The Child Nutrition Programs by emv53904

VIEWS: 36 PAGES: 23

									                       The Child Nutrition Programs
                       PART OF THE TOTAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
                          PROMOTING HEALTH AND NUTRITION


The Child Nutrition Programs administered in the state of Washington by Child
Nutrition Services, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction are:
         National School Lunch Program
         School Breakfast Program
         Child and Adult Care Food Program
         Simplified Summer Food Program
         Seamless Summer Feeding Program
         Special Milk Program
         Commodity Distribution Program

                                  Child Nutrition Services
                                    Mission Statement
Assist school districts and other institutions in providing quality nutrition programs that
promote life-long, healthful living while providing nutritious meals each day that
prepare children for learning.

                                        Goals
        To provide leadership for the child nutrition meal programs through
         advocacy, assistance, and administration.
        To manage program resources for the benefit of recipients.
        To incorporate nutrition education in all phases of services.

                                        Objectives
          Assist Child Nutrition Program sponsors.
          Advocate for good nutrition.
          Administer the Child Nutrition Programs.
          Support section staff.
          Promote strong agency cooperation, interaction, and communication.

                                     Randy I. Dorn
                        State Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                   Martin T. Mueller
                       Assistant Superintendent, Student Support
                                   George C. Sneller
                            Director, Child Nutrition Services

                      Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                   Old Capitol Building
                                     PO Box 47200
                                Olympia, WA 98504-7200

         To order more copies of this document, please call 1-888-59-LEARN
    (1-888-595-3276), or visit our Web site at http://www.k12.wa.us/ChildNutrition/.
                               Table of Contents
History—National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs                  1
Washington State School Lunch and Breakfast Highlights                      1-2
History—Washington State Commodity Distribution Program                      3
Washington State Commodity Distribution Program Highlights                   3
Special Milk Program                                                         3
History—Child and Adult Care Food Program                                   13
Washington State Child and Adult Care Food Program Highlights             13-14
History—Simplified Summer Food Program                                      15
Washington State Simplified Summer Food Program Highlights                  15
History—Washington State Seamless Summer Feeding Program                    16
Washington State Seamless Summer Feeding Program Highlights                 16
History—Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program                                   18
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Highlights                                18
2007–08 Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Grant Recipients                          19

STATISTICS:
Washington State School Breakfast and Lunch Program Statistics               2
National School Lunch Program Average Lunch Selling Price                    4
National School Breakfast Program Average Breakfast Selling Price            4
National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program Expenditures              5
Child Nutrition Program Summary                                              5
October Public School Free/Reduced-Price Lunch Applications Summary          6
2007–08 National School Lunch Participation Total
     by Congressional District                                               7
2007–08 National School Breakfast Participation Total
     by Congressional District                                               7
2007–08 School Districts Operating Federal Lunch and Breakfast Programs
     by Congressional District Revenues and Expenditures                     8
Child Nutrition Programs Average Daily Participation and Percentage
       of Change                                                           9-10
2007–08 National School Lunch Program Participation                         11
2007–08 National School Breakfast Program Participation                     12
Child and Adult Care Food Program Participation FY 2009                     14
School Nutrition Services Revenue                                           17
                                History
         National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs
        The National School Lunch Act, signed by President Harry S. Truman,
permanently authorized the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in 1946. Three
reasons prompted this legislation: (1) there were many young men found to be
malnourished during physical examinations for the military service; (2) there was a
need for an outlet for agricultural commodities produced by flourishing farms after
World War II; and (3) lunch was needed at school for learning to take place. In 1962,
funds for free and reduced-price lunches were first authorized for schools and, in 1970,
uniform national income eligibility guidelines for free and reduced-price meals were
authorized.
        The School Breakfast Program (SBP) was first established under the Child
Nutrition Act of 1966 as a pilot project. First consideration was to have the program for
schools in poor areas and in areas where children had to travel a long distance to
school. In 1971 eligibility for free and reduced-price breakfasts was established using
the same income eligibility guidelines as the school lunch program. In 1975 the School
Breakfast Program became a permanent program.
        On October 31, 1998, the Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998 (Public
Law 105-336) was signed and allowed snacks to be claimed for reimbursement by
schools operating after school care programs for children up to 18 years and children
with disabilities. To be eligible for the after school snack program, children must be in
care for education or enrichment purposes. After school care programs that operate in
areas served by a school in which at least 50 percent of the children enrolled in school
are eligible for free and reduced-price meals may claim snacks for reimbursement at
the free rate. Schools in other areas may also participate in the after school hours
snack program; however, reimbursement depends on the eligibility category for each
child who participates in the after school program and receives a snack.


  Washington State School Lunch and School Breakfast Highlights

       The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast
Program (SBP) are designed to promote the health and well-being of children by
providing nutritious meals to children in public and private schools and residential child
care institutions (RCCIs).
       The income eligibility guidelines for school meals are intended to direct benefits
to those children most in need. These guidelines are based on the federal income
poverty guidelines and are revised annually. The eligibility criteria is 130 percent of the
income poverty guidelines for free and 185 percent for reduced-price meals.
       There are currently 374 local education agencies (LEAs) in Washington State
that participate in the NSLP/SBP which includes 281 public school districts, 44 private
schools, and 49 RCCIs.




State of Washington                         Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
1
       LEAs participating in the NSLP are required to provide meals that contain
one-third of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for protein, calcium, iron,
vitamin A, vitamin C, and with no more than 30 percent of calories from fat and less
than 10 percent of calories from saturated fat. LEAs participating in the SBP offer one-
fourth of the RDAs for these nutrients.

                   Washington State School Breakfast and
                     School Lunch Program Statistics
                           School Year 2008–09
                         (For Public Schools Only)

School Breakfast Program:

Districts on School Breakfast Program                      270
Districts not on School Breakfast Program                   25

Schools on School Breakfast Program                      1,824
Schools not on School Breakfast Program                    136

Average Daily Participation, October 2008             160,026

* Children with Access to Breakfast                   946,901
* Children without Access to Breakfast                 96,927

                                                    1,043,028

National School Lunch Program:

Districts on National School Lunch Program                 281
Districts not on National School Lunch Program              14

Schools on National School Lunch Program                 1,954
Schools not on National School Lunch Program                 6

Average Daily Participation, October 2008             500,921

* Children with Access to Lunch                     1,020,381
* Children without Access to Lunch                     23,447

                                                    1,043,828


* Based on October 2008 enrollment figures reported to Child Nutrition Services.




State of Washington                         Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                         2
     History Washington State Commodity Distribution Programs
        The commodity program began in the early 1930’s as an outgrowth of federal
agriculture policies designed to shore up farm prices and help American farmers
suffering from the economic upheaval of the Great Depression. Many individual
farmers lost their farms, while the total amount of farmland increased. Farmers planted
more acreage to try and make up for poor prices – thus further depressing prices by
increasing surpluses in a time of falling demand. At the same time, millions of people in
the cities lost their jobs and were without means of support for themselves and their
families. The danger of malnutrition among children became a national concern. For
the full legislative history of food distribution programs visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/
fdd/aboutfd/fd_history.pdf.

    Washington State Commodity Distribution Program Highlights

        Public and private school districts as well as approved state agencies (recipient
agencies [RAs]) that participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are
eligible to receive food purchased by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In
2008, commodities valued at over $20 million and totaling over 21 million pounds were
allocated. Each month schools are in session, approximately 2 million pounds of
commodities are distributed by the commodity distribution section of Child Nutrition
Services.
        In 2008–09, 358 RAs were allocated commodities at the rate of .2075 cents for
each lunch served and selected from a variety of dry, canned, frozen, and fresh foods
up to nine times during the year. These commodities represent 20–25 percent of the
value of all foods purchased for the lunch program. In cooperation with the Department
of Defense, 54 RAs were allocated $1,732,246 of USDA entitlement funds for the
purchase of fresh fruit and vegetables.
        Food Distribution is funded through USDA State Administrative Expense (SAE)
funds and a state-administered revolving fund. RAs are charged a fee to cover
storage, handling, and shipping. They also reimburse the state account for processing
costs of raw USDA processors who manufacture over 40 specific food items for NSLP.
        Simplified Summer Food Program (SSFP) sponsors also receive USDA
commodities based on 1.5 cents for each meal served. Some Child and Adult Care
Food Program (CACFP) institutions receive cash-in-lieu for commodities.

                               Special Milk Program
        The Special Milk Program (SMP) was established in 1955 to increase the
consumption of fluid milk for children in nonprofit schools. In 1966 the Special Milk
Program was incorporated into the Child Nutrition Act. In 1981, legislation was
enacted that limited participation in the milk program to schools and institutions not
participating in other child nutrition programs. Participation was restored to schools on
the NSLP/SBP with split session kindergarten in which children do not have access to
meal service.



State of Washington                        Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
3
        The SMP provides reimbursement for milk served to children in schools, child
care institutions, after school programs, or camps that do not participate in other Child
Nutrition Programs. Children from families that qualify for free milk may receive milk at
no cost if this program option is chosen by the school or institution.
   There are currently 69 Special Milk Program sponsors; of which 2 sponsors are
public schools, 40 private schools,10 nonresidential child care institutions, and 17
summer camps.
                         National School Lunch Program
                          Average Lunch Selling Price
                                                             Free K–3
      SY        Elem          M/Jr.            HS                               Adult
                                                             Reduced*
    1999–00     $1.41         $1.65           $1.71             $0.39            $2.49
    2000–01     $1.43         $1.66           $1.72             $0.39            $2.51
    2001–02     $1.47         $1.71           $1.77             $0.39            $2.56
    2002–03     $1.46         $1.73           $1.79             $0.38            $2.57
    2003–04     $1.56         $1.81           $1.87             $0.39            $2.68
    2004–05     $1.60         $1.85           $1.90             $0.38            $2.75
    2005–06     $1.65         $1.89           $1.90             $0.38            $2.83
    2006–07     $1.77         $2.04           $2.11             $0.40            $2.94
    2007–08     $1.84         $2.11           $2.17             $0.39***         $3.03
    2008–09     $1.92         $2.10           $2.00             $0.37            $3.23
*   Some sponsors do not charge reduced-price eligible students for their meals. This
    results in the average price being less than the maximum allowed.
** Beginning school year 2006–07, the Washington State Legislature appropriated
    funds to subsidize the charge for reduced-price breakfast.
*** Beginning school year 2007–08, Washington State Legislature appropriated funds
    to subsidize the charge for reduced-priced lunch for students in K–3.
                        National School Breakfast Program
                         Average Breakfast Selling Price
       SY          Elem           M/Jr.             HS         Reduced          Adult
    1999–00        $0.88          $0.96          $0.98           $0.28          $1.46
    2000–01        $0.88          $0.97          $0.99           $0.28          $1.46
    2001–02        $0.90          $0.99          $1.01           $0.28          $1.50
    2002–03        $0.89          $0.97          $1.02           $0.28          $1.53
    2003–04        $0.95          $1.03          $1.06           $0.28          $1.59
    2004–05        $0.97          $1.06          $1.08           $0.28          $1.64
    2005–06        $0.99          $1.08          $1.09           $0.27          $1.69
    2006–07        $1.08          $1.18          $1.21           $0.00**        $1.73
    2007–08        $0.97          $1.02          $1.13           $0.00          $1.67
    2008–09        $1.10          $1.17          $1.12           $0.00          $1.81

State of Washington                        Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                        4
                        National School Lunch and
                   School Breakfast Program Expenditures
Year             Food         Labor          Supplies            Other        Average
                                                                              Cost
                                                                              Per Meal
1993–94        70,773,281    75,030,260     6,016,295         7,288,470        $2.06
1994–95        74,923,201    78,625,370     6,848,959         7,899,151        $2.08
1995–96        78,324,340    82,272,249     7,288,304         8,760,041        $2.14
1996–97        81,836,408    84,487,344     7,626,431         9,133,121        $2.17
1997–98        85,167,100    89,024,033     8,148,168         9,616,122        $2.24
1998–99        90,378,786    92,877,104     8,377,977        10,768,208        $2.27
1999–00        94,657,825    99,606,954     9,524,394         9,692,169        $2.34
2000–01        96,662,566   105,907,099    12,310,515         9,600,020        $2.45
2001–02       103,300,092   112,835,741    12,257,599         9,914,322        $2.51
2002–03       101,429,332   118,548,200    13,780,480         9,849,598        $2.51
2003–04       110,528,581   123,231,921    12,781,190         9,528,314        $2.57
2004–05       117,908,682   131,020,671    14,385,007        10,000,123        $2.69
2005–06       120,076,450   137,725,732    14,772,879         9,328,905        $2.79
2006–07       126,459,676   146,880,347    14,887,228        10,256,588        $2.79
2007–08       138,134,790   153,698,489    15,859,833         8,250,916        $2.99


                  National School Lunch Program Summary

                                  Free = 130% of poverty guidelines
                                  Reduced-price = 185% of poverty guidelines
                                  Above-scale (paid) = 185%




                                            Free
                                            30%



       Paid
       61%
                                            Reduced-price
                                            9%




State of Washington                       Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
5
               October Public School Free/Reduced-Price
                    Lunch Applications Summary
School       October K-12    Number of Free       % of Students Eligible for
Year          Enrollment    and Reduced-Price     Free and Reduced-Price
                                                     Meals Applications

1993–94         915,694         255,906                     27.9%
1994–95         934,309         274,599                     29.4%
1995–96         951,696         291,177                     30.6%
1996–97         971,903         302,855                     31.2%
1997–98         985,617         304,437                     30.9%
1998–99         994,649         312,088                     31.4%
1999–00         995,523         309,088                     31.0%
2000–01         994,921         311,065                     31.0%
2001–02       1,000,660         325,328                     33.0%
2002–03         984,590         350,100                     35.5%
2003–04         986,274         364,803                     37.0%
2004–05       1,000,780         375,427                     37.5%
2005–06       1,012,765         384,088                     37.9%
2006–07       1,013,361         380,129                     37.5%
2007–08       1,016,509         388,227                     38.2%
2008–09       1,020,381         400,696                     39.5%




State of Washington               Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                               6
                 National School Lunch Participation Total
                         by Congressional District
                             (Public Schools)
                                 2007–08
Congressional          Enrollment    Total Meals—Free,                  ADP*
   District                         Reduced-price, & Paid

    1                    93,983           6,412,024                    37,663
    2                   143,313          11,017,522                    63,262
    3                   125,690          10,269,943                    58,385
    4                   145,394          14,952,375                    86,549
    5                   108,973          10,306,301                    60,202
    6                   113,084          10,221,991                    58,540
    7                    45,879           3,441,226                    19,716
    8                   103,291           7,615,989                    42,856
    9                   135,321          11,141,100                    63,730
TOTAL                 1,014,928          85,378,471                   490,902

               National School Breakfast Participation Total
                         by Congressional District
                             (Public Schools)
                                 2007–08

Congressional          Enrollment    Total Meals—Free,                  ADP*
   District                         Reduced-price, & Paid

        1                93,983           1,191,259                     6,621
        2               143,313           3,012,115                    16,666
        3               125,690           3,077,978                    17,562
        4               145,394           5,393,889                    31,300
        5               108,973           3,205,577                    18,596
        6               113,084           4,294,227                    24,779
        7                45,879           1,290,329                     7,323
        8               103,291           1,277,434                     7,202
        9               135,321           3,262,938                    18,451
TOTAL                 1,014,928          26,005,746                   148,500

* Average Daily Participation




State of Washington                   Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
7
 School Districts Operating Federal Lunch and Breakfast Programs
                     by Congressional District
                    Revenues and Expenditures
                              2007–08

Congressional         Total Revenue    Total Expenditure         Revenue Less
   District                                                       Expenditure
        1             $24,731,758        $27,262,725             -$2,530,967
        2             $40,613,530        $45,740,965             -$5,127,435
        3             $37,696,760        $42,312,077             -$4,615,317
        4             $53,815,267        $59,183,082             -$5,367,815
        5             $36,293,897        $43,249,689             -$6,995,792
        6             $38,452,906        $44,305,686             -$5,852,780
        7             $11,561,237        $13,910,399             -$2,349,162
        8             $29,992,908        $31,826,179             -$1,833,271
        9             $41,056,864        $42,568,176             -$1,511,312
     Total        $314,215,127         $350,358,978             -$36,143,851




State of Washington                   Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                   8
            Child Nutrition Programs Average Daily Participation
                          and Percentage of Change

     Public Schools, Private Schools, and Residential Child Care Institutions
    LUNCH          Oct. 2003 % of Change     Oct. 2004 % of Change   Oct. 2005 % of Change
Meals              10,268,308                 9,529,742               9,745,458
ADP                   474,319     2%            478,940     1%          488,214     2%
Days of Service         21.65                     19.89                   19.96

    LUNCH           Oct. 2006 % of Change    Oct. 2007 % of Change   Oct. 2008 % of Change
Meals               10,410,842               10,866,308              10,875,724
ADP                    495,417     1%           498,470     1%          500,921     1%
Days of Service          21.01                    21.80                   21.71

 BREAKFAST          Oct. 2003 % of Change    Oct. 2004 % of Change   Oct. 2005 % of Change
Meals                2,775,974                2,655,668               2,734,284
ADP                    126,659     2%           132,078     4%          136,735     4%
Days of Service          21.92                     20.1                      20

 BREAKFAST          Oct. 2006 % of Change    Oct. 2007 % of Change   Oct. 2008 % of Change
Meals                3,125,231                3,314,491               3,483,567
ADP                    148,143    14%           151,668     1%          160,026     1%
Days of Service          21.10                    21.85                   21.77

   SNACKS           Oct. 2003 % of Change    Oct. 2004 % of Change   Oct. 2005 % of Change
Meals                 216,365                  173,736                 182,881
ADP                     10,690    15%             9,258   -13%            9,791     6%
Days of Service          20.24                    18.76                   18.68

   SNACKS           Oct. 2006 % of Change    Oct. 2007 % of Change   Oct. 2008 % of Change
Meals                 197,856                  194,296                 179,713
ADP                     10,187    -2%             9,766     1%            9,139     1%
Days of Service          19.42                    19.90                   19.66


                                Summer Feeding Program
                  July 2003   % of Change   July 2004 % of Change    July 2005 % of Change
Sites                     441     -6%              430    -2%               407    -5%
Meals                767,675                   692,227                  660,550
Lunch ADP              24,909     -9%           23,071    -7%            22,102    -4%

                  July 2006   % of Change   July 2007 % of Change    July 2008 % of Change
Sites                     584     43%              558    -4%                562    1%
Meals                811,588                   847,933                  924,779
Lunch ADP              30,435     38%           39,558   30 %             37,636   -5%




State of Washington                           Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
9
        Child Nutrition Programs Average Daily Participation and
                          Percentage of Change

                         Seamless Summer Feeding Program
                  July 2003 % of Change   July 2004 % of Change July 2005 % of Change
Sites                    139    35%              157    13%           204     30%
Meals                310,149                 288,771              318,179
Lunch ADP             11,014    38%           12,264    11%      13,034        6%

                  July 2006 % of Change   July 2007 % of Change July 2008 % of Change
Sites                      70  -66%               68    -3%         60       -12%
Meals                102,673                  98,615              109,917
Lunch ADP               4,042  -70%            5,627    39%       3,955      -30%


                          Child and Adult Care Food Program
                                Family Day Care Homes
                Sept. 2003 % of Change    Sept. 2004 % of Change Sept. 2005 % of Change
Sites Operating       4,451    -6%              4,032    -9%          3,705     -9%
Meals            1,552,910                 1,467,951              1,348,050
ADP                 29,448     -5%            27,814     -6%         27,263     -2%

                Sept. 2006 % of Change    Sept. 2007 % of Change Sept. 2008 % of Change
Sites Operating       3,452    -7%              3,221    -7%           3,213     0%
Meals            1,223,852                 1,111,059              1,183,640
ADP                 24,885     -9%            24,700     -1%         20,631    -16%

                         Child and Adult Care Food Program
                      Child Care Centers and Adult Care Centers

                Sept. 2003 % of Change Sept. 2004 % of Change     Sept. 2005 % of Change
Sites Operating         989     8%           1,022     3%               1,096     7%
Meals            1,584,537              1,688,224                  1,748,947
ADP                 40,952     14%         49,538     21%             45,415     -8%

                  Sept. 2006 % of Change Sept. 2007 % of Change   Sept. 2008 % of Change
Sites Operating         1,099   0.27%          1,117     2%             1,152     3%
Meals              1,735,260              1,729,465                1,984,832
ADP                   49,446      9%         51,394      4%           52,748      3%



ADP: Average Daily Participation                    % of Change: Current year data
compared to data from previous year.




State of Washington                        Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                       10
          2007–08 National School Lunch Program Participation
These figures represent the number of lunches served in each of the categories for the
2007–08 school year for all sponsors.
   County      Enrollment         Free         Reduced           Paid          ADP
Adams              4,234         339,861         80,778         125,496        3,034
Asotin             3,096         133,577         47,588         104,819        1,589
Benton            33,650       1,268,741        304,862       1,020,446       14,411
Chelan            13,970         767,241        129,066         424,416        7,337
Clallam            8,798         389,852        105,947         306,777        4,459
Clark             72,777       2,234,127        716,666       2,729,573       31,558
Columbia             505          18,199          4,095           20,617         238
Cowlitz           17,563         762,620        179,856         669,154        8,954
Douglas            6,757         397,734         82,230         229,282        3,940
Ferry                920          56,723         18,311           33,526         603
Franklin          15,677       1,090,488        178,359         330,276        8,884
Garfield             318          15,608          5,167           22,331         239
Grant             18,224       1,290,599        237,567         486,613       11,193
Grays Harbor      11,604         640,537        156,502         436,391        6,852

Island             8,648         197,582         110,695          356,721        3,694
Jefferson          2,907          99,346          35,380           96,454        1,284
King             253,238       7,560,538       2,274,706        9,903,704      109,661
Kitsap            38,498         972,901         396,768        1,566,425       16,312
Kittitas           4,742         162,227          35,700          180,412        2,102
Klickitat          2,943         163,527          32,142           98,993        1,637
Lewis             11,753         661,822         139,672          382,141        6,576
Lincoln            2,211          87,995          38,227          126,054        1,402
Mason              8,251         362,340          95,174          265,428        4,016
Okanogan           6,592         403,665          87,091          188,169        3,772
Pacific            2,962         208,352          40,041          114,823        2,018
Pend Oreille       1,746          91,828          22,869           66,527        1,007
Pierce           127,354       4,644,377       1,489,482        4,351,371       58,251
San Juan           1,441          29,410          19,567           51,470          558
Skagit            18,141         871,270         209,206          646,163        9,592
Skamania           1,142          41,934          15,685           53,029          615
Snohomish        106,762       2,763,801         982,795        4,238,709       44,363
Spokane           73,021       2,780,151       1,022,519        3,063,290       38,144
Stevens            5,658         305,984          89,107          151,515        3,037
Thurston          38,590       1,184,640         416,652        1,759,593       18,672
Wahkiakum            478          25,340           3,446           20,151          272
Walla Walla        8,784         524,875         114,514          300,093        5,219
Whatcom           26,228       1,005,525         284,653          912,932       12,240
Whitman            4,423         126,957          49,910          273,471        2,502
Yakima            50,809       4,062,485         608,716        1,228,432       32,776
TOTALS         1,015,415      38,744,779      10,861,711       37,335,787      483,013
ADP: Average Daily Participation

State of Washington                        Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
11
       2007–08 National School Breakfast Program Participation
These figures represent the number of breakfasts served in each of the categories
for the 2007–08 school year for all sponsors.
   County        Enrollment          Free        Reduced          Paid           ADP
Adams                    4,234        185,447         33,745         27,293         1,369
Asotin                   3,096         71,744         18,478         16,654           594
Benton                  33,650        559,057        111,079         92,423         4,236
Chelan                  13,970        299,038         43,328         40,120         2,125
Clallam                  8,798        253,631         67,293        161,231         2,679
Clark                   72,777        903,458        261,598        377,830         8,572
Columbia                   505          7,483          1,079          1,061            53
Cowlitz                 17,563        360,923         72,848        106,827         3,003
Douglas                  6,757        172,287         35,629         37,229         1,362
Ferry                      920         32,047          8,516          9,248           277
Franklin                15,677        526,359         72,055         55,328         3,632
Garfield                   318          5,388          1,641          2,723            54
Grant                   18,224        579,668         91,451         95,410         4,258
Grays Harbor            11,604        317,955         71,349         83,400         2,626
Island                   8,648         70,960         37,642         43,981           848
Jefferson                2,907         53,588         19,073         20,798           519
King                  253,238       3,147,321        805,834        936,057        27,162
Kitsap                  38,498        446,689        158,576        201,508         4,482
Kittitas                 4,742         76,760         13,930         29,783           669
Klickitat                2,943         74,548         10,776         17,110           569
Lewis                   11,753        360,302         61,680         72,550         2,747
Lincoln                  2,211         39,067         10,675         11,705           341
Mason                    8,251        169,772         44,573         68,991         1,574
Okanogan                 6,592        179,902         31,148         31,582         1,348
Pacific                  2,962        118,105         18,026         24,942           895
Pend Oreille             1,746         59,650         13,541         20,921           523
Pierce                127,354       2,366,131        657,101        710,786        20,745
San Juan                 1,441          7,723          7,149          8,750           131
Skagit                  18,141        413,114         83,978        117,691         3,415
Skamania                 1,142         26,502          8,904         14,667           278
Snohomish             106,762       1,135,485        344,763        473,950        10,857
Spokane                 73,021      1,236,745        361,245        333,499        10,730
Stevens                  5,658        181,938         44,729         43,264         1,500
Thurston                38,590        599,170        170,808        245,579         5,642
Wahkiakum                  478         13,906          1,424          4,578           111
Walla Walla              8,784        262,845         45,438         40,099         1,935
Whatcom                 26,228        512,716        129,334        126,317         4,269
Whitman                  4,423         56,810         20,792         36,820           636
Yakima                  50,809      1,921,839        198,197        145,073        12,584
TOTALS              1,015,415      17,806,073      4,189,425      4,887,778       149,352
ADP: Average Daily Participation
State of Washington                         Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                        12
                 History Child and Adult Care Food Program
         In 1968 the Special Food Service Program for Children (SFSPFC), the
forerunner to the Child Care Food Program and the Summer Food Service Program,
was established. This pilot program was operated by day care centers where poor
economic conditions existed or where there were high concentrations of working
mothers. In 1975 the Child Care and Summer Food Service components of the
SFSPFC were separated.
         The Child Care Food Program was permanently established in 1978. Eligibility
was expanded to include before and after school care and any licensed public or
private nonprofit organization providing nonresidential child care. It specifically
included family day care homes and the Head Start Program.
         In 1989 adult day care centers providing meals to eligible enrolled individuals
began participating and the program’s name was changed to the Child and Adult Care
Food Program (CACFP).
         The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996
(P.L. 104-193) mandated several changes to the CACFP, including the reimbursement
structure for family day care homes and a reduction in the number of meals that child
care centers may claim for reimbursement.
         The Child Reauthorization Act of 1998 allowed emergency shelters that serve
homeless children and their families to participate and authorizes reimbursement for
snacks served in at-risk centers.
         The Child Reauthorization Act of 2004 expanded for-profit (proprietary) centers’
eligibility if at least 25 percent of the children in care (enrolled or license capacity,
whichever is less) are eligible for free or reduced-price meals. They may also
participate if they receive compensation under Title XX for at least 25 percent of their
licensed or enrolled capacity, whichever is less.
         CACFP benefits are available to children 12 years and under, children of
migrant workers 15 years and under, persons age 18 and under who are residents of
emergency shelters, and mentally or physically disabled persons as defined by the
state.

               Washington State CACFP Program Highlights
        The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) provides federal funds to
nonresidential child and adult care facilities to serve nutritious meals and snacks. The
goal of the CACFP is to improve and maintain the health and nutritional status of
children and adults in care while promoting the development of good eating habits.
        Eligible programs include nonresidential, licensed public or private, nonprofit
child care centers or family day care homes. Head Start, Early Childhood Educational
Assistance Program (ECEAP), outside-school-hours, certain homeless shelters, and at
-risk centers meeting the CACFP requirements are also eligible. Proprietary child care
centers may participate if at least 25 percent of the children in care (enrolled or license
capacity, whichever is less) are eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Eligibility
based on compensation under Title XX is not an option in Washington. Certain adult
care centers that provide services to adults 60 years or older or chronically-impaired,
disabled persons 18 years or older are also eligible.

State of Washington                         Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
13
         Eligible participants include infants and children through the age of 12, children of
migrant workers 15 years and under, children 18 years and under in emergency shelters or
in at-risk programs, mentally or physically disabled persons as defined by the state, and
adults 60 years and older.
         Reimbursement rates for child and adult care centers are based on family income
eligibility. Homeless shelters and at-risk centers are reimbursed at the free rate.
         Reimbursement rates for family day care home providers are based on a two-tiered
structure determined by economic need based on the location of the day care home, the
income of the day care provider, or the income of an individual child’s household.
         Since 1990, the number of child care center sites participating in the CACFP has
steadily increased. The number of family day care homes has steadily decreased since
1997. The CACFP reaches children in 39 counties. Participation in child care centers
continues to increase especially among the for-profit centers. Following is a breakdown of
types of institutions in fiscal year 2009, who participate in CACFP.

                                  CACFP Participation
                                   Fiscal Year 2009

       Independent centers have only one site. Sponsors have two or more sites.

       CACFP centers are further divided according to the population they serve. Some
centers serve multiple populations. The following chart shows the number of sites approved
to serve each program type.
                                       Program Types
Sponsor Type                                 Number             Site Sponsored
     Independent Centers                      406                     406
     Adult Care Sponsors                        9                      20
     Center Sponsors                          147                     752

Subtotals                                      562                 1,178

      Family Day Care Home Sponsors              14                 3,580

Grand Totals                                   576                 4,758
Institution Type                                               Number of Sites
       Adult Care Centers                                           20
       Child Care Centers                                          827
       Head Starts                                                 322
       Outside School Hours Care                                   139
       ECEAP                                                       131
       At-Risk Program                                             126
       Emergency Shelters                                             6

     Family day care home sponsors provided services to 3,580 day care home providers.
Some centers serve multiple programs. For example, a child care center might also have a
Head Start program and an at-risk program.

State of Washington                             Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                            14
            History Simplified Summer Food Service Program
         The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) was established in 1968 as part of
the pilot program along with the Child Care Food Program. The intention was to
provide meals to children in areas where poor economic conditions existed or where
there were high concentrations of working mothers. In 1975, the SFSP was formally
established as a separate program. In 1981, the Omnibus Reconciliation Bill set the
eligibility requirements at higher levels than in previous years. Area
eligibility required 50 percent of the children in the area to be from families at or
below 185 percent of the poverty level and sponsorship of the program no longer
available to private, nonprofit organizations unless they sponsored a residential
summer camp. In 1989, private, nonprofit organizations were allowed again to sponsor
the SFSP with limitations. The Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998 signed in
late October lifted some of the restrictions for private, nonprofit
organizations to allow them to provide meals to children at more sites, particularly in
rural areas.
         Sponsors must apply to operate a SFSP. Once approved, sponsors
operate sites in low-income areas and may feed children 18 years and younger.
Sponsors may serve a maximum of two meals per day, which includes breakfast,
lunch, or snacks.
         Beginning in summer 2006, Washington State began operating the
Simplified Summer Food Program, formally known as the Lugar Pilot. This program
reduces the paperwork burden placed on sponsors and ensures them the maximum
reimbursement (meals served multiplied by rates).

                 Washington State SFSP Highlights
         (now known as the Simplified Summer Food Program)
               The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction assumed the
administration of the Summer Food Service Program in Washington State in 1989. The
first year, 22 organizations and one school district sponsored the program in the state.
During these last 19 years, the number of sponsors, feeding sites, and
children participating has fluctuated—especially since 2002 when school districts
received the option of operating the Seamless Summer Feeding Program instead of
the SFSP. Participation fluctuated again in 2006 when Washington State switched
from offering the Summer Food Service Program to the Simplified Summer Food
Program. In 2008, meals were served to children in 35 of the 39 counties, at a total of
665 sites statewide. An average of 37,636 children were served each day.

         Following is a breakdown of the 106 sponsors participating in 2008:
             School Districts ............................................................... 68
             Private nonprofit organizations ....................................... 17
             Indian Tribe ....................................................................... 4
             City and county governments ......................................... 10
             Colleges/Universities and Upward Bound/NYSP .............. 2
             Residential Camps ............................................................ 5
             TOTAL .......................................................................... 106

State of Washington                                Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
15
    History Washington State Seamless Summer Feeding Program
       The Seamless Summer Feeding Program (SP) began as a pilot program in
California and Florida. The SP was expanded to all states in 2002 and was set to
terminate following the summer of 2004. However, in early 2004, the program became
a permanent option for school districts to use in operation of a summer feeding
program.
       The SP combines features of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP),
School Breakfast Program (SBP), and the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP).
The purpose of the SP is to reduce the administrative burden and paperwork
requirements placed on school districts to run a summer food program.
       School districts must apply to operate the program. Once approved, schools
operate sites in low-income areas and may feed children 18 years and younger. Meals
are reimbursed at the free NSLP/SBP rates. Schools may serve a maximum of two
meals per day, which includes snacks as a meal choice. Sites may be in schools and
nonschool settings, community centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCAs, etc. It is
important to note that school districts operating an academic summer school and
feeding only those children enrolled in the summer school program, must extend their
NSLP/SBP agreement instead of operating under the SP.

  Washington State Seamless Summer Feeding Program Highlights

        The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction administers the program at
the state level. For the summer of 2008, there were 38 school districts/private schools
participating with 60 meal service sites throughout the state. Meals were served to an
average of 3,955 children each day.
        Training is offered to school district personnel in March/April of each year.
Although training is not mandatory, attendance is highly recommended to help
sponsors plan, operate, and monitor a successful program.
        Sponsorship of the SP decreased in 2007, as Washington State was
approved to operate under the ―Simplified‖ rules of the SFSP. School districts were
encouraged to switch from the SP back to the SFSP, as the Simplified Summer Food
Program (SSFP) has decreased the administrative burdens associated with the
program and reimbursement rates are higher under the SSFP than the SP.




State of Washington                        Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                       16
                      School Nutrition Services Revenue

State support for reduced-price meals:

For school year 2007–08, Washington State funded the 30 cent co-pay for reduced-
price breakfasts served in public schools.

Number of Breakfasts:     4,163,644
Dollar Amount:           $1,249,093

For school year 2007–08, Washington State funded the 40 cent co-pay for reduced-
price lunches in public schools for children in kindergarten through third grade.

Number of Lunches:        3,825,989
Dollar Amount:           $1,530,396




           School Nutrition Services Revenue
                  School Year 2007-08
                                 Local Levy
                                   10.3%
                         State
                         2.9%
                                                                         Federal
                                                                         Local Sales
                                                             Federal
                                                              51.0%      State

                  Local Sales                                            Local Levy
                    35.8%




State of Washington                      Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
17
                                    History
                      Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program
       The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program initially began as a pilot project
authorized by Congress in 2002. The pilot provided funds to purchase fresh fruits and
vegetables in four States and an Indian Tribal Organization (ITO) for School Year 2002
-2003. The purpose of the pilot was to determine the best practices for increasing fruit
(both fresh and dried) and fresh vegetable consumption.
       The success of the pilot led to the enactment of legislation in 2004 to expand
the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program and to make it a permanent program under the
National School Lunch Act. The law added four additional states and two ITOs for
School Year 2004-2005.
       In 2006 the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration,
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act appropriated a one-time funding of
$6,000,000 to further expand the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program in six additional
States.
       The 2008 Consolidated Appropriations Act expanded the Fresh Fruit and
Vegetable Program nationwide and provided approximately $9.9 million to begin
program operations for School Year 2008-2009.
       The Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 amended the Richard B.
Russell National School Lunch Act by adding section 19, the Fresh Fruit and
Vegetable
Program. Section 19 permanently authorized the program nationwide, consolidated all
prior operations under Section 19 and provided a significant funding increase,
beginning with $40 million in FY 2009.

               Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Highlights

        The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) provides all children in
participating schools with a variety of free fresh fruits and vegetables throughout
the school day. It is an effective and creative way of introducing fresh fruits
and vegetables as healthy snack options. The FFVP also encourages community
partnerships to support the schools when they offer free fruit and vegetables to
children during the school day. The goal of the FFVP is to:
          • Create healthier school environments by providing healthier food
          choices.
          • Expand the variety of fruits and vegetables children experience.
          • Increase children’s fruit and vegetable consumption.
          • Make a difference in children’s diets to impact their present and
          future health.
        This program is seen as an important catalyst for change in efforts to combat
childhood obesity by helping children learn more healthful eating habits. The FFVP
introduces school children to a variety of produce that they otherwise might not have
had the opportunity to sample.
        The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction administers the FFVP at the
State level. In 2007, grants were awarded to 25 schools in Washington State, serving
9,047 students.

State of Washington                        Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
                                                                                       18
  2007–08 Federal Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program Grant Recipients
    School District            School                 Enrollment        Funding Amt.

Washtucna SD          Washtucna School                          59          $6,849.07

Clarkston SD          Highland Elem.                          317          $32,731.77
Manson SD             Manson Elem.                            364          $37,177.87

Lake Chelan SD        Morgan-Owens Elem.                      562          $57,826.79
Orondo SD             Orondo Elem.                            229          $23,102.27

Bridgeport SD         Bridgeport Elem.                        369          $37,876.31

Mansfield SD          Mansfield School                          86          $9,780.05
Orient SD             Orient Elem.                              73          $8,069.98
Warden SD             Warden Middle                           211          $21,807.48

Aberdeen SD           Robert Gray Elem.                       336          $34,459.77
Seattle SD            Emerson Elem.                           404          $41,683.62
Highline SD           Madrona Elem.                           640          $66,045.20
Bellevue SD           Sherwood Forest Elem.                   538          $54,983.81
Auburn SD             Pioneer Elem.                           442          $45,591.83
Klickitat SD          Klickitat Elem.                           68          $8,498.83
Oroville SD           Oroville Elem.                          364          $37,275.64

Mount Vernon SD       Little Mountain Elem.                   593          $61,098.00
Spokane SD            Shaw Middle                             673          $69,389.41

East Valley SD        Trent Elem.                             511          $52,246.71

Wellipinit SD         Wellipinit Elem.                        165          $17,089.98

Northport SD          Northport Elem.                         111          $11,617.02

Bellingham SD         Shuksan Middle                          540          $55,679.12

Nooksack Valley SD    Everson Elem.                           259          $26,551.34

Mount Baker SD        Kendall Elem.                           552          $56,733.46

Wapato SD             Camas Elem.                             581          $59,945.89

                                        TOTALS              9,047        $934,111.22

State of Washington                       Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
19
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs
and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where
applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual
orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an
individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited
bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means
for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400
Independence Avenue SW, Washington DC 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 or
(202) 720-6382 (TDD).

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

								
To top