing calculator. A Regents Exam
(Mathematics B) is required at the conclusion of the course.


MATH 11B-H (376)
Grade level 10-12                               Full year/1 credit                        weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to the guidelines in front of book.

Description:
This is the third in a series of honors courses designed to attract students with superior mathematical and
analytical abilities who possess excellent work habits. Students will explore enrichment topics beyond
the content covered in Math B. Students will be required to write research papers and work on assigned
projects. The Mathematics B Regents Exam is the final exam for students in this program.


MATHEMATICS 12 (311)
Grade Level 11-12                                Full year/1 credit                       weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math B

Description:
The Math 12 course is offered to those students who have shown a strong inclination and ability in the
study of mathematics. It is designed as a pre-calculus program for those students who wish to continue
their work in college-level mathematics. This course integrates topics from algebra, analytic geometry,
and trigonometry from a modern and advanced point of view. It includes the study of sequences, limits
and series, and linear and quadratic expressions. The course also covers special functions, complex
numbers, polar coordinates, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrix algebra and determinants. A
school final exam is required.




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MATH 12 HONORS (319)
Grade Level 11-12                          Full year/1 credit                             weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to the guidelines in front of book.

Description:
This honors program is the third in an Honors sequence of courses specifically designed to prepare
students to take a calculus course or any other fifth-year advanced mathematics course. This program
allows students to develop a solid foundation of advanced mathematical skills and concepts. It develops
the student’s ability to use mathematical models and technology (a graphing calculator) to investigate,
reason, predict, and interpret, so that they may solve advanced problems with confidence. The topics
listed in the Math 12 course description will be covered from a more abstract and detailed perspective.
An extensive use of the graphing calculator is woven into the curriculum. A school final is required.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB (312)
Grade Level 12                         Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Math 12 and teacher recommendation

Description:
This Advanced Placement course in mathematics consists of a full academic year of work in calculus and
related topics. This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college
preparatory mathematics. In this program, the student studies differential calculus of algebraic functions
and its applications. Integral calculus, including geometric and physical applications of integration, is
covered. The calculus of elementary transcendental functions and its applications are also studied.
Students must take the Advanced Placement Calculus Exam designed for use in awarding credit or
placement or both in a college calculus sequence. All related fees must be paid by the student.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC (326)
Grade Level 12                         Full year/1 credit                         weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Math 12 Honors and department approval

Description:
Advanced Placement Calculus BC is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It
included all topics covered in Advanced Placement Calculus AB plus additional topics and is intended to
be especially challenging and demanding. Calculus BC is therefore considered an extension of Calculus
AB rather than an enhancement; common topics require a similar depth of understanding. Additional
topics covered in Calculus BC include: (1) parametric, polar and vector functions (2) numerical solutions
of differential equations (3) slope fields (4) improper integrals and (5) polynomial approximations and
series.

Students must take and pay for the cost of the Advanced Placement Calculus Exam designed for use in
awarding college credit or placement or both, from institutions of higher learning.

SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS 1(310)
Grade Level 10-12                           Full year/1 credit                            weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Course credit in NY Standard 2A(NYS2A) or Math 10 A/B-R

Description:
This course blends the basic concepts of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statistics and probability,
emphasizing problem solving and interconnectedness among real life applications. The course will
incorporate graphing calculators, computers (utilizing C++, Excel and internet applications) and
technology. Instructors will also teach major skills that are required for the SAT 1 Mathematics Test. This
course is offered for students who complete the mathematics A/B curriculum and are interested in
pursuing an academic mathematics class which does not terminate in a Regents examination. A school
final examination is required.
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INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (383)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math A and Math B

Description:
This course is designed for students who have completed the Math A and Math B courses. The
goal of this course is to make the study of statistics interesting and accessible to students with a
wide variety of interests. The course covers basic topics including: organization of data,
numerical descriptive measures, probability, probability distributions, sampling distributions,
hypotheses testing and estimation, analysis of variance, simple linear regression, sampling
techniques, surveys and design of experiments. Students will use the graphing calculator and a
statistical package (Microsoft Excel) to carry out extensive analysis of data. A school final
examination is required.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (314)
Grade Level 10-12                                Full year/ 1 credit                      weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Regents credit in Math B and knowledge of word processing

Description:
This course is a beginning course in structured computer programming in the language of C++. Students
should have good logical reasoning skills. This is a good course for anyone who is considering majoring
in Computer Science in college. Students will be able to write programs involving looping, arrays,
functions, classes, strings, and records (structures). This is a unique course, so, if you are not somewhat
familiar with computer programming, you should consult with the teacher to find out if it is for you.

VISUAL BASIC (384)
Grade Level 10-12                                Full year/1 credit                       weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math A

Description:
Are you interested in developing computer programs? Have you ever wondered how video games were
designed? If you answer yes to either of these questions, then this course is for you.

This full year course will introduce students to the fundamentals of computer science. Students work on
projects throughout the year, which encompass the research and development of computer programs.
Topics will include the History and Development of Computers, Logic, Computer Programming, Iteration
(Looping Structures) and Arrays. Students will enter programs into the LISA (Long Island Software
Awards) scholarship contest sponsored by Newsday and Computer Associates. Upon completion of this
course, students will be knowledgeable about the exciting and fast-paced world of computer science.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE (315)
Grade Level 11-12                         Full year/1 credit              weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math B and Computer Programming knowledge in any language
including looping

Description:
The Advanced Placement Computer Science course is intended to be comparable to any first-year college
course in Computer Science. Although C++ is the dominant programming language used, many topics
are covered. C++ is used as a tool to demonstrate general computer science concepts. The major
emphasis in the course is on programming methodology, algorithms, and data structure. The student will
design and implement computer based solutions to problems in several application areas using the C++
language. Students must take and pay for an Advanced Placement Exam in Computer Science in May.



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SAT PREPARATION (382)
Grade Level 11-12

There are three sections on the SAT: critical reading, which has sentence completion and passage-based
questions; writing, which has multiple-choice questions and a written essay; and math, which is based on
the math that college bound students typically learn during three years of high school.

The SAT Preparation Course in English Language Arts will be devoted to addressing critical reading and
writing issues and broader concerns regarding test preparation. Test taking skills will also be reviewed.
This course will meet outside the regular school day.




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                                      MISCELLANEOUS



COUNCIL FOR UNITY (99)                      Full year/1 credit           weight 1.00

Description:
This program will empower individuals and groups with the skills necessary to promote
unity, safety and achievement in schools and communities. A cluster of lesson plans
revolves around a single theme with strategies designed to produce the desired outcome
of that theme. There are five in all:

       1.   Family and self-esteem
       2.   Empowerment
       3.   Unity
       4.   Legacy and articulation
       5.   Evaluation




                                            (44)
                                               MUSIC


                         5-UNIT SEQUENCE (MUSIC MAJORS)
                               2 UNITS     - THEORY DEVELOPMENT
                                             (THEORY 1 & AP)
                               3 UNITS     - PERFORMANCE


9TH GRADE BAND (901)                 Full year/1 credit                                   weight 1.00
Grade Level 9
Prerequisite: Appropriate band instrument experience

Description:
This is a first year band course at the high school level and a continuation of the band program beyond the
Middle School. Activities throughout the year include evening concerts, festivals, parades and other
events. Attendance at the evening concerts is mandatory. Band members also receive weekly small group
instrumental lessons on a rotating schedule. Grades are based upon performance and progress in the
lessons, band rehearsals, concerts and other public performances. As a member of the 9th grade band,
participation in other musical groups such as jazz ensemble or chorus is also possible.

SENIOR BAND (902)
Grade Level 10-12                     Full year/1 credit                      weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Successful participation and completion of 9th Grade Band or audition by the band
director.

Description:
This is a performance-oriented course for players of band instruments. Advanced performance and
musical skills will be studied. Activities throughout the year include evening concerts, festivals, parades,
football games, and exchange concerts. Attendance at many of these is mandatory. Band members also
receive weekly small group instrumental lessons during the year on a rotating schedule. Grades are based
upon performance and progress in the lessons, band rehearsals, concerts and other public performances.
As a member of the band, participation in other musical groups such as the orchestra, chorus and stage
band is also a possibility.

NINTH GRADE CHOIR (903)
Grade Level 9                             Full year/1 credit                             weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Open to all.

Description:
This is a first year choral course at the high school level. Activities include a study of vocal techniques as
well as general musical skills. Activities throughout the year include evening concerts, assembly
performances and festival participation. Attendance at many of these is mandatory. Chorus members
also receive weekly group vocal lessons during the year on a rotating schedule. Grades are based upon
performance and progress in the lessons, chorus rehearsals, concerts and other public performances.



                                                  (45)
SENIOR CHOIR (904)
Grade Level 10-12                      Full year/1 credit                      weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Successful participation and completion of 9th Grade Choir or audition by the Choir
director.

Description:
This is an advanced course in choral performance. A wide range of choral/vocal techniques is studied
through the performance of representative material at concerts, assemblies, festivals and exchange
concerts. Attendance at many of these is mandatory. Chorus members also receive weekly group vocal
lessons throughout the year on a rotating schedule. Grades are based upon performance and progress in
the lessons, chorus rehearsals, concerts and other public performances. Other optional activities may
include participation in small ensembles, Chamber Choir, and Show Choir.


ORCHESTRA (905)
Grade Level 9-12                      Full year/1 credit                             weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Previous experience performing on a string instrument.

Description:
This is an advanced, performance-oriented course for students who play string instruments. Techniques
and musical skills specific to string instruments will be studied through the performance of a wide range
of representative music. Activities include concerts, assemblies and festival participation. Attendance at
many of these is mandatory. Orchestra members also receive weekly small group instrumental lessons
during the year on a rotating schedule. Grades are based upon performance and progress in the lessons,
orchestra rehearsals, concerts and other public performances. Note: The woodwind, brass, and
percussion players for the full orchestra will be selected from the band membership.


MUSIC THEORY 1 (906)
Grade Level 9-12                        Full year/1 credit                            weight 1.08

Prerequisite: Reasonable ability to read music.              Choral or instrumental experience is
recommended.

Description:
This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of music construction and composition. Topics
explored include scales, intervals, chords, ear training, composition, and arranging. These are discussed
within the context of the literature and history of western music. Note: Students who plan to take AP
Music Theory as part of a five unit sequence should take Music Theory I as a freshman or sophomore to
allow for the possibility that the AP class may not be offered every year.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY (915)
Grade Level 9-12                   Full year/1 credit                                  weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Music Theory I or comparable experience.

Description:
This is an advanced Music Theory course and prepares students for the AP Music Theory test and
possible college credit. Ear training, transposition, form and phrase analysis, sight singing, secondary
dominants, and counterpoint will be studied. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement
Music Theory Test at the conclusion of the course. Note: AP Music Theory will be offered during a year
when there are enough interested students who have completed Music Theory I to warrant offering the
course.




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                                                NJROTC

The purpose of the NJROTC program is “To instill in students the value of citizenship, service to the
United States, personal responsibility and a sense of accomplishment.” By pursuing the three or four year
cadet program in the Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps, students will strengthen their
awareness, develop self-confidence and self-respect, achieve commitment, appreciate the value of a
quality education, and learn the significance of paying attention to detail. Course material interfaces with
nearly every other academic discipline and reinforces students’ knowledge in their ever-changing world.
Military Service after graduation is not required although participation in this program makes them
eligible for nominations to service academies and advanced promotions upon military enlistment. ROTC
college scholarships. Skills learned prepare students for college, work and any other pursuits they choose.
This is a co-educational program.

NJROTC I (952)
Grade Level 9-12                          Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: None

Description:
This course can best be described as a joint academic/youth program for high school level students, which
is co-sponsored by the Riverhead Central School District and the United States Navy. Students are
introduced to military procedures, terminology, and concepts. Military conduct, appearance, and drill, as
well as the wearing of the cadet uniform, are emphasized to teach self-discipline and teamwork concepts.
Two highly qualified instructors with over 40 years of experience are on staff in the high school full time.
They are retired Navy, Marine or Coast Guard personnel who are certified by both the U.S. Navy and the
New York State Education Department to perform their duties as NJROTC instructors and administrators.
Course content includes:

Familiarization with the care and wearing of the Navy Junior ROTC uniform, instructions in leadership,
human behavior, International Code Flags, military rank and rating insignia, an introduction of the Navy
Department and the Department of Defense, Naval history and familiarization with naval ships, aircraft
and their purpose. Field trips to a variety of military bases, cruises on naval ships and flights in military
aircraft may be included. Military drill will also be incorporated into the curriculum. Students will learn
teamwork in drilling, marching, and ceremonies. They will also learn various military concepts which
develop their thinking and acting as “one unit.” Military drill enables cadets to develop pride and self-
confidence while participating in parades, field meets, and military reviews.


NJROTC II (951)
Grade Level 10-11                       Full year/1 credit                              weight 1.00
Prerequisite: NJROTC I (A provision exists for Juniors and Seniors to make a “late start” in the
program with the approval of the Senior NJROTC Instructor. An 11th or 12th grade student may be
permitted to enter at the NJROTC II level based on a sound school achievement record in grades 9 and
10)

Description:
NJROTC II is a follow-up to NJROTC I with an emphasis on development of leadership skills. Having
already satisfactorily completed the basic introduction to military drill, cadets now participate as drill
leaders and are introduced to the use of demilitarized drill rifles and military dress swords. The study of
meteorology, oceanography, seamanship, navigation, and aviation are presented.



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NJROTC III (954)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/1 credit                                 weight 1.00
Prerequisite: NJROTC II

Description:
NJROTC III is a follow-up to NJROTC II. Third year cadets are expected to help plan the activities of
the unit and to lead the Corps of Cadets through the yearly cadet activities. The academic syllabus
includes military drill refresher training, study of the role of the United States and the United States Navy
in world affairs, study of NATO, oceanography, and advanced technology in today’s military forces, with
regular emphasis on current events. The NJROTC III year has strong emphasis on leadership.

Third year cadets are encouraged to spread their talents around by active participation in school and
community service activities.

NJROTC IV (955)
Grade Level 12                       Full year/1 credit                        weight 1.00
Prerequisite: NJROTC III, record of exemplary performance, and approval of SNSI or NSI.

Description:
Outstanding cadets who have proven their leadership ability and who have displayed exemplary personal
qualities may qualify to participate in NJROTC IV subject to the approval of the naval science instructor.
They are utilized as staff cadets to the NJROTC instructors and are required to help plan and implement
the cadets’ schedule. This includes their involvement in classroom supervision and instruction.

Senior cadets are assigned as class leaders in NJROTC I classes to help new cadets “learn the ropes.”
NJROTC IV cadets are graded on a competitive basis, involving their ability to lead, inspire, and
motivate, maintain class conduct and control. Senior NJROTC Cadets will be required to complete
assignments in the CNET NJROTC IV Curriculum.

NJROTC IV cadets assist with the administrative, supply and operational reports and requirements
involved with the NJROTC Program. Cadets learn to function within the guidelines promulgated by the
United States Navy and the Riverhead Central School District.




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                OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION

Students who are interested in attending occupational programs at the BOCES H.B. Ward Technical Center, The
Brookhaven Technical Center or the Suffolk Aviation Academy can apply in the spring of their sophomore year.
Each fall, representatives from BOCES make a presentation to the sophomore class to describe the programs
offered and to answer any questions. Interested students must visit and fill out an application, review it with their
parents and guidance counselor, and meet the following criteria for eligibility:


    A. Students in the graduating classes of 2008-2010 must have 12 credits completed prior to beginning a
       BOCES program and be able to fit the occupational programs into the four-year plan.

    B. Students must have and maintain a school attendance rate of at least 90% and demonstrate a serious
       commitment in attending occupational courses.

    C. Students will be dropped in mid October, or at any other time during the school year, if he/she
       fails to satisfy Riverhead High School’s attendance requirements.

Please talk to your guidance counselor if you have specific questions.


                                                  **********
                                         Courses Offered at:
H. B. Ward Technical Center              Brookhaven Technical Center                Suffolk Aviation Academy

Audio Production Technology                 Animal Care                             Aviation/Professional Pilot Training
Auto After-Market Acc. Instal.              Animal Science                          Aviation/Airframe Mechanics
Autobody Repair & Refin.                    Art Design & Visual Communications
Automotive Technology                       Carpentry/Res. Const. & Home Imp.
Barbering                                   Cosmetology
Clinical Medical Assisting                  Dental Assisting
Computer Technology                         Drafting-Computer Aided & Manuel
Cosmetology                                 Dramatic Art
Culinary Arts/Rest. Op. Mgmt.               Fashion Merchandising
Early Childhood Education                   Home Theater, Security & Installation
Law Enforcement                             Motorcycle/Marine Service Technician
Marine/Motorcycle & Outdoor Power           Pharmacy Technician
                  Equipment                 Plumbing and Heating
Nurse Assisting                             Practical Nursing
Paralegal Studies                           Pre-Engineering; PLTW
                                            Professional Photography-Digital Photography
                                            Television Production
                                            Trade Electricity




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                   PHYSICAL EDUCATION
STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION:

The Riverhead School District is committed to a policy of Non-Discrimination (on the basis of
ethnicity, sex, religion, or any disability) in the Physical Education Program. Careful
consideration is given to ensure that opportunity be give to all aspects of the Physical Education
Program in accordance with Title IX. Mr. William Groth, Athletic Director, should be contacted
for further information concerning this.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1119 or 1500)                      Full year/½ credit             no weight
                                                       Alternate days
Description:
Students must change for class every day. Students will be penalized five points off their grade
for each “unprepared”. Being prepared includes a change of shirt and pants as well as proper
athletic shoes with laces (safety & hygiene). Students should also keep a sweatshirt or jacket to
wear when going outside. Students must be dressed and out into the gym five minutes after the
bell.

All students must participate in each class, while wearing sneakers and appropriate athletic attire.
(No jewelry at all is permitted to be worn during class). There are two exceptions:
    1.     Presentation of a doctor’s note excusing the student for a “stated” period of time from
           active participation.
    2.     Presentation of a parent’s note at the beginning of class for a legitimate reason,
           limited to one note per quarter.
All other non-participation can jeopardize course credit. A final failing grade will be recorded if
the four quarter averages are below 65, and the course will have to be repeated.

Each student must complete skill and written tests in each Unit, as well as physical fitness tests,
including the mile run.

Activities and Curriculum

In keeping with the Physical Education curriculum and the New York State Standard for
Physical Education, 9th and 10th graders will have emphasis placed on fundamental skill
development in a variety of sports. Activities may include, soccer, football, badminton,
basketball, softball, aerobics, weight training, field hockey, volleyball, golf, tennis, team
handball, European handball, lacrosse and wrestling.

Students in 11th and 12th grades will also participate in a proficient level in these activities.
However, an additional emphasis will be placed on healthy lifetime physical fitness activities.
These activities may be offered at different time periods throughout the school year depending
on such factors as class size, grading mix and availability of field and/or gym space.

Physical Education students will be graded in accordance with the following:
33% - Psychomotor: Skill development and assessment
33% - Affective: Effort
34% - Cognitive: Knowledge of activity/sport based on written tests and other assessments


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PROJECT ADVENTURE (1098)
Grade Level: 11 & 12                    Full year/ ½ credit                             no weight
                                        Alternate days
Description:
Project Adventure is the ideal physical education experience. The games and activities are non-
competitive and focus on communication, cooperation and trust in a fun, active and non-
threatening environment. The non-athlete tends to excel and the athlete is challenged in ways
they never would be in traditional physical education or athletics. The philosophy of adventure
activities centers around the “Full Value Contract,” which emphasizes fair play, honesty,
integrity and team work. “Challenge by Choice” is a part of the contract that allows students to
choose their level of personal risk, so no student is forced to take part in an activity or part of an
activity that they perceive is too risky. However, they are challenged to explore their personal
potential, mentally, physically and emotionally. Personality inventories are taken at the
beginning of the course which help identify tenancies and comfort zones. Project Adventure
seeks to challenge the student’s status quo and get them to think and behave “out-of-the-box.”
Pure physical education is when we learn about ourselves through physical activity and Project
Adventure does just that.

Project Adventure has these three main objectives or standards:

Standard 1: Personal Health and Fitness

The student will obtain the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain physical
fitness, participate in physical activity and maintain personal health.

Standard 2: A Safe and Healthy Environment

The student will acquire the knowledge and ability necessary to create and maintain a safe and
healthy environment.

Standard 3: Resource Management

The student will understand and be able to manage personal and community resources.


ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1113)
Grades 9 – 12                             Full year/ ½ credit                         no weight
                                         Alternate days
Description:
Adapted physical education (APE) is vitally important to the quality of life for students with
disabilities. Providing sage and successful experiences and meeting the unique needs of students
with disabilities through physical education will enhance self-actualization, including the
development of abilities in the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains.

Adaptive physical education means a specially designed program of developmental activities,
games, sports and rhythms suited to the interests, capabilities, and limitations of students with
disabilities who may not safely or successfully engage in unrestricted participation in the
activities of the regular physical education program. The term adaptive physical education
appears in Part 300 of the Code of Federal Regulations and Part 200 and Part 135 of the
Commissioner’s Regulations. Nationally, the recognized term is adaptive physical education.
Adapted physical education may be provided to any child who has a unique need in physical
education.
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CORE BASED FITNESS TRAINING (1118)
Grade Level 9-12                       Full year/ ½ credit                  no weight
                                       Alternate days
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Physical Education staff and/or athletic team coach

Description:
In keeping with the Physical Education curriculum and the New York State Standards for
Physical Education this course will focus on Core Based strength training and the development
of athletic movements. This course will enroll all participants in the nationally recognized
Bigger, Faster, Stronger Program. All participants will receive a personalized computer
generated workout program that will focus on the development of a strong athletic core. This
course will focus on the following core lifts: squat, towel bench, dead lift and power clean. In
addition, this course will emphasize the development of power through the use of plyometric
training as well as the development of speed through the use of agility drills.

All participants are expected to dress appropriately for class (gym clothes) and be able to
complete all assigned workouts. Students will be tested every four weeks on their knowledge of
training applications as well as performance-based criteria.




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                                         SCIENCE
                Accelerated/Honors                                           Regents
                Living Environment (8th Grade)                         Living Environment R

                Physical Setting H

                Chemistry H or AP                                Chemistry R           Physical Setting R

                Physics H or AP                                  Physics R             Chemistry R

                AP Level Science                                 Science Elective      Physics R
                                                                                           or
                                                                                       Science Elective
                                            Electives:
                                            AP Biology
                                          AP Chemistry
                                            AP Physics
                                         Forensic Science
                                          Marine Biology
                                            Astronomy
                                      Environmental Science
                                Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries

Riverhead High School’s science curriculum provides varied opportunities and challenges for all students.
All course offerings are designed to meet the future needs of the student. The technological
advancements of our society made during the last decade will be greatly enhanced during the next decade.
Thus, the background needed for scientific literacy and for future competition is available during the four
years of high school. Careful planning can result in the equivalent of seven years of science. College
level courses are available in biology, chemistry and physics.


REGENTS PHYSICAL SETTING (Earth Science) (402)
Grade Level 9 – 12      Full year/1credit                                                 weight 1.04

Description:
Physical Setting Regents is a laboratory-oriented course which places emphasis on the analysis of the
environment. Content areas include investigating processes of change in the environment, the motions of
the earth, the earth’s energy, and the rock cycle. The syllabus has been designed to facilitate teaching by
the investigative method. Physical Setting is a challenge for the dedicated, hard working student. The
course consists of five lecture-discussion periods followed by laboratory reinforcement sessions
scheduled on an alternate day basis. Frequent reading and writing tasks beyond the school day are
assigned to meet the course requirements and follow the New York State guidelines on homework of 30-
45 minutes per school day with weekend assignments.

A New York State mandated laboratory requirement must be completed by each student to become
eligible to take the final State examination. It is the student’s responsibility to submit, on specific due
dates, satisfactorily written laboratory reports. This course may be used for a unit of credit toward a New
York State Regents High School Diploma. A Regents examination is required at the conclusion of the
course.


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HONORS PHYSICAL SETTING/EARTH SCIENCE (400)
Grade Level: Accelerated 9-12       Full year/1 credit                                    weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Departmental Approval

Description:
This course will be based upon the Learning Standards for Math, Science & Technology Physical
Setting/Earth Science Core Curriculum Guide. It will include all of the required and extended areas in
Regents Earth Science and will also include many enrichment activities. Included in the class
requirements will be a minimum of one research paper and mandatory participation in our annual Science
Fair by submitting an individual project. This course is designed for the highly motivated, independent
learner who is willing to do much more both in and out of class. The pace will be significantly faster than
in Regents Earth Science so that more class time can be spent on additional laboratory and project work.
The final exam will be the NYS Regents Physical Setting/Earth Science exam.




REGENTS LIVING ENVIRONMENT (404)
Grade 9-12                    Full year/1 credit                                          weight 1.04

Description:
The intent of this course will be to provide students with an awareness of the natural world, basic and
scientific concepts, stimulation of inductive reasoning, and a basic understanding of biological processes
and generalizations. Broad ranges of fundamental principles of life, similarities and differences among
living organisms, homeostasis in organisms, genetic continuity, reproduction and development, evolution
and ecology are included in this course. Modern evolution and ecology stimulate self motivation, interest,
and enlightenment of the integration of life forms. Regents Living Environment is a challenge for the
dedicated, hard working student. The course consists of five lecture-discussion periods followed by
laboratory reinforcement sessions scheduled on an alternate day basis. Frequent reading and writing tasks
beyond the school day are assigned to meet the course requirements and follow the New York State
guidelines on homework of 30-45 minutes per school day with weekend assignments.

A New York State mandated laboratory requirement must be completed by each student with intentions
of taking the final State examination. It is the student’s responsibility to submit, on specific due dates,
satisfactorily written laboratory reports. This course may be used for a unit of credit toward a New York
State Regents High School Diploma.


HONORS LIVING ENVIRONMENT (427)
Grade Level Accelerated 9-12             Full year/1credit                       weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Department Approval, minimum 90 overall average in 8th grade Science

Description:
This enriched course will cover all of the required and extended areas in Regents Living Environment and
will also include many enrichment activities. It is a course designed for the highly motivated,
independent learner who is willing to do much more both in and out of class. The pace will be
significantly faster than in Regents Living Environment so that more class time can be spent on additional
laboratory and project work. The final exam will be the New York State Regents Living Environment
exam. The minimum overall course grade to continue in the honors program for the following year is 80.




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CHEMISTRY (406)
Grade Level 11-12                         Full year/1credit                    weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Regents Biology, Physical Setting, equivalent or department approval.

Description:
Nearly every activity and product in our environment can be related to chemistry. Knowledge of this
subject enables students to understand their surroundings and the increasingly technological world. Using
the knowledge of previous years combined with new concepts, students apply these learnings to practical
situations. In addition, intangible outcomes of the course through various laboratory exercises are the
appreciation of the scientific method, the ability and willingness to change beliefs and opinions after
careful weighing of new evidence, and the development of the habit of critical thinking. General
Chemistry follows the ACS Chemistry in the Community format. Topics may include: supplying our
water needs, chemical resources, petroleum, understanding food, chemistry of air and climate, health risks
and choices, and the chemical industry. The course will be developmental and day-to-day effort ensures
long-term results. The level of work is similar to a Regents level course.


REGENTS CHEMISTRY (407)
Grade Level Accelerated 10, 11,12        Full year/1credit                    weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Math 9A (or equivalent), Regents Biology or department
approval

Description:
This course stresses fundamental concepts and unifying principles of chemistry, of particular interest to
students who intend to pursue some future science courses. Emphasis is placed on the use of chemical
measurement with respect to behavior of matter and energy. Bonding, periodicity, and atomic structure
are studied in detail, including introductory quantum mechanics. The theory of chemical reactions, which
includes kinetics, equilibrium, acid-based, and redox reactions are also covered. A brief introduction to
organic reactions, structure, and naming is included. Laboratory work and reports are required which
emphasize the principles of qualitative and quantitative analysis. The course consists of five lecture-
discussion periods followed by laboratory reinforcement sessions scheduled on an alternate day basis.
Frequent reading and writing tasks beyond the school day are assigned to meet the course requirements
and follow the New York State guidelines on homework of 30-45 minutes per school day with weekend
assignments.

A New York State mandated laboratory requirement must be completed by each student with intentions
of taking the final State examination. It is the student’s responsibility to submit, on specific due dates,
satisfactorily written laboratory reports, which will be filed for six months for Board of Regents
certification. This course may be used for a unit of credit toward a New York State Regents High School
Diploma.


HONORS CHEMISTRY (428)
Grade Level Accelerated 10,11,12                    Full year/1credit                     weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Department Approval

Description:
This enriched course will cover all of the required and extended areas in Regents Chemistry and will also
include many additional enrichment activities and applications. It is a course designed for the highly
motivated, independent learner who is willing to do much more both in and out of class. The pace will be
significantly faster than in Regents Chemistry so that more class time can be spent on additional material
and laboratory work. The final exam will be the New York State Regents Chemistry Exam. The
minimum overall course grade to continue in the honors program is 80.

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PHYSICS (409)
Grade Level: 11-12                      Full year/1credit                                   weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Math A and Regents science requirement

Description:
This is the science course you will love and remember! The intent of this course is to provide students
with a basic understanding of Physics. This is a hands-on, activity based class that follows the conceptual
Physics program. This is an excellent course for students who struggle with Math yet would like to learn
more about Newton’s Laws of motion and why we need seatbelts, why doubling your speed will be so
deadly, how a hydraulic lift works, why water seeks its own level, how a laser works and how you can
dazzle your date with your knowledge of Physics. All of these questions will be answered and more.
Physics will meet the third year science requirement on the same level as a Regents course but not
culminating with a Regents exam.

REGENTS PHYSICS (410)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/1credit                      weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Regents Earth Science, Regents Biology, Regents Chemistry, or
departmental approval

Description:
This course presents a modern view of physics with a major emphasis placed on the fundamental concepts
underlying this basic science. The syllabus has been designed to encourage the utilization of such basic
conservation of momentum and the conservation of change in related areas rather than in isolation. This
approach tends to foster an appreciation for the unity of physics. As a result, the syllabus will be
presented in such a way as to show the importance of these ideas as unifying concepts, which can be
repeatedly applied throughout the course. The objectives of the course in physics should extend beyond a
minimal comprehension of the basic facts and principles outlined in the syllabus. The appreciation of the
scientific method, the ability and willingness to change beliefs and opinions after careful weighing of new
evidence, and the development of the habit of critical thinking are the intangible but most important
outcomes of the study of this science. These methods of thought and action will remain long after many
specific details of subject matter are forgotten. The course consists of five lecture-discussion periods
followed by laboratory reinforcement sessions scheduled on an alternate day basis. Frequent reading and
writing tasks beyond the school day are assigned to meet the course requirements and follow the New
York State guidelines on homework of 30-45 minutes per school day with weekend assignments.

A New York State mandatory laboratory requirement must be completed by each student with intentions
of taking the final State examination. It is the student’s responsibility to submit, on specific due dates,
satisfactorily written laboratory reports. This course may be used for a unit of credit toward a New York
State Regents High School Diploma.


HONORS PHYSICS (430)
Grade Level 11-12                                 Full year/1credit                        weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Department Approval

Description:
This enriched course will cover all of the required and extended areas in Regents Physics and will also
include many additional enrichment activities and applications. It is a course designed for the highly
motivated, independent learner who is willing to do much more both in and out of class. The pace will be
significantly faster than in Regents Physics so that more class time can be spent on additional material,
laboratory work and projects such as the Brookhaven National Laboratory bridge building contest. The
final examination will be the New York State Regents Physics examination. The minimum overall course
grade to continue in the honors program is 80.


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ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (405)
Grade Level Accelerated 10-12          Full year/1 credit                                     weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Regents Chemistry and Departmental Approval

Description:
The major themes discussed, observed, and tested in Advanced Placement Biology are the molecular and
cellular aspects of life, organismal biology, and population relationships including ecology, population
genetics, evolution, and behavioral concepts. These themes are built upon a solid foundation obtained
through the Living Environment course and extensive summer research work.. Since a thorough
presentation of biology involved the use of concepts learned in chemistry, students taking this advanced
course are required to be enrolled in or to have taken Regents Chemistry. The course consists of seven
weekly class sessions which are combinations of lecture, discussion, laboratory exercise, and research.
Current events, book reviews, oral and written research papers are expected each quarter. Advanced
Placement Biology is completed by taking a national exam which may lead to advanced standing in
college. Students are responsible for paying all related fees.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY (408)
Grade Level Accelerated 10-12       Full year/1 credit                                         weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Departmental Approval

Description:
Advanced Placement Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually
taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as
freshmen, second year work in the chemistry sequence at their institutions or to register in courses in
other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the Advanced Placement
Chemistry course fills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. Advanced
Placement Chemistry will meet the objectives of a general chemistry course. Students should attain a
depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems.
The course will contribute to the development of the students’ ability to think clearly and to express their
ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. The college course in general chemistry differs
qualitatively from the usual first secondary school course in chemistry with respect to the kind of
textbook used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations, the mathematical formulation
of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by students. Quantitative differences appear in the
number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by students, and the nature and the variety of
experiments done in the laboratory. It is recommended for most students that Advanced Placement
Chemistry be taken only after the successful completion of a first course in high school chemistry. It is
desirable that a student have a course in secondary school physics and a four-year college preparatory
program in mathematics. Advanced Placement Chemistry is completed by taking a national exam which
may lead to advanced standing and monetary savings in many leading universities. Students are
responsible for paying all related fees.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS (411)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/1 credit                  weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Must successfully complete Math B and currently be enrolled in Math 12 or
comparable course, departmental approval

Description:
The Advanced Placement Physics course is designed to be the equivalent of the general physics course
usually taken during the first year of college. For some students, this course enables them to undertake,
as freshmen, second-year work in the physics sequence at their institutions or to register in courses in
other fields where general physics was a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Physics course fulfills
the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. The AP Physics course includes
topics in both classical and modern physics. The aim of the course is to develop students’ ability to:

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        1. Read, understand, and interpret physical information (verbal, mathematical and graphical).
        2. Describe and explain the sequence of steps in the analysis of a particular physical
            phenomenon or problem.
        3. Use basic mathematical reasoning – arithmetic, algebraic, geometric, trignometric – in a
        physical situation or problem.
        4. Perform experiments and interpret the results of observations.
        AP Physics is completed by taking a national exam which may lead to advanced standing in
        college. Students are responsible for paying all related fees.

All students who take AP Chemistry and AP Physics in place of Regents Chemistry and Regents
Physics will be required to take the AP exam in May and the Regents exam in June.


FORENSIC SCIENCE (412)
Grade Level 11-12                          Full year/1 credit                     weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Course credit in Regents Earth Science, Regents Biology and Chemistry or Regents
Chemistry

Description:
Forensic Science is the application of the natural sciences to investigation of physical evidence. This
course is an applied or practical science course designed for students who may not have had a previous
interest in the field of pure science. It will attempt to capture students’ interest by applying science skills
to a contemporary popular professional field, law enforcement. Students will be involved in the
collection of physical evidence from a simulated crime scene. The evidence collected will be analyzed by
the students in the lab as pertinent topics are covered in lectures. Field trips to police labs and medical
examiner offices will be scheduled. This course will be supplemented with guest speakers. The course
meets five periods per week. The level of work is similar to a Regents level course.


FORENSIC SCIENCE (415)
(Syracuse University Project Advance)
Grade Level 11-12                             Full year/4 college credits            weight 1.18
Prerequisite: Course credit in Earth Science R, Chemistry R, Biology R and corresponding exam

Forensic Science is focused upon the application of scientific methods and techniques to crime and law.
Recent advances in scientific methods and principles have had an enormous impact upon law enforcement
and the entire criminal justice system. This course is intended to provide an introduction to understanding
the science behind crime detection. Scientific methods specifically relevant to crime detection and
analysis will be presented with emphasis placed upon the techniques used in evaluating physical
evidence. Topics included are blood analysis, organic and inorganic evidence analysis, microscopic
investigations, hair analysis, DNA, drug chemistry and toxicology, fiber comparisons, paints, glass
compositions and fragmentation, fingerprints, soil comparisons and arson investigations, among others.
Laboratory exercises will include techniques commonly employed in forensic investigations.

The forensics requirement is satisfied upon successful completion of this course. Students are required to
pay the tuition charges and fees assessed by Syracuse University.




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ASTRONOMY/METEOROLOGY (413)
Grade Level 11-12                               Full year/1credit                           weight 1. 00

Prerequisite: Course credit in Regents Physical Setting, Regents Living Environment,
Regents Chemistry (or currently enrolled), or department approval.

Description:
Astromony will introduce students to the evolution of our solar system and will develop an appreciation
for the uniqueness of each planet, especially Earth. Students will utilize the telescope in the J.E. Young
Observatory at the high school for class time observations. Students are also expected to attend at least
one evening observation session. Field trips will be conducted to the planetarium at Suffolk Community
College (Riverhead Campus). In the planetarium students will learn the locations of stars and
constellations which are recognizable during different seasons of the year. Numerous laboratory
exercises, which reinforce lecture discussions, are completed during class sessions.

Meteorology will emphasize weather topics which directly relate to one’s everyday experiences and stress
the understanding and application of principles in meteorology. Students will develop an understanding of
the physical process responsible for daily weather changes through lab work and hands on activities.
During the course we will take a look at weather fronts, air masses, hurricanes, blizzards and severe
weather. We will use computers to create our own weather forecasts for Long Island.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (440)
Grade Level 11-12                        Full year/ ½ credit
                                         Alternate days                                     weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Biology R, Earth Science R, with Chemistry R recommended

Description:
In this course students would study both the physical and biological factors of the environment.
This interdisciplinary course would mesh biology, chemistry and earth science with economics,
social issues and literature.


MARINE BIOLOGY (414)
Grade Level 11-12                   Full year/1 credit            weight 1.04
Prerequisite:  Course credit in Regents Earth Science and Regents Biology, or
departmental approval

Description:
Marine Biology is the study of living organisms in the ocean. Field trips are an important aspect
of this course: recent field trips have been to Fire Island, Montauk Point, Mystic Aquarium and
the Museum of Natural History in NYC (pending RCSD Board approval). Specimens collected
in the field will be studied in the classroom. The marine life in waters surrounding Long Island is
emphasized; students will learn to identify common seashells and make seaweed prints. The first
semester focuses on invertebrate animals and the second semester focuses on vertebrate animals
such as sharks, sea turtles, and whales. This course is a very “hands-on” learning experience. The
level of work is similar to a Regents level course.




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CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES (441)
Grade Level 11-12                      Full year/ ½ credit                weight 1.00
                                       Alternate days
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and minimum grade of 80 in Biology and
Chemistry

Description:
This course will provide students with a basic background and understanding in the recognition, care and
prevention of common exercise and athletic injuries. Students will review the major anatomical structures
of the human body to better understand the common injuries that occur to these structures. Proficiency in
the application of the taping and wrapping techniques that are used will be developed. Students will have
the opportunity to meet with quest speakers who are currently working in the Sports Medicine field.

This course may be taken by a junior or senior who may be interested in pursuing a college education and
career path in the fields of Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, Athletic Training, Physical or Occupational
Therapy as well as other areas related to health and exercise.


RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP (0420)
Grade Level 9-12                        Full year/1 credit                  weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Regents Earth Science, Regents Biology, Regents Chemistry, Regents Physics
or department and research facility approval. Application forms are available from your
science teacher.

Description:
This honors level science course is available for those highly motivated and disciplined students who
have the ability to work independently on research projects under the direction of a research scientist from
a neighboring facility. Transportation will be provided by the school district during the school day.
Students would be expected to spend approximately 15 hours a week at the facility. These hours may be
scheduled during the school day, or possibly after school or on weekends to provide some flexibility for
the student. Students will be placed according to their areas of interest and as opportunities are available.
A scientific research paper is required.




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                               SOCIAL STUDIES


        Honors/Accelerated                                                  Regents Level

Global History & Geography 9H                                               Global History 9R
                ↓                                                                   ↓
Global History 10H or AP European History                                   Global History 10R
                ↓                                                                   ↓
US History & Gov’t 11H or AP US History & Gov’t                             US History & Gov’t 11R
                ↓                                                                   ↓
SUPA Economics & Public Affairs                                             Economics R
                                                                                 AND
                                                                            Criminal Justice or
                                                                            Participation in Gov’t



                    Accelerated Electives                          Elective Courses
                     SUPA Psychology                        African-American History & Literature
                                                                      Psychology
                                                                      Civil Law




The purpose of the social studies curriculum is to give students the knowledge, intellectual skills, civic
understandings, and dispositions toward democratic values that are necessary to function effectively in
American society.

The social studies curriculum will help students understand their roots, see their connections to the past,
recognize the commonality of people across time, respect diversity, appreciate the delicate balance of
rights and responsibilities in society, and develop the habits of thoughtful analysis and reflective thinking.

The curriculum will provide students with the background to conduct research in order to cast informed
votes, the skills to place conflicting ideas in context, and the wisdom to make good judgments in dealing
with the tensions inherent in society such as the enduring struggle to find the proper balance between
protecting the rights of the individual and promoting the common good.

Ultimately, social studies instruction should help students assume their role as responsible citizens in
America’s constitutional democracy and as active contributors to a society that is increasingly diverse and
interdependent with other nations of the world.




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GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 9R (252)
Grade Level 9                           Full year/1 credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Social Studies 8

Description:
After developing working definitions for the basic tools of the social sciences, we begin our journey
through time with the early river civilizations of the Middle East, India, and China. The classical
civilizations of Ancient Greece, Rome, and, the less than familiar, Han Dynasty of China lead us into a
detailed study of the world’s religions. The period of history from 500-1200, called the Middle Ages,
will see us look at, not only medieval Europe, but the Gupta Empire of India, the Tang Dynasty of China,
the Byzantine Empire, and the Golden Age of Islam.

The next unit, 1200-1650, begins with the impact of trade between cultures/civilizations. This flows into
the European Renaissance. We’ll also look at Japanese Feudalism, the Mongol Dynasty, and it conquests.

The concluding 9th grade unit deals with the age of exploration and the civilizations that the Europeans
came in contact with in Latin America, Africa and Asia. The age of kings and emperors, those absolute
rulers, cap off the year.

Instruction will emphasize thematic and document based essay writing. A departmental midterm and
final similar in format to the new Regents will be given.

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 9H (253)
Grade Level 9                       Full year/1 credit                                   weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to the guidelines listed in the front of the book

Description:
Please refer to Global History and Geography 9R for a course description. The difference between 9R
and 9H is in the approach; greater enrichment plus a much greater emphasis is placed on critical thinking,
long term projects, more historical detail, and the analysis/understanding of primary source materials.

We have greater expectations for the honor students, in terms of their work effort and product, as well as
their maturity.

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 10R (255)
Grade Level 10                    Full year/1 credit                                     weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Global History and Geography 9

Description:
This Regents course is a continuation of the chronological study of Global History and Geography 9. The
first unit begins with a study of the Age of Revolutions from 1750-1914 and includes the American,
French, Latin American, Napoleonic, and Industrial, political, economic, and social revolutions. The 19th
century eras of nationalism and imperialism as products and outgrowths of these revolutions are studied
in detail. The second unit, the Half Century of Crisis 1900-1945, includes World War I, the Russian
Revolution, the rise of dictators, and World War II. The third unit focuses on a study of The World from
1945 to the Present Millennium. Areas of focus include the Cold War to the Little Hot Ones, Mao to
Tiananmen Square, apartheid to Mandela, Saddam to the Ayatollah, Peron to Castro, and Gorby to Boris.
The final unit, Global Connections and Interactions, ties it all together by focusing on connections,
trends, patterns, and problems. It is a look to the 21st Century by studying the past.

Instruction will emphasize thematic and document based essay writing. All students will be required to
take the new Global History and Geography Regents examination. In depth instruction will be given so
that students will be prepared for this exam which includes: multiple choice questions, a document based
question (short responses and essay), and a thematic essay. Every student must pass this exam in order to
graduate.
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GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 10 HONORS (256)
Grade Level 10                      Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.08
Prerequisite: Please refer to the guidelines listed in the front of the book

Description:
Global History and Geography 10 Honors contains the same historic content as the Global History and
Geography 10 Regents course. The distinguishing features include a rigorous and challenging approach
to the content, higher expectations, rewarding enrichment projects, academic material, and collective
classroom interaction.

Students will look at events from multiple lenses and perspectives. They will work with many primary
source documents. Students are expected to use a variety of sources to enhance their learning experiences
including internet research and visits to New York City museums.

Instruction will emphasize thematic and document based essay writing.

The requirement of passing the Global History and Geography Regents is a minimum expectation. We
want all Honors students to attain mastery levels of 85 or better.

UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT R (208)
Grade Level 11                    Full year/1 credit                                        weight 1.04
Prerequisite: Global History and Geography 9 and 10

Description:
This is a chronological survey of the history of the United States. The beginning units emphasize not
only the structure of our government institutions, but how they have evolved to date. The Constitution
and constitutional issues in a historic frame will be studied in depth. The balance of the course will trace:
1) our economic development from our industrial infancy to that of a global economic giant in an ever
increasingly interdependent world family; 2) our role in international affairs from the Monroe Doctrine
and Manifest Destiny to UN Resolution 342 and the New World Order; 3) America’s human expansion
from its Puritan origins to “One Nation/Many Peoples” a struggle for human equality, identity, unity and
goals; 4) the impact of geography on America’s historical development; 5) the analysis of primary source
documents to better understand the historical, cultural, economic, and social development; 6) thematic
and document based essay writing.

The U.S. History and Government Regents Examination serves as the final examination. In order to
graduate, a student must pass the new U.S. History and Government Regents.


UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT HONORS (210)
Grade Level 11                      Full year/1 credit                                      weight 1.08
 Prerequisite: Please refer to the guidelines in the front of the book

Description:
This course of study is identical in content to the U.S. History and Government course described
above. The difference lies in the approach. Greater emphasis is placed on scholarship/critical thinking,
analysis of primary source documents, and the study of events from multiple perspectives. It differs from
the AP American History course in that it is less rigorous although still academically challenging, bears
no college credit and has a varying emphasis in certain content units. Instruction will emphasize thematic
and document based essay writing.

The requirement of passing the U.S. History Regents is a minimum expectation. We want all Honors
students to attain mastery levels of 85 or better.

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ECONOMICS R (214)
Grade Level 12                     1 semester/ ½ credit                                      weight 1.04
Prerequisite: U.S. History and Government

Description:
The study of economics in grade 12 should provide students with the economic knowledge and skills that
enable them to function as informed and economically literate citizens in our society and in the world.
The course is designed to be used with all students, emphasizes rational decision-making, and encourages
students to become wiser consumers as well as better citizens. Teachers will provide for different student
needs by selecting appropriate instructional materials and learning strategies.


PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT R (215)
Grade Level 12                            1 semester/ ½ credit                               weight 1.04
Prerequisite: U.S. History and Government

Description:
Students studying participation in government in grade 12 should experience a culminating course that
relates the content and skills component of the K-11 social studies curriculum, as well as the total
educational experience, to the individual student’s need to act as a responsible citizen.

Course content will be:

* interdisciplinary, for it will be drawn from areas beyond the defined social studies curriculum; will
include life experience beyond classroom and school
* related to problems or issues addressed by students, i.e., content in the form of data, facts, or
knowledge may vary from school to school, but real and substantive issues at the local, state, national,
and global levels should be integrated to the program
* in the form of intellectual processes or operations necessary to deal with data generated by problems or
issues addressed, i.e., the substance of the course

In addition, the term participation must be interpreted in the broad sense to include actual community
service programs or out-of-school internships, and in-class, in-school activities that involve students in
the analysis of public issues chosen because of some unique relevance to the student involved. Defining,
analyzing, monitoring, and discussing issues and policies is the fundamental participatory activity in a
classroom.


PUBLIC AFFAIRS (216)
(Syracuse University Project Advance)
Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy
Grade Level 12                     1 semester/3college credits/ ½ credit                     weight 1.18
Prerequisite: U.S. History and Government and teacher recommendation

Description:
This one-semester course will emphasize the interaction between citizens and government at all levels,
(local, state and federal). The course will encourage students to understand and participate in the
democratic process. A “hands-on” approach will be used to involve students. The objectives are to:
introduce students to decision-making and problem solving, analyze individually selected public policy
issues, assess student ability to establish criteria, identify alternatives, evaluate alternatives, and choose
and solve the problem. Students are required to pay the tuition charges and fees assessed by Syracuse
University(as of 2005, cost is $313).


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ECONOMIC IDEAS AND ISSUES (217)
(Syracuse University Project Advance)
Grade Level 12                    1 semester/ 3college credits/ ½ credit                   weight 1.18
Prerequisite: U.S. History and Government and teacher recommendation

Description:
Economic Ideas and Issues is designed for students with a liberal arts interest and constitutes an
introduction to mainstream economic thought. The course is rigorous, but not heavily mathematical.
Students should understand basic algebra and geometry. More importantly, they should be able to reason
effectively.

The course begins with a presentation of the scientific method, which is then used to analyze the question:
How do individuals and societies make choices when they are faced with scarcity? Beginning with the
individual in the simplest of situations, a one-person society, the course moves step by step to develop a
model of a complex society based on division of labor and exchange through markets. The process takes
students from the microeconomic to the macroeconomic level, emphasizing the connection between these
two perspectives. Students examine the benefits, as well as the problems, inherent in a market-oriented
economy. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the ongoing economic policy debate
between interventionists and non-interventionists.

Additionally, the economics requirement is satisfied upon successful completion of this course. Students
are required to pay the tuition charges and fees assessed by Syracuse University (as of 2005 cost is $313).

Students will play Newsday’s Stock Market Game, where they will compete against high schools all over
the Island.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (218)
Grade Level 12                      1 semester/ ½ credit                                   weight 1.04
Prerequisite: U.S. History and Government

Description:
This one semester course emphasizes the interaction between the citizen and his/her government from a
legal perspective. Mock trial learning activities in our student courtroom afford students the opportunity
to replicate the American legal process and procedures.

Academic skills in writing, research, and oral presentation are developed in this legal forum. Students
will examine the criminal justice system and many related topics by visiting or receiving speakers from a
wide variety of criminal justice agencies. This course will satisfy the Participation in Government
requirement.

CIVIL LAW (219)
Grade Level 11 & 12                1 semester/ ½ credit                                    weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of
Global History and Geography 9R & 10R and Regents exam

Description:
The course will build on the skills developed in the first year law course and will concentrate primarily on
civil law. Mock trials in the student courtroom will take place. Students will learn how to duplicate
American legal procedures and will refine their research and oral presentation skills.




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PSYCHOLOGY (220)
Grade Level 11 & 12                Full year/ ½ credit                                     weight 1.00
                                   Alternate days
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of
Global History and Geography 9R & 10R and Regents exam

Description:
This introductory course in psychology is designed to promote self-understanding and to improve
interpersonal relationships. The course is designed for students who have completed the required social
studies courses and for those who may have room in their schedules for an elective. Traditional
psychological approaches are studied as well as transactional analysis techniques.


PSYCHOLOGY 205 Foundations of Human Behavior (201)
(Syracuse University Project Advance)
Grade Level 11 &12                   Full year/3 college credits/ ½ credit       weight 1.18
                                     Alternate days
Prerequisite: Final average of 80 or better in previous years social studies course and teacher
recommendation.

Description: Psychology 205 is an introductory course offered by the Psychology Department at
Syracuse University. Dr. Sutterer and Dr. Lewandowski, in conjunction with other members of the
department, have designed an innovative course which provides instruction in the fundamental topics in
psychology in addition to providing a degree of freedom for students to pursue individual topics of
interest. Students are required to pay the tuition charges and fees assessed by Syracuse University (as of
2005, cost is $313).

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND LITERATURE (202)
Grade Level 11 & 12          Full year/1 credit in Social studies or English               weight 1.00
Prerequisite: Successful completion of previous years social studies course.

Description: A true and thorough history of America cannot be taught and understood without including
those Americans who have participated in and contributed to America’s growth: African Americans.
Since they first set foot on Virginia’s soil in 1619, they have been key players-and have played an integral
role-in making our country what it is today.

The focus on this course will be on the historical achievements and writings of African-Americans
throughout U. S. History. Where applicable, the struggles they overcame will be researched and
discussed. The bulk of the material to be utilized for this course will be primary sources and documents.
The history and literature of African-Americans will be taught largely through their own words. However,
the currents and “prevailing winds” of thought at different periods, and key events, will be brought in to
enlarge and enlighten the historical “picture”.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN HISTORY (209)
Grade Level 11 & 12                 Full year/ 1credit                        weight 1.18
Prerequisite: High achievement in prior coursework and teacher recommendation

Description:
Advanced Placement American History is a college level course offered to highly motivated,
academically successful students who wish to pursue college studies while still in high school. This is a
rigorous course of study where students are expected to read and comprehend large tracts of historic
material from both primary and secondary sources on their own. The instructor serves as a resource
person, leading discussions on historic topics/events of importance.


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 The course follows a chronological history of the United States emphasizing the development of our
political and economic institutions, America’s ever changing roles in the international arena (from
Washington’s Farewell Address to President Clinton’s Global Warming Pronouncement), to the
social/intellectual history of our people.

The Advance Placement examination, given in May, is required of all students enrolled. Students must
pay all related fees. The remaining 6 weeks are devoted to independent research projects and preparation
for the U.S. History and Government Regents Examination (a State requirement for graduation).


ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY (211)
Grade Level 10 - 12                Full year/1 credit                         weight 1.18
Prerequisite: High achievement in prior course work with teacher recommendation

Description:
This full year college level course surveys European History from 1450 to the present. Requirements
include college level readings, research papers and book reviews. Students are required to take the
Advanced Placement exam in May. Students must pay all related fees. All Students taking this course in
place of Global 10R will be required to take the AP exam in May and the Regents exam in June.
*Subject to acceptable enrollment.


GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY REGENTS TEST PREP (227)
Grade Level 10-12                                 Full Year/Graduation Requirement
Prerequisite: Failure on Global History and Geography Regents examination

Description:
This test prep course is designed to prepare students for the new Global History and Geography Regents
exam. Students must pass this exam in order to receive a local high school diploma or Regents diploma.
The exam is offered in January, June, and August of every calendar year.


U.S. HISTORY REGENTS TEST PREP (223)
Grade Level 11-12                                  Full Year/Graduation Requirement
Prerequisite: Failure on U.S. History Regents exam

Description: This test preparation course is designed to prepare students for the U.S. History Regents
exam. Students must pass this exam in order to receive a local high school diploma or a Regents diploma.
This exam is offered in January, June and August of every calendar year.




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                          SPECIAL EDUCATION
                                SPECIAL PROGRAMS
The Special Education Program is a four-year program designed to meet the individual requirements of
students with special needs.

The first level of programming is the resource room provided to those students who need a period a day
to receive academic or behavior management assistance.

The second level is the collaborative program, in which students are fully mainstreamed in all primary
academic areas with support from a learning specialist in each of these classes.

The third level (School Within a School-SWS) is a self-contained class for students who require further
academic support in major subject areas as well as additional remedial interventions in reading, writing
and basic mathematical concepts. The goal of this class is to prepare students to successfully challenge
the rigors of the Collaborative Teaching Program.

                SWS NY State Math 1A              40 weeks                        1 credit
                SWS NY State Math IIA             40 weeks                        1 credit

These math courses provide the special education student the equivalent of a high school two-year math
program. The curriculum is presented in a modified manner so that the unique needs of the special
education student are met.

                SWS Global History 9R                                             1 credit
                SWS Global History 10R                                            1 credit
                SWS U.S. History & Government R                                   1 credit
                SWS Participation in Government/Economics R                       1 credit

These four social studies courses provide the special education student the equivalent of a regular high
school four-year program, yet the curriculum is designed to meet the unique needs of the special
education student.

                Regents Living Environment X                              4 semesters/2 credits

This course will fulfill two years of the science requirement. Students will take the Regents exam at the
completion of this two-year course.

                SWS English 9R                                                    1 credit
                SWS English 10R                                                   1 credit
                SWS English 11R                                                   1 credit
                SWS English 12R                                                   1 credit

This represents a four year English program leading to the passing of the Regents exam as well as
fulfilling the necessary requirements for the high school diploma.

The fourth level is a Basic Skills Development Program special occupational education. This program
could be carried out in a variety of trade areas in all four years of high school. When a student is
approved to participate in occupational education as a component of his or her I.E.P., a fifth year of high
school may be considered for the attainment of the high school diploma.

The fifth level is a combination of the first three levels where students are partially mainstreamed,
partially self-contained in the school-within-a-school program and some may even add an occupational
dimension.
                                                 (70)
                     SAFETY NET FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS

The New York State Board of Regents has approved the extension of the Safety Net for students with
disabilities who entered grade 9 from September 1996 through September 2009. Students are encouraged
to graduate with a Regents diploma by passing all required Regents exams with a score of 65 or better.
Students with disabilities who do not pass one or more required Regents exams for graduation, may take
the Regents Competency Exam (RCT) in that subject area. These students will earn a local high school
diploma.

Please note: Students must take the Regents exam in the required subject area prior to or after taking the
RCT exam.




                                           I.E.P. DIPLOMAS

All special education students in first, second and third level are expected to work toward earning a NYS
Regents diploma.

An I.E.P. diploma will be issued to those special education students who have mastered all the objectives
on their I.E.P.’s. This may be evidenced in three ways:

        1. The completion of the Collaborative Teaching Program.
        2. The completion in totality of the Basic Skills Development Program (BSD).
        3. The completion of a BOCES special education academic or life skills program and be certified
           by the BOCES administration that all I.E.P. goals were met.

To receive an I.E.P. diploma, a student must have attained the age of 18.

No student being served in a Learning Support Resource Room will be eligible for an I.E.P. diploma.
Students are assigned to the Resource Room on a daily basis. Only seniors may be considered for an
alternate day placement.




                                                 (71)
               ½ CREDIT COURSES
          CAREER & FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
                     KEYBOARDING
              BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
              INTRO TO WEB PAGE DESIGN
                COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
                  CHILD DEVELOPMENT
                 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
               COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I
                 PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
               WORLD OF CONSTRUCTION
                 MATERIALS PROCESSING
               TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS
               RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES
                   BASIC ELECTRICITY
                        HEALTH*
                   SKILLS FOR LIVING
                      ASTRONOMY
        CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
               ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
                      ECONOMICS*
            PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT*
                   CRIMINAL JUSTICE*
                      PSYCHOLOGY
                       CIVIL LAW
                    PUBLIC AFFAIRS
                 PHYSICAL EDUCATION*
             CORE BASED FITNESS TRAINING
                  PROJECT ADVENTURE
                      ADAPTIVE PE

              *GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

   THE FOLLOWING COURSES CAN BE USED TO SATISFY
        THE COMPUTER LITERACY REQUIREMENT


  COMPUTER PROGRAMMING            COMPUTER GRAPHICS
   AP COMPUTER SCIENCE       ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS
      KEYBOARDING          DESIGN & DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION
BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS         COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I
INTRO TO WEB PAGE DESIGN          SURVEY OF MATH
 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS         COMPUTER JOURNALISM
  BOCES COMPUTER TECH      BOCES COMPUTERIZED OFFICE TECH
  MATH 8 ACCELERATED




                           (72)
        HIGH SCHOOL TELEPHONE DIRECTORY

Principal…………………………. James J. McCaffrey………………………… 369-6723

Associate Principal…………………..Stanley Pelech II………………………… 369-6740

Asst. Principal for Academic
Supervision Grades 7-12……………Shirley Cepero ………………………… 369-6837

Asst. Principal for Academic
Supervision Grades 7-12.……………Jeanne Grim...…………………………… 369-7677

Asst. Principal for Operations ……..Charles Regan…………………………… 369-6725

Asst. Principal for Operations …….Michael J. Winfield ……………………… 369-6746

Athletic Director…………………….William Groth…………………………… 369-6818

Director Pupil Personnel Services…Betsy Chappell………………………….. 369-6800

Guidance Director…………………Joseph Connolly…………………………. 369-6730

Guidance Counselors……………Anastasia Mouyiaris (A-Dan) ……………… 369-6730
                        Christopher Martin (Dao-Hol)……………….369-6729
                          Craig Korobow (Hom-Mi)…………………369-6728
                         Suzanne Maurino (Mo-Sa) ………………... 369-6729
                          Christy Salerno (Sc-Z)…………………… 369-6729

Gymnasium.……………………………Boys………………………………….. 369-6754

Gymnasium…………………………….Girls………………………………….. 369-6755

Library………………………………Suzanne Conlin…………………………. 369-6732

Music………………………………David Loddengaard………………………. 369-6741

Naval Junior ROTC……………Senior Chief Kevin Woods…………………...369-6806
                      Lt.Colonel Peter McCarthy

Psychologists…………………………..Tara Candela………………………….. 369-6731

                             Joanna Dierberger……………………….. 369-9454

School Nurses………………….Laura Goode/Edie Reisenberg………………. 369-6748

Social Workers………………………Therese Godoy………………………….. 369-6737

                            Nicholas Kardaras ……………………….. 369-6744
                            NOTES
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                            *******

               DISTRICT ADMINISTRATION

              Joseph Singleton, Superintendent of Schools
Joseph Ogeka, Asst. Superintendent for Personnel & Community Relations
    Nancy Carney, Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction
          Lynn Kobylenski, Asst. Superintendent for Business
        Elizabeth Chappell, Director of Pupil Personnel Services
        Kevin Stack, Asst. Director of Pupil Personnel Services


                   BOARD OF EDUCATION

                      Nancy Gassert, President
                    W. Brian Stark, Vice-President
                          Kathleen Berezny
                          Timothy Griffing
                           Angela DeVito
                           Christine Prete
                         Mary Ellen Harkin


                             *******