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Coming this summer to Panama City Beach

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					The
GENTRY BAUMLINE SPECIAL TO THE TORCH

An Official Publication of Florida State University Panama City

TORCH
to 2,000 nightly in the massive, air conditioned tent, adorned in trademark garnet and gold. Audiences will enjoy a dazzling threering aerial and stage production full of jaw-dropping routines that will rival any professional troupe. When asked if he would be returning to the microphone to announce the nightly performances, Hamrick stated, “No, I won’t be performing for this particular venture. I’m happy working behind the scenes to make this production a success for the residents and visitors of Panama City Beach.” According to Hamrick, they have received tremendous support from the local business community, and are hopeful that Circus by the Sea will become a mainstay attraction. Under the new beachside big top at Frank Brown Park in Panama City Beach, the performers will also spend their days instructing children ages 7 to 12 in the area’s first-ever Circus Camps. The camps will include lessons in a wide variety of thrilling circus performance skills, from balancing acts to juggling, and even flying high on the trapeze. Available from June 23 through July 31, the week-long (Monday through Thursday) Circus Camps run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Children will receive oneon- one instruction with FSU performers, in addition to playing games and participating in the many recreational activities available at Frank Brown Park. “We’ve signed a five-year renewable contract with Circus by the Sea, but I’m pretty certain Panama City residents will be seeing our performers for at least the next 10 years,” said Striffler, who added that some of the student performers are planning on enrolling in summer classes at FSU’s Panama City campus. Circus admission is $24 for adults, $16 for children (ages 4-16) and free for children under 4 years old. Circus Camp is $285 per week for one child and includes a daily snack. To purchase tickets or for more information on Circus by the Sea and Circus Camp, visit www.CircusByTheSea.com.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Panama City, FL Permit No. 79
FSU Panama City 4750 Collegiate Drive Panama City, FL 32405 Toll-free 866-MyFSUPC (850) 872-4750 www.pc.fsu.edu

FSU Circus by the Sea:
Panama City Beach will soon welcome its newest seasonal attraction – Circus by the Sea, featuring the Florida State University Flying High Circus. Designed to entertain the young and the young at heart, Circus by the Sea is bringing endearing family entertainment to a destination known primarily as a Spring Break getaway. A long-time favorite beach town for college students, Panama City Beach is excited to add a true summer family amusement option for the 4.5 million visitors who flock to the area every year. According to Circus Presenter Donald Hamrick, the Circus by the Sea project has been in the works since February of 2007. An FSU alumnus with both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in music, Hamrick’s career history includes experience as both performer and producer for a number of touring shows. He approached the FSU Flying High Circus about establishing a Florida summer home. In a happy coincidence, FSU was already considering adding a Florida site, expanding beyond Georgia’s Callaway Gardens, which has hosted the performers for nearly half a century. “We were finally in a position to grow into two summer homes, and we knew our next location would have to be in Florida,” said Mark Striffler, associate director, FSU Ogelsby Union Administration. “Panama City Beach seemed like a natural fit, with FSU’s Panama City campus and so many alumni already there.” With all the necessary arrangements in place, FSU junior and senior student performers will take center stage six nights a week (Monday through Saturday), from June 13 to Aug. 2. During the Independence Day weekend, Circus by the Sea will host matinee performances, July 4 and July 5, beginning at 3 p.m. A number of special guest performers will add to the excitement throughout the season. “The Greatest Collegiate Show on Earth” will welcome crowds of up
WENDY DIXON MARKETING AND MEDIA

Coming this summer to Panama City Beach
What’s it like being a circus performer?
What’s it like to fly in the air with only a net below you or to feel the exhilaration in that magical moment when the doors are thrown open and the show is about to start? Then the bright lights and triumphal music let you know you’re about to do something remarkable. The show begins with the ringmaster’s whistle and you unveil your routines for the crowd. The reward for the long hours of labor and rehearsal is the sweep of oohs and aahs which fills the tent. You may know what a circus ringmaster is and you may know that a trapeze artist flies seamlessly through the air, but you probably have never heard of the Quartette Adagio, Two-Lane, High Casting, Roman Rings or Rolla Rolla. These are some of the spellbinding acts the student performers do at each show in FSU’s Flying High Circus. They have appeared in Europe, Canada and the Bahamas. And now they are coming to Panama City Beach, Fla. They will spend their summers at Circus by the Sea and will provide a welcome entertainment alternative for families looking for a great show.

See Circus, Page 3

In the March 2008 Issue…

• UCSI given innovation award in Tallahassee: Text written by instructors wins, Page 4 • Fall Convocation celebrated in December: 142 students completed degrees, Page 5 • Exhibits add to Mesa Verde Commissioning: Education students make contribution, Page 10

Local alumni flying high, page 8

• Faculty get a first look at Academic Center: New building nearing completion, Page 11

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The

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March 2008

State-of-the-art laboratories to produce future professionals
Sarah GileS Development CoorDinator

The academic laboratories currently under construction at FSU Panama City will support programs in the areas of criminology, civil and environmental engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, advance scientific diving and underwater crime scene investigation. These programs have been added to the curriculum offered at FSU Panama City to meet the growing workforce demands in Northwest Florida. “Because they are in such high demand, most of our engineering graduates begin serving in the local engineering workplace long before they finish their degree,” said Geoffrey Brooks, FSU PC electrical engineering faculty member. It has been necessary to utilize space at Gulf Coast Community College to establish most of the laboratories needed to support these important educational opportunities for students, because adequate space is not available in existing facilities at FSU PC. These programs have grown rapidly, despite the challenges presented to both students and faculty due to the lack of lab space at FSU PC. With the completion of the labs, FSU PC will be much better positioned to meet the higher education needs of northwest Florida. State-of-the-art academic labs will help grow these programs and assist FSU Panama City in becoming a talent magnet for students who desire a profession in one of these fields. “We now have employers directing student design projects, which gives them direct access to our upcoming graduates while giving our students real-world opportunities unique to our campus,” explained Brooks. “The new academic labs will facilitate these research opportunities while accommodating the

The Holley Building construction, circa January 2008. - Contributed Photo/Aerophoto.com

growth of our engineering programs.” Since the launch of the Building the Future Campaign just over seven months ago, alumni and community members have stepped forward to provide $198,000.00 in gifts and pledges toward the furnishings and equipment needed for the new academic laboratories. Each contribution to the campaign moves the campus closer to the goal of fully funding the academic laboratories. “We are very appreciative of those alumni and community members who have contributed to the campaign,” said FSU PC Dean George DePuy. “We hope others will come forward this year to support this project which directly benefits the region by making enhanced educational opportunities available to residents and promotes economic development in the area.” Gifts to the Building the Future Campaign

accomplish more than fully furnishing academic laboratories. They will have a lasting and profound effect on higher education in northwest Florida. Your gift will help provide the highest quality educational opportunities for local students and will have a positive impact on economic growth for the area by providing professionals for the local work force. About the Building the Future Campaign At 105,000 square-feet, the Academic Center currently under construction at FSU Panama City will serve as the centerpiece of the campus and will effectively double the number of students that can be served at the campus. It will provide 21 general purpose classrooms, 10 academic laboratories, a multi-purpose lecture/ meeting hall, 10 seminar rooms and a library and learning center. The first priority of the Building the Future Campaign is to generate $600,000 in private

support, which will be submitted for a dollarfor-dollar match* by the State of Florida Alec P Courtelis University Facility Enhancement . Challenge Grant program. This will provide the $1.2 million needed to purchase furnishings and equipment to complete the Academic Center’s laboratories. The second priority of the campaign is to generate $400,000 in private support, which will qualify for a 50 percent match* by the State of Florida’s Challenge Grant program. The $600,000 Scientific Equipment Endowment will provide resources for future maintenance and replacement of the academic laboratories’ equipment. Gifts of any amount may be made to the Building the Future Campaign. Numerous naming opportunities are available. Gifts to the Building the Future Campaign of $5,000 and above will be recognized permanently in the Academic Center. To make your contribution online, visit www.pc.fsu.edu/foundation. Checks should be made payable to FSU PC Foundation and mailed to the Office of Advancement, FSU Panama City, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Fla. 32405. For questions concerning the Building the Future Campaign, contact Sarah Giles, FSU Panama City Development Coordinator, at (850) 770-2152 or email sgiles@pc.fsu.edu. *It is anticipated that all gifts received for the Building the Future Campaign will qualify for a state match. FSU Panama City and the Florida State University Foundation cannot guarantee state of Florida matching funds.

www.pc.fsu.edu/foundation

Building the Future

Thank you for helping FSU Panama City Build the Future Today.
$198,024
$50,000
l help establish the Future Campaign wil Sr.’s gift to the Building ed by Jimmy Patronis, mic Center. Gifts receiv in FSU PC’s new Acade te of Florida. academic laboratories ollar by the Sta l be matched dollar-for-d December 15, 2008 wil is, Sr.; Frank Hall, PC dean; Jimmy Patron ve: George DePuy, FSU Pictured abo Board president FSU PC Development

$600,000 GOAL
$350,000 $450,000 $550,000

$150,000

$250,000

$100,000

$200,000

$300,000

$400,000

$500,000

Re c o g n i zing Gifts and Pledges as of February 26, 2008
Leadership Council Thomas G. and Donna P McCoy . Cornerstone Circle Jimmy Patronis, Sr. President’s Club Community Services Foundation Tyndall Federal Credit Union Charter Club George DePuy Dick and Nan Locher Representative Jimmy Patronis, Jr. Jerry and Mary Sowell Dean’s Partner Bay Walk-In Clinic Linda Dupree Charley and JoAn Gramling Frank Hall Franklin Harrison Edward Hutchison Michael and Mariam Ingram Innovations Federal Credit Union Dean’s Partner Mike Nichols Panama City Area Seminole Club Regions John and Gail Robbins Smurfit-Stone Container Corporation Douglas L. Stringer Elizabeth Walters Distinguished Partner C.W. Roberts Contracting Mark and Sarah Giles HealthSouth Peoples First Community Bank Scott Rentals Sunshine Piping, Inc. SunTrust Honored Partner Larson and Beverly Bland Coastal Metals Margit Arias Kastell Littco Engineering Broward E. (Bud) Ratliff Suzanne M. Towne Benefactor Partner Milton Acton Applied Research Associates Donald J. Banks BaySolutions Jan Colcord Jami Duchesne Edgewater Beach Resort Robert Fowler Gulf Coast Community College Foundation James and Barbara Haag Sandra Halvorson Knology David Lovett Martha McRae Mary Ola Miller Al Murphy Panama City Housing Authority Panhandle Educators Federal Credit Union Cortez Patrick PBS&J Peter R. Brown Construction Reynolds, Smith & Hills The News Herald Leon and Glenda Walters Academic Partner Mark Adams The Bagel Maker, Inc. Claire Calohan Lynn Centrone Teresa Cowles Shelia Cox Joyce H. Dannecker Wendy Dixon Mylisa Sword Feulner Jay and Cynthia Gardner Yvette Herr Shirley Jackson Fred and Margaret Lewis Bruce H. Lloyd Homer Ooten George Peacock Clara Lynne Pratt Jacque Price Arlene Shaheen Larry Smith Drew and Patti Smith Ron Whitas

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Year 2008 off to a great start
Message from the Dean
In early February, the excellent news was received that all of the admission restrictions which FSU Panama City had been operating under were lifted. While admissions restrictions remain in effect on the main campus, we can now return to our normal admissions guidelines to serve the citizens of northwest Florida. We are also pleased to announce that the 25th Commencement Ceremony of FSU PC will take place at the Marina Civic Center on April 27. About 400 people complete bachelor’s or master’s degrees from our campus over the course of each year and we expect about 240 to participate in the April ceremony. Many of the graduates will be 21 or 22-year-old students who have gone straight through a community college program and then two years at FSU Panama City. But many other graduates will be non-traditional place-bound students who might not have been able to complete their degree if it were not for our campus. The FSU Circus will begin performing in Panama City Beach in June. The circus dates to 1946 but it has taken this long to have them establish a summer home in Panama City Beach. They will also continue to perform at Callaway Gardens in Georgia. This will bring a major new tourist attraction to the area and directly benefit the local economy. The research park in Lynn Haven is coming closer to reality. The plans call for FSU to receive 40 acres from the U.S. Air Force and serve as the cornerstone of a larger tract of land. The remainder of the land is be used as a location for high tech companies that should bring well paying jobs to the area. The state budget situation is impacting our campus. We have already absorbed one budget cut and more cuts are projected. We are trying to take these cuts in ways that will have the least effect on our ability to serve our students and Northwest Florida. The new academic center building is only months away from completion. The Building the Future Campaign is an effort to raise the remaining funds we need to fully equip the wonderful

TORCH
Vol. 15, No. 1
Dean
Dr. George DePuy gdepuy@pc.fsu.edu

The

Director of aDvanceMent
Gail Robbins grobbins@pc.fsu.edu

eDitor-in-chief
Andrew Smith asmith@pc.fsu.edu

aSSiStant eDitor
Erin Ciszczon eciszczon@pc.fsu.edu

aluMni affairS
Russell Kinslow rkinslow@pc.fsu.edu

DevelopMent
laboratories we will have in this building. The degree programs that will use these labs directly support the local economy. Many members of the community have contributed to this campaign so far. We are hopeful that many more people will step forward this year. Any funds contributed this year will be eligible for a one-toone match by the state. The deadline for receiving contributions that are eligible for matching funds is Dec. 15, 2008. If you have not yet contributed to this campaign, I hope you will consider doing so. It directly benefits your community. George DePuy, Ph.D. Dean Sarah Giles sgiles@pc.fsu.edu

Marketing & MeDia
Wendy Dixon wdixon@pc.fsu.edu

Special eventS
Becky Kelly rkelly@pc.fsu.edu

prograM aSSiStant
Helen Johnson hjohnson@pc.fsu.edu

photographerS
Erin Ciszczon eciszczon@pc.fsu.edu Andrew Smith asmith@pc.fsu.edu

CIRCUS from page 1
Rivaling any professional circus, the FSU Flying High Circus is primarily an aerial and stage presentation with three rings of captivating entertainment for everyone. But the Flying High Circus performers do much more than entertain audiences with the riveting performances you see under the tent. For one thing, these students design and sew their own costumes. Along with the dazzle and glitz of their performances, they must do a lot behind the scenes to learn the entire business of putting on “The Greatest Collegiate Show on Earth.” “We are the backbone as well as the fluff that makes up the FSU Flying High Circus,” recreation and leisure services major Milla Voellinger said. “We generate our own money through sponsorships and fund raising. We take care of, repair and sometimes make all of our equipment as well as put up and take down our tent. There is much more going on behind the scenes throughout the year than what most people see during the show.” Some students take advantage of the one-semester hour Circus Activities course offered through the College of Education/Physical Education. The course introduces the basics of juggling, trapeze, aerial ballet and rigging. However, this course is not mandatory. The only requirement to be a member of the FSU Circus is that one be a degreeseeking student registered at Florida State University. Ah, but there’s much more to being a circus performer than meets the eye. In the circus, as in comedy, timing is everything. This timing is also a fine art, and many hours of practice go into perfecting the seemingly simple routine that captivates the audience. Senior Casey Dellinger, an exercise science major from St. Petersburg, Fla. has been part of the FSU Circus for three years. She performs the Sky Pole, Triple Trapeze and Mexican Cloud Swing. Dellinger is passionate about performing and cannot wait to bring the joy of circus to the Florida Panhandle. Putting in three to four hours of rehearsal in a day, she explains how much she dedicates to her extra curricular activity on show days. “Not only do we perform during the show, we get there a few hours early to put up the nets and set up any other equipment. After that, we do hair and makeup and get into costume,” Dellinger said. “After the show we change out equipment, take down the nets and get the tent ready for the next show. It’s an exhausting day!” Graphic design major Tara Ogren specializes in the Flying Trapeze, Sky Pole, Balancing Act and the Mexican Cloud Swing. She must maintain her fitness level as an “above the net” performer by doing at least ten pull-ups and ten leg-lifts a day. To stay in shape, she has to constantly maintain the vivacity any other athlete would use as a catalyst to perform at her best. “Being a circus performer in the FSU Circus takes a lot of selfmotivation,” Ogren said. “For a lot of the acts there isn’t a coach so you really have to push yourself. It also takes pushing your limits when you finally get past the fear of doing a new trick.” For students like Ft. Myers, Fla. native Voellinger, the circus is what attracts them to FSU in the first place. “The circus is my whole life,” Voellinger said. “I am so lucky to be a part of something so unique and am proud of the progress I have made.”

contributing photographerS
FSU Flying High Circus Aerophoto.com

contributing WriterS
FSU Flying High Circus Aerophoto.com

aDvertiSing SaleS
Sales Director - Andrew Smith Asst. Sales Director - Erin Ciszczon torch@pc.fsu.edu The Torch, Volume 15, Number 1, is an official bulletin of Florida State University Panama City and is published four times yearly. It is published by the FSU PC Office of Advancement to keep students, alumni, friends, staff & faculty informed about FSU PC’s growth, change, needs and accomplishments. Change of Address Only: Office of Advancement, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Barron 207, Panama City, Fla. 32405-1099. Telephone: (850) 770-2150. Fax: (850) 872-4199 E-mail: torch@pc.fsu.edu. Other Business: Office of Advancement, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Barron 207, Panama City, Fla. 32405-1099. Telephone: (850) 770-2150. Fax: (850) 872-4199. Email: torch@pc.fsu.edu. To suggest features or to inquire about advertising, call (850) 770-2156, or e-mail: torch@pc.fsu.edu. The Torch reserves the right to refuse any materials based on space availability and appropriateness. Inclusion of advertising does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services. Opinions expressed in The Torch are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of its editors or policies of Florida State University Panama City. The Torch is available in alternate formats by contacting the Office of Advancement. For those who are hearing or speech impaired, contact the phone number through the Florida Relay Service at 1800-955-8770 (voice) or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). Download the Torch from the FSU Panama City web site: www.pc.fsu.edu.

Voellinger was a dancer in high school and enjoyed the thrill of extreme sports. Being a part of the circus lets her dance and be a daredevil at the same time. She performs the Double Trapeze, Two-Lane, High Casting, Roman Rings, Rolla Rolla. She also serves as ringmaster. The circus is an extreme sport, and Voellinger and her cast mates put in an extreme workout. Even though performing takes its toll physically, she plans to go on as long as her body lets her. Jack Rice, a graduate student majoring in urban and regional planning, says the first thing performers have to learn is the circus jargon. Pieces of equipment, such as the hut, lot, double trap, teeterboard and pulley block are all props for the performances. They learn how to set up and break down the tent. But as the students progress, they have to learn something essential to circus performing, trust. “You learn to trust yourself and your partner the more you practice,” Rice said. “As you watch the rigging process and rig things yourself you learn to trust the equipment.” So is this a chance of a lifetime? “One hundred percent,” said Dellinger. “Where else will you ever be able to say that you ran away to college to join the circus?” Rice agreed, “Without a doubt, this is a chance of a lifetime. The circus taught me so much about myself and gave me an extraordinary group of friends I might not have met otherwise.”

The Torch is printed by The News Herald.

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The

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March 2008

UCSI brings new meaning to innovation
ERIN CISZCZON ASSISTANT EDITOR

In October 2000 terrorists attacked the USS Cole in Yemen, killing 17 U.S. sailors and injuring 37 others. In response to the event, the U.S. Department of Defense contacted the founders of the Underwater Crime Scene Investigation (UCSI) at Florida State University Panama City and asked them to come up with a way to stabilize an underwater crime scene. It had become apparent that there was no good way to conduct a proper investigation in an underwater environment. Since then the UCSI team at FSU PC has taken a leading role in developing underwater investigative techniques and have literally written the book on underwater crime scene investigation. The book “Underwater Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for Law Enforcement” was written by the faculty and staff in the UCSI program and was published by Best Publishing Company. The book is an extension of an earlier manual they put together for the U.S. Department of Defense. The efforts of those involved did not go unnoticed. Tom Kelley, Ph.D., was recognized for co-authoring a manual with his FSU PC colleagues: Dale Nute, Ph.D., Mark Feulner, M.A., and Mike Zinszer, M.S. during the 3rd Annual Innovators Reception at Florida State University in Tallahassee. Innovation is usually associated with inventions and patents, not passages and books. Therefore UCSI instructor Dale Nute said it was nice to see that FSU recognized that developing different ways of thinking, as they did in the field of underwater crime scene investigation, is also a form of innovation. The UCSI program at FSU PC has been featured in magazines and on television, but the innovation award was truly an honor because it came from within the university. There are a total of nine authors listed on the cover of the book, most of whom are instructors at FSU PC. These instructors are also graduates of FSU who have received or are about to complete a Ph.D. degree. The bulk of the writing and editing of the book was shared by everyone. UCSI Director Tom Kelley said he is proud of the number of individuals who contributed. Those who assisted, he explained, had various backgrounds from underwater

Tom Kelley, second from left, was recognized at the 3rd Annual FSU Innovators Reception for co-authoring a manual with his FSU PC colleagues Mike Zinszer, left, Dale Nute, Ken McDonald and Mark Feulner. The manual reinforces the scientific approach to underwater investigation. - Contributed Photo

archeology, oceanography and engineering. “The dedication of these guys was incredible. They are the hardest working people I’ve ever met in my life,” Kelley said. It took about six years for the book to be completed, with meetings usually taking place each Thursday morning. Nute said the hardest part of the project was getting everyone together in the same room. However, he hoped the process served as an example to students who question the importance of group work in school. The book will no doubt help the students in the UCSI program. Up to this point instructors had to spend time piecing together copies of information for their students because there was a lack of adequate material. Having a book will make the lesson plans easier to follow for both the teacher and the student. Kelley explained that everything the instructors do to enhance UCSI only increases the students’ value in the job market. No other university in the United States offers this type of program and employment opportunities are numerous in areas such as law enforcement, marine insurance, construction and engineering. The book will serve as a “how-to” for underwater crime scene protocol and procedure. It can be used as a tool for various levels of government and law enforcement including NOAA, NASA and FBI. Having guidelines in place will create a safer

environment when working in hazardous conditions such as biological, chemical or radiological contaminants. In addition to possibly saving lives, the guidelines that are outlined will ensure accuracy during an investigation. According to Kelley, the book describes underwater crime scene investigation not as a mere snatch and grab procedure, but as a science. It brings underwater crime scene investigation one step closer to being conducted in the same way as those on the surface. “Evidence found in the water used to be looked at as wasted, but now we can start to solve crimes by securing items in an underwater environment,” Kelley said. The authors of the book didn’t just write their theories down on paper, but they took time to develop and test them. This confirmed the effectiveness of what they were teaching. One of the trips they took to conduct work on site led to a situation they will never forget. After assisting with an investigation in Aruba, the instructors proceeded to travel back to the United States but they ran into trouble when security wanted to confiscate their equipment. They, of course, hesitated to leave millions of dollars of equipment behind. Fortunately, everything was resolved and they made their flight just in time. To date the UCSI program at FSU PC has assisted in approximately 30 investigations,

so they have gone a step beyond practice and put theories to the test in real scenarios. Sometimes things sound like a good idea but when implemented don’t work out as planned. According to instructor Mark Feulner they had to find the right balance when explaining organization and management. Concepts that were stated simply turned out to be unsuccessful, while those that were detailed became too complex. “We started with one train of thought, went to the opposite end and settled on being somewhere in the middle,” Feulner said. “Procedures for managing both personnel and bystanders were incorporated into the manual based on our experiences in the field.” “Underwater Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for Law Enforcement” primarily focuses on how to organize and manage crime scene investigation. Next the UCSI faculty and staff plan to focus on writing down the steps to implement those procedures. Even though the book has already gone to print, Kelley and the others see it as just the beginning. As technology advances there will be new and better methodology, and they hope to continue adding and updating the book.

“Underwater Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for Law Enforcement”
Authors Thomas B. Kelley H. Dale Nute Michael A. Zinszer Mark Feulner Gregg Stanton William Charlton, Jr. Joerg Hess Terry Roy Johnson Kenneth McDonald Contributing Researchers Kenneth Shaw Banyon Pelham Dan Walsh Special Thanks Eric C. McNair

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FSU PANAMA CITY AUDITORIUM

Thursday June 5, 2008

March 2008

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Page 5

Fall convocation is tradition
BECKY KELLY SPECIAL EVENTS

Inside FBI Profiling
ERIN CISZCZON ASSISTANT EDITOR

Gregg McCrary has consulted on thousands of criminal cases in North America, Central America, Europe and Asia and has provided consultation and training regarding violence related issues to state, local and international agencies. His work was highlighted in several television documentaries including “The Mind of a Serial Killer.” Since retiring from the FBI in 1995, McCrary provides expert testimony in civil and criminal litigation. On Jan. 31 McCrary was on the campus of Florida State University Panama City sharing insight into criminal behavior. He met with psychology and criminology classes before speaking to a community group in the auditorium. McCrary first took time to dispel a few myths. Most people, he explained, get their ideas about crime solving from television and movies but the depictions are not realistic. FBI agents do interview serial killers and rapists, but they do not ask criminals for help with cases as depicted in “Silence of the Lambs.” Nor are any physic powers involved as in the television show “The Profiler.” He warned even books can give a false impression of profiling. Profiler is a broad term. There is no specific licensure one has to have to be considered a profiler; however, there is a professional organization trying to set the standard. With the title explained, McCrary talked about the job of FBI agents. He said there is no specific profile of any particular criminal. What the FBI does is retrospective profiling – an ‘after the fact’ attempt to describe the characteristic traits of the person of a particular crime. “We work backwards from the crime and the crime scene, analyzing all the decisions the offender has to make, to try and make some logical inferences about the type of offender of that specific crime,” McCrary said. FBI agents look at the victim, crime scene, suspect and evidence. As an example, McCrary shared the details of one specific case in the 1980s. In Rochester, New York, 16 prostitutes were murdered in a period of 18 months. McCrary was able to deduce the bodies had postmortem wounds and proposed that if the police could locate one of the victim’s body, officers might be able to catch the suspect upon his return. The plan worked and police arrested Arthur Shawcross “The Genesee River Killer.” McCrary talked about this case and others, allowing time to answer questions. Lauren Rees is an undergraduate at FSU PC. The time of the program worked out well for her since she was already on campus to attend class. Rees just completed reading one of McCrary’s books and was excited to hear him. “I think it’s awesome,” she said. “You learn about different aspects of crime but it’s nice to hear from someone who’s been there.” Although McCrary’s presentation tied in well to the criminology and psychology programs at FSU PC, it was not just the faculty and students who attended. The evening event was free and open to the public. Dawn Weis and her daughter, Brittany, were among those in the audience who took advantage of the opportunity to listen to McCrary. Brittany is a senior a Rutherford High School and is interested in human behavior. “She’s trying to decide on a major,” explained her mother, “so when we saw the event advertised in the newspaper, we decided to come.” The event was well attended and FSU PC is planning similar programs for the public to share in this unique type of educational experience.

On Dec. 16, 2007, Florida State University Panama City held its seventh annual Fall Convocation at the Edgewater Beach Resort. Fall Convocation has become a tradition at FSU Panama City that is full of meaning for both students and administration. Thirty-five fall 2007 graduates participated in this year’s ceremony which was attended by more than 300 family members and friends. Graduation is a significant accomplishment and major milestone in a student’s life. FSU PC believes it is important to honor that achievement. The campus has one commencement ceremony during the academic year held at the end of the spring semester. Since the university is unable to hold more than one graduation ceremony, former dean Ed Wright suggested holding convocation – a gathering of students, faculty, staff, friends and family coming together to honor and celebrate the accomplishments of FSU PC fall graduates. Today, fall graduates have the option of participating in either the FSU graduation ceremony in Tallahassee or waiting until the end of spring semester to participate in the Panama City ceremony held at the Marina Civic Center. In addition, they are invited to convocation. Dean George DePuy said, “Fall Convocation is a wonderful opportunity for the family and friends of those who just completed their degree requirements to show how proud they are of the graduate.” At convocation, graduates processed down the aisle to the “Hymn to the Garnet and Gold.” Per tradition, the National Anthem was

After the convocation ceremony concluded, students and their families were invited to take photos and enjoy cake and punch. - Erin Ciszczon/FSU PC

sung and an invocation given. Then graduates listened to a few words of wisdom. FSU PC Development Board President Mike Nichols was keynote speaker for the event. Nichols is president of Nichols and Associates of Bay County, Inc., an insurance agency providing life, health, retirement and long term care insurance to Bay County area for 20 years. He has been a member of the Bay County Chamber of Commerce for 18 years and a resident of Bay County for 41 years. Nichols emphasized the uniqueness of FSU PC that attracts potential students to enroll. He noted the home-town feel, the one-on-one instruction and the flexible class schedules. “Whatever the reason,” he stated, “it seems that FSU Panama City has a special place in the hearts of its students.”

For many, graduation marks a new beginning. Some students may already have jobs lined up. Some will move away from northwest Florida. Others will stay and contribute to the growth of this community. Nichols advised graduates to “take what inspired you to come this far, and use it to accomplish whatever it is you want to do next, keeping in mind that everything takes hard work and determination.” Following the speaker, graduates walked across the stage where Dean DePuy greeted them with a handshake and a commemorative bookmark. Before they headed back to their seats, they smiled for the photographer who officially captured this right of passage. Many more pictures were taken and words of congratulations spoken as the ceremony concluded.

Spring 2008 FSU PC Foundation Scholarship Awards
Endowed General Scholarship Fund Paul Baldy Paul Bonnette Kati Corning Terrence Davis Charlotte Demmon Rodolfo Espanola Mary Gunderson Emily Harrison Tiffany Hinds Kristy Jacobs Cheryl Jones Rebecca Kirner Kristina Landerman Mary Lee James McMillion Karla Odom Dennis Pake Cheri Patterson-Langford Misty Reyes Michael Ross Tanja Roulach Morgan Rudd Haley Salter Michelle Schroeder Tracy Sexton Camrin Spradlin Malinda Stalvey Heather Tanner Jacilyn Turco License To Learn Scholarship Angela Ashmore Matthew Beard Tony Boullard Bryan Brannon Gina Clenney Tabitha Dick Hallie Glenn Christopher Guastella LeaAnn Rooney Jessica Williams AT&T Employees Scholarship Amber Benton Scott Dubuque Kevin Sharkey Mary Ola Reynolds Miller Scholarship Wanda Crittenden

Florida State University Panama City Dean’s List Fall 2007
Joseph A. Albritton Harold E. Andrews Ryan D. Artrip Christina L. Barker Jody Z. Barnes Angela S. Barwick Amber L. Benton Amy G. Bradley Bertha A. Brady Kristen M. Brookins Hope E. Burgess Cheryl A. Burris Jacqueline N. Bynum Amy J. Byrd Elizabeth N. Cadwell Mia S. Cangelosi Kristin A. Casey Irena Y. Castello Jennifer R. Castillo Ginny L. Cone Jill N. Cook Rae A. Coutu Shari K. Crisp Joshua A. Dailey Kristina L. Darby Andrew G. Davis Charlotte L. Demmon Brittany L. Dorko Tina M. Dryden Adam P. Duggar Michael G. Dupree Denise E. Durrence Joseph L. Earp Sayrah E. Ellis Angela M. Evans Kelli Ferns-Siller Hendrixson M. Frye Colin L. Gallien Molly E. Garvey Joel L. Goodson Lee E. Goostree Jayne A. Greer Mary A. Gunderson Jonathan A. Hall Kari M. Halverson Valerie A. Hamon Shirley A. Hannah Lauren M. Harris Britney N. Haynes Keri L. Healis Melissa L. Hess Angela K. Hester Whitney J. Heyser Peter M. Hill Tiffani C. Hinds Wendell R. Hodges Amy M. Hodson Sarah A. Holloway Melissa F. Holstegge Cassandra J. Hull Christopher J. Jackson Tasha A. Jackson Amanda M. Jolley Rachel L. Keune Courtney M. Kincaid Ashley M. King Bethany A. Kirkland Amanda D. Lange Melissa J. Libat Alysa L. Locke Catherine D. Long Kelly J. Manning Carmen C. Marrs Darrell G. Martin Angela E. Martincich Richard M. Martincich Marie C. Mayfield Brenda G. McGill Tinsley D. McGruder Alice A. McKeithen Denise N. Melvin Ryan R. Messer Alison M. Metcalf Deborah L. Metzandrews Barbara J. Meyers Nicole M. Molt Ana A. Montero Matthew L. Morgan Heather M. Morris Samia Mubarak Jonathan M. Nuckols Casey D. O’Brien Alaina M. Pitts Erin C. Ray Rachel D. Riddleberger Lacey A. Ruiz Kevin S. Sansbury Carmen T. Sapp Amy B. Saunders Garry L. Schoolcraft Scott A. Schroeder Chaz E. Scism Lynsey M. Sherman Amanda M. Shuler Benjamin T. Simmons Tina L. Simpson Natasha L. Smith James C. Smithers Joy P. Steele Jennifer M. Stephens Jenna M. Stevens Brian M. Stewart Slade C. Styles Janna C. Swanson Jamie-ann U. Tedtaotao Penny L. Treeparsert Katherine L. Walden Matthew A. Walz Linda A. Warren Sabrina L. Washington Sammie E. Watson Lisa M. Weis Chylon S. Whitehurst Candice L. Wilds Kristen P. Winterman

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Student Feature: Aundrea Massinger
Undergraduate appreciates versatility of business degree
ERIN CISZCZON ASSISTANT EDITOR

For those interested in a career in business, choosing exactly what path to pursue can be a difficult decision. Jobs within the field vary considerably in terms of work environment and typical duties. It is possible, with a little research, to find a career that will fit one’s own unique interests, skills and values. Aundrea Massinger had an interest in finance and investments, but it was the versatility of a business degree which prompted her to enroll in the College of Business at Florida State University Panama City. She believes that just because a person has a business degree doesn’t mean they have to work for a large corporation. “With a business degree, as long as you put your mind to it, you can really do anything,” she said. Making the decision to register at FSU PC was easy for Massinger. She was raised in Panama City and after completing two years at Gulf Coast Community College, she still wanted to stay in the area. With the basic knowledge of business she acquired at GCCC, she was ready to dive further into the field and enrolled at FSU PC in the fall of 2005. Although the classes have been challenging, Massinger said she has learned a lot. First, on a personal level, Massinger said being in the program has made her more aware of her own finances. Those in their 20s and 30s often think that they have plenty of time to worry about retirement, but Massinger knows the importance of planning early. Due to the knowledge gained in class, she feels better prepared to handle her and her husband’s future. “I think people are under the impression that they can always start later,” she said. “That they can put money back later in life when they’re in their 30s and 40s – when you think you are going to be more financially secure. But then you have kids and other things come along. The earlier you can begin, with the way interest rates work, the better off you will be.” In addition to having a better understanding of finances, Massinger also learned how to communicate better as a result of working with fellow classmates to accomplish group projects. “Presentations have to be backed up with

Aundrea Massinger uses her knowledge of business to be successful at her job as a music pastor. - Contributed Photo

research and support,” she said. “That makes it much more interesting because you can find real world examples and you’re not just reading an example from the book.” In one finance class, Massinger was part of a group that created a financial plan for three individuals – a 25-year-old, 45-year-old and 65-year-old. The project looked at the needs of people at those ages and how investing related to their needs. Classmates later told her they learned a lot from the presentation and applied much of the same information to their portfolios. Behind every lesson and project there is an instructor and Massinger used the word “fantastic” to describe the instructors at FSU PC. She said it is evident that the teachers care whether or not students learn from the course. They are willing to take the time to help the students understand the topics being discussed. This, along with small class sizes, all leads to a better learning environment according to Massinger. “The classes are small so you get a lot of oneon-one attention,” she said. “The instructors are specialists in their field so they have the background. Plus, they’ve done the research to explain why something happens instead of just stating that it happens.”

Massinger considers herself a visual learner and has taken advantage of the instructors’ willingness to give one-on-one instruction on numerous occasions. Her advice to anyone entering the program is to not be afraid to ask questions. She said any student can do well in the program as long as they are motivated and willing to learn. Massinger acknowledged that people in the business field can be stereotyped as self centered and tough, but she pointed out that it doesn’t have to be that way. She feels management is a great way to spread servant leadership. In fact, she is currently exploring that topic for a research paper. Massinger knows a thing or two about servant leadership, being the music pastor at Callaway Assembly of God. She has been attending the place of worship since she was in fourth grade and it has been her dream for many years to become a music pastor. Although it might not appear so at first glance, Massinger is using her degree. She has seen many correlations between her job and the lessons taught in classroom at FSU PC. She has seen just how similar the church is to a business. After all, she explained, business is about managing and working with people. Recently her church organized a Christmas

performance where they served 500 people on fine china followed by a concert. For that event, Massinger had to use skills related to customer service and organizing a worker base. It was the biggest production she has been a part of to date. One of her long-term goals at the church is to create a hierarchy where instead of leading the entire music program, she can start to delegate a few responsibilities. “It’s basically building up younger people to become leaders and equip them with what they need,” she said. “If you look at it now within the business world and the church world, we have the baby boomer generation and our generation, and if we don’t build up the younger ones then who’s going to take over after we go?” Before working full time at the church, Massinger worked for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board and First National Bank of Northwest Florida. While employed at the bank, she moved around in the various departments. She started on the teller line then went on to bookkeeping, loans and customer service. She received an understanding of every aspect of the bank and found the experience to be very interesting. “It kept me occupied,” she said with a smile. “I can’t handle doing one thing for a long time.” Massinger admits working full time and attending school simultaneously did require some time management on her behalf. She considers herself fortunate to have achieved so much at a young age and said it is partially due to the support of her parents and her husband, Brian, that she has been successful. She was married two years ago. Her husband is also pursing his educational goals, taking classes in electrical and computer engineering at GCCC. Massinger will participate in graduation this spring and return to finish a few classes in the summer. She will earn an undergraduate degree in business, but that won’t be the end of her college career. She plans to continue her education by completing a degree in music and then eventually entering into a master’s level business program. “I have enjoyed being in school, because I know I am doing something to better myself,” she said. “It’s important to be a life-long learner.”

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Program Spotlight: Business administration
Preparing the leaders of tomorrow
ERIN CISZCZON ASSISTANT EDITOR

The business program curriculum at Florida State University Panama City offers the same courses that are offered in Tallahassee, even using some of Tallahassee’s professors. The business administration degree, however, is unique to the Panama City campus. It has a mixture of general and specific courses which a student can take when available and depending on completion of pre-requisites. The business administration major at FSU PC prepares students with a general business background. Students study a wide variety of subjects, from finance to management to marketing. The core courses in business provide a general foundation on which other classes build. For instance, one required core course is Legal Environment of Business. Laws and ethics are covered in all courses after this one – this course gives students a starting point and a frame of reference for other courses. An interesting point about the program, according to instructor Jeanne Dexter, Ph.D, is the students seem to be friendly with each other and genuinely care about their peers. Some arrange to study together, both online and in person. “It is not unusual to hear that students are studying in small groups, some even arranging to meet at students’ homes where they fix dinner and study,” Dexter said. “Business in general needs collegiality, and what better way to start.” Most classes have group projects. What Dexter and the other instructors at FSU PC have heard from area business people is that

they want graduates who have the ability to work with others and by themselves. The instructors have also heard that businesses want students who are responsible. Therefore, they try to teach students to take responsibility for their own actions and understand that a deadline is a deadline. Dexter said it is important for students to see that no one part of business operates independently from others. She explained a best business practice for everyone in a business is to see the synergy of how departments need to work together for the best results for all. In addition, she feels most personnel problems can be worked out if everyone involved just communicated better with each other. At FSU PC the definition of communication involves both oral and written communication, which students will see in most of the classes. Overall, Dexter believes FSU PC has the best full-time faculty anywhere. She pointed out most faculty arrive here and never leave and concluded that it is because they have the best of all worlds – they get to teach in their areas of expertise, have supportive administrators and have the best students. Putting it another way, she said those at FSU PC have the benefits of a large campus and the convenience and interconnectedness of a smaller college. “It’s a nice feeling when one looks forward to going to work, and when students enjoy attending classes,” she said. “I had a new student once ask me why everyone on our campus was smiling. She was convinced no one could be that happy. After she was here a few months, she came in and said she now knew why everyone on campus was so happy. What better compliment could a campus want?”

This is Dexter’s 23rd year of teaching business. She started her career at a private liberal arts college, where she taught a number of courses in and out of business, including out-of-business courses such as Writing Across the Disciplines, Polynesian Cultures, Applied Creativity, Money and Buddhism. The course Dexter enjoyed the most was an entrepreneurship course where students started and ran their own business. One big plus to the program since Dexter’s been here is the addition of another full-time faculty member. In her first year at FSU PC, she was the only full-time resident faculty in business administration. “There were times when it was a little lonely,” she said. “It’s nice to have colleagues to talk with about educational practices or students who might be having issues.” Gary Bliss began teaching at the College of Business in Tallahassee in 1982 as an adjunct professor and is now an instructor in the business administration program at FSU PC. He is a finance teacher who emphasizes “cash flow” and how important financial management is to a business. Bliss tries to point out that finance is only one aspect of business because marketing, management, structure and operations are all integral parts of a business. A successful business, he said, has to be cognizant of all of the aspects of business. “I hope my students gain confidence in their abilities and knowledge so that they can successfully apply their skills in a business setting,” he said. According to Bliss, the characteristics of a successful business person can also be applied to any person in any line of work.

These characteristics include being highly skilled, being motivated, being adaptable and being able to get along with others. He also recommended individuals remain honest and drop the attitude of “entitlement.” He said it’s interesting to see some people refuse to accept work that they consider beneath their level. They usually don’t make it very far in the real world, he warned. “The students here at FSU PC are truly a pleasure to be associated with,” Bliss said. “Most are returning to the classroom after beginning a career or a family, and they are highly motivated to learn so they can advance their career.” Bliss describes the business program at FSU PC as having more of a personal approach. Even the largest classes are small by university standards and this allows more personal attention from the faculty. “I must comment on the quality of administration and faculty here,” he said. “The administration supports the faculty, and the faculty is a group of dedicated skilled professionals.” The undergraduate business administration program provides a broad level of education covering many subjects, whereas the master’s program involves a deeper level of study. The master’s degree in business administration at FSU PC provides professionals with opportunities to further their knowledge of an ever-changing workplace. Did you know? Florida State University’s College of Business was named in 29th place among public undergraduate business schools on the U.S. News and World Report’s undergraduate rankings list released Aug. 17.

Alumnus Feature: Wayne Vickers
MBA program gives grad tools to succeed
RUSSELL KINSLOW ALUMNI AFFAIRS

Wayne Vickers is not your typical master’s of business administration (MBA) graduate. Vickers received his MBA degree in 1998 from FSU Panama City twelve years after he earned a bachelor’s degree in computer information science and worked as the director of technology for FSU Panama City. “I always wanted to get a business degree because there was not a lot of business training in our family and I felt like it was an area I needed to know something about,” Vickers said. Vickers has worked at Berg Steel Pipe, Inc. for the last nine years as the manager of information technology. He manages the company’s computer processing and programming needs and oversees a number of programmers and network technicians. Vickers explained that local companies can greatly benefit from the professionalism and skills that MBA graduates possess. Graduates can help guide a business to a more profitable future. They can also apply proper technologies to common problems and introduce modern accounting processes that will make businesses better and flow more smoothly. “I think the future for MBA graduates in this area is very bright,” Vickers said. “We have graduates that grow businesses in a smart way, who can make professional decisions and can make businesses run in a professional manner.” Vickers started a different master’s program before he switched to the MBA program. He wanted to get an MBA so he could understand business processes and common business concepts. Vickers stated that relevant business knowledge is necessary in today’s business world. “I was smart enough to know that I did not

know enough about business,” Vickers said. “You learn the basic concepts and that is why I joined the program.” Vickers discovered that there was a large amount of group work involved with the MBA program. The group work was graded on how the group performed together. Vickers said that this is the same way that group work is evaluated in the business world. He explained that if one person in the group is not performing then the group suffers. “If one person in the group performs very well then the group looks better and the company looks better as a whole,” Vickers said. Vickers learned the importance of working in a group and keeping the group dynamic organized and moving forward on a project. The MBA program also helped him to learn how to manage the same group dynamics that he has experienced in business. “The group concept was real helpful to me because before when I worked in computer science, it was, ‘Here is your work now go do it,’” Vickers said. Vickers believes that the FSU Panama City MBA program is a valuable tool that will help participants in their future endeavors. It is an opportunity to learn an enormous amount of information on relevant business topics. Vickers found one particular finance lesson fascinating. A business is not supposed to finance long term assets with short term money or finance short term assets with long term money. “If you are trying to buy a car with a 30 year mortgage, there aren’t too many bankers that would finance that deal,” Vickers said. “You can ask your accountant if it’s a good deal and they will say, ‘no’, but now you’ve wasted time and that’s an opportunity cost.” Vickers said it’s cliché but in business, “time is money.” He explained that what the average

person doesn’t think about without the proper training could doom a business. “What are you here for? You are here to learn, you are here to get a degree but it is less about the degree and more about the education,” Vickers said. Vickers suggested that MBA students should put as much as they can into their education and pull out the same. Students should keep their eyes wide open, learn as much as possible and talk to their instructors whenever they are available. Vickers felt that some students were scared to talk to their instructors. He found that the instructors at FSU Panama City were very open to talking to their students. Vickers feels that in business most people bring the same or similar knowledge to the table. He thinks that persistence and stamina in one’s goal setting will set them apart from the rest. “Sometimes you have a bad day and you can’t let that bad day define your week or month,” Vickers said. “You have to get up that next morning and try again and learn to do better.”

Vickers explained that if everybody had all the right answers then everybody would be successful all the time. He stated that everybody does not have all the answers and every situation is different. “Get the tools in your toolbox, that’s your MBA, and use your tools and be persistent,” Vickers said. “Once you have the tools that the MBA program gives you to be successful, use that and determination to get what you want.” Vickers joked saying that one of his goals is to rule the world by 2011. But in all reality he aspires to be a chief information officer (CIO) for a company. “I think my training has given me a lot of insight into what happens on the upper management level,” Vickers said. “I would be able to help guide a company that is dependent on information technology.” In the business world a number of CIO positions are being added to the corporate chief officer levels because companies see the relevance and value that information technology brings to their businesses. Vickers also expressed an interest in owning his own business one day. “I am learning a lot that guides me toward owning my own business if it eventually happens,” Vickers said. When asked about his hobbies, Vickers declared that being a dad is his top priority. He also enjoys coaching flag football. Vickers is active in his church and is a big FSU football fan. He has had season tickets to FSU football home games since 1986 and Vickers said he can’t remember the last time he missed a home game. “It was probably sometime around when the kids were born, although they were born in May,” Vickers said. “We planned that, just kidding, but it makes for a good story though.”

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FSU Flying High Circus has roots in Panama City
RUSSELL KINSLOW ALUMNI AFFAIRS

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Sarah Cooper

March 2008
When Coonce was asked about the boys arrival from Gainesville, she responded by declaring it an invasion. “They shouldn’t have come up there (Tallahassee) and taken over our territory,” Coonce said. “They should have just stayed down in Gainesville. We didn’t need them up there.”

Lenora Holman
Sarah Cooper was in the first circus in 1947 and she participated through ‘50. Cooper performed in the bicycle act and dive swing. She was also on numerous dance teams and performed as a clown. Cooper explained that because there were so few performers early on, everyone had to perform in four or five acts. In the first year, the circus performed at businessman lunches, churches and went on the first road trip to Quincy, Fla. Cooper explained how she was initially chosen for the circus. She said that Coach Haskin lined everyone against the wall and had them perform various acrobatic acts. Haskin then singled Cooper out to sit on a bench. “I knew right then I was going back to the dorm,” Cooper said. “I was so hurt.” Haskin came over and took Cooper’s hand and asked her how long she had been milking cows. In the circus you need to have a really strong grip. “Whoever thought that milking a cow would actually payoff for something?” Cooper said. “I made circus and I loved it.”

In 1947 Florida State University became a coeducational university. The first FSU Athletic Director, Howard Danford, wanted a unique way to combine activities for the women and the newly arriving men. Prior to becoming the athletic director, Danford was the director of the Madison City Recreational Department in Wisconsin. While working in Madison, Danford witnessed the success that Jack Haskin had in starting a community circus. Danford hired Jack Haskin to start the FSU student circus. For more than six decades the FSU Flying High Circus, as it was later to be known, has had phenomenal success. The circus has entertained millions and has been featured on numerous television shows. The FSU Flying High Circus will be coming to Panama City Beach this summer. There are many local FSU alumni that performed in the circus over the past 60 years.

Bill Quigley

Lenora Holman performed in the circus from ‘51-‘54. She performed in the bicycle act and numerous other acts. Holman described how one summer she and a partner worked diligently to perfect the perch pole act. She lived on tomato soup that summer so she wouldn’t gain any weight. By the time that Holman and her partner had perfected the act her partner was drafted. So they were never able to perform the act. “I was so upset,” Holman said. “Of course he didn’t want to go but I guess we worked so hard that his grades slipped.” Holman said that she graduated from college a year early because of the circus. She would stay in summer school to work on her act and the extra time taking classes over summer gave her the opportunity to graduate early. Holman said that she was upset about it because she was not ready to leave. “We had wonderful friends and I adored Coach Haskin, he was a great role model,” Holman said. “It was fun just being a star.”

Jimmie Hanks
Bill Quigley also performed in the first circus in ‘47 and he continued to perform in ‘48. Quigley explained that in the first years they did not perform a lot of the dangerous acts that they do now. Quigley stated that he was one of the heavyweight guys on the football team. He was used to lift up the girls and help them perform acrobatic acts. “I was a weightlifter of sorts,” Quigley said. “I was no star.” Quigley remembered why he joined the circus. He said when all the boys came to Tallahassee, FSU was still mostly a girl’s school. Quigley guessed that there must have been 147 girls for every one guy. The circus was the first school activity that involved both the girls and the boys. “We went to play, not to stay,” Quigley said.

Bayne Coonce

Jimmie Hanks was involved with the circus from ‘52-‘54. He performed in the lamp act. The act has a drunk man climb a lamp and he tries to light his cigarette from an oil lamp at the end of the pole. As Hanks would climb the pole it would bend to a 45 degree angle. “Everyone would gasp as the pole bent one way then another way,” Hanks said. Eventually when Hanks lit the cigarette it would explode and he would fall off the pole. “I really enjoyed the camaraderie,” Hanks said. “One of the biggest things was a performance in Pensacola, being able to perform before my mom and dad.”

Shirley Pipkin

(Left) Lenora Holman rides on the gentlemen’s left shoulder during the bicycle act. (Right) Sarah Cooper swings in her circus attire. - Contributed Photos

Bayne Coonce played a different role in the first year of the circus. She performed in the circus band. Early on in the circus, performances were accompanied by a live 12 piece band. Coonce played trombone in the circus band from ‘47-‘50 and she also performed as first chair trombone for the band symphonic orchestra and was in marching band. She said that one girl wanted to start a little group to play and practice in, a little orchestra, about the same time as the circus. The circus asked them to play during their performances. “It was just a fun thing to do,” Coonce said. “We enjoyed playing in the band and watching the circus out of the corner of your eye.”

Shirley Pipkin performed in the circus from ‘52-’54. She performed The Moon and the Hanging Ladder. Pipkin was also in numerous dance routines and performed in the Flying DeCosmos trapeze act. “One thing that my mother had said, when I started out on the trapeze, was that I could do anything but that,” Pipkin said. Pipkin had to stop performing in the trapeze act after she was married. Coach Haskin had a rule that no one would get up on the rigging if they were married and had a possibility of having a child. Pipkin recalled an incident that involved her son and his babysitter. Pipkin’s son was

March 2008
watching the “Greatest Show on Earth,” a movie that had circus performances, with his babysitter and he told the sitter that his mother had performed in the circus. The babysitter was concerned that Pipkin’s son was stretching the truth and alerted her. Pipkin assured the babysitter that she did perform in the circus when she was in college. “The circus was a very interesting time and good fellowship,” Pipkin said. “It’s a time that you build up trust and dependability with others.”

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their hands would soften and peel. “I have a great appreciation for the performances that you see now,” Plumb said. “It is wonderful to see it continue.”

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important lessons taught to the performers. Mulligan said Coach Haskin was quite stern and she had never been coached like that before. “My lasting impression of the circus is that it was very wholesome, very artistic, and it’s like dancing in the sky.” Mulligan said.

Andrew Wackherlin

Tim Allen

Ina Plumb
Andrew Wackherlin performed in the circus from ‘86-‘89. Wackherlin said that when he first attended FSU he knew nothing of the circus. He thought it looked interesting and asked if he could participate. Wackherlin started on the bike with four girls doing different positions on it as he rode around the ring. He performed in the Quartet Adagio and Rolla Rolla, where he would be up on a platform, balancing a board on a ten inch diameter pipe. One special performance that Wackherlin got to participate in was in the Bahamas. “The kids were thrilled to death to see the circus and we were thrilled to perform for them,” Wackherlin said. Wackherlin described how the circus performers were real close. He said that they would get dirty and grungy together and stay up late at night with each other. “You really get to know them and it’s a pretty tight knit group,” Wackherlin said. “I think circus is a great thing to do, you get to meet a lot of great people and travel.” These are just ten Panama City residents that were able to share their experiences of performing in the FSU Flying High Circus. If you or anyone you know participated in the circus and live in the Panama City area, contact Russell Kinslow at (850)770-2158. There will be a special recognition of FSU Flying High Circus alumni at the FSU circus day on June 12 at the Circus by the Sea.

Barbara Mulligan
Tim Allen was involved with the circus from ‘79-‘81. He was the official photographer and organized a multi-media show for the circus. Allen also performed in the Quartet Adagio, where three boys and a small girl would do a variety of acts. Some of the acts included using the girl as a jump rope and Allen would jump over her. Another was where the girl would be thrown thirty feet and Allen would catch her. “I will never forget one show where I almost dropped her,” Allen said. “She ended up about six inches from the floor and I received one of the dirtiest looks I have ever seen.” Allen explained that it took a lot of self discipline, effort and time to perform in the circus. It’s a professional atmosphere where everyone is helping each other and learning tricks. Allen has fond memories of the road shows. He described one time when he performed in Blountstown where the crowd cheered with excitement after his performance and the children ran up to him for his autograph after the show. “There is nothing like being in a show in front of a crowd,” Allen said. “It was a really fun experience and I would recommend it to everyone.”

Barbara Mulligan was involved with the circus in ‘53 and ‘54. She joined her freshman year when there was a strict rule that freshman girls were not allowed to travel with the circus although freshman boys could. Mulligan said Coach Haskin came to one of the Wednesday afternoon teas to recruit participants. He especially wanted small framed girls and Mulligan was small, she weighed about 93 pounds at the time. Mulligan performed the Double Trapeze and the Triple Trapeze. “I was impressed with how many things I learned like balancing and centering,” Mulligan said. “Those have been lifelong assets, as I have gotten older I have never fallen.” Mulligan described her experience with the circus as the same as being on an athletic team. The circus was part of the athletic department and discipline and safety were

Ina Plumb, Ph.D. performed in the circus in ‘53. She performed the Triple Trapeze, Three Member Hang and the Spanish Web, where a single rope hangs down and the performer does aerial stunts on it. Plumb had performances in the Orange Bowl and in Georgia where she performed for her sister and nephew. “I got permission to dress as the gorilla and go into the stands,” Plumb said. “I sat next to my 5-year-old nephew and he had no idea that it was his aunt sitting next to him.” Plumb explained the uncertainty that the performers had with their costumes. The costumes were passed down from previous performers and had to be adjusted to fit the current users. “It was fun doing the dance routines but that was probably the original ‘wardrobe malfunction,’” Plumb said. Plumb remembered how the performers would receive calluses from working on the bars. They would be advised to rub salt on their calluses to make them tough like leather because if they used hand lotion

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Exhibits add to USS Mesa Verde commissioning
HELEN JOHNSON PROGRAM ASSISTANT

In December 2007, FSU Panama City students in the elementary education program participated in the educational component of the commissioning of the USS Mesa Verde. Advised by FSU Panama City instructor Cristina Rios, preservice teachers researched and presented information on Native American cultures and created a teaching activity that can be used when visiting the Mesa Verde National Park in Mesa Verde, Col. Exhibits were displayed at the Gulf Coast Community College campus during the event. The catalyst for this unusual combination of a military and educational program began when plans were laid for a new amphibious transport dock ship for the U.S. Navy. Ships need names and this one was no exception. The ship’s namesake, the Mesa Verde National Park, was created June 29, 1906. In 1970 the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization designated it as a World Heritage Site. Ships are often named after historical U.S. events or figures. This class ship will be the first named after a national park. The importance of the World Heritage designation was not lost on Rios. She has been teaching diversity in her social studies for educators’ classes for many years and is passionate about teaching pre-service teachers about other cultures. “When learning about other cultures,” she stated, “respect needs to permeate through everything we do in life.” When approached by Ken Shaw, associate dean of FSU Panama City, to develop a project to compliment the commissioning efforts, Rios had no difficulty finding enthusiastic students to participate. “I asked some of the students that were interested in diverse cultures if they would develop a type of activity that would relate to the Mesa Verde National Park as well as a celebration of the Native American cultures,” Rios explained. “They designed a project called the ‘Passport to Mesa Verde’. It was a trip for kids and the activities that they would need to have

Mesa Verde National Park Ranger Linda Martin, students Adam Duggar, Teresa Tripp, Rachel Harrison, Pam Dillard, Cristina Rios, M.A., and Ranger Tessy Shirakawa participate in events surrounding the commissioning of the USS Mesa Verde. - Helen Johnson/FSU PC

before they go to the park, during their stay and afterwards. This incorporated topics on reading, math, social studies and science. We also had two presentation boards on the different Native American cultures that tied in the importance of culture along with history.” Students Kelly Blair, Kelly Kirvin and Teresa Tripp presented “Passport to Native American Cultures: A Teacher’s Journey into the Native American Experience with Her Pre-service Teachers” and Pam Dillard, Adam Duggard and Rachel Harrison presented the display, “Journey to Mesa Verde.” As a World Heritage Site, the park is committed to educating the world as to the history of its early inhabitants as well as to the park’s geologic wonders. Its Web site (http://www.mesa.verde.national-park. com) has established a link with resources for teachers, children and the general public. Rios understands and supports such a commitment. She has been encouraging her student teachers to explore other

cultures and in so doing, opening their imaginations to the potential that all students have when given a supportive teaching environment. “I try to get them to learn that in order to appreciate the culture you need to have knowledge, you need to do the research of the culture, and not only one culture, but as many as possible,” she ardently declared. “Right now whenever we get hooked into current events we are learning about other cultures. I think some of the misconceptions we have about different cultures is lack of knowledge and exposure. The English for speakers of other languages and social studies courses in our elementary education program are preparing our preservice teachers with the vision, content, dispositions, and resources to weave the richness of cultural diversity through the fabric of instruction. Culture is not only a standard for educational purposes but also the essence of understanding humanity.” In addition to participating in the educational component, Rios also deepened her appreciation for the USS Mesa Verde

and crew directly. The week before the commissioning, she and approximately 60 other individuals were guests aboard the Mesa Verde as she traveled from Naval Air Station Pensacola to Panama City. Rios was able to observe sailors as the ship was under way for the day and joined them during meals. She believes this personal experience has helped her appreciate and understand a bit about the culture of the Navy which has its own way of doing things too. Summarizing the experience, Rios ardently said, “The Mesa Verde experience touched my heart in a very profound way. As an honored guest this experience made me realize the courage, tradition and teamwork represented by our country’s naval service personnel. These three characteristics are in the ship’s crest and epitomize the culture I experienced on the ship.” The USS Mesa Verde is based in Norfolk, Va. and is crewed by 360 sailors and three marines. She is captained by Commander Shawn W. Lobree.

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Faculty get first look at new Academic Center
Erin CiszCzon AssistAnt Editor

With plenty of sunshine and temperatures in the mid 70s, it was a great December day to be outside as the FSU PC faculty gathered near the construction site of the Holley Academic Center. Each grabbed a hard hat as they prepared to enter the building that already had its foundation and exterior walls in place. The group of instructors was greeted by Kyle Rowell, construction administrator for the architect firm Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc., who would lead them on a tour through the building. Chris Lacher, an instructor in the College of Computer Science, proposed the idea of a tour. At a previous faculty meeting, he asked Associate Dean Ken Shaw if it was possible for the faculty to get an up-close look at the structure. “It was mainly just pride and curiosity,” Lacher said. “We are proud of the new building and curious about how it works ‘under the skin.’” Even though Lacher had seen plans several times, he was not prepared for the grandeur. He explained the architecture is really dramatic as it affects personal use of the building, using the way the various balconied levels expand as they go up as an example. The architecture he felt made it seem even bigger because of the way space is brought to the eye. “It will be great to have new facilities,” Lacher said. “We will all enjoy and take pride in the way the building affects our students and visitors. The biggest benefit, however, will be the statement the building makes about FSU and its commitment to Panama City. Nothing could speak more visibly or with greater authority.” Assistant Dean Stephen Leach was also present for the event and helped to guide the tour. He pointed out classrooms and academic laboratories as the faculty walked through the building. He too was amazed at its size and what a beautiful view those inside will have of the nearby water. “It is a very impressive facility,” Leach said. “I think this will have a positive influence on visitors who might be thinking of attending FSU. We will have several large classrooms and several computer-equipped

(a computer for each student) teaching labs. This solves the scheduling problems that take place each term.” Leach also assisted the faculty in locating their future offices. All faculty are getting new computers, mostly laptops with docking stations and additional full-size monitors with full-size wireless keyboard and mouse. This will facilitate use in the classroom, conferences, etc. The faculty offices will be grouped by department: business, communications, nursing and criminology on the first floor. After a look at the ground floor, it was up to the second floor to see where the faculty members in education, psychology, social work, computer science, civil engineering and electrical engineering will be located. Everyone to this point managed to avoid the scattered debris of wood and tools but there was one thing they could not avoid – the narrow metal staircase. The actual stairs in the Holley Academic Center are not yet finished, so one by one the faculty members climbed the temporary and somewhat unstable stairs to the second floor. Only a few faculty members were brave enough to proceed to the third floor. Most chose to wait behind. “Everyone seems very excited now that they have seen their actual office space,” Leach said. Perhaps no one is more excited about the new Academic Center than campus librarian Darby Syrkin. She has been part of the building committee from the beginning and has worked with the architects to create a Library & Learning Center that will support student learning and collaboration. Although there will be a small number of books on Reserves in the new facility, the library print collection will still be housed at the Gulf Coast Community College Library. The benefit of that is the Library & Learning Center will have plenty of space for group and individual work areas. Some of the final decisions on the furniture haven’t been made, but Syrkin is envisioning collaborative workstations and comfortable chairs that will incorporate laptop tables and drink holders. Food and drink will be allowed in the area and the drink holders might also be handy should a small coffee cart or cafe be added to the building in the

FSU Panama City faculty and staff members view the new Academic Center from inside the structure for the first time. The tour took place following a faculty meeting in December 2007. - Erin Ciszczon/FSU PC

future. “I think the students will love it,” she said. “I want it to be a comfortable and productive space for everyone.” The Holley Academic Center is scheduled to be finished in late August or early September of 2008. Dan Nix, director of finance and administration, said the construction is on schedule. He explained the priority of the administration right now is the completion of the new building. Then they will start to look at changes to the Barron Building as it is scheduled to become

a building with even more student services such as Student Government Council offices and possibly a weight room. As enrollment and the campus grows in the future, Dan Nix, director of Finance and Administration, doesn’t think there will be a problem in putting any office or other space available in existing facilities to good use. “For many years a lack of available space has been an issue at FSU PC so it will be great to now have these options as new opportunities come forward,” Nix said.

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FSU PC looks back at Golf Classic history
Andrew Smith editor-in-chief

As FSU PC looks forward to the spring and its 25th graduation ceremony, we take a moment to look back at the history of the FSU Panama City Golf Classic, which has raised thousands of dollars for scholarships and funding donated by our community through this popular event. The tournament is not yet as old as our campus’s youngest student, but the 18year-old FSU PC Golf Classic is already a staple of the spring for the alumni and friends of the campus. It is, and has always been, a unique event in this area due to the design of competition in which the average duffer can compete with the most seasoned golfers. In fact, Dr. Larry Bland, the first dean of FSU PC and the originator of the event, said that the team competition during the first 10 years was never won by more than one or two strokes. The teams which play for prizes are balanced by the rules, which have remained the same since the inaugural event. “One thing that has always been different about the Classic than other golf tournaments, was that we made the tourney exceptionally fair,” Bland said. The tournament was set up so any golfer could compete for the big prizes because each golfer would enter the tournament as an individual and submit their own handicap. The campus created a special computer program which would then take the pool of all participants and mix them statistically to create evenly balanced teams. This allowed the tournament to have balance, so no player would feel like they were beaten by a loaded team playing as a practiced four-some. The players are ranked by handicap into “A,” (being the lowest scores, closest to par), “B,” “C” or “D” before the tournament begins upon entering a certified handicap from a golf course. After the players are ranked, the teams are set by computer and announced at the parings party, which serves as the opening night of the tournament before the nextday’s rounds begin. Dr. Bland said that the success of the

Beverly Bland, Coach Bobby Bowden, and former FSU PC Dean Larry Bland take a moment to relax after the morning round of an early FSU PC Golf Classic at the Hombre Golf Course. - File Photo Illustration/FSU PC

tournament was apparent in its first year due to the efforts of the campus staff who made it a memorable event. “I was the only golfer at FSU PC, but all of the staff pitched in and worked the tournament,” he said. “The maintenance crew built the hole signs which are still used today. Those signs have been the envy of other golf tournaments. My wife made teepee tee markers for each hole and the staff volunteered to drive the carts and pick up players. Everyone at FSU PC got right into the project and the team effort from the staff is my favorite memory of the first tournament.” The FSU PC Golf Classic has always hosted a high profile guest from FSU football, including Coach Bobby Bowden, who has attended 16 of the 17 previous tournaments. Bland had met Bowden a few years before the tournament began at other FSU golf tournaments and asked him to come over for the first FSU PC Golf Classic as the special guest. Bowden, who knows the Panama City area well, was glad to support the Panama City campus by taking part in the Classic. “Larry is a big golfer, and I had gotten to know him because we had played in Seminole booster tournaments before,” Bowden said. “I am happy to help with anything that portrays FSU

in a good light, especially the branch campus. The FSU Panama City campus is a tremendous arm of FSU and I hope it will continue to grow.” The coach has always been a dedicated supporter of FSU PC because the area is close to his heart. “Ann and I spend a lot of time here in Panama City because it is where we spend our vacations,” he said. “The first time I was in Panama City, I was 10 years old in 1939, or 1940. My family is from Birmingham, and you know how everyone from Birmingham comes to Panama City for vacation. Destin wasn’t even a spot on the map back then. I have been coming to Panama City ever since. In 1979 we bought our first condo and now we have two. The whole family, Ann and I, and our six kids and their spouses and our 21 grandchildren all enjoy coming to Panama City.” The FSU PC Golf Classic will be held at the Hombre Golf Club where it has been played for the last 18 years. Bowden feels comfortable on any of the three links provided by the Hombre (“The Good,” “The Bad” and “The Ugly”) because he plays them in his time off. “My sons and I play golf at the Hombre when we come on vacation to Panama City,” Bowden said. “Wes Burnham is

one of our biggest boosters and one of my favorite people.” The affable coach said his favorite memory of each of the tournaments were the supporters of the local campus and the many other Seminole supporters he has met in the area. “My favorite memory sure isn’t my score,” the coach quipped laughingly. Bowden enjoys his time on the links, but his play time is limited. “I started playing golf when I was coaching at South Georgia College in 1958. I’ve never taken lessons in my life I just play for fun. I do not go hunting or fishing because I don’t have the time. Golf is my recreation. I only have a chance to go golfing in April, May and June… when July comes around I put the clubs away and get ready for football season.” Since Bowden began playing golf in the FSU PC Golf Classic, the Seminoles have won 168 football games in 17 seasons, including 11 ACC titles (joined ACC in 1991), 11 bowl games, two national championships with only 47 losses (20 ACC, 6 bowl) and a one amazing comeback tie with the University of Florida in 1994. Bowden has also coached two Heisman trophy winners in that time and watched several of his protégés lead their new teams to glory. He has also had the field at Doak Campbell named after him by an act of the state legislature and in 2004 the Fellowship of Christian Athletes named its national award after him, which is given out during the halftime of the Bowl Championship Series game. Off the field, he has made a great impact by sharing his time and befriending so many people, which has inspired others to support the needs of Florida State University. FSU Panama City will again host Coach Bobby Bowden at the 18th annual Golf Classic March 7, 2008 along with 167 other great Seminole and FSU PC supporters. The 2008 FSU PC Golf tournament is full, but if you would like to participate or be a sponsor in next year’s event, contact Development Coordinator Sarah Giles at 850-770-2152, or via e-mail at sgiles@ pc.fsu.edu for more information.

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Lubo Liu, Ph.D., has had the paper “Kinetics of Acidic Macrocapsules in Controlling the pH of Groundwater” accepted by the journal Environmental Engineering Science. Dr. Liu has also started collaboration with Tsinghua University in China on the topic “Drinking Water & Beach Water Quality.” Stan Lindsay, Ph.D., has written a chapter, “Communication, Hierarchy, and Dramatistic Form: The Arousing and Relieving of Stress” for the book Transformative Communication Studies: Culture, Hierarchy, and the Human Condition. Lindsay recently had two papers accepted: (1) “Perelman’s Epideictic and Burke’s Entelechy: The Transmission of Values” (2008 Promise of Reason Conference in May 2008 at Eugene, OR) and (2) “The Kenneth Burke Concordance: A Heuristic, Organizational, Mnemonic, and Pedagogical Tool for Scholars in Multiple Fields” (2008 Rhetoric Society of America Conference in May 2008 at Seattle, WA). He has also been a peer reviewer of articles submitted to the Western Journal of Communication and the KB Journal. Cristina Rios was featured in the News Herald article Sept. 3, “Through Immigrant Eyes.” She received a letter from United States Lt. Steve Sellers is an alumni of Florida State University, earning his bachelor of science degree in criminology in 1989. He then went on to earn his master’s degree in public administration in 2001. His past jobs have included being a computer operator for Florida Department of Law Enforcement, probation officer for the Department of Corrections, officer with the FSU Police Department and lieutenant of the Tallahassee Community College Police Department. Sellers is most looking forward to meeting new people and learning new things. He and his wife love to travel and meet new people and learn about different locations and experience new things. He is still learning about the operational methods for the FSU PC department and campus. “I do see an amazing amount of growth for the PC campus in the near future and that will bring many challenges with regards to providing enhanced levels of service and security,” he said. Sellers takes a leadership approach to his job. He feels he should model the expected behavior and demonstrate the work ethic for all employees within the department. The

FSU Panama City Faculty News and Notes
Representative Ilena Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.) Nov. 2, acknowledging the work that she had done with Florida schools with regards to teaching about diversity. Rios was involved in the recent commissioning of the Mesa Verde LP19 in Panama City, working with the Higher Education Projects at GCCC. Chris Falk was nominated for the Outstanding Graduate Faculty Mentor Award. Sara Stoecklin, Ph.D., has recently submitted the article “The Making of a Good Object-oriented Method” (co-authored with Suzanne Smith) for refereed acceptance at the ACM Southeast Conference. Ahmet Pamuk, Ph.D., has had two recent journal papers: (1) “Remediation of Pile Foundations against Lateral Spreading by Passive Site Stabilization Technique” in Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering and (2) “Stabilization of Liquefiable Soils Using Colloidal Silica Grout” in the Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering. Jeanne Dexter, Ph.D., had the paper “Community Service as a Hiring Prerequisite?” accepted at the Southern Management Conference. Dexter also recently completed a certificate program in Negotiation and Conflict Management at Notre Dame. John Cagle had the following articles published: (1) “Education: A complex and empowering intervention at the end of life” (co-authored with P J. Kovacs) in Health . & Social Work and (2) “Adult day services” and “Transportation” (both co-authored with M. J. Naleppa) in The Encyclopedia of Elder Care (2nd edition). Cagle also made a poster presentation “An analysis of end-of-life content” presented at national Aging Network conferences at the Gerontological Society of America, 60th Annual Scientific Meeting in San Francisco, CA. Darby Syrkin served as the leader of the Regional Campus Libraries Discussion Group for the National Association of College and Research Libraries. She is also the Internet Resources Column Editor for Public Services Quarterly. Claire Calohan provided an article “Autistic Disorder” (co-authored with Colin Peeler) for Social work in mental health: An evidencebased approach. Gary Bliss chaired a session at the Southern Finance Association Conference in Charleston, Dr. Ramesh Rajagopalan earned his master’s and Ph.D. from Syracuse University, NY both in electrical engineering. He completed a bachelor’s in electrical engineering and master’s in physics from India. Rajagopalan did not know that he loved teaching until he became a teaching assistant at Syracuse University. He thoroughly enjoyed the experience. In addition, academia has been his dream right from graduate school. “One of the main perks of teaching is the satisfaction you get from the success of the students,” he said. “That’s a big motivator for me. Rajagopalan was a student searching the job market, looking for academic positions when he came across a faculty opening at FSU PC. He is quite excited about his new job and is looking forward to the sunny weather and exploring Florida. He joked that he really needed a break from the winter weather. On a more serious note, Rajagopalan wants to contribute towards the growth of FSU PC. Some immediate goals include: adding new programs, constructing new labs, recruiting more students and helping to expand the university over all.

SC. He also enhanced and presented a course on “Building a Healthy Financial Lifestyle” to employees of Florida State University. Bliss also developed and presented a session on “Financial Planning” to young executives through the Bay County Chamber of Commerce’s Bay Young Professionals group. Mike Zinszer recently published (coauthored with Adel Elsafty and George Morcous) the article “Forensic Investigation of Bridge Construction Scaffolding Collapse.” Mike Barbour recently conducted inservice training in “Time Management” for the management team at Jackson Hospital in Jackson County, Fla. Marion Fesmire, Ph.D., will present the paper (co-authored with C. Lundeen) “A Distance Learning Cohort: The Impact of Reading Coursework on Reading Practices in a Rural School” at the 2008 American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting. Kathy Davis coordinated testing (in November and December of last year) of Elementary and Social Studies Education students participating in pilot tests of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam.

Welcome Lt. Steve Sellers - Florida State University Police

Welcome Ramesh Rajagopalan - Electrical and Computer Engineering

daily duties and responsibilities are different from position to position but he explained the manner in which one takes pride in their job and serves the campus should remain the same. “To me, serving is the key,” he said. “The police motto of ‘To Protect and Serve’ is so true. We learn how to ‘protect’ during the various training classes that officer attend but very rarely do we concentrate on serving others.

“I am hoping that FSU PC will give me a great teaching experience and numerous possibilities for professional growth,” he said. “I have a wonderful set of colleagues here and I hope to learn a lot from them. The people here are very welcoming.” This semester Rajagopalan is teaching two courses – digital communications and advanced circuits with computers. He is also instructing the circuits lab.

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How do I become a student at FSU PC?
UNDERGRADUATE Quick guide to applying online
• Go to www.pc.fsu.edu • In the frame on the far left of your screen, click on “Admissions.” • In the right frame, click on “Apply Online.” • Next, click on “FSU Panama City Undergraduate Online Application” • Download the “Florida Residency Form.” • Pay the $30 non-refundable application fee by check or money order. • Mail the application fee and the completed “Florida Residency Form” or “Alabama/ Georgia Residency Form” with appropriate documentation (i.e., copy of driver’s license, voter registration, etc.) to: Office of Admissions & Records, FSU PC, 4750 Collegiate Dr., Panama City, FL 324051099. • Request one (1) official transcript from your high school and all colleges and universities attended to be sent to FSU PC. If you are applying to a degree program that requires a departmental application, be sure to follow the instructions provided by the department. After you have been admitted, you will receive a letter from the Office of Student Affairs inviting you to New Student Orientation. With the letter will be additional information including the Thagard Student Health History Form. Be sure to return the completed form to the Office of Student Affairs in Panama City before attending orientation. You cannot register for classes until the Office of Student Affairs has processed this form.

Planning for college takes thought, effort and organization. Our tools and advice can help you keep on track to make the application process easy and painless. Contact the Office of Admissions & Records for more information: (850) 770-2160.

GRADUATE Quick guide to applying online
• Go to www.pc.fsu.edu • In the frame on the far left of your screen, click on “Admissions.” • In the right frame, click on “Apply Online.” • Next, click on “FSU Panama City Graduate Online Application.” • Download the “Florida Residency Form.” • Pay the $30 non-refundable application fee by check or money order. Mail the application fee and the completed “Florida Residency Form” or “Alabama/Georgia Residency Form” with appropriate documentation (i.e., copy of driver’s license, voter registration, etc.) to: Office of Admissions & Records, FSU Panama City, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City FL, 32405. • Request two (2) official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. These should be sent to the address shown above. • Official test scores from the GRE (#5219) are required of all applicants except those requesting admission to the College of Business. Official test results from the GMAT (#5219) are required of applicants requesting admission to the College of Business. The GRE and GMAT scores are considered official when they are sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey. Student copies are not considered official. If you are applying to a degree program that requires a departmental application, be sure to follow the instructions provided by the department, including deadline dates. Be sure to complete the Thagard Student Health History Form and return it to the Office of Student Affairs in Panama City. You cannot register for classes until the Office of Student Affairs has processed this form. Cost Effective July 1, 2007, through June 30, 2008, the cost for the General Test is $140 for test sites in the U.S. Take the Graduate Record Exam Official GRE test scores (GMAT for College of Business applicants) are required for admission to graduate study at Florida State University. The GRE General Test measures skills that are acquired over a long period of time and are not related to any specific field of study. The skills measured are in these areas: verbal reasoning; quantitative reasoning; critical thinking and analytical writing. The scores provide common measures for comparing the qualifications of applicants and aid in the evaluation of grades and recommendations. The verbal reasoning section of the General Test measures reading comprehension, and verbal and analogical reasoning skills in a multiple-choice format. It measures your ability to understand complex ideas expressed in written passages and in the relationships between words. Typical testing time for the computer-based version of this section is 30-minutes (30 questions). The quantitative reasoning section measures your ability to understand basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and data analysis. In addition, it measures your ability to reason quantitatively and to solve problems in a quantitative setting. Typical testing time for the computer-based version of this section is 45-minutes (28 questions). The critical thinking and analytical writing section consists of two Analytical Writing tasks: a 45minute “Present Your Perspective on an Issue” task and a 30-minute “Analyze an Argument” task. This section of the exam is a performance test, in which you must organize and articulate your own ideas as you discuss a complex issue, as well as explain the logical Test Prep A CD-ROM containing “GRE Powerprep Software” is sent to each individual who registers for the computer-based GRE General Test. You may also download the Powerprep software for free. Visit the GRE website at www.ets.org/gre/greprep.html . Test Centers in the Area • Dothan (Test Center #2611) Prometric Testing Center 3245 Montgomery Hwy, Suite 7 Dothan, AL 36303 Phone: (334) 677-6334 • Tallahassee (Test Center #0617) Prometric Testing Center 1410 Marketing Street, Suite B-1 Pavilions Shopping Center Tallahassee, FL 32312 Phone: (850) 386-8707 • Pensacola (Test Center #7725) University of West Florida 11000 University Parkway, Bldg 21 Pensacola, FL 32514 Phone: (850) 473-7339

Frequently Asked Questions at FSU Panama City
Does it matter when I drop/add or make changes to my schedule? Yes. During the first four days of classes, courses may be added, dropped, or sections of a course changed. Students are responsible for knowing their schedule and making adjustments before the end of the Drop/ Add period. Students are financially liable for all courses appearing on their schedule after the fourth day of classes. Courses may be dropped through the seventh week of classes with the exception of mandated college preparatory courses, freshman composition, and courses involved in allegations of academic dishonesty; however, tuition charges remain. After the 12th week of classes, courses may be dropped only in exceptional circumstances. Three quick notes on drop/add regulations: 1. Effective the first day of classes, a student cannot drop his/her last or only course. (This is actually considered a cancellation of schedule and separate regulations apply.) 2. After the fifth day of the semester, students may only add courses with approval of the instructor. The student must pay the additional fees within five (5) calendar days to avoid the late payment fee. 3. Students who register for courses but do not attend classes receive grades of “F” if the courses are not officially dropped. What happens if I do not pay my tuition? As published in the General Bulletin, in accordance with Board of Governors Rule 6C-7.002 (6), F.A.C., students who do not pay tuition and fees or make arrangements for tuition and fee payment by the published deadline each semester will have their schedules cancelled. Students will be notified using their FSU email account concerning outstanding tuition delinquencies and given an opportunity to pay tuition and fees or make arrangements for payment with the Office of Student Financial Services prior to cancellation. Students whose schedule are cancelled for non-payment of tuition and fees will have their academic progress discontinued for the term in question and will not be able to attend class or receive grades. If my schedule is cancelled for non-payment, can I appeal? Yes. Students whose schedules are cancelled for non-payment of tuition and fees may appeal to the University Registrar for reinstatement and continuation of academic progress for the term. A written appeal must be submitted to the University Registrar by the end of the 12th week of the Fall and Spring semesters (consult the Registration Guide for Summer term deadlines). Prior to a student’s appeal being approved, the Office of Student Financial Services must verify that payment for the current term has been received or that appropriate arrangements have been made for tuition and fee payment. Students whose schedules are reinstated are subject to a $100.00 late registration fee and a $100.00 late payment fee. Check or credit card payments that are returned or refused will negate any tuition payment agreement for the reinstatement of a student’s schedule. The University reserves the right to deny reinstatement when a demonstrated pattern of tuition delinquencies over two or more semesters has occurred. Do I have to complete the foreign language requirement before I enter FSU PC? Yes, this is a university admission requirement. To satisfy this requirement, students must complete two sequential units of the same foreign language in high school or at least eight (8) semester hours of the same foreign language at the college level. It is important to understand that, although completion of two years of high school foreign language courses or eight semester hours in college will satisfy the University’s admission requirement, these courses do not satisfy the College of Arts & Sciences’ foreign language graduation requirement. Students pursuing a BS or BA degree within the College of Arts and Sciences, must be proficient through the intermediate level in any one language other than English and must satisfy this requirement by completing college course work through the 2000 level. What is mapping? MappingisFSU’sacademicadvisingandmonitoring system which impacts all full-time undergraduate students. Each major has a map. The map is a termby-term sample course schedule. Students do not have to complete all of the recommended classes on their maps to remain on course; they simply must meet certain minimum requirements known as “milestones.” Milestones may include a minimum grade point average (GPA), completion of specific classes, and/or minimum grades in one or more of the milestone classes. To graduate on-time, or in a timely manner, the student needs to make sure they have achieved or surpassed these milestones by the end of each term. Students who are “off course” are notified of such status by the University. Before registering again, these students must meet with their advisor in order to: 1) determine what is necessary to get back on course; or 2) identify possible alternative majors. If students are off course for two (2) consecutive semesters, they will be required to change to their major to a more appropriate major. Students will not be permitted to change to a major for which they would be off course for more than one semester. Can I give you a copy of the transcript from my last school? It has all my coursework listed on it, even those from other schools. As tedious as this task seems, it is vital for you to get all of your official transcripts sent from each institution you attended to the Office of Admissions and Records. Although your most recent transcript has all your coursework, it is not considered official unless it comes directly from the school where you took the courses. The admissions office has forms that you can send to each institution. I know that the admissions office has a deadline, but what about departmental deadlines? Both undergraduate and graduate students should make the initial contact with their respective departments early in the admission process. While talking with program advisors, each student should ask about departmental admission requirements. In some cases, students may have a different deadline, require writing samples, letters of recommendation, or other supplemental documents Whether you have already earned your Associate of Arts degree, are transferring in to FSU Panama City with multiple credits from multiple institutions, or are interested in pursuing a graduate degree, the Office of Admissions & Records is here to help. With offices located on campus, the Education Center at Tyndall Air Force Base, and the University Center at Chipola College, the staff of FSU PC is committed to assisting you throughout the admissions process. Do I have to have everything turned in by the admission deadline, or just the application? Turn in everything. That’s why it’s so important to plan out your strategy for admission early. Your application is not complete until the application fee and all high school and college transcripts have been received. Graduate programs require many entrance documentation such as: transcripts from all previous colleges and universities, letters of recommendation, resume, statement of purpose, and writing samples. FSU Panama City is an upper division campus, meaning students who come here will have completed their freshman and sophomore years at another institution, such as a junior or community college, or even a four-year college or university. Your strategy should be based on where you are now in terms of your college track.

Information about FSU PC:

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SUmmER 2008 CoURSE oFFERINGS*
*Course offerings are subject to change. Please check our Web site for the most up-to-date schedule.

Courses listed in RED are distance learning courses and will incur additional fees.
These courses are listed by departments and may not be representative of degrees offered at FSU PC. For degrees/majors available at the Panama City campus, please visit our Web site.

SUmmER A May 21 - august 8 ACCoUNTING ANALysis OF FiN sT PREs COsT ACTG ii ANTHRoPoloGy ANT4930 FORENsiC ANTHRPOLOGy CHIlDHooD EDUCATIoN , READING AND DISAbIlITy SERvICES EEX5017 TyP ATyP EARLy DEVEL EEX5248 POsiTiVE BEHAV sUP EEX5286 PREP iNDV TRANsiTiON iDs5347 iNF/TOD TyP ATyP DEV RED5337 sUPV/iNsT sEC sCH RD CIvIl AND ENvIRoNmENTAl ENGINEERING CEs3100 sTRUCTURAL ANALysis CommUNICATIoN COM4470 DEsKTOP MULTiMEDiA COM4905 DiR iNDiV sTUDy COM4909 HONORs WORK COM4910 APPLiC REsEARCH METH COM4941 APPLiC iNsTRUC METH COM4945 COM iNTRNsHP COM5906 DiR iNDiV sTUDy COM5911 sUPERVisED REsEARCH COM5940 sUPERVisED TEACHiNG COM8966 MAsTERs COMPREH EXAM ComPUTER SCIENCE CDA3101 COMPUTER ORG ii CEN4681 EXPERT sysTEMs Cis5930 EXPERT sysTEM DEsiGNCOP3014 PROGRAMMiNG i COP3014 PROGRAMMiNG i CRImINoloGy & CRImINAl JUSTICE CCJ4938 UW TECH EVALUATiON CCJ5285 sURVEy CJ THEORy/REs CCJ5285 sURVEy CJ THEORy/REs CCJ5625 ECOLOGy OF CRiME CCJ5981 UW TECH EVALUATiON EDUCATIoNAl lEADERSHIP AND PolICy STUDIES ADE5189 sTAFF TRAiN DEV EDA5192 EDUCATiONAL LEADRsHP EDA5232 LEGAL AsP PUB sCH AD EDA5242 sCHOOL FiNANCE EDA5423 DECisiON OR ED REs EDA5504 iNsTRUCT LEADERsHiP EDUCATIoNAl PSyCHoloGy EDF5935 MULTiCULTURAL EDUC EDF5935 MULTiCULTURAL EDUC ElECTRICAl AND ComPUTER ENGINEERING EEL3216 FUND OF POWER sysTEM EEL3472 ELECTROMAGNETiC FD i EEL3512 iNTRO TO COMMUNiCAT EEL3949 CO-OP WORK EXPER EEL4713 COMPUTER ARCH EEL4748 EMB MiCRO DEs PROJCT EEL4915C EE sR DEsiGN PROJ ii EEL4930 COMPUTER NETWORKs EEL5764 COMP sysTEM ARCHiTEC EDUCATIoNAl lEADERSHIP ADE5189 sTAFF TRAiNG - DEVEL FINANACE FiN3244 FiN MKTs/iNsT/iNTL F FiN3403 FiNCL MANGE OF FiRM FiN5445 PROB FiNANCL MGMT MAN5716 BUs CONDiTNs ANALys MAN5716 BUs CONDiTNs ANALys GEoGRAPHy Gis3015 MAP ANALysis HISToRy WOH4244 WORLD WAR ii WOH5246 WORLD WAR ii HoSPITAlITy HFT5477 FiNCL/COsT CNTRL sys INFoRmATIoN STUDIES Lis5271 REsEARCH METHODs Lis5362 DEs PROD NETWRK MED Lis5408 MGT OF iNFO ORGs Lis5411 iNTRO iNFO POLiCy ACG3171 ACG3351

INFoRmATIoN STUDIES PLAN EVAL & FiN MANG iNFO NEEDs CHiLDREN iNFO NEEDs yNG ADULT iNTRO iNFORM sERViCE iNFO ORGANiZATiON CATALOGiNG & CLAssiF FDTNs OF iNFO PROFEs HEALTH iNFO REsOURCE MKTG LiB & iNFO sERV mANAGEmENT GEB3213 BUs COMMUNiCATiON MAN3240 ORGANiZTNL BEHAViOR MAN3600 MULTiNTL BUs OPER MAN4701 BUsiNEss & sOCiETy MAN5245 ORGAN BEHAViOR mANAGEmENT INFoRmATIoN SySTEmS isM3003 FOUNDATiONs OF Mis isM5021 iNFORM & TECH MGMT isM5021 iNFORM & TECH MGMT isM5046 sOC & ORG iss iN Mis mARkETING MAR3023 BAsiC MARKET CONCPTs MAR3323 PROMOTNAL MGMT MAR5409 BUsiNEss TO BUsiNEss MAN5501 OPERATNs MANAGEMENT MAN5601 MULTNATNL BUs OPERAT mATHEmATICS MAP3305 ENG MATHEMATiCs i mECHANICAl ENGINEERING EML3100 THERMODyNAMiCs EGM3512 ENGiNEERiNG MECHANiC mIDDlE & SECoNDARy EDUCATIoN MAE5146 sCHOOL MATH CURRiC MAE5641 sP TPC: PROB sOLViNG MAE5641 sP TPC: NUMBER sysTM MAE8966 MAsTERs COMP EXAM NURSING NGR5149 ADVANCED PATHOPHys NGR5149 ADVANCED PATHOPHys NGR5602C ADV MANAGEMNT FAM ii NGR5718C EVAL METH iN NsG ED NUR3286 NURsiNG AGiNG FAMiLy NUR3655 MULTiCL FACTORs HLTH NUR4080 NRs CONCEPTs i NUR4080L NGs PRACTiCUM i PolITICAl SCIENCE POs3931 sPC TPCs:GOVERNMENT PUP3002 iNTRO PUBLiC POLiCy PSyCHoloGy EAB3703 APPLD BEHVR ANALysis EAB5710 DEV DisABiL & AUTisM EAB5780 ETHiC & PROF issUEs EAB5940 APP BEHAV ANALy PRAC EAB5942 APP BEHAV ANALy PRAC EXP3422C CONDiT & LEARN W LAB Psy4920 TREATMENT OF AUTisM Psy4920 BHVR ANLys iN sCHOOL Psy5908 TREATMENT OF AUTisM Psy5908 BHVR ANLys iN sCHOOL Psy5908 ABA APPLiCATiONs Psy5908 MsTR COMP EXAM PREP Psy5917 sUPERVisED REsEARCH Psy8966 MAsTERs COMP EXAM sOP3742 PsyCH OF WOMEN RISk mANAGEmENT/INSURANCE BUL3310 LEGAL/ETHiC ENV BUs BUL5810 LEGAL/ETHOC ENV BUs REE3043 REAL EsTATE REE4433 LEGAL ENV REAL EsT REE5305 REAL EsTATE iNVEsTMT REE5435 REAL EsTATE LAW RMi5011C FUND RisK/iNsURANCE RMi5136 EMPLOyEE BENEFiT PLN RMi5710C iNs COMP OPERATiONs SoCIAl WoRk sOW4152 HUMAN sEXUALiTy sOW4510 UNDERGRAD FiELD iNsT sOW4522 iNTEGRATVE FiELD sEM sOW4645 AGiNG AND OLD AGE sOW5369 iNTEGR sEM/ADV PRAC sOW5432 EVALUATiON s W PRAC sOW5532 GRAD FiELD iNsTCTN i Lis5426 Lis5564 Lis5565 Lis5603 Lis5703 Lis5711 Lis5916 Lis5916 Lis5916

SoCIAl WoRk GRAD FiELD iNsTR ii sW W/CHiLDREN & ADOL SoCIoloGy syD3020 POPULATiON & sOCiETy syP3540 sOCiOLOGy OF LAW syP4550 ALCOHOL & DRUG PROB syP4570 DEViANCE/sOCiAL CNTR URbAN & REGIoNAl PlANNING URP4404 RiVER BAsiN PLANNiNG URP5405 RiVER BAsiN PLANNiNG sOW5535 sOW5655 SUmmER b May 21 - June 20 ART EDUCATIoN ARE3313C ART iN ELEMENTAR sCH CHIlDHooD EDUCATIoN , READING AND DISAbIlITy SERvICES EEC4930 DiFFERENTiATED iNsT EEX4070 iNC sT/Dis iN GEN ED EEX5087 MiD/sEC CURR sPEC ED EMR5235 TCHG PROFND DisABiL MAE4326 HOW CHiLDRN LRN MATH RED4941 RDG/EsOL PRACTiCUM RED5147 FOUNDTNs DEVEL READ RED5546 DiAGNOsis OF READiNG TsL4080 LANG PRiN FOR TCHRs ClASSICS CLA3501 GEN/sOC ANCNT GREECE CommUNICATIoN ADV5503 MEDiA CONsUMER BEHAV COM3110 COM FOR BUs & PROFEs COM4935 iNTRO TO GRAD sTUDy CRImINoloGy & CRImINAl JUSTICE CCJ3011 CRiMiNOLOGy CCJ4816 PUBLiC AND PRiV sEC CJE3761 iNTRO UNDERWATER iNV CJE3761L iNTRO UNDERWATER iNV CJL3510 COURTs HISToRy AMH4423 FL HisT siNCE 1821 AMH3351 PREs POLiTiCs TO 1877 INFoRmATIoN STUDIES Lis5313 DEs PROD MEDiA REs Lis5512 sCHL COLL DEV/MNGT

PSyCHoloGy CLiNCL/COUNsEL PsyCH ABNORMAL PsyCHOLOGy SoCIAl WoRk sOW4323 THRy/PRAC sOC WK GRP CLP3305 CLP4143 SUmmER C June 30 - august 8 CHIlDHooD EDUCATIoN , READING AND DISAbIlITy SERvICES EEX4212 EDUC AssEssMNT DisAB EEX5774 TRANs FOR sEVERE Dis LAE4314 LANGUAGE ART ELE sCH LAE5319 ORL/WR EXPR ELEM sCH sCE4310 TCHNG sCiEN ELEM sCH ssE4113 ELE sCHL sOCiAL sTUD TsL4081 TCHNG ENG LEARNERs TsL4324 EsOL iNsTRUCTiON ClASSICS CLT3378 ANCiENT MyTHOLOGy CommUNICATIoN ADV4800 CREATiVE sTRATEGy ii COM5336 PROGRAMMiNG & DEsiGN CRImINoloGy & CRImINAl JUSTICE CCJ4663 WOMEN-CRiME-JUsTiCE CCJ5636 COMPARATiVE CRiM/CJ CJE4763 sCi UNDERWATER iNV CJE4763L sCi UW iNVEsTN LAB CJE5767 sCi UNDERWATER iNV CJE5767L sCi UW iNVEsTN LAB EDUCATIoNAl PSyCHoloGy EDF5443 MEAs & EVAL iN CLAss SoCIoloGy syP3000 sOCAL PsyCH OF GRUPs SUmmER D June 16 - august 8 CHEmICAl AND bIoloGICAl ENGINEERING EGN3613 PRiN OF EGN ECONOMy CIvIl ENGINEERING CGN4802 sENiOR DEsGN PROJECT CWR4120 GRNDWATER HyDROLOG EEs3040 iNTRO ENViRN ENG sCi

FoundAtion SCholArShipS
Fall 2008 & Spring 2009 Awards Spring 2009 (only) Awards
Apply March 17, 2008 through July 3, 2008 Apply August 1, 2008 through October 31, 2008

FSu pAnAmA City

$750 for undergraduates per semester $850 for graduates per semester APPLY NOW
Students must complete the paper or electronic Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Processing of the FAFSA takes 4-6 weeks. Students should complete the FAFSA application at least 30 days prior to the scholarship application deadline. Students may apply for financial aid before applying for or obtaining admission status, but no offer of scholarship or financial aid will be made unless the student is officially admitted to FSU, the FAFSA has been processed and the Student Aid Report received prior to scholarship application deadlines. Students must be enrolled for a minimum of six hours and possess a minimum G. P A. of 2.5 to receive a scholarship award. .
Please contact Financial Aid, Office of Student Affairs at (850) 770-2170 or 1-866-MyFSUPC, or visit our web site at www.pc.fsu.edu for an application.

Scholarship requirements

vISIT www.PC.fsu.Edu FoR THE moST UP-To-DATE SCHEDUlE

•

FSU Panama City 4750 Collegiate Drive Panama City, Fl 32405

•

Toll Free Number: office of Admissions: office of Financial Aid:

(866) 693-7872 (850) 770-2160 (850) 770-2170

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*course offerings are subject to change. please check our Web site for the most up-to-date schedule.

fAll 2008 coursE offErings*
courses listed in rEd are distance learning courses and will incur additional fees.
EducAtionAl lEAdErship And policy studiEs ADE5385 ADULT LEARNING CGS5310 INFO MNGT TECH IN ED EDA5192 EDUCATIOAL LEADERSHP EDA5503 THE PRINCIPALSHIP EDA5931 ASST PRINCIPAL EDA5931 PRACTICUM IN ED LEAD EducAtionAl psychology And lEArning systEms EDF4210 ED PSY: DEV LEARNERS ElEctricAl And computEr EnginEEring EEE3300 ELECTRONICS EEE3300L ELECTRONICS LAB EEL3111 INTRO CIRCUIT ANALYS EEL3135 SIG/LINAR SYST ANALY EEL3473 ELECTROMAGNETIC FDII EEL3705 DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN EEL3705L DIGITAL LOGIC LAB EEL3949 CO-OP WORK EXPER EEL4021 STAT TOP IN ELEC ENG EEL4911C SR DESIGN PROJECT I EEL4930 ADV COMPTR ARCHITEC EEL5930 ADV COMPTR ARCHITEC finAncE FIN3244 FIN MKTS/INST/INTL F FIN3403 FINCL MANGE OF FIRM FIN4424 PROB IN FINAN MANAG FIN4504 INVESTMENTS FIN5425 PROB FINANCL MANAGEM FIN5515 INVSTMNT MANAG & ANA QMB3200 METHOD BUS DECISION history AMH4231 THE U.S.:1920-1945 EUH3533 HISTORY OF IRELAND EUH4576 20TH CENTURY RUSSIA EUH5579 20TH CENTURY RUSSIA hospitAlity HFT5697 LEGAL ENVIRONMT/HAT informAtion studiEs LIS5008 ADV ONLINE SRCHING LIS5203 ASSESSING INFO NEEDS LIS5260 INFORMATION SCIENCE LIS5263 THEORY INFO RETRIEV LIS5271 RESRCH INFO STUDIES LIS5275 USABILITY ANALYSIS LIS5313 DES PROD MEDIA RES LIS5362 DES & PROD OF NET MU LIS5367 ADV WEB APPLICATIONS LIS5408 MGT OF INFO ORGS LIS5411 INTRO INFO POLICY LIS5417 INTRO LEGAL RESRCS LIS5418 INTRO MED INFORMATIC LIS5484 INTRO. DATA NETWORKS LIS5511 MGMNT INFO COLLECTN LIS5512 SCHOOL COLL DEV MGT LIS5524 INSTR ROLE INF SPC LIS5565 INFO NEEDS OF YA’S LIS5590 MUSEUM INFORMATICS LIS5602 MARKETING LIS5603 INTRO INFO SERVICES LIS5703 INFO ORGANIZATION LIS5736 INDEXING & ABSTRACT LIS5782 DATABASE MGT SYSTEMS LIS5916 FDTNS OF THE PROFESS LIS5916 INFO LEADERSHIP LIS5916 METADATA LIS5916 INTRO TO INFO ARCHIT LIS5945 INTERNSHIP LIS5945 SCHOOL MEDIA INTERN mAnAgEmEnt GEB3213 BUS COMMUNICATION MAN3240 ORGANIZTNL BEHAVIOR MAN4720 STRA MAN AND BUS POL MAN4930 MANAGERIAL CREATIVITY MAN5721 STRATEGY AND BUS POL MAN5721 STRATEGY AND BUS POL mAnAgEmEnt informAtion systEms ISM5021 INFORM & TECH MGMT ISM5021 INFORM & TECH MGMT ISM5118 ADV SYS ANALYSIS/DES ISM5227 ADV TELECOMM MGMT ISM5315 PROJECT MANAGEMENT mAnAgEmEnt informAtion systEms ISM5428 KNOW MGT & BUS INTEL ISM5507 E-BUSINESS mArkEting MAR3023 BASIC MARKET CONCPTS MAR3503 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR MAR4841 SERVICES MARKETING MAN5501 OPERATNS MANAGEMENT MAN5601 MULTNATNL BUS OPERAT mAthEmAtics MAP3305 ENG MATHEMATICS I MAP3306 ENG MATHEMATICS II mEchAnicAl EnginEEring EML3100 THERMODYNAMICS middlE & sEcondAry EducAtion MAE5338 SEM TEACH GEOMETRY MAE5338 SEM TEACH GEOMETRY MAE5641 ANLYS OF STUD LRNG MAE5641 ANLYS OF STUD LRNG MAE5795 SEM ON RSRCH MATH ED MAE5795 SEM ON RSRCH MATH ED MAE8966 MASTERS COMPREH EXAM SSE4113 ELE SCHL SOCIAL STUD SSE4362 FNDMNTL TEACH SOC ST SSE4364 SKILL DEV. SOC. STUD SSE4664 INQUR TEACH SOC STUD SSE4940 FIELD STUDY SOC ED SSE4944 STUDENT TEACHING SSE SSE5366 SKILL DEV. SOC. STUD SSE5367 FUNDA TEACH SOC STUD SSE5665 INQUI TEACH SOC STUD SSE5943 FIELD LAB INTERNSHIP SSE5947 INTRNSHP GRAD STUDEN nursing NUR3495 WOM HLTH ISS/LFE CYL NUR4107 NURSNG HEALTHCAR SYS NUR4835 PROF NSG LDSHP/MAN NUR4835L NSG LDSHP/MGMT LAB politicAl sciEncE POS3142 URBAN POLITICS POS3182 FLORIDA GOVERNMENT POS4624 SUPR CRT/CIV LIB-RTS POT4205 AMER POLITIC THOUGHT psychology CLP3314 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY DEP4404 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING DEP5165 DEVELOPMENTAL PSY EAB5700 BASIC PRIN OF BEHAV EAB5711 MENTAL HLTH & AGING psychology EAB5780 ETHIC & PROF ISSUES EAB5940 APP BEHAV ANALY PRAC EAB5941 APP BEHAV ANALY PRAC EXP3202C SENSAT & PERC W LAB PSB4731 BIOPSYCH OF SEX BEHA PSY3213C RESEARCH METHD W LAB PSY4920 RESEARCH TOPICS PSY5908 TREATMENT OF AUTISM PSY5908 BHVR ANLYS IN SCHOOL PSY5908 ABA APPLICATIONS PSY5908 MSTR COMP EXAM PREP PSY5917 SUPERVISED RESEARCH PSY8966 MASTERS COMPREH EXAM SOP3004 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY risk mAnAgEmEnt/insurAncE BUL5810 LEGL ENVIRONMT BUS REE3043 REAL ESTATE REE5205 REAL EST FIN / APPR RMI3011 RISK MANAG INSURANCE RMI5225C P/L CONTRACT ANALYSIS RMI5810C PERS FINACL PLANNING sociAl Work SOW1054 HUMN SERV EXPERIENCE SOW3203 INTRO SOC WRK/WELFRE SOW3350 INTRVWNG RECORD SOW4232 SOC WELF POLICY PROG SOW4403 INTRO SOW RESEARCH SOW4510 UNDERGRAD FIELD INST SOW4522 INTEGRATVE FIELD SEM SOW4620 DIVERSITY IN SW SOW4702 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY SOW5105 H.B & S.E. I SOW5308 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE SOW5369 INTEGR SEM/ADV PRAC SOW5532 GRAD FIELD INSTCTN I SOW5535 GRAD FIELD INSTR II SOW5611 FAMILY COUNSELING SOW5712 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY sociology SYA4010 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY SYA4300 METHODS SOCIAL RESCH SYD3020 POPULATION & SOCIETY SYD4700 RACE/MINORTY RELATNS SYO3460 SOC OF MASS MEDIA SYP3000 SOCAL PSYCH OF GRUPS SYP3730 AGING & LIFE COURSE SYP4570 DEVIANCE/SOCIAL CNTR

these courses are listed by departments and may not be representative of degrees offered at fsu pc. for degrees/majors available at the panama city campus, please visit our Web site.

Accounting FIN ACTG & REP I FIN ACTG & REP III FIN RPRTG & MGR CTRL FEDERAL TAX ACTG I FEDERAL TAX ACTG II Anthropology ANT4241 ANTHROP OF RELIGION Art EducAtion ARE3313 CART IN ELEMENTAR SCH childhood EducAtion , rEAding And disAblity sErvicEs EDE4907 DIRCTD FIELD EXPERNC EDE4943 STUDNT TEACH ELEM ED EDE5327 DIFFERENTIATING INST EDG4410 CLASS MAN & LEGAL IS EDG5250 CURRICULUM & INSTRUC EEC4930 DIFFERENTIATED INST EEX4212 EDUC ASSESSMNT DISAB LAE5349 LANG & LIT DEV:STORY MAE4310 TEACH ELEM SCHL MATH MAE4326 HOW CHILD LRN MATH RED4310 EARLY LIT LEARNING RED4510 TCHG RDG ELEM SCH RED4941 RDG/ESOL PRACTICUM RED5546 DIAGNOSIS OF READING TSL4080 LANG PRIN FOR TCHRS TSL4081 TCHNG ENG LEARNERS civil And EnvironmEntAl EnginEEring CCE4004 CONST ENGINEERING CEG3011 SOIL MECHANICS CEG3011L SOIL MECHANICS LAB CEG4801 GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN CES4702 CONCRETE I CGN4800 PRE SR DSGN/PRF ISS CWR3201 HYDRAULICS CWR3201L HYDRAULICS LAB CWR4202 HYDRAULIC ENG I EES3040 INTRO ENVIRN ENG SCI EES3040L INTRO ENVIRN ENG LAB EGM3512 ENGINEERING MECHANIC EGN3331 STRENGTH MATERIALS I EGN3331L STRENGTH MATERLS LAB EGN3613 PRIN OF EGN ECONOMY TTE3004 TRANSPORTATION ENGIN communicAtion ADV3001 CREATIVE STRATEGY I ADV3008 PRIN OF ADVERTISING COM3120 COM FOR ORGANIZ COM4470 DESKTOP MULTIMEDIA COM4905 DIR INDIV STUDY COM4909 HONORS WORK COM4910 APPLIC RESEARCH METH COM4941 APPLIC INSTRUC METH COM4945 COM INTRNSHP COM5127 ASSESSING ORG COM COM5469 COM PLANNG & DISPUTE COM5526 MARKETING COM MGMT COM5906 DIR INDIV STUDY COM5911 SUPERVISED RESEARCH COM5940 SUPERVISED TEACHING COM8966 MASTERS COMPREH EXAM PUR3000 INTRODUCTION TO PR PUR3100 PR WRITING SPC3301 INTERPESONL COMMUNI computEr sciEncE CDA4150 COMP ARCHITECTUR CDA5155 COMP ARCHITECTUR CEN4020 SOFTWARE ENG I CEN5064 ADV SOFTWARE DESIGN CIS4930 ADV SOFTWARE DESIGN CIS4933 HONORS WORK CIS5935 RESEARCH SEMINAR COP3330 OO PROGRAMMING COP3353 INTRO TO UNIX COP4020 PROGRAM LANGUAGE criminology & criminAl JusticE CCJ5606 CRIMINOLOGIAL THEORY CCJ5669 RACE/ETH/CRIME CCJ5705 RESCH METH CRIM I CJE5024 POLICE & SOCIETY Economics ECO3223 FIN MKT/BANK/MON POL ACG3101 ACG4201 ACG5026 TAX4001 TAX4011

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