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AFFORDABLE LUXURY THE NEW BOTTOM LINE

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AFFORDABLE LUXURY THE NEW BOTTOM LINE Powered By Docstoc
					Winter 2007/2008

SUMMER 2008

AFFORDABLE LUXURY: THE NEW BOTTOM LINE
Luxurious living is no longer an all or nothing proposition, at least not when it comes to great food. An increase in international travel and the rise of the celebrity chef phenomenon have made people more familiar with fantastic foods than ever before. In an era of responsible spending, however, consumers are looking for ways to strike a balance between their appetites and their wallets. This mission is far from impossible thanks to the concept known as “affordable luxury,” which promises mass availability and affordability of items with luxury appeal. More than anything else, “affordable luxury” means that menus that are rich in both indulgence and value can satisfy consumers’ cravings but not eat up their savings. For the most part, specialty food is a rather “affordable luxury.” Relative to a luxury like a new car, a prime rib dinner seems like a downright bargain. But, when times are tough, many people feel uncomfortable about purchasing their favorite treats. The beauty of “affordable luxury” is that splurging on indulgent food does not have to be a stretch on the budget. Carl’s Jr.’s® Six Dollar Burgers and Hardee’s® Thickburgers, for example, provide premium beef and toppings for six dollars or less. Charlie Brown’s Steakhouse, an East Coast chain, is running a springtime special of bourbon flat iron steak for just $13.99, after an extremely successful run with a flat iron steak and jumbo shrimp combination, priced at $12.99. And recently, T.G. I. Friday’s® Restaurant announced it would extend its successful “Right Portion, Right Price” menu, on which prices range from $5.99 to $9.99. Two top features on the menu are a petite sirloin steak and a bistro sirloin salad.

®

Bottom Line: Now is the time for affordable luxury to shine. Consumers are looking for “deluxe on a dime” at precisely the moment when operators have a multitude of ways to deliver it.

DEFINING THE TREND
An April, 2008 survey of 506 consumers conducted for Tyson Food Service confirmed that where food is concerned, luxury and indulgence are fairly synonymous terms. As the chart on the next page shows, more than three-fourths of consumers (77%) agreed that like luxuries, indulgent foods are more expensive than everyday foods. Nearly as many consumers agreed that indulgent foods are those that they only eat on special occasions (76%), but are also those for which they will pay more (75%). Of course, indulgent foods, like luxuries, include many people’s favorites (70%), are craveable (69%), and often have ingredients that are higher-end (68%) or unique (66%). It’s also worth noting that indulgent foods are ideal foodservice fare: three-quarters of consumers (75%) report that they rarely make indulgent foods at home, and nearly seven of ten consumers (68%) indicate that they order indulgent foods from restaurants or other foodservice establishments.



© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.

How well do each of the following statements reflect your view of indulgent foods and beverages? % of Consumers Selecting Top Two Box (4 or 5, where 5 = “strongly reflects my view”)
Foods that are more expensive than other foods I eat Foods that I eat only on special occasions Foods that I will pay more for Foods that I rarely make at home Foods that include many of my favorites Foods that I crave Foods that often have many higher-end ingredients Foods that I’ll order from restaurants or other foodservice establishments Foods that have unique ingredients Foods that are difficult to make myself Foods that have very distinct flavors* Foods that are more expensive than other foods I eat Foods that are not particularly good for me Foods that I eat only on special occasions Foods that can be affordable Foods that I will pay more for Foods that are not typical American dishes Foods that I rarely make at home Foods *Spicy, buffalo, curry, etc.that include many of my favorites Foods that I crave 77% 76% 75% 34% 75% 70% 69% 44% 43% 57% 77% 76% 75% 75% 70% 69% 68% 68% 66% 62%

that I’ll order from restaurants or other foodservice establishments

Bottom Line: The desire for indulgent, affordable yet luxurious food is already well-established and defined. Most consumers associate Foods that often have many higher-end ingredients 68% 61% Premium hamburgers** indulgent foods with those that are available in foodserviceSteak venues.
Foods that have unique ingredients PROTEINS TOP LIST OF INDULGENT FOODS Lobster Prime rib 68% 58% 66% 49% 62% Pizza Beef Tenderloin

31%

31% 29%

Foods that are difficult to Given a wide list of items from whichmake myself four of the top five foods that consumers designated as indulgent, luxurious to choose, Foods that have particular, more than three of 57% or craveable were proteins. In very distinct flavors* Cheesecake five consumers (61%) indicate that steak is an chocolate food, and 27% Dark indulgent 46% nearly the same amount not particularly good forabout lobster. Almost half of44% consumers (49%) consider prime rib an indulgent Foods that are (58%) feel that way me Specialty coffee* Milkshakes 36% 26% food, and slightly fewer Foods that can be affordablethe top 15 foods deemed indulgent by consumers, all, with the exception of (46%), cheesecake. Of 43% pizza, are either proteins or sweet treats. Shrimp cocktail Fried Chicken 36% Foods that are not typical American dishes

Do You Consider the Super-premium ice cream Following Foods Indulgent? 31% % Indicating
Steak Lobster
80% 72%

34%

24%

Kobe Beef

23%

61% 58% 49%
53% 48%

Premium hamburgers** Pizza Beef Tenderloin

31% 31% 29% 27%
22% 15% 26% 7%
Lobster

Prime rib 71% Cheesecake

46% 39% 36%

39%

37%

Specialty coffee*
Fried chicken shakes

Dark chocolate 37% 25% Milkshakes Fried ShrimpChicken Steak cocktail Kobe Beef

6%
Kobe beef

Shrimp cocktail MilkPizza

Super-premium ice cream

Dark Premium 36% Specialty chocolate hamburgers coffee

31%

Cheesecake

Superpremium ice cream

Beef 24% Prime tenderloin rib

23%

* Lattes, cappuccinos or mochas ** Larger size, gourmet toppings

72%

71% 53% 48%

It is Often Difficult Find the Indulge Food I W

58%
MilkPizza Dark Premium

39%

39%

37%

37%

25%

22%
Beef

15%
Prime 9%

Specialty

15% Cheese-

Super-

Shrimp 14% Steak



7%
Lobster

6%
Kobe

© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.

i

2%

Foods that I’ll order from restaurants or other foodservice establishments Steak Foods that have unique ingredients 31% 31% 29% Foods thatLobster are difficult to make myself Foods that have very distinct flavors* Prime rib Foods that are not particularly good for me Cheesecake can be affordable Foods that

61% 58% 49% 46%

68% Premium hamburgers** 66% Pizza 62% 57% Beef Tenderloin 44% Dark chocolate 43%

31% 31% 29% 27%

rgers** Pizza

nderloin

While not all indulgent foods are pricey, the top three selected by consumers do tend to cost more than many other items further down the list. In ocolate Foods that are not typical American dishes36% Specialty coffee* Milkshakes 27% 26% 34% fact, when consumers were asked how affordable each indulgent item is, proteins such as shrimp cocktail, steak, beef tenderloin, prime rib, lobster kshakes and Kobe beef were at the bottom of the range. Meanwhile, eight of ten (80%) consumers indicated that fried chicken is affordable, and slightly 24% Shrimp cocktail 26% Fried Chicken 36% more than seven of ten agreed that milkshakes and pizza are as well (72% and 71%, respectively). Approximately half of those surveyed agreed Chicken Super-premium ice 24% Kobe Beef 31% 23% that dark chocolate (53%) and premium hamburgers (48%)cream are affordable too.
23% Steak

be Beef

61%

Premium hamburgers** Pizza Beef Tenderloin Dark chocolate Milkshakes

31% 31% 29% 27% 26%

How Affordable Are the Following Foods? Lobster 58% % of Consumers Saying “Very Affordable” or “Somewhat Affordable”
Prime rib

49% 46%
37%

80%

72%

71% 53%

Cheesecake
48% Specialty coffee* 39% 39%

36% 37% 36%

Shrimp cocktail
7%
Lobster Fried 6% chicken Kobe beef Milkshakes Pizza Dark Premium Specialty chocolate hamburgers coffee

25%
Steak

22%
Beef tenderloin

Super-premium ice cream

Cheesecake

Superpremium ice cream

Shrimp cocktail

31%

Prime rib

Fried Chicken 15% 7% Kobe Beef
Lobster

6%
Kobe beef

24% 23%

Primary Reason Why Consumers Forgo an Indulgent Food or Beverage Not surprisingly, how affordable an indulgent food is plays a large
80%
It is Often Difficult to Find the Indulgent Food I Want 9% Fried chicken

72%

71% 53%
I Do 48% Not Order 39% Indulgent Foods or Beverages 2%

58%

MilkPizza shakes The Item is Not Healthy 14%

Dark Premium Specialty chocolate hamburgers coffee

15%

der oods ges

The item is The Item is Not too expensive Prepared
15%

The item isItem is The not preparedExpensive Too they 58% the Way I Like way I like

14 ice Considering that many of the indulgent foods chosen by consumers, cream 9% The I such as cheesecake, fried chicken, super-premium ice cream and 2% Not Pr milkshakes, are decidedly not healthy, it’s ironic that so relatively I do not order the W It is often difficult The item is indulgent foods few people forgo indulgent that basis alone. This, in turn, solidifies them on 1 to find the not healthy or beverages It Often price as the food I want primary reason why consumers do not always orderisthe Difficult Find the Indulge indulgent foods they desire. Food I Wa

role in whether consumers decide to buy it. Nearly three-fifths Difficult to It is Often Find the of consumers (58%) report that the primary reason they forgo an Indulgent Food I Want indulgent food is because it is too expensive. Much further down on 9% 39% 37% 37% 25% the list, only 15% of consumers pass22% an indulgent food because up 15% it is not prepared the way they like, and only 14% do so 7% because 6% the The I indulgent food is Shrimp not healthy. CheeseSuperSteak Beef Prime Lobster Kobe is Not H
cake premium cocktail tenderloin rib beef

14%

58%

58%

63%

63%

Since most of the protein-based indulgent foods fall on the more expensive side of the ledger, this also lends credence to the notion that many consumers would like to purchase more protein-based 47% 43% indulgent foods if they could afford them.

9

is

more

14% In looking a bit more closely at the 58% of 15% consumers who forgo an indulgent food because it is too expensive, the data is very clear: 9% 2% Total < $50K the less likely consumers are to pass up an indulgent food due to$100K or more that point, those $50K-$74.9K $75K-$99.9K the higher the income bracket they’re in, its price. To The item not I do not order It — $74,999 are The annual The item is consumers whose item is household income isisless than $50,000 or between $50,000is often difficult 20 percentage points more likely to prepared they indulgent foods the too expensive not healthyare thoseto findearnindulgent — $99,999. forgo the purchase of an indulgent food way I likeit is too expensive than because who $75,000 or beverages food I want

Annual Household Income of Those Who Forgo Indulgent Foods/Beverages Because They Are Too Expensive % By Income Bracket
93% 58% 63% 63% 43% Side Dish 8% < $50K $50K-$74.9K
Appetizer 10%

47%

Total

$75K-$99.9K

$100K or more

Bottom Line: In many cases, consumers gravitate naturally towards indulgent proteins such as steak, prime rib and lobster, but many may not order these foods as frequently as they’d like due to their perceived higher price tags. 28%
19% 4%



Main entree 82%

© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.

58% 15% 15% 14% 14% 9% 9% 2%

The Item is Not Health 14%

The item is not I do not order It is often difficult 2% The item is The item is prepared they indulgent foods to find the indulgent not order too expensive item is not not healthy The I do It is often difficult The item is way I like The item is or food I want indulgent foods beverages prepared they to find the indulgent too expensive not healthy WHEN & WHERE TO INDULGE way I like or beverages food I want

The Item is Not Prepare the Way I Li 15%

Far and away, the meal at which consumers are most likely to eat indulgent foods is dinner. More than nine of ten consumers (93%) report that they are likely to eat indulgent foods during the dinner daypart, whereas fewer than a third (28%) are likely 63% to eat them for lunch, the next most popular option. Nearly one63%five consumers (19%) likes indulgent foods for a snack, a of 58% 47% 43% fact that dovetails nicely with 63% popularity of indulgent, specialty coffee drinks. Consumers are not very likely (4%) to eat the 63% 58% 47% indulgent foods at breakfast or, at the very least, to consider the foods they do eat for that meal indulgent. 43% For that vast majority of consumers who $50K most likely to eat indulgent foods at dinner and/or lunch, slightly or more are more than eight Total < $50K-$74.9K $75K-$99.9K $100K of ten (82%) report that the main entrée is most likely to be indulgent. This coincides with consumers’ strong feelings that Total < $50K $50K-$74.9K $75K-$99.9K $100K or more premium proteins, such as steak, lobster and prime rib, are indulgent foods.
For Which Meals Are You Most Likely to Eat Indulgent Foods (excluding dessert)? Select up to Two Responses
93% 93%
Side Dish 8% Appetizer 10%

For Which Part of Dinner Are You Most Likely to Eat Indulgent Foods?

Side Dish 8%

Appetizer 10%

28% 28% 19% Dinner Dinner Lunch Lunch Snack 4% Snack Breakfast 19% 4% Breakfast Main entree 82% Main entree 82%

Most consumers (86%) report that they get their indulgent foods from a full-service restaurant. This is double the percentage points of those who make their own indulgent foods at home (43%). More than a quarter of consumers claim they get indulgent foods from a fast-food restaurant (29%) or from the prepared foods counter in a supermarket (26%), suggesting that convenience is not a hurdle to providing these affordable luxuries.

Where Consumers Typically Get Their Indulgent Foods
86% 43% Eaten in, taken Made at home out or delivered from a sit-down, full-service restaurant 29% From a fastfood restaurant 26% Purchased at a prepared foods counter in a supermarket 18% Made by a friend or family member who does not live with me 4% From a company or school cafeteria

1% I never eat indulgent foods

Bottom Line: Whether for lunch or dinner, consumers prefer indulgent foods primarily as a main entrée selection, and 30% Pizza primarily in full-service restaurants. This indicates there is significant opportunity for operators outside of full service to 30% offer indulgent foods, and for all operators to offer indulgent foods that go beyond just entrées. 19% Kobe beef
31%
Dark chocolate Specialty coffee Milkshakes Fried chicken

Other 1%

29% 27%

34% 35% 35%

No 20%

30% 27%



The size I can get a small good p amount of an contro indulgent food 27 at a reasonable price © 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc. 45%

43% Eaten in, taken Made at home out or delivered from a sit-down, HIGHER PRICES NOT THE END OF AFFORDABLE LUXURY full-service restaurant

29% From a fastfood restaurant

26%

Purchased prepared fo counter a superma

Recently, prices have risen for many food products and commodities, concurrent with an economic downturn. As a result, restaurants and other foodservice establishments are contemplating or have already taken price increases on their menus, just as many consumers are becoming more prudent in their spending habits. Fortunately, this does not mean that indulgent foods have to become an unaffordable luxury for most consumers. If faced with a 10% increase in the price of an indulgent food, a majority of consumers report they would either purchase less of that food or would not change their purchase behavior at all; in no instance did a majority of consumers report that they would no longer purchase the item altogether. Case in point: more than half of consumers (54%) indicate they would purchase less steak if the price for it were to increase by 10%, and nearly one-fifth of consumers (18%) say they would not change their purchase behavior at all under those circumstances. Where prime rib is concerned, nearly half of consumers (48%) report they would purchase less of it, while almost one of five (19%) state they would not change their behavior at all, if the price were to increase by 10%. Across the board, consumers want to be able to continue to enjoy indulgent foods, but many clearly anticipate that they will have to cut back on how much of them they eat.

How Would a 0% Increase in Price of the Following Foods Affect Your Purchase Behavior?*
Pizza Kobe beef Dark chocolate Specialty coffee Milkshakes Fried chicken Super-premium ice cream Shrimp cocktail Cheesecake Beef tenderloin Premium hamburgers Lobster Prime rib Steak

30% 30% 19% 31% 29% 27% 30% 27% 19% 20% 23% 21% 25% 18% 19% 18% 34% 35% 35% 35% 37% 39% 41% 42% 43% 44%

48% 54%

Would Not Change Behavior

Would Purchase Less Frequently

*Balance to 100% = “would split portion,” “would purchase smaller portion,” and “would no longer purchase at all.

Bottom Line: Even in the face of potential price increases, consumers would be reluctant to cut out their favorite indulgent foods entirely. This may signal that consumers would be amenable to alternative presentations of indulgent foods that would entail stable prices.

*Bas

GOOD THINGS COME IN SMALL(ER) PACKAGES
One way in which operators can continue to put indulgent, protein-based entrée foods on their menus without running into prohibitive price barriers is to offer smaller portions of them, often in the guise of a flavorful accent in a dish or in combination with another, less expensive protein. Asian-style beef lettuce wraps, for example, include a smaller portion of beef than would a full-size steak entrée, but still offer plenty of filling flavor and variety. By the same token, diners who order “Roasted Pekin Duck” at the Powerhouse Restaurant and Bar in Chicago get a half-breast and a duck confit instead of a whole duck breast. The substitution cuts costs nearly in half by allowing the restaurant to buy entire birds instead of individual duck breasts.1 By and large, consumers approve of the idea of smaller portions when it comes to indulgent foods. As indicated in the charts 27% on the following page, when asked if they would be willing to try a smaller portion of an indulgent food at a foodservice 18% establishment in place of a larger one, eight of ten consumers (80%) agreed.
58% 17%

Broken out further, 84% of women and 75% of men would be willing to try a smaller portion of an indulgent food. Knowledge will go smaller I will go out to I appeal of this gender gap can be used effectively by operators to Iposition out to servings of indulgent foods thatwill splitspecificallyI will orde eat less often eat at about portions of my smaller port to women, such as fried chicken on a salad or a mini burger entrée. the same rate
1

“Restaurants Tweak Menus as Ingredient Costs Grow,” The Wall Street Journal, March 8, 2008

but will order my favorite indulgent foods and beverages less frequently

favorite indulgent foods more often with my dining partner(s)

of my favor indulgent fo



© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.

9%

26% Purchased at a prepared foods counter in a supermarket

Specialty coffee

18%

27%

20%
35%

4%

a faststaurant

Made by a friend or family member Fried chicken who does not live with me
Super-premium ice cream

Milkshakes

From a I35% eat never company or school 27% indulgent foods cafeteria 35%
19% 37%

30%

1%

amount of an indulgent food at a reasonable price 45% Yes 80%

Would You Be Willing to Try A Smaller Portion of an Indulgent 20% Shrimp cocktail 39% Food at a Foodservice Venue in Place of a Larger One ?
Cheesecake Beef tenderloin

23%

% of Other Consumers Willing to Try A Smaller Portion of Indulgent Food, by Gender 1% *Base: 506 consumers.

*Base: 405 consu

41% 42%

% a

%

1%

The small size is a I can get a small good portion 43% amount of an 84% control for me indulgent food 27% 18% Lobster at 44% a reasonable price 19% Prime rib 48% 45% 75% Yes 18% I am able to try a new, Steak 54% 80% indulgent food and if I don’t like it, I have not spent Would Not Change Behavior Would Purchase Less Frequently Male a lot of money on it Female *Balance to 100% = “would split portion,” “would purchase smaller portion,” and “would no longer purchase at all. 30% *Base: 405 consumers.*Base: 405 consumers.
Premium No hamburgers 20%

21%

25%

*Base: 506 consumers.

If I want to eat an indulgent food I want a lot of it, not just a taste 45%

eria

r % school

I never eat indulgent foods What Feature of an Accent/Smaller Dish

3%

4%

48% 54%

ss Frequently

urchase at all.

Slightly more than two of five consumers (41%) who would be willing to try a smaller portion of indulgent Price is not an 84% fare are attracted to the concept mainly by the Other issue for me; I of afford promise can getting a good price for their food. Nearly 2% Other one of the full plate three consumers (30%) is interested in smaller 1% 14% 75% portions as a way to try new indulgent foods without the worry of having wasted much money if the dish The portion If I want to eat does not hit the spot. Bothof these explanations of The small 58% indulgent food an indulgent food, Male Female size is a offered may I want a lot of it, echo a common theme these days among diners, I can get a small good portion 27% *Base: 405amount of an consumers. be too value 18% not just a taste namely that of seeking small for money spent. A 17% control for me 14% 45% indulgent food 17% 27% 2% bit more than a quarter of all consumers (27%) I am not at a reasonable looking for a smaller portion sizes of indulgent food price report that I will go out to I will go out to I will split I smaller portion will order I will not None of the above 45% eat less often are most eat at about portions of my smaller of food appealingmy dining they control how much portions change because 23% the same rate favorite indulgent of my favorite eaten. behavior at all food is It’s likely that these consumers, who but will order able foods more often I am to try a new, indulgent foods my favorite indulgent with my I are indulgent food and if *Base: 101 consumers. chiefly concerned with their health, are not as foods and beverages dining partner(s) don’t concerned as others are about their finances. less frequentlylike it, I have not spent
of Indulgent Food is Most Appealing to You?
*Base: 405 consumers.

s

*Base: 101 consu

a lot of money on it 30%

Bottom17% Smaller portions of indulgent foods66% an ideal way to address rising prices in that they simultaneously satisfy the needs Line: are 14% 58% 51% 2% 49% of those consumers who are counting their not an as well as to those who are counting their 51% pennies calories. Price is
I will order I will not None of I can affordthe above 2% smaller portions change my dining the full plate of my favorite behavior at all 14% Atindulgent foodsthe day, the impact of today’s economic the end of Total < $50K

lit f my ulgent often y ner(s)

PUTTING IT ALL IN PERSPECTIVE

Other

issue for me;

situation on consumers’ spending patterns is palpable. Where $50K-$74.9K $75K-$99.9K $100K or more indulgent foods are concerned, nearly three of five consumers (58%) report that they will go out to eat less often and purchase fewer indulgent foods because of the current of The portion state of the economy. (Incidentally, this is the exact same percentage If I want to eat of consumers that alsofood, indicated they would indulgent food forgo an indulgent food because it is too expensive.) Slightly more than a an indulgent I want a lot of it, quarter of consumers (27%) plan to eat out at offered may same rate as they did previously, but will order their favorite about the not just taste be too small indulgent foods lessafrequently. 45%
17%

I am not Nearly one-fifth of consumers (18%) plan to split portions of their favorite indulgent foods more often or order smaller portions looking for a of their favorite indulgent foodsportion because of current economic pressures. Menus that feature indulgent dishes meant to smaller (17%) 51% 51% 49% food be shared or that play to the of23% in small plates will provide these consumers with ways to stretch their food dollars and trend
*Base: 101 consumers.

$50K-$74.9K

$75K-$99.9K

$100K or more



© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.

Would Not Change Behavior hamburgers
Lobster

43% Would Purchase Less Frequently 44%

*Balance to 100% = “would split portion,” “would purchase smaller portion,” and “would no longer purchase at all. 18%

Male
*Base: 405 consumers.

84% Female

Prime rib Steak

19% 18%

48% 54%

If I want an indulge I want a l not just a 45%

75%

continueWould Not Change Behavior cuisine. Applebees’® Ultimate Trio of appetizers is one example of a small plate idea featuring I want to e to dine out on indulgent If Would Purchase Less Frequently an Male Female craveable tastes that customers can share. Tapas is another. Still, it is refreshing to see that 14% of consumers state they will indulgent f *Balance to 100% = “would split portion,” “would purchase smaller portion,” and “would no longer purchase at all. I want a lot o not change their dining out behavior at all with regard to indulgent foods and the current economic crunch. *Base: 1 not just a tas *Base: 405 consumers.
45%

How Will the State of the Economy Today Impact Your Purchases of Indulgent Foods & Beverages in Foodservice Establishments?
58% 27% 18% 17% 14% I will not change my dining behavior at all 14%

*Base: 101 co

2% None of the above

I will go out to eat less often 58%

I will go out to eat at about the same rate but will order my favorite indulgent foods27% beverages and less frequently I will go out to

I will split portions of my favorite indulgent foods more often with my dining partner(s) 18%

I will order smaller portions of my favorite indulgent foods 17%

2%

I will order I will not Of eat less often consumers who plan to eat outI will split and purchase fewer indulgent foods becauseNone of the abovestate of the 58% of less of my of the current eat at about portions often smaller portions change my dining the same rate that favorite indulgent of those favorite of my who report annual household income of less than $50,000 the economy, further analysis shows two-thirds (66%) behavior at all but indulgent foods indicate they would my favorite indulgent those who report an annual household income of $50,000 or above, approximately half follow will order For foods more often this path. with my foods and beverages 66% of all consumers would do so. As expected, those who earn less money are most affected by the economic downturn, but in dining partner(s) 58% less frequently all income brackets there are plenty of consumers who are cautious about dining out nowadays, not to mention 51% cautious about 51% 49% what they will order when they do dine out.

I will go out to

% of Consumers Who Will Dine Out Less Frequently Due to Current State of the Economy, By Income Bracket
Total 58% < $50K 66% $50K-$74.9K 49% $75K-$99.9K 51% $100K or more 51%

Total

< $50K

$50K-$74.9K

$75K-$99.9K

$100K or more

Key Takeaways
• Although the economic pressure may be most keenly felt by those at the lower end of the earnings spectrum, plenty of consumers at all income levels have made it clear that they do not want to part with their favorite indulgent foods, despite rising prices. Operators should act now to integrate new menuing ideas that have been created to attract and retain these consumers. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways for consumers to get the indulgent foods they crave most at prices they can stomach. Dishes designed to be shared, less-expensive-yet-fulfilling cuts of meat, and small plates are just three ways to ensure that no consumer will have to forgo the steak they crave or the beef tenderloin they covet. There is a way to have it all. Affordable luxury is not a fad. It is a trend that will remain strong in good times and bad. Foodservice establishments that make it possible for consumers to indulge in leaner times will likely be viewed quite positively in those same consumers’ eyes when the richer times return.

© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.

•

•

TYSON DISCOVERY CENTER™
Throughout the years it’s been our goal to bring consumer-driven products with best-in-class back-ofhouse performance to the foodservice marketplace. Our commitment to innovation and discovery is like no other food manufacturer. And we’re going to keep anticipating consumer demands and your needs by continually seeking the next big thing.

So “What’s Next” from Tyson Food Service?
In an effort to answer consumer demand for mass availability and affordability of items with luxury appeal, we have developed new items such as IBP® USDA Choice Flat Iron Everyday Steaks™ & Tyson® USDA Choice Prime Rib Style Beef, giving consumers easier access to indulgent items they crave without breaking the bank.

GORGONZOLA FLAT IRON STEAK SALAD

IBP USDA CHOICE FLAT IRON EvEryday StEakS
IBP Flat Iron Everyday Steaks fulfill consumer expectations for quality and consistency. We take pride in producing premium-quality beef that exceeds customers’ expectations. – A less expensive alternative to rib or loin steaks that still offers great taste and appetite appeal – It’s cut from the second most tender beef muscle – A flavorful, well-marbled steak that’s perfect for dinner menus – Juicy and flavorful – Use it for sandwiches, wraps and even salads – Absolutely no tenderizing is required Key Reasons to Choose IBP Flat Iron Everyday Steaks – Quality and consistency you can expect from the IBP brand – Juicy and flavorful – The world’s largest beef producer is backed by reputation, service and leadership.

Fresh-off-the-grill slices of tender flat iron steak, gorgonzola cheese crumbles, and walnuts atop a bed of fresh mix baby greens tossed with roasted yellow and red beets and walnut-herb vinaigrette. A drizzle of rich gorgonzola cream sauce takes this entrée salad over the top.
Featured Product: IBP USDA Choice Flat Iron Everyday Steaks, 8-oz. , #12169-1208

tySon PRIME RIB STYLE BEEF
Reignite the popularity of a classic favorite with Prime Rib Style Beef – Tradition with a Twist – USDA Choice prime rib style beef cut from the chuck eye roll for a most effective alternative to traditional prime rib. Fully cooked, rare, for maximum flavor. – Available shaved or whole. Key Reasons to Choose Tyson Prime Rib Style Beef – Versatile enough to menu as an entrée or use as an ingredient in salads, sandwiches, etc. – Fully cooked for speed to plate and improved product consistency.

PRIME SLIDERS

This trio of mini-but-mighty indulgent sandwiches features melt-in-your-mouth prime rib style shaved beef, along with tasty dollops of creamy horseradish coleslaw, piled high on soft dinner rolls.
Featured Product: Tyson USDA Choice Prime Rib Style Shaved Beef, Fully Cooked, Rare, #12567-928

For more menuing ideas at the heart of consumers’ need for availability and affordability of items with luxury appeal, complete recipes, merchandising materials or information on products featured above visit www.tysonfoodservice.com
Brought to you by Tyson Food Service Marketing in collaboration with Technomic, Inc., a fact-based food industry marketing research and consulting firm, Insights & Discovery provides the restaurant industry with research-based analysis of key industry developments. Data is collected and analyzed by Technomic, Inc. This information cannot be distributed or duplicated without the express written approval of Tyson Foods, Inc. If you have questions, comments or topic suggestions, please contact Kimberly Perman at kperman@technomic.com or directly at (312) 506-3831.
© 2008 Tyson Foods, Inc.



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posted:11/12/2008
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