The Influential Tourist by trendy3

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The Influential Tourist
F
or much of the world, “vacation” simply means wishful thinking; for others, the entire month of August. But many countries are discovering that a rested worker means a better worker, and that the power of the tourist dollar should never be underestimated. Those summer holidays may be a country’s ticket to economic success. | By Sylvia A. Allegretto and L. Josh Bivens

Vacation (in weeks)
7.8 7.9 7.0 6.6

Average Taken
7.6

Legally Required
7.0 6.5

Just Call in Sick
The best travelers pack what they think they’ll need and then remove half. Europeans, with at least a month’s vacation a year, can justify the second suitcase. Chinese and American workers, with no legally required vacation time, aren’t so lucky. But they still get a little R & R, thanks in part to state holidays.
3.9 4.0

5.7 5.0 4.0 4.0 5.3 4.2 4.4

4.0

4.0

3.0 2.0

0

0

United Germany France States

Italy

Britain

Japan

Ireland Nether- Norway Spain lands

China

The Overworked American

Americans labor far more hours than workers in most European countries, but they don’t necessarily work smarter. Productivity, measured as gross domestic product generated per hour worked, is higher in Norway, Ireland, and France (yes, France), countries where workers clock several hundred hours less than Americans each year. Taking time off may make you a better worker after all.

2,100 2,000 1,900 1,800 1,700

Japan
Spai n
United States

Average Annual Hours Worked

Productivity Levels (U.S. $ created/hour)
$65

Norway
$60

$62.66

Britain

Canada
France

$55 $50 $45 $40 $35

$54.03 $48.86 $47.52 $47.26 $41.14 $34.80

Italy
1,600

France
1,500 1,400

Ireland United States Germany

Norway

Germa ny

Britain Japan

1979
26
Foreign Policy

1989

2000

2004

SOURCES: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT (OECD), JAPANESE MINISTRY OF HEALTH, LABOUR, AND WELFARE, INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION; OECD; AUTHORS’ CALCULATIONS

We’ll Always Have Paris

When the world goes on vacation, the world goes to France. More than 800 million tourists traveled abroad in 2005, and nearly 1 in 10 alighted on French soil, injecting $40 billion into the country’s economy. And the Great Wall is now enticing tourists away from the Sistine Chapel. In 2004, China overtook Italy as the world’s fourth most popular tourist destination.

World’s Top Destinations (in millions of tourists)
①
60.0 47.9 34.9 77.2 75.0 75.1 75.3

②
50.9 52.4 55.6

③
51.2 43.5 41.2 46.1 49.4

④
41.8 46.8 31.2 33.0 20.0

1995

2000

2003

2004

2005

1995

2000

2003

2004

2005

1995

2000

2003

2004

2005

1995

2000

2003

2004 2004

France

Spain

United States

China

⑤ 31.1
1995

41.2 39.6 37.1 36.5

⑥

27.8 30.0 23.5 25.2 24.7 1995 2000 2003 2004 2005

⑦
20.2 20.6 18.7 20.6 21.9 1995 2000 2003 2004 2005

⑧
14.8 1995 19.0 2000 21.5 18.4 20.1 2003 2005

2000

2003

2004

2005

Italy

Britain

Mexico

Germany

Wish You Were Here
SOURCES: TOP: WORLD TOURISM ORGANIZATION; BOTTOM: WORLD TOURISM ORGANIZATION, CROATIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS, MALDIVES DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION, LEBANESE MINISTRY OF TOURISM, CAMBODIAN MINISTRY OF TOURISM CREDITS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ANDREA GINGERICH, BRANDON JENNINGS, ANDREW WOOD, LOUIS LEBBOS, MICHAEL AW/GETTY IMAGES, JEAN-CLAUDE GALLARD

Hordes of tourists may cause headaches by clogging sidewalks and beaches, but some economies desperately need the crowds. Here’s where tourist euros, yen, and riyals make the biggest impact.

Most Dependent on Tourism

Croatia
GDP from tourism: 21 percent, the largest share in Europe Big draw: The Dalmatian Coast, billed as the next Riviera Who visits: Germans and Italians, a third of all visitors

Maldives
GDP from tourism: 63 percent, the world’s highest Big draw: Reputation as top honeymoon destination Who visits: Europeans, 77 percent of all visitors

Lebanon
GDP from tourism: 27 percent, the largest share in the region Big draw: Beirut, once again the Paris of the Middle East Who visits: Saudis, Jordanians, and Iranians, a third of all visitors.

Cambodia
GDP from tourism: 15 percent, the largest share in Asia Big draw: Have you seen the jungle temples? Who visits: Koreans and Japanese, a quarter of all visitors

Sylvia A. Allegretto and L. Josh Bivens are economists at the Economic Policy Institute.
J u ly

2005

| Au g u s t

2006

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