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Electronic Stewardship for Small

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					Electronic Stewardship for Small and
Handheld Electronics
 Federal Electronics Challenge
 Partner Call
 March 5, 2009




                                       1
Agenda
 What is a small or handheld device
 Purchasing
 Data security
 Recycling/End-of-life




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Small and Handheld Devices
What is a small or handheld     They can be devices for many
electronic device?              markets:
      Personal Digital            Consumer
       Assistants (PDA’s)          Commercial
      Cell Phones                 Industrial
      Digital cameras             Military
      Global Positioning          Laboratory
       Systems (GPS)
      Portable media players      It seems like all most
      Analytic devices             anything is getting a
                                    handheld version today
                                                               3
Small and Handheld Devices
   For the purposes of this call they are
    generally:
     Battery operated
     Can operate independently of other devices
     Self contained
     May have some accessories




                                                   4
What’s the difference?
 What makes small devices different
 than the larger devices they supplant?
    Fewer  serviceable parts
    They are moving with the user
    Shorter time between generations
    Easier to damage
    Harder to upgrade
    Potentially shorter life span


                                          5
What’s the difference?
   What makes small devices different than the
    larger devices they supplant?
     Different operating systems /software means
      each type of device may need different
      knowledge to maintain
     Input and output devices aren’t always there to
      support the device
         How  does data come off?
         How are data security processes done if there isn’t a
          drive to boot a program from?

                                                                  6
Purchasing
   ENERGY STAR
   Battery Chargers
       230 million battery chargers are used in the US
       More energy efficient battery chargers have the potential
        to save Americans more than 1 billion kilowatt hours
        (kWh) of energy per year, saving Americans more than
        $100 million annually
       Conventional battery chargers — even when not actively
        charging a product — can draw as much as 5 to 20
        times more energy than is actually stored in the battery!
       Advanced energy-saving designs are now available that,
        on average, use 35 percent less energy.
                                                               7
Purchasing
   ENERGY STAR
   External Power Adapters
       As many as 1.5 billion are in use in the U.S.
            300 billion kWh/year, and
            11% of the national electric bill
       Used in:
            MP3 players, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), camcorders,
             digital cameras, laptops, and cordless and mobile phones.
       Savings
            On average, 30% more efficient than conventional models.
            Are often lighter and smaller in size, which makes it easier for
             consumers to transport products like laptops.
                                                                                8
Purchasing
   Ecolabels:
       EPEAT
            IEEE/EPEAT standard will be considered in 2011/12
       TCO and Blue Angle have some listed products in this
        class
            These are European programs
            Few products in the US market have these labels
   Look at key environmental attributes similar to
    what is available for other electronics
       Reduced toxins
       Recyclability
       Upgradability/Reuseability                               9
Purchasing
   Look at FEC tools
     Product environmental assessment tools
     Total cost of ownership tool
       www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/resources/docs/topenv.pdf

   Manufacturer’s product environmental
    information sheet




                                                                        10
Purchasing
   Other things to consider
       Compatibility with existing equipment
          Memory
          Software
          Cables
          Supplies   and consumables
       Compatibility with networks
          Wi-Fi
          Cellular   telephone
          Others?

                                                11
Data Security
   Understand how end-of-life data security effects
    these devices
       Clearing – Resistant to keyboard attacks
       Purging – Resistant to laboratory attacks
   Know the difference between resets
       Soft – may just restart the device
       Hard/factory – may return it to the factory settings
   Different devices may use different methods to
    clear memory


                                                               12
Data Security
   Equipment may contain information that should
    not get out. To find out how to reset see:
       Owners manual
       Websites
   Remember data security when
       Transferring equipment to a new user
       Sending equipment for repair
   Some devices may not have a way to clear data
       Is this important based on the device and use?
   Work with you IT department to determine the
    best way to remove data                              13
End-of-Life Management
   Following the regular property process:
       Reuse, donation, recycling before disposal
   Remember:
     Cables and documentation
     Memory cards and SIM chips
     Will any outside services be needed?
   Consumables:
       Rechargeable batteries are recyclable
          If   the battery is not removable, can it be replaced?
       Some accessories can also be recycled
                                                                    14
End-of-Life Management
   Use the FEC end-of-life tools to evaluate recyclers
   Because of the small size, many retailers and
    manufactures may offer recycling programs
       EPA’s Plug-in to eCycling program has links to
        manufacture and retailer environmental sites:
        www.epa.gov/epawaste/partnerships/plugin/partners.htm
       The Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation, RBRC,
        offers collection programs for batteries and small
        devices. www.rbrc.org



                                                                15
Reusability
 Network compatibility
 Connection to servers
 Compatible features
 Equipment
     Cables and documentation
     Memory cards
         Remove  them or include them?
         Evaluate on a case by case basis



                                             16
Discussion
 Has any one tried to buy a ‘greener’ small
  device?
 How have people recycled these devices?
 Has old equipment been suitable for reuse
  or donation?
 How has data security been handled?




                                               17
Contact Information
   Main FEC Point of             Presented by:
    Contact:                          Chris Newman
       Cate Berard                   U.S. Environmental
       U.S. Environmental             Protection Agency,
        Protection Agency              Chicago
                                    newman.christopherm@epa.gov
       berard.cate@epa.gov
                                      312-353-8402
       202-564-8847


 Regional Champions
      www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/champions.htm
                                                              18
Federal Electronics Challenge

Web site
 http://www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/

E-mail
 info@electronicschallenge.net
 partner@electronicschallenge.net
 stakeholder@electronicschallenge.net


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