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					                                           SuperFoods RX
                                 Steven Pratt, M.D. & Kathy Matthews

   Dr. Pratt, an ophthalmologist and dermatologist, wrote the book SuperFoods Rx. He
   believes that our eyes and our skin are the first line indicators of proper nutrition
   and good health (as many people also believe about canine health). Through much
   meta-analysis, and independent research, he has developed a list of 14 foods that
   will increase our health.

   What I like about the list of 14 SuperFoods is that, for the most part, they are
   accessible, easy to prepare, relatively inexpensive, and taste great! Additionally,
   through my own reading about canine nutrition, all 14 foods (except oats and
   beans) are nutritious and healthful additions to your dog’s diet.

   His book explains how almost every food here is healthful for us, whether its cancer
   prevention, lowering blood pressure, preventing osteoporosis, preventing heart
   disease, preventing cataracts, or other chronic diseases. His book also has buying
   guides and recipes. This overview is a series of excerpts from the book, as a guide
   to buying, preparing, and adding each SuperFood into your lifestyle.

   Note: A SIDEKICK is a food of nearly equal nutritional value, but for some reason, is
   not quite as healthy as the primary food (possibly slightly higher in calories). More
   important than targeting only the primary food, focus on the variety.

Beans
   SIDEKICKS: All beans are included, but special attention goes to pinto, navy, Great
   Northern, lima, garbanzo, lentils, green beans, sugar snap peas, and green peas
   TRY TO EAT: at least four ½ cup servings per week

   NOTES:
    Look for low-salt canned beans, and always put in a strainer and rinse with cool
     water to decrease sodium by 40%.
    Beans are as effective as oat bran at reducing blood cholesterol levels and
     triglyceride levels. Both together are even better.
    Beans are a good fiber source (see table)                 Bean         Fiber (g) /
    Be sure lard is not an ingredient in the can. Look for                 ½ cup serv
     beans labeled as “vegetarian.”                            Lentils      8
    Add chickpeas to a salad, mixed with some chopped         Black        7.5
     onion and olive oil, or pureed into hummus.
                                                               Pinto        7.5
    Combine beans with pasta. I like pasta e fagioli.
                                                               Kidney       4.5 – 5.5
    Mash beans with some finely chopped garlic and use
                                                               Chickpeas 4
     as a sandwich spread.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                      Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 1 of 15
Blueberries
   SIDEKICKS: Purple grapes, cranberries, boysenberries, raspberries, strawberries,
   currants, blackberries, cherries, and all other varieties of fresh, frozen, or dried
   berries
   TRY TO EAT: 1 to 2 cups daily

    NOTES:
     Mix 100% juice with water or seltzer (1:1), to reduce calories.
     Commercially produced berry-grape-pomegranate juice is very rich in
      antioxidants, some 3 times higher than red wine or tea, because processing
      extracts tannins in the rind. To find the best juices, look for those with sediment
      at the bottom of the bottle. Don’t forget to shake. (see table)
     Drink 100 % juice with dinner (or red wine or tea), because the polyphenols help
      neutralize the adverse effects of the oxidized oils and fats in foods like the char
      on grilled foods.
     Dried fruit: is a very powerful source of health-promoting nutrients, as all the
      fruits’ benefits remain and are concentrated (except Vit. C). Unfortunately,
      chemical sprays are also concentrated, so go with blueberries and cranberries
      (not heavily treated), or buy organic. Add apricots and figs to this group.
     Dried fruit seems to possess significant anti-wrinkle properties.
     Take a bowl of berries, add a sliced banana, pour ½ - 1 cup soymilk, drizzle 1 – 2
      Tbsp of buckwheat honey, and mash with a fork.
     Blueberries should be washed briefly, but only before using them. Store in the
      fridge only for a day or two in a container allowing air circulation, after picking
      out moldy or crushed fruit.
     Freeze in a single layer on a cookie sheet (without washing them) before storing
      in airtight bags.
     Sprinkle berries and wheat germ on yogurt.
     Mix frozen berries in hot oatmeal.
     Toss onto cold cereal.
     Whip into a smoothie with yogurt, banana, ice, and soy or nonfat milk.
     Add to whole-wheat pancakes.
     Cranberry-orange relish recipe for poultry/fish (pg 60)

             Juices   (pg 54)                                       Mg of polyphenols
                                                                    per 8 oz serv
             Odwalla C Monster                                      845
             Trader Joe’s 100% unfiltered concord grape juice       670
             R.W. Knudsen 100% pomegranate juice                    639
             R.W. Knudsen 100% cranberry juice                      587
             R.W. Knudsen Just Blueberry                            425
             100% apple juice                                       61

             Jams
             Trader Joe’s Organic Blueberry Fruit Spread            400
             Knott’s pure boysenberry preserves                     300
             Welch’s concord grape jam                              60


    A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                        Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                     Page 2 of 15
Broccoli
   SIDEKICKS: Brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, turnips, cauliflower, collards, bok choy,
   mustard greens, Swiss chard
   TRY TO EAT: ½ to 1 cup daily

   NOTES:
    Broccoli is one of the most nutrient dense foods known – meaning high nutrients
     for low calories.
    Eat both raw and cooked.
    As little as 1/8 cup daily of chopped broccoli will significantly decrease cancer risk
    Broccoli-sprouts (www.broccosprouts.com) are very healthy – sprinkle on salad or
     sandwiches.
    Adding salt will decrease the bitter taste, or stir-fry with low sodium soy sauce, or
     add to casseroles and lasagnas.
    Too much is not good – stay less than 2 cups per day.
    The deeper the color the more nutritious, the smaller the heads the tastier.
    Steaming or microwaving in very little water is the best way to cook it.
    Keep frozen broccoli on hand for stir-fries.
    Puree leftover broccoli with sautéed onions, mix with low fat or soy milk, and a
     grind or two of nutmeg for a great fast soup.
    Leftover cooked cold broccoli with toasted sesame seeds and salad dressing.
    Shred Brussels sprouts and stir-fry with minced garlic, olive oil, coarsely chopped
     toasted walnuts or pine nuts, and squeeze of lemon juice. Toss with pasta or as a
     side dish.
    Coat cut-up broccoli or cauliflower with a little olive oil and salt. Roast at 425 for
     20-30 minutes.
    Serve raw with hummus.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                     Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 3 of 15
Oats
   SUPER SIDEKICKS: wheat germ and ground flaxseed
   SIDEKICKS: brown rice, barley, wheat, buckwheat, rye, millet, bulgur wheat,
   amaranth, quinoa, triticale, kamut, yellow corn, wild rice, spelt, couscous
   TRY TO EAT: 5 to 7 servings a day

   NOTES:
    Flaxseeds are the best plant source of Omega-3, and the best source of
     phytoestrogens, balancing estrogens and protecting against breast cancer.
    Buy ground flaxseeds, or grind in a coffee grinder or pepper mill. Store in fridge.
    Add 2 Tbsp of ground flaxseed to oatmeal, cereal, yogurt, smoothies, pancakes,
     muffins, or quick breads.
    Super Breakfast: a bowl of oatmeal, with raisins or dried cranberries or
     blueberries, 2 Tbsp each of flaxseed and wheat germ. In the summer, substitute
     yogurt for oatmeal.
    2 Tbsp of wheat germ has       Product                                     Fiber (g)
     100 mg of Omega-3.             Uncle Sam Cereal – toasted whole grain      10
    Try Kretschmer toasted         wheat flakes with crispy whole flaxseed
     wheat germ.                    ½ cup oats                                  9
    Bread/Cereal Labels: (1)       Post Shredded Wheat N Bran                  8
     the list of ingredients        2 Tbsp flaxseed                             7
     should begin with the word 1 slice Bran for Life bread                     5
     “whole.” This applies to all   2 Tbsp wheat germ                           2
     baked goods. (2) the fiber     ½ cup cooked brown rice                     2
     content should be at least     ½ cup cooked yellow corn                    2
     3 grams per serving.
     Together, both ensure a healthy product.
    Whole grain refers to every part of the grain: the bran, the endosperm, the germ.
    Whole grain is an important part of reducing           Grain           Fiber (g) Per
     hypertension. See the DASH diet (Dietary                               ¼ cup serv
     Approaches to Stop Hypertension) at                    Triticale       8.7
     www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/        Barley          8
    Soaking whole grains before cooking reduces
                                                            Amaranth        7.4
     cooking time
                                                            Wheat bran      6.5
    Tips for eating more whole grains:
                                                            Rye             6.2
      o Buy only whole grain bread (except grilled
                                                            Buckwheat       4.3
          cheese which is gross on brown bread)
                                                            Wheat germ      3.8
      o Substitute brown for white rice
      o Buy whole grain crackers                            Quinoa          2.5
      o Watch breakfast food cereals – avoid refined        Wild rice       1.5
          grain                                             Millet          1.5
      o Use whole grain tortillas and pitas                 Brown rice      0.9
      o Add oats to stuffings, meatballs, and meat loaf White rice          0.2
      o Add some exotic grains to side dishes, like barley or quinoa
      o Look for Japanese soba buckwheat noodles. They’re good in soups or cold
          with a sesame dressing.
    See Apple-Oat Crisp recipe on Pg 83



   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                   Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 4 of 15
Oranges
   SIDEKICKS: Lemons, white and pink grapefruit, kumquats, tangerines, limes
   TRY TO EAT: 1 serving daily

   NOTES:
    Aim for 350 mg or more of dietary Vitamin C daily.
    Rutin, a flavonoid in citrus, has     Vegetables                        Vit. C (mg)
     an anti-inflammatory effect,          1 large yellow bell pepper            341
     possesses antiviral activity, and     1 lg red bell pepper                  312
     helps protect capillaries from        1 lg orange bell pepper               238
     age-related breakdown.                1 lg green bell pepper                132
    Pectin, is the high quality fiber in  1 cup raw chopped broccoli             79
     citrus fruits (especially
     tangerines), and is the kind of       Fruits
     fiber that lowers cholesterol, and    1 cup fresh sliced strawberries        97
     stabilizes blood sugar. Large
                                           1 cup papaya cubes                     87
     amounts are present in the
                                           1 navel orange                         83
     “white stuff”, so don’t peel it off
                                           1 kiwi                                 70
     the orange. Its also present in
                                           1 cup cubed cantaloupe                 59
     pulp. Eat the whole fruit when
     possible; drink the pulped juice
     when possible.                        Juices
    Pink grapefruit have higher           1 cup Odwalla C Monster               350
     nutritional content then white        1 cup fresh orange juice              124
     grapefruit, and less calories.        1 cup orange juice from conc.          97
    The oil in citrus peels have limonene, which prevents cancer by stimulating
     antioxidant production, and reduces abnormal cell growth. Store citrus zest in the
     freezer.
    The flavonoids, and other antioxidants, in citrus fruit survive the manufacturing
     process when being made into marmalade, and the pectin used to set the
     marmalade helps lower cholesterol. Marmalade is a much better choice than
     butter for your muffin or toast.
    Tips to eat more oranges:
       o Eat an orange, tangerine, or Clementine out of hand daily.
       o Add mandarin orange segments to a spinach salad with some chopped red
          onion.
       o Sprinkle grapefruit halves with a dusting of brown sugar and broil for a great
          dessert.
       o Add orange juice to smoothies.
       o Add orange/lemon zest to cakes, smoothies, muffins, drinks, yogurt, salads,
          chicken salad, poultry or fish dishes, and hot or cold tea.
    Kumquats, available mostly in the winter, are nutrition powerhouses.
    See Fresh Orange Lemonade recipe on Pg 97.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                   Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 5 of 15
Pumpkin
  SIDEKICKS: Carrots, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, orange bell peppers
  TRY TO EAT: ½ cup most days

   NOTES:
    Pumpkins are nutritious, high fiber, and low calories. Canned is actually more
     nutritious than fresh.
    Carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, help prevent cancer and heart disease.
     Carotenoids are found in deep orange, yellow, or red vegetables. ½ cup of
     pumpkin gives 100%-200% of daily carotenoid recommendations.
    Also look to oranges, red bell peppers, apricots or prunes, cantaloupe or
     watermelon, mango, or persimmon. Also, Haagen-Dazs mango sorbet.
    How to buy a winter squash: It should be rock hard, if its soft its either too young
     or too old; buy with stem on to prevent bacteria problems, skin should be dull in
     sheen, and deep rich color. You’ll find most vivid colors at harvest time, but it will
     taste sweeter later in the year.
    Mix canned pumpkin with low/non-fat yogurt, or applesauce, drizzle with
     buckwheat honey, and a few raisins.
    Pumpkin seeds: often labeled as pepitas. To prepare from a fresh pumpkin,
     remove pulp and strings, rinse in water, air dry by sitting overnight, drizzle with
     olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt, roast on cookie sheet at 350 degrees, for 15 –
     20 mins. Sprinkle with curry or chili powder. Cool completely and store in air tight
     container in the fridge.
    Prepare sweet potatoes by piercing with a fork, and in the microwave for 5
     minutes, before putting in the oven. Or, slice with mandolin, toss with olive oil
     and salt, and roast on cookie sheet at 400 degrees, for 20 mins. Turn them a few
     times.
    Pumpkin Pudding recipe on Pg 107, and Butternut Squash on Pg 108.

                                                Alpha-Carotene All-Stars              Mg
                                                Pumpkin (1 cup cooked)                11.7
                                                Carrots (1 cup cooked)                 6.6
                                                Butternut Squash (1 cup cooked)        2.3
                                                Orange bell pepper (1 cup)             0.3
                                                Collards (1 cup cooked)                0.2

                                                Beta-Carotene All-Stars               Mg
                                                Sweet Potato (1 cup cooked)             23
                                                Pumpkin (1 cup cooked)                  17
                                                Carrots (1 cup cooked)                  13
                                                Spinach (1 cup cooked)                11.3
                                                Butternut squash (1 cup cooked)        9.4




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                           Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 6 of 15
Wild Salmon
   SIDEKICKS: Alaskan halibut, canned albacore tuna, sardines, herring, trout, sea
   bass, oysters, and clams
   TRY TO EAT: fish two to four times per week

   NOTES:
    These fish are high in marine-derived Omega-3.
    To get a healthy amount of Omega-3 and Omega-6 in your diet:
       o Use Omega-3 enriched eggs
       o Cook with canola oil
       o Eat soy nuts and walnuts
       o Use wheat germ on cereal, yogurt, and in baking
       o Eat wild salmon and its sidekicks 2 – 4 times a week
       o Look for salad dressing with some soybean or canola oil
       o Use flaxseed oil (sparingly) in homemade salad dressings
       o Use ground flaxseed in baking and pancakes
       o Avoid processed and refined foods, including baked goods
    Canned tuna is a popular source of Omega-3. Here are some tips:
       o Due to potential mercury content, do not eat more than 1 can per week
       o Buy albacore tuna – its most nutritious
       o Buy tuna in spring water so you don’t get extra fat
       o Low-salt canned tuna is best
    In general, haddock, tilapia, salmon, cod, Pollock, canned albacore tuna, sole,
     and most shellfish are relatively low in mercury.
    The best salmon is U.S. Pacific wild Alaska salmon, whether fresh, frozen, or
     canned.
    Other heart healthy seafood include: arctic char, catfish (farmed), clams
     (farmed), Dungeness crab, crayfish, halibut (Alaskan), herring, mahi mahi,
     mussels (farmed), sablefish, scallops (farmed), striped bass, and tilapia (farmed).
    Canned wild Alaskan salmon bones are cooked and are soft enough to not be
     noticed. Add to a salad for a delicious light meal. You can make salmon-burgers
     from canned salmon.
    Sardines in tomato sauce (due to lycopene), or soybean oil, or olive oil are
     healthy. If you are new to sardines, try it in olive oil.
    Defrost fresh frozen fish in the fridge to maintain texture and flavor.
    When it comes to fish: some is better than none! Even one serving a week makes
     a significant impact on risk for cardiovascular death.
    Regarding Omega-3 supplements: aim for one gram of EPA/DHA per day.
    See Grilled Wild Alaskan Salmon Burgers Recipe on Pg 122.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                   Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 7 of 15
Soy
   SIDEKICKS: tofu, soymilk, soy nuts, edamame, tempeh, miso
   TRY TO EAT: at least 15 g of soy protein per day, divided into two separate meals or
   snacks.

   NOTES:
    Soy is inexpensive, high-quality nutrition, lots of soluble fiber, and a wealth of
     disease fighting phytonutrients, and phytoestrogens.
    Soy prevents cancer, decreases bad and increases good cholesterol, helps with
     heart disease, and may help with menopausal symptoms.
    Try to use soy daily, either as soymilk on cereal, or soy protein powder, or soy
     nuts.
    Daily intake of 25 g of soy protein is ideal.
      o 4 oz of firm tofu has 18 – 20 g of protein.
      o One soy burger has 10 – 12 g.
      o 1 cup of Edensoy soymilk has 11 g.
      o ½ cup of tempeh has 16 – 19 g.
      o ¼ cup of roasted soy nuts has 15 g.
    Edamame are green soybeans in their pods. Boil pods in lightly salted water, and
     pop out of pods. They are available in frozen food section (in shell, or shelled),
     and are great to add to soups, pasta, salads, and stews. One cup of shelled
     edamame has about 23 g of protein.
    Books about soy recipes: Amazing Soy, The Joy of Soy, This Can’t be Tofu, and
     The New Soy Cookbook. See also soyfoods.com, soybean.org, soyproducts.com.

                Soy                                         Calories   Fat (g)   Isoflavones
                Soybeans, dried, cooked, 1 cup                298       15.0          95
                Soybean sprouts, ¼ cup                        171        9.4          57
                Soy nuts, ¼ cup                               194        9.3          55
                Tempeh, 4 oz                                  226        8.7          50
                Soy flour, full fat, 1/3 cup                  121        5.7          49
                Tofu, firm, 4 oz                              164        9.9          28
                Soymilk, 1 cup                                81         4.7          24
                Edamame, cooked, 4 oz                         160        7.3          16




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                                 Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 8 of 15
Spinach
   SIDEKICKS: Kale, collards, Swiss chard, mustard greens, turnip greens, bok choy,
   romaine lettuce, orange bell peppers
   TRY TO EAT: 1 cup steamed or 2 cups raw most days

   NOTES:
    All of spinach’s sidekicks are powerfully nutritious foods, preventing
     cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and helps with your vision. Vary between
     them all.
    Spinach is high in carotenoids, antioxidants, vitamins, and lutein.
    1 cup of fresh spinach has 190% of daily         Lutein All-Stars          (Mg/ 1 Cup)
     recommendation of Vit K, a fat-soluble           Kale, cooked              23.7
     vitamin not stored in the body, and must         Spinach, cooked           20.4
     be replaced regularly.                           Collards, cooked          14.6
    Leafy greens are high in potassium, low in       Turnip greens, cooked     12.1
     sodium, and have other nutrients that help Spinach, raw                    3.7
     with high blood pressure.                        Broccoli, cooked          2.4
    To enhance absorption of carotenes, toss cooked greens with a tsp of olive oil,
     chopped nuts, or a piece of salmon (something with healthy fat).
    Besides fiber, spinach and romaine have higher levels then iceberg lettuce of
     every beneficial nutrient, for the same number of calories (6-9 Cal/Serv).
    Before using spinach, it should
                                          Nutrients (1 cup raw) Spinach Romaine Iceberg
     be washed twice to remove the
                                          Calories                    7       9         6
     sand. Dip and swish in a basin       Fiber                    <1g      <1g      >1g
     of water, let sand sink, pull        Calcium (mg)               30      18        11
     spinach out, and repeat. Don’t       Iron                      0.8     0.6       0.2
     soak spinach, you lose valuable      Magnesium                  24       8         4
     vitamins.                            Potassium                 167     140        84
    Greens are best eaten both           Zinc                      0.2     0.1       0.1
     cooked and raw. Cooking              Vitamin C                   8      13         2
     liberates some nutrients, but        Lutein                    3.7     1.4       0.2
     degrades others. Eat both as a       Beta-carotene             1.7       2       0.1
     salad and cooked forms.
    Quick ways to get spinach in your diet:
       o Layer cooked spinach in lasagna.
       o Steam spinach, sprinkle with lemon juice, and parmesan cheese. Keeps for 3
          days in the fridge, so enjoy leftovers.
       o Add some spinach to soups.
       o Dress greens with some balsamic vinegar and sesame seeds.
       o Add chopped greens to an omelet with other ingredients.
       o Shred greens onto tacos.
       o Use on sandwiches instead of iceberg.
    Try purslane, sometimes considered a weed, as a healthy addition to this
     SuperFood, and eaten similar to spinach. Try growing yourself, as it grows easily.
    Spinach Pesto: puree raw spinach with almonds or walnuts, some garlic, olive oil,
     and parmesan cheese. Delicious on chickpeas or pasta. It can be frozen.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                     Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 9 of 15
Tea
   SIDEKICKS: none
   TRY TO EAT: 1 or more cups daily

   NOTES:
    It’s cheap, no calories, relaxing, tastes good warm or cold, and available
     everywhere, lowers blood pressure, prevents cancer and osteoporosis, prevents
     sun damage, lowers risk for stroke, and promotes heart health. Its also anti-
     viral/inflammatory/cavity/allergy.
    Although green tea gets most attention, all tea is healthful, containing thousands
     of chemicals, such as flavonoids, such as EGCG.
    Tea before exercising helps fight the free radicals produced during exercise.
    Tea may help with weight-loss by increasing energy expenditure (and substituting
     a no-cal beverage for a high cal beverage (Arie’s note)).
    Tea tips:
       o Brewed tea is healthier than instant.
       o Tea bags are as healthy as loose tea.
       o Squeeze the tea bag to double polyphenol content.
       o Add a wedge of lemon with rind for polyphenol boost.
       o Avoid drinking extremely hot tea.
       o Flavonoids degrade with time, drink freshly brewed tea.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                   Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 10 of 15
Tomatoes
   SIDEKICKS: red watermelon, pink grapefruit, Japanese persimmons, red-fleshed
   papaya, strawberry guava
   TRY TO EAT: one serving of processed tomatoes or sidekicks per day and multiple
   servings per week of fresh tomatoes.

   NOTES:
    The healthy aspects of tomatoes are available with fresh tomatoes, canned
     tomatoes, tomato and spaghetti sauce, taco sauce, pizza, ketchup or barbeque
     sauce.
    Tomatoes are filled with lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. They prevent cancer,
     and increase the skins natural SPF.
    The efficient absorption of lycopene depends on the presence of a bit of dietary
     fat. Serve watermelon, tomatoes, or any of the sidekicks with olive oil, cheese,
     nuts, or something slightly fatty.
    Tomatoes are rich in a wide variety of nutrients, which seem to work
   synergistically to promote health, low in calories, high in fiber, and high in
   potassium.
    Processed tomatoes (sauce and paste) are more effective against cancer,
   because the lycopene is liberated during processing. However, processing
   diminishes the Vitamin C.             Food – Aim for 22 mg)               Lycopene (mg)
    Here are some ways to get           Tomato puree (½ cup)                27.2
          tomatoes into your life:       Tomato juice (1 cup)                22
      o Sauté cherry tomatoes in         R.W. Knudsen Very Veggie juice      22
      olive oil and herbs, toss over     cocktail (1 cup)
      pasta or serve as a side           Tomato sauce (½ cup)                18.5
      dish.                              Watermelon wedge                    13
      o Use sun-dried tomatoes           Tomato Paste (2 Tbsp)               9.2
      (no salt added) in                 Watermelon balls (1 cup)            7
                                         Ketchup (2 Tbsp)                    5.8
      sandwiches.
                                         Stewed Tomatoes, canned (½ cup)     5.1
      o Toss a can of diced
                                         Pizza (3 oz slice)                  4
      tomatoes into soups and
                                         Tomato (fresh, medium)              3.2
      stews.                             5 cherry tomatoes                   2.2
      o Make homemade pizza              ½ pink grapefruit                   1.8
      with extra sauce and top
      with veggies. Aim for whole grain pizza dough.
      o A quick meal is turkey or chicken cutlet, pounded thin and sautéed to brown
      it slightly, top with favorite salsa and bake in the oven until done. Sprinkle with
      grated cheese.
      o Sandwich of toasted whole wheat bread, topped with sliced avocado, and
      chunky salsa.
    Recipe: Cherry tomatoes, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Bake in oven at 450 degrees,
     for 20 mins. Sprinkle with fresh basil before serving.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                    Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 11 of 15
Turkey (Skinless Breast)
   SIDEKICKS: Skinless chicken breast
   TRY TO EAT: 3 to 4 servings per week of 3 to 4 oz

   NOTES:
    Skinless turkey breast is one of the leanest meat protein sources in the world. It
     also offers a rich array of nutrients that are heart-healthy and help lower the risk
     for cancer.
    Skinless turkey breast is very low in saturated fat.
    Skinless chicken breast is a sidekick of turkey, but take note that it is higher in
     calories and higher in saturated fat.
    Don’t focus on total protein intake, instead focus on healthy sources of protein.
    Try substituting nut and soy protein for read meat consumption. Doing so will
     definitely lower your risk for cardiovascular disease.
    Grass-fed, organic beef is leaner and healthier than corn-fed cattle. Grass-fed
     beef has a healthy balance of Omega-6 to Omega-3 fatty acid, has plant-derived
     Vitamin E, and is lower in saturated fat. However, it is also harder to find and
     expensive, making skinless turkey a easier and less expensive alternative.
    Turkey strengthens your immune system, and helps with antioxidant defense.
    If purchasing ground turkey, aim for 99% fat-free, with no added skin.
    Buy only whole turkey with no added fats or oils, check the label carefully. Self-
     basting birds may contain unhealthy oil or butter.
    Some ways to use turkey:
       o Remove the skin after cooking from the traditional holiday meal. Try making
       just turkey breast instead of the whole turkey.
       o Try a turkey sandwich on whole grain bread, with spinach or romaine, sliced
       onion and avocado, and mustard or mayo.
       o Turkey tacos or burritos with cooked, shredded turkey, stir-fried with olive
       oil, onions, and peppers.
       o Turkey slices with a bit of barbeque sauce. Eat with some cranberry sauce.
       o Turkey soup with plenty of vegetables.
       o Lean, ground turkey meat in spaghetti sauce.


                Meat (3 oz)                             Calories    Protein   Saturated Fat
                Skinless white meat turkey                115         26 g         0.2 g
                Skinless while meat chicken               140         26 g        0.85 g
                95% lean ground beef                      145         22 g         2.4 g




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                                  Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 12 of 15
Walnuts
  SIDEKICKS: almonds, pistachios, sesame seeds, peanuts, pumpkin and sunflower
  seeds, macadamia nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, cashews
  TRY TO EAT: 1 oz, five times a week        Nuts (1 oz)                      Cal
                                                             Almonds (24, raw)                      164
   NOTES:                                          Walnuts (14 halves)                  185
    A serving of shelled nuts is 1 oz, which      Hazelnuts (20, raw)                  178
     is 10 – 48 nuts depending on size, and        Peanuts (48, dry roasted)            166
     is 150 – 200 Calories.                        Peanut butter (2 Tbsp)               190
    Nuts are high in fat and calories, eat in     Pecans (20 halves, raw)              195
     moderation. Watch portions carefully.         Pistachios (47 kernels, dry roasted) 162
    There is a correlation between eating nuts and decreasing causes of mortality.
    People who eat nuts regularly enjoy a significant reduction in coronary heart
     disease, and reduce their risk of diabetes, cancer, and other chronic ailments.
    Nuts or seeds are so healthy because they are a high concentration of everything
     a plant needs to flourish.
    All nuts are rich sources of nutrients, and variety is important, so eat from all the
     sidekicks. The author suggests first walnuts; second choices include almonds,
     pistachios, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds. All others fall close in third place.
    Walnuts are one of the few rich sources of plant-derived Omega-3 fatty acids,
     along with flaxseed, wheat germ, soybeans, spinach, purslane, and canola oil.
    Walnuts play a significant role in lowering blood cholesterol levels.
    Pistachios are loaded with fiber; there is more fiber in a serving of pistachios than
     a serving of broccoli or spinach.
    Arginine is an essential amino acid that reduces blood pressure through a series
     of chemical occurrences. Top nut and seed sources of arginine are: watermelon
     seeds, peanuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, walnuts, hazelnuts, and pistachios.
    Peanut butter, in moderation, is healthy. Look for no added salt, no added sugar,
     and if possible, no added partially hydrogenated oils. Laura Scudder’s all natural
     old-fashioned peanut butter is the author’s favorite.
    Because of high concentration of fats, nuts have a tendency to go rancid. Heat,
     humidity, and light all hasten spoilage. Look to stores with high turnover. They
     should smell sweet and nutty, sharp or bitter is rancid. Keep nuts in a cool place,
     in a sealed container for up to 4 months.
    Dry-roasted nuts are a good choice, with no added oil or salt. You can roast nuts:
     on a cookie sheet at 160 - 170 degrees, 15 – 20 mins, or until they turn dark.
    Store nuts in the freezer, or in the fridge (fridge is good for 6 months).
    Toss of walnuts, pine nuts, or sliced almonds into a nonstick pan on medium
     heat, shake the pan every few minutes until lightly toasted. Toss into a salad.
    Here is some ways to add nuts to your diet:
       o Use nuts on frozen yogurt
       o Stir peanut butter in stews and curries to enrich flavor
       o Use finely chopped nuts to coat fish or poultry
       o Try peanut butter on pancakes
       o Gently sauté chopped nuts in olive oil along with bread crumbs and chopped
       garlic and toss with freshly cooked pasta
       o PB-J on whole wheat
       o Toss 2 Tbsp of sunflower seeds on cereal


   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                                Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 13 of 15
Yogurt
   SIDEKICKS: Kefir
   TRY TO EAT: 2 cups daily

   NOTES:
    One of the most important aspects of yogurt is the synergistic source of two
     health promoting substances: prebiotics and probiotics. Prebiotics are
     nondigestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria in
     the colon. Probiotics are microorganisms that, in adequate amounts, benefit our
     health.
    Yogurt plays a primary role by encouraging growth of good bacteria and limiting
     bad bacteria.
    Yogurt has the ability to strengthen the immune system and help prevent
     infection.
    Inulin, a dietary fiber additive in Stonyfield Farm Yogurt, is shown to increase
     calcium absorption.
    Yogurt must contain live active cultures. Avoid labels saying, “heat treated after
     culturing.”
    When shopping, look for:
       o Low-fat or nonfat varieties
       o No artificial colors
       o Very fresh
       o Whey protein listed on the label (increases the viability of probiotic bacteria).
       o Rich in live active cultures (check for specific cultures, the more the better).
    The National Yogurt Association has created a voluntary “live active cultures”
     (LAC) seal that guarantees labeled yogurt has 100 million organisms per gram.
     Look for the LAC seal.
    Look for bacteria: L. acidophilus, S. theramophilus, L. bulgaricus, B. bifidus, L.
     casei, and L. reuteri.
    Probiotics help prevent cancer, alleviate allergies, lower blood pressure, and
     eliminate Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that is one of the main causes of
     ulcers.
    One cup of nonfat plain yogurt supplies 414 mg of calcium, 40% of your daily
     calcium needs at only 100 calories. The rich source of potassium plays a role in
     normalizing blood pressure.
    Best Quick All-Star Superfoods Rx Breakfast: a bowl of nonfat yogurt, topped with
     blueberries (or a sidekick), sliced banana, small handful of walnuts (or sidekicks),
     and a Tbsp of Flaxseed or wheat germ.
    Blueberry Yogurt Shake: Combine in a blender 1 cup nonfat plain yogurt, ¼ cup
     orange juice, ½ cup frozen blueberries, ½ banana. Blend on medium until smooth
     and frothy.




   A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                    Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                    Page 14 of 15
Beans
   SIDEKICKS: All beans are included, but special attention goes to pinto, navy, Great Northern, lima,
   garbanzo, lentils, green beans, sugar snap peas, and green peas
   TRY TO EAT: at least four ½ cup servings per week

Blueberries
    SIDEKICKS: Purple grapes, cranberries, boysenberries, raspberries, strawberries, currants, blackberries,
    cherries, and all other varieties of fresh, frozen, or dried berries
    TRY TO EAT: 1 to 2 cups daily

Broccoli
    SIDEKICKS: Brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, turnips, cauliflower, collards, bok choy, mustard greens,
    Swiss chard
    TRY TO EAT: ½ to 1 cup daily

Oats
    SUPER SIDEKICKS : wheat germ and ground flaxseed
    SIDEKICKS: brown rice, barley, wheat, buckwheat, rye, millet, bulgur wheat, amaranth, quinoa,
    triticale, kamut, yellow corn, wild rice, spelt, couscous
    TRY TO EAT: 5 to 7 servings a day

Oranges
    SIDEKICKS: Lemons, white and pink grapefruit, kumquats, tangerines, limes
    TRY TO EAT: 1 serving daily

Pumpkin
   SIDEKICKS: Carrots, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, orange bell peppers
   TRY TO EAT: ½ cup most days

Wild Salmon
    SIDEKICKS: Alaskan halibut, canned albacore tuna, sardines, herring, trout, sea bass, oysters, and
    clams
    TRY TO EAT: fish two to four times per week

Soy
      SIDEKICKS: tofu, soymilk, soy nuts, edamame, tempeh, miso
      TRY TO EAT: at least 15 g of soy protein per day, divided into two separate meals or snacks.

Spinach
    SIDEKICKS: Kale, collards, Swiss chard, mustard greens, turnip greens, bok choy, romaine lettuce,
    orange bell peppers
    TRY TO EAT: 1 cup steamed or 2 cups raw most days

Tomatoes
   SIDEKICKS: red watermelon, pink grapefruit, Japanese persimmons, red-fleshed papaya, strawberry
   guava
   TRY TO EAT: one serving of processed tomatoes or sidekicks per day and multiple servings per week of
   fresh tomatoes.

Turkey (Skinless Breast)
    SIDEKICKS: Skinless chicken breast
    TRY TO EAT: 3 to 4 servings per week of 3 to 4 oz

Walnuts
   SIDEKICKS: almonds, pistachios, sesame seeds, peanuts, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, macadamia
   nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, cashews
   TRY TO EAT: 1 oz, five times a week

Yogurt
   SIDEKICKS: Kefir
   TRY TO EAT: 2 cups daily


      A Guide to: SuperFoods Rx, by Steven Pratt, MD                                  Prepared by: Arie Smouter
                                                       Page 15 of 15

				
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