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Swimming pools - appendix 1

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					                                                               Appendix 1
                Model Pool Safety Operating Procedures

School Swimming Pool

Normal Operating Procedures

Head of Establishment (Pool Operator)

……………………………… (name) ……………………………………. (position)
has overall responsibility for the safe operation of the pool.

Pool Manager

……………………………….(name)……………………………………..(position)
has responsibility for the day to day management of the pool.

Maintenance Manager

……………………………….,(name)……………………………………(position)
has responsibility for the maintenance of the pool.

Other Responsibilities

Insert any names of personnel responsible for any other aspects of the pool
operation, detailing their responsibilities (e.g. documentation of risk
assessment, amendments to PSOP, management of lettings etc).

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Dimensions and Depth of Pool

The length of the pool is
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The width of the pool is
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Dimensions of any additional pools/features:
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The total swimming surface area is (m2)
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The maximum depth of the pool is
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The minimum depth of the pool is
…………………………………………………………………………………………
Pool Capacity

The capacity of the pool (max number of swimmers at one time)
is…………………………………………………………………………………

Guidance: Pool operators should assess the maximum numbers that can
safely be admitted to the pool. The Health and Safety Executive guidance
HSG179 recommends that in determining maximum figures, use 3m² (three
meters squared) of water surface area per bather as a starting point and base
their figures using operational experience, taking into account all of the
variables such as depth, size and shape. This should be used as a guide for
the assessment. A higher density may be reasonable in a pool with a large
area of shallow water. Conversely, a lower density may be appropriate where
significant space must be allowed for activities such as poolside diving.

Should the Pool Operator decide that a higher density is appropriate, the
Rationale must be documented in the risk assessment.

In addition to physical safety, the maximum loading should also take account
of the capacity of the pool water treatment plant.

Lifesaving Qualifications

It is emphasised that pool operators must be satisfied with all aspects of pool
safety, including the availability of suitably qualified lifesavers before any
activity takes place.

There must be no more than 20 pupils in the water under the supervision of
one teacher. At least two adults must be present poolside during the
swimming session.

Learner Pools

An adult holding a current certificate in one of the following qualifications must
be poolside:

• East Sussex County Council Lifesaving Certificate.
• RLSS Rescue Award (programmed swimming only).
• RLSS National Pool Lifeguard.
• STA NARS Pool Attendant (programmed swimming only).
• STA NARS Pool Lifeguard.

Programmed Swimming in pools – max 1.5.m depth

Programmed swimming is defined as 'activities, in or out of the water, which
are controlled and disciplined by a teacher or instructor. This includes
activities such as competitive training, and individual or group swimming
instruction'

An adult holding a current certificate in one of the following qualifications must
be on the side of the pool:

      RLSS Rescue Award
      RLSS National Pool Lifeguard
      STA NARS Pool Attendant Certificate
      STA NARS Pool Lifeguard

Pools over 1.5m depth

An adult holding a current certificate in one of the following qualifications must
be on the side of the pool:

      RLSS National Pool Lifeguard Qualification
      STA NARS Pool Lifeguard

Pools of 300m2 and over

Two adults holding a current certificate in one of the following qualifications
must be on the side of the pool:

      RLSS National Pool Lifeguard Qualification
      STA NARS Pool Lifeguard

All of the above qualifications are valid for 2 years from the date of
attendance. The RLSS National Pool Lifeguard or NARS Pool Lifeguard
qualifications must be supplemented by site specific and on-going update
training and, where relevant, training hours must be recorded.

Lifeguard Staffing Levels

Guidance: Guidelines on lifeguard numbers are given in the HSC/Sport
England document ‘Managing Health and Safety in Swimming Pools’. The
HSE and Sports Council do not make specific recommendations on lifeguard
numbers as it is felt that this is a matter for the Pool Operator to determine.
However, the document does recommend minimum numbers for certain
standard sizes of rectangular pools when used for general public swimming
and without diving or other special equipment.

Standard pool size in    Area     Min number of           Min number of
metres                   (M2)     lifeguards              lifeguards in busy
                                                          conditions
20 x 8.5                   170              1                         2

25 x 8.5                   212              1                        2

25 x 10                    250              1                        2

25 x 12.5                  312              2                        2
33.3 x 12.5              416              2                       3

Additional lifeguards may be required if there are hidden areas of water or
where there are extensive areas of water deeper than 2 metres. Conversely,
fewer may be required where the pool only contains water of 1 metre or less
in depth or during programmed school swimming sessions, taking into
account the ages and swimming abilities of the pupils and the numbers being
supervised.

It is essential that the recommended levels of supervision are maintained.
Requirements for curriculum and recreational swimming have been set out in
the PE Code of Practice and in the Safety in Swimming Pools document.
With regards to lettings, the minimum number of adults and the required level
of competency are detailed in 10.2.

There must be a minimum of two adults poolside at all times, one should be a
member of school staff. Where, groups of people with disabilities are using
the pool, higher levels of supervision may be required.

NOP: The minimum staffing level is one at all times (poolside) when there is
access to the pool, and especially when there are teachers, swimmers or
spectators in and around the pool environment.

The minimum staffing level is two or more during the following sessions:

…………………………………………………………………………………………

Conditions when one Lifeguard

Guidance: When there is one Lifeguard supervising the pool, the following
conditions must apply:

1. There must be another adult present on poolside who is available to assist
in an emergency, or

2. There must be adequate means, such as an alarm, bleeper or walkie-
   talkie, of summoning assistance rapidly to the pool area.

Please note that the remaining swimmers are no longer supervised until
assistance arrives, and the recovery of a casualty from the water often
requires at least two people.

NOP: The means of summoning assistance is as follows:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
Key Tasks of a Lifeguard

            Anticipate problems and potential emergencies and act accordingly
              (e.g. swimmer out of depth, in path of diver).

            Enforce the rules.

            Control the behaviour of the swimmers.

            Give immediate First Aid in the event of injury (if qualified).

            Initiate emergency action (e.g. rescue) according to RLSS
              Lifesaving training.

            Initiate pool evacuation according to Procedures.

            Communicate with the swimmers and educate them of rules.

            Communicate with members of staff - pass on or request
              information whenever necessary

All the above require absolute concentration and an ability to react to differing
situations.

Factors in Past Fatalities/Injuries

            Prior health problems (heart trouble, impaired hearing or sight,
             epilepsy).

            Inadequate or inappropriate supervision.

            Alcohol or food before swimming.

            Youth and inexperience (half of those who drown nationwide are
             under 15).

            Weak or non-swimmers out of depth.

            Unauthorised access to a pool intended to be out of use.

            Diving into insufficient depth of water, leading to concussion or
             head/spine injury.

            Unruly behaviour and misuse of equipment.

            Unclear pool water preventing casualty from being seen.

            Absence of or inadequate response by Lifeguard in an emergency.
          Lack of knowledge or understanding of normal operating
           procedures and emergency action plans.

Lifeguard Supervision Techniques

When supervising the swimmers, the Lifeguard staff must take all reasonably
practicable steps to be aware of all the swimmers, what they are doing and
where they are.

It is accepted that it is not possible for every swimmer to be supervised all the
time, even when they are in close proximity to the member of staff, however
the following provides guidance to maximise the level and effectiveness of
supervision.

Lifeguards are expected to scan the area they are supervising on a regular
and frequent basis, even while their attention may be focused on one
swimmer or a small group of swimmers.

With regard to scanning, whenever possible, Lifeguards are expected, as a
minimum, to adopt the 10:20 system - this requires the member of staff to
scan the pool every 10 seconds, and be no more than 20 seconds away from
any incident that may occur.

Lifeguards must not allow themselves to have their attention drawn to one
swimmer or a small group of swimmers any more than is necessary. Should,
for whatever reason, attention be diverted on a regular basis, the matter must
be referred to the Teacher in charge.

Lifeguards must place themselves where they are able to see as many
swimmers as possible, and be seen by as many swimmers as possible (see
Poolside Positions).

Lifeguards must be brief when talking to swimmers. If drawn into a
conversation with a swimmer and the quality of the supervision is affected, the
Lifeguard must politely say that it must stop.

When talking to either a swimmer or member of staff, the Lifeguard must
NEVER stop watching the pool. Staff are advised, therefore, to stand side by
side facing the water.

Lifeguards must, so far as is practicably possible, assess the swimming
ability/confidence in the water of each swimmer when they first enter the
water.

Information or concerns about swimmers must be communicated to the
Teacher in charge.

The first and last rule is that Lifeguards must NEVER stop watching the water.
Lifeguard Awareness of Environment

Lifeguards must always check to make sure the life saving aids are in their
correct positions whenever they first go on to poolside and return to poolside
(see Position of Pool Life-saving Aids).

Lifeguards must always be aware of other members of staff, where they are,
who they are, and what they are doing. This is essential if use of resources is
optimised in the event of an emergency.

Signs of Potential Emergency

Lifeguards must be aware of warning signs that a potential emergency is
developing. Examples of such signs are:
     (i)    Worried expression on face of swimmer
     (ii) Cries for help
     (iii) Crowd gathering
     (iv) Deliberate waving of arm
     (i)    Sudden submerging
     (vi) Sudden silence
     (vii) Two or more swimmers in very close contact
     (viii) A swimmer in a vertical position in the water
     (ix) Hair over the eyes or mouth

Maximum Length of Lifesaving Duties

Guidance: The role of a Lifeguard requires constant and high levels of
concentration. In order, therefore, that this concentration is maintained, it is
essential that the Lifeguard feels alert.

The environment may influence the Lifeguard's feeling of alertness - high
temperatures, high humidity or high noise levels may all contribute to a
Lifeguard's level of concentration falling, and these factors must be taken into
account when determining how long a Lifeguard supervises the pool in one
stretch.

NOP: The maximum length of time a Lifeguard will normally supervise the
pool in one stretch is one hour, however, under exceptional circumstances
this may be increased to an absolute maximum of two hours.

Reporting Tiredness/Ill Health

As detailed above it is important that the Lifeguard remains alert. The health
of a Lifeguard may also influence his/her level of concentration. For this
reason it is essential that if there is any health problem that may impair his/her
concentration or judgement, it must be reported to the Teacher in charge who
will then need to assess the Lifeguard's ability to continue with their duties.
Lifeguard Behaviour Rules

Insert expected behaviours of Lifeguards:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Use of Whistle

Lifeguards must always carry a whistle with them when supervising the pool.
Should a Lifeguard not have a whistle, they must report it immediately to the
Teacher in charge who will provide one.

The whistle is an important tool in alerting both swimmers and other staff, but
must be used sparingly - its effectiveness will be greater if only used when
absolutely necessary.


Access to Pool when Unattended

Effective measures must be taken to ensure that unauthorised access to the
pool is prevented, and at no time should the pool be accessible without the
presence of a nominated Lifeguard.

Insert the measures being enforced:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Plan of Pool

A simple plan of the pool, to scale as much as possible, must be included in
the PSOP, detailing, as a minimum, the pool itself, the location of the
Lifeguarding positions, areas of the pool to be scanned by the Lifeguard
(surveillance zones), position of Lifesaving Aids, maximum and minimum
depth of water, location of Fire Exits, location of plant room (if relevant) and
location of chemical storage.

Lifeguard Positions

The designated Lifeguarding positions and the area of the pool they are
designed to cover are as follows:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The Lifeguard is/is not (delete as necessary) permitted to patrol poolside on
foot instead of/ as well as (delete as necessary) occupying one of the above
positions.
Lifesaving Aids (Emergency Equipment) Positions

Guidance: All pools must have emergency equipment. The Pool Operator
will have identified the type of equipment required as part of the risk
assessment, depending on the type and design of the pool, the nature of the
use etc.

All equipment provided for emergency use must be kept in its designated
place and be maintained in working order.

NOP: Lifesaving Aids for use in the event of an emergency are located as
follows:

Reaching Poles (insert colour) …………………………………………………..

Lifebuoys (insert colour)………………………..…………………………………

Torpedo Buoys (insert colour)……………...……………………………………

Throwbags (insert colour)…………………………………………………………

Throw Ropes (insert colour) ……………………..………………………………..

Spinal
Board………………………………………………………………….……………….

Other Lifesaving Aids (insert as necessary) ……………………………………

Safety Signage Positions

Guidance: The Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations
1996 cover prohibition, mandatory warning, emergency escape and first aid
signs.

Prohibition signs (e.g. no diving) should be a white circle with red edging and
diagonal line.

The warning signs need to be triangular with black edging and a yellow
background, and should contain a black pictogram indicating the danger.

Pool operators are free to design or choose suitable pictograms, which will
help maintain a safe pool environment.

Signs may be particularly important where there are any sudden changes in
depth and it is necessary to clearly mark the depth of the water, it is
necessary to show areas where it is unsafe to swim, or there are slippery
surfaces.

Pool operators will have carried out a risk assessment to determine what
signs are required.
NOP: Safety Signs are located as follows:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Swimming Pool Rules

The following are examples of swimming rules the Pool Operator may wish to
enforce. Delete/amend as necessary.

         No running. No pushing. No ducking. No fighting. No acrobatics.
          No spitting. No bombing. No jumping on to other swimmers.

         Only appropriate swimwear is to be worn: No cut-down jeans. T-
          shirts should be discouraged unless necessary due to medical
          condition etc. No heavy or obstructive jewellery. No nappies
          (children/babies must wear regular swimwear or special "aqua
          nappies"). No footwear except swim socks.

         No eating/drinking/chewing gum when swimming.

         No wearing of heavy jewellery, or any jewellery that may be a safety
          hazard or may injury the wearer or another swimmer.

         While swimming, swimmers who smell of alcohol or are behaving
          as if under the influence of alcohol, must be closely monitored and
          the Pool Operator/Pool Manager informed should action be
          necessary.

         Swimmers should be advised not to eat a heavy meal within one
          hour before swimming.

         No china/glass cups, plates or other breakables etc allowed in the
          pool area.

         No faking injury or faking drowning.

         No behaviour considered dangerous or objectionable by any
          member of staff. Swimmers must show respect for each other and
          must not cause any inconvenience to other swimmers.

         Swimmers who are known to be visiting the pool for the first time
          should be encouraged, when possible, to make themselves familiar
          with the pool environment and design.

Other pool rules as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Special Pool Feature Rules

If the pool has any special features, such as slides, whirlpools etc, insert any
applicable rules:

…………………………………………………………………………………………

Diving/Jumping Rules

Guidance: Pool operators, swimming teachers and those involved in
lifeguarding activities need to be particularly aware of the hazards of diving
into water of insufficient depth. Diving into water of insufficient depth can lead
to concussion or injury to the head or spine. The most serious of these
accidents can lead to tetraplegia (total paralysis below the neck).

The latest safety guidance recommends that children should not be taught to
dive where the water depth is less than 1.8 metres. ASA guidance states that
when diving is being taught, ideally the water depth should be at least full
standing height plus arms and fingers fully extended. Very few pools can,
however, provide water of sufficient depth to meet this requirement,
particularly for tall children. As it would be far less safe to not teach diving at
all to a proportion of the population, the ASA recommends a minimum depth
of 1.8m, with the exercise of additional caution. The pool freeboard (distance
from the water surface to poolside), must not exceed 0.38 metres.

A forward clearance (horizontal distance at which the above minimum depth is
maintained), of 7.6 metres must be available. It is also recommended in the
document ‘Diving in Swimming Pools’, published by the Institute of Sport and
Recreation Management (ISRM) that pupils should be instructed in flat racing
dives only. ‘Plain header’ dives should be avoided.

To ensure maximum safety, teachers should not attempt to instruct pupils in
diving techniques unless they have obtained at least one of the qualifications
listed below.

The following types of diving should be prohibited in all areas of the pool
during programmed and unprogrammed sessions:

      Running dives;
      Backward dives;
      Dives without hand in front of head;
      Indiscriminate diving;
      Somersault entries;
      ‘bombing’.

In pools with a water depth of less than 1.8, all head-first entries and diving
should be prohibited during unprogrammed sessions.
Diving from the poolside

Diving must only be taught by a teacher or swimming instructor who
possesses either:

      ASA full Teachers Certificate
      STA full Teachers Certificate
      ASA full Club Coach Award
      ASA Assistant Club Coach Award

The minimum water depth for shallow entry dives (racing dives) from the
poolside is 1.8 metres. Plain header dives, running dives, backward dives,
dives without hand in front of head, indiscriminate diving, somersault entries
and bombing should not be taught as they are not a requirement of the
National Curriculum for Physical Education. With regard to GCSE syllabus
the racing dive is to be covered but this should be taught from the poolside
and not from starting block.

Diving from starting blocks (racing dives)

Under no circumstances should diving from starting blocks take place within
school swimming lessons unless it is for the purpose of teaching the ASA
Competitive Start Award. This can only be taught by a teacher or swimming
instructor who possesses either:

      ASA Advanced Teachers Certificate
      STA full Teachers Certificate
      ASA Full Club Coach Award
      ASA Assistant Club Coach Award

Please note that the height of the blocks must not exceed 500mm above
water level and for the purposes of teaching, the water depth must be a
minimum of 1.8m.

Diving from diving boards

Diving from diving boards must only be taught by a teacher or a swimming
instructor who possesses either:

      ASA Diving Teachers Certificate
      STA Diving Teachers Certificate

The minimum water depth for diving from diving boards is 3 metres.

Running dives - ARE NOT PERMITTED

Diving boards should be used under supervision in the first instance.
Subsequently, they should be used only by children who have passed a test
of competence and then only if any free use is accepted as a low risk as
determined by a risk assessment.

NOP: Diving should only be practised from the side inside designated diving
areas.

Jumping

Jumping should be discouraged unless it is an essential part of a unit of work
within the National Curriculum for Physical Education e.g. lifesaving or
survival qualification/course.

Jumping should not be permitted in pools of a depth less than 1.8 metres.

Goggles and Face Masks

Goggles should be strongly discouraged during school swimming lessons due
to the following risks associated with wearing goggles:

      The risk of impact injury to the eyeball through incorrect putting on and
       removal of goggles, especially with wet fingers;
      Pupils should not get used to only swimming with goggles as their
       ability to cope in a water related accident will be weakened if they
       cannot swim without goggles;
      Goggles often do not prevent pool water from coming into contact with
       the eyes, especially if they are poorly fitted.

If parents/guardians insist on their child wearing goggles then pupils should
be taught to remove them by slipping them off their head, rather than by
stretching the retaining band.


Access to Poolside

Swimming groups must not be able to access the poolside until a nominated
lifeguard is on poolside. The behaviour of the swimmers must be managed
by the teacher in charge.

Checking Numbers of Swimmers

In relation to school swimming sessions, staff must count pupils into and out
of the pool, and at regular intervals during the session. Working in pairs (the
"buddy" system) is a vital additional precaution. The teacher should adopt a
simple signalling system and those signals should be explained to the pupils.

Assessing Pupils' Swimming Ability

In relation to school swimming sessions, if larger groups of pupils are to be
sub-divided or set by ability for swimming activities, teachers must not rely on
the pupils' own assessment of their swimming ability as they are liable to
overstate their competence. Teachers must have witnessed a demonstration
of each pupil's ability before assigning them to competence based groups and
records kept.

Water Clarity

Guidance: Unclear water is a safety hazard. It makes it more difficult to see
a casualty in the water; a diver may not see swimmers below the surface and
obstacles may not be seen. Poor water clarity also indicates that water
treatment is inadequate.

NOP: The bottom of the pool must always be visible, in particular, the grill
and outlet covers in the deepest part of the pool. The clarity should be
constantly monitored and, should it begin to deteriorate, the pool must be
evacuated until a satisfactory standard once again exists. In addition, debris
may on occasion be detected in the pool, i.e. glass, faeces, etc.
Should the water clarity deteriorate in any way, the matter must be reported to
the Maintenance Manager/Pool Manager/Pool Operator (delete as
necessary).

Water Quality

Guidance: The standard of water quality is extremely important to reduce the
risk of infection. Lack of clarity of water will indicate a problem with the
standard of the water. This is in addition to the safety hazard presented by
cloudy water, preventing persons from being seen at the bottom of the pool.

Various forms of pollution from swimmers themselves and also from other
sources are introduced almost continuously into the water and environment of
swimming pools. If left untreated, the pollutants build up with the risk of
infection from increasing numbers of bacteria and other micro-organisms.

Pollution derived from swimmers include:

      Material from swimmers such as mucus from the nose, saliva from the
       mouth, sweat, hair and scales from the skin as well as urine and faecal
       matter.

      Material on swimmers' bodies such as general dirt.

      Materials on swimmers' bodies such as powders, creams, lotions and
       oil.

Many products such as cleaning materials used for the pool surrounds may
contaminate the pool water. Care must be taken over the use of such
products. Open air pools become contaminated directly by dusts, leaves,
grass, soil, etc.

Footbaths

It is recommended that footbaths should have a simple tablet feeder to add
disinfectant and continually overflowing the water to waste.

Hygiene Rules for Swimmers

      Use the footbath.

      Use the shower before entering the pool to remove dirt/dust/grime.

      Use the toilets before entering the pool.

      Blow noses before entering the pool.

      Persons with severe athletes foot should not be allowed in the
       swimming pool or surrounding areas unless their feet are suitably
       covered. Possible infections between the toes may only be soggy skin
       rather than active fungus infection.

      Verrucae sufferers should only be allowed in the pool and area if
       treatment has been started or they are wearing a plastsox.

      Children suffering from any stomach upsets (diarrhoea or sickness)
       should not be allowed in the pool.

      Persons with any infected skin lesion should not be allowed into the
       pool.

      Children with a discharging ear infection should not be allowed into the
       pool.

      It is preferable in order to protect the filter that all bathers, especially
       those with long hair, wear bathing caps.

Hygiene Rules for Staff

In order to minimise the dirt and harmful bacteria brought into the pool
environment, all Lifeguards and staff must ensure that their footwear is clean
before walking on poolside.

It is recommended that plastic disposable shoe covers are provided to protect
poolside from any dirt or harmful bacteria that may be present.

Recording Use of Pool

It is important to record the usage of the pool in order to assist any risk
management process, assist any accident investigation, assess the usage in
relation to the water treatment and plant etc.

The following should, whenever possible, be recorded on an hourly basis:
      Nature of the session
      Maximum usage during the hour
      Minimum usage during the hour
      Age profile of the swimmers
      Number of Lifeguards
      Name of Lifeguard/s

Pool Covers

Insert the procedure for covering and uncovering the pool, identifying any
manual handling risks with control measures to minimise those risks:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Areas of Hazard

Guidance:

The design of the pool and the equipment used in the pool environment both
present potential hazards.

These hazards must be identified and assessed. The Pool Operator must
take all reasonable action to eliminate the hazard and/or reduce the risk
presented by the hazard.

All Lifeguards must:

a) be aware of these hazards
b) modify their pool supervision accordingly to take them into account
c) take all necessary preventative action in order to minimise the risk of an
   incident occurring
d) educate the swimmers as much as practicably possible about the level of
   risk presented

Examples of hazards in a swimming pool environment are:

      Slippery pool surrounds and changing room floor.

      Restricted width of pool surround due to permanent or non-permanent
       obstructions. The HSC Guidance HSG 179 recommends a minimum
       width of pool surround of 2m to allow the free flow of swimmers walking
       around the pool, but often this width is reduced either due to the design
       of the pool or the presence of obstacles such as Lifeguard chairs,
       disabled hoists etc. Where no action can reasonably be taken to
       eliminate or reduce the risk, where possible the management of the
       swimmers' movement must be modified and the Lifeguard must be
       aware of the risk and modify their pool supervision as necessary.
      The NOP must detail the widths of the pool surrounds including the
       areas where the width is reduced to less than 2m.

      Grills in the pool floor or walls. These increase the risk of fingers and
       toes being caught.

      Refraction/reflection of natural or artificial light on the surface of the
       water. This increases the risk of the Lifeguard not being able to see
       underwater.

      Steps into the water. These can be very slippery and require regular
       checks and maintenance.

      Poolside drainage. These can potentially trap toes or can be a tripping
       hazard and therefore need regular checks and maintenance.

      Permanent obstructions on poolside. In addition to the reduction in
       width of the pool surround, the obstructions themselves may be a
       hazard. Disabled hoists, for example, are often a hazard because of
       their shape.

      The depth of the water. This is clearly a very important hazard to
       consider, especially when swimmers are out of their depth. Sudden
       changes in depth also present a significant hazard as it can
       disorientate a swimmer even when they are within their depth. Shallow
       water is also a hazard as there is a risk of swimmers diving or jumping
       into the water.

      The depth of the water at the point of access to the pool (e.g. from the
       changing rooms). When swimmers first enter the pool environment
       they may not be familiar with the pool's design, depth of water etc.
       Measures must be taken to control their movement, especially as
       young children may be excited and have a tendency to run.

      Blind spots. Even with the most effective Lifeguard scanning areas
       there may be areas of the pool that are harder to supervise or may be
       obstructed.

      Footbaths. These present a tripping hazard, compounded by the
       potential for being slippery.

      Irregular design of the pool. A swimmer may be familiar with a
       conventionally shaped rectangular pool, and may be disorientated by
       irregular features such as a curved pool wall or variations in freeboard
       (the vertical distance from the surface of the water to the pool
       surround).

When assessing all hazards, it is important to consider not just the potential
for injury due to the hazard itself but also the potential for a swimmer to
consequently fall into the water in an injured or disorientated state.

NOP: The following are potential hazards with their associated control
measures:

  1. Hazard: …………………………………………………………………….….

  Control measure: …………………………………………………………………

  2. Hazard: …………………………………………………………………………

  Control measure: ……...………………………………………………….………

Miscellaneous Equipment Set Up

Insert the procedure for any miscellaneous equipment set up or dismantling,
identifying any manual handling risks with control measures to minimise those
risks:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Communication

There must be a telephone giving direct contact to the emergency services or
a poolside alarm for summoning outside help. Alarms should be tested daily.
A notice should be prominently displayed in all areas indicating the location of
the nearest telephone.

Cleaning

Caretakers/pool operators should not enter a pool to carry out cleaning or
maintenance work when it has been drained other than learner pools. This
work will normally require a contractor and the use of access equipment.

Care must be taken to ensure that any persons who may be present at the
establishment during work activities are not subjected to hazards to their
health and safety. It is recommended that effective measures should be
taken to prevent unauthorised access to a pool intended to be out of use.
Consideration should be given to those at risk if the pool is empty and the
need for edge protection, if necessary.

Maintenance

Wherever employees or contractors are required to work, safe means of
access and a safe place of work must be provided. In general, at swimming
pools particular care and suitable precautions may be needed where:

      People work in wet areas where surfaces may become slippery and
       use of electricity poses particular risks.
        A warm humid atmosphere may cause drowsiness. This may be
         particularly important where employees are working indoors at heights.
        There is risk of drowning from falling into an unsupervised pool or into
         a tank.
        There is a risk of falling more than 2m to the base of a pool which is
         empty or at reduced depth.

Floors, passage ramps and stairs should be properly maintained and kept free
of obstructions and any substance likely to cause slipping. All paths, paved
areas, pool surrounds, fencing and equipment should also be properly
maintained at all times.

Floor surfaces in wet areas where people walk barefoot should be carefully
maintained to avoid injury from sharp edges.

It is important in wet areas that:

               Broken or missing tiles are replaced quickly.
               There is no accumulation of working materials or other debris
                which could cause injury to bare feet.
               Drainage is adequate to avoid surfaces becoming slippery.

The following checks will be carried out at the frequency indicated below.

Daily Checks/Duties

a)       Check Emergency alarms.

b)       Check Emergency equipment and in position.

c)       Two hourly daily check pH, disinfectant and clarity of water.

d)       Remove debris floating on the surface of the swimming pool.

e)       Ensure that filters, pumps, etc are operating satisfactorily.

f)       Inspect and check emergency lighting.

g)       Clean and refill foot baths with foot bath chemical liquid.

h)       Clean changing areas with disinfectant and clean surrounds.

i)       Floor thoroughly cleansed, with pool water, by a combination of hosing,
         mopping and scrubbing.

Weekly Checks/Duties

a)       Thoroughly clean Pool surround and equipment.

b)       Clean surface water skimmer baskets of debris.
c)     Backwash filter plant or renew filter material, according to type of
       filtration plant fitted and ensure that the equipment is functioning
       efficiently.

d)     Clean the floor of the pool.

e)     Sample and test for residual disinfectant.

f)     On Fridays, if the pool is not in use over the week-end, following the
       last swimming session, ensure that all equipment is functioning
       efficiently and left operational. Shock dose the swimming pool to cover
       the weekend.

g)     Outdoor pools - Inspect for debris and defects.

h)     Hydrotherapy pools only – take a sample of water and send to
       Laboratory for microbiological examination.

Monthly

a)     Check level transfer channels drained and cleaned.


b)     Take a sample of water and send to Laboratory for microbiological
       examination.

Three Monthly

a)     Transportable and portable electrical equipment to be inspected.

b)     Check lighting and ensure that bottom of pool is visible at all times.

Annual

a)     Obtain Electrical test certificate.

Electricity

A current electrical test certificate must be obtained at the start of the season.
This must be issued by a competent electrical contractor.

Any RCDs in the area or changing areas should be tested for tripping before
use, inspected visually weekly and tested by a ‘competent’ person using a
RCD tester every three months to ensure that they will safely react to a fault
of 30ma or greater within 40mS. Test records should be kept.

Work on electrical installations should only be performed by employees who
are suitably trained and competent in relation to the equipment and work in
question.
Lighting

A good standard of illumination is important and consideration should be
given to the following points:

      External windows should be kept clean.
      Artificial lighting should be arranged so that pool reflections particularly
       during light loads are minimised. The lighting should be maintained in
       good working order with units kept clean.
      Any emergency lighting should be tested daily.

Outdoor Pools only

Winterising

Following maintenance and draining of pipe work and filters, action should be
taken to ensure that the equipment remains protected from frost and that the
pool remains 2/3 full of water.

Pool heavy duty covers should be put on.

Periodically check that there is no loss of water through leakage or other
defects.

Defects in the pool structure or equipment should be rectified as and when
they are identified. Failure to do so can lead to costly repairs and delay the
re-commissioning of the pool.

Weekly inspections should be carried out and documented during the winter
and any debris removed.

Marbelite pools - Carry out weekly inspections of conditions and security of
debris cover (where provided) and document.

Recommissioning

Electrical equipment and installations must be tested in accordance with 8.5
and a current electrical test certificate obtained. This must be signed by a
competent electrical contractor.

The pool must be drained, thoroughly cleaned and refilled. The Water
Authority (Southern Water) should be notified prior to emptying the pool. It is
recommended that a microbiological test is completed prior to the pool being
put back into use. The filter plant and heating equipment must be put back
into commission.

The condition of fencing, coatings on timber and metal work should be
inspected at regular intervals, all defects should be rectified.

Gates to pool surrounds and plant room must be kept locked when the pool is
not in use.

Moving and Handling

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations require that manual handling
tasks are identified and avoided where possible. Where moving and handling
tasks cannot be avoided an assessment of the activity must be carried out.

When chemicals are delivered, sufficient space for parking should be provided
close to the storage area to minimise any moving and handling. When
handling chemicals suitable scoops have been provided to discourage manual
handling.

Risk assessments will be completed for any moving and handling tasks that
cannot be eliminated.

Only those employees who have received training on the use of hoists may
operate the equipment. The hoists will be tested every six months in line with
current legislation.

Employees who are required to undertake moving and handling activities
must be competent in the correct handling techniques.

COSHH

Under the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations
a COSHH assessment must be undertaken of all the hazardous substances
before the substance is used. The COSHH assessment will identify the
hazards associated with the substances, the control measures to be put in
place to minimise the level of risk, any personal protective clothing/equipment
identified and operator training. Safe systems of work must also be devised
and followed to protect employees and others from contacting, ingesting or
inhaling harmful materials.

Depending upon the type of disinfection system, some or all of the following
protective clothing may be needed during delivery, handling of materials,
cleaning or maintenance:

             impervious boots;

             impervious aprons;

             impervious gauntlets;

             eye protection to BS2092:1987 (BS EN 166, 167 and 168);

             respiratory protection to BS4275 and BS2091 for systems using
              normal plant operation implies a list of exposure to toxic gases.
When handling dry materials, employees, pupils or visitors should not be
exposed to excessive dust. Where necessary conditions for weighing or
measuring out materials should be carefully controlled. Exhaust ventilation
may need to be considered.           Emergency arrangements for serious
leaks/spillages must be devised and written down, as must a safe disposal
system, safe delivery and storage arrangements.

Chemicals should be stored in their original containers and care taken to
ensure that containers are kept tightly closed; that they do not leak and are
clearly marked to show what they contain.

Chemicals should be stored in their original containers and care taken to
ensure that containers are kept tightly closed; that they do not leak and are
clearly marked to show what they contain.

Different chemicals should never be mixed and steps should be taken to
prevent the possibility of accidental mixing. Chlorine compounds used at
swimming pools must be kept apart from acid materials as mixing of even
small quantities may cause rapid generation of highly toxic chlorine gas.

Vessels used to measure or otherwise contain chemicals should be well
washed out with water before and after use.

When diluting or dissolving a chemical, where this is appropriate, always add
the chemical slowly to the water, never the water to the chemical.

Chemicals must not be stored in boiler rooms. Ensure that rooms in which
chemicals are used and stored are cool, dry and well ventilated and secure
and that they are kept clean.

Rooms, cupboards and other places used for the storage and handling of
swimming pool chemicals must be kept locked and only entered by authorised
persons.

Spilled chemicals must be cleared away and disposed of safely following the
suppliers/manufacturers guidance, washing down as necessary. Empty
chemical containers must also be disposed of safely.

Fire Precautions

All Fire Prevention equipment, such as Fire Extinguishers, must be checked
by a competent person annually.

The Fire Extinguishers are located as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

All Fire Exits must be checked for ease of use, as a minimum, daily, and
structurally every term.
The Fire Exits are located as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The Fire Alarm Bell/Sounder/s must be checked, as a minimum, weekly.

The Fire Alarm/s is/are located as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The Fire Alarm Call Button/s must be checked, as a minimum, weekly.

The Call Button/s is/are located as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

First Aid

A first aider must be on site (within the school building) at all times when
swimming is taking place to provide support in case of an incident.
Employees should be informed as to who the first aider is and how to contact
them. In case of an incident, the first aider must have access to the COSHH
assessments so that this information can be passed to emergency services if
necessary.

The first aiders are:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The first aid box is located
…………………………………………………………………

Accident/Incident reporting

Incidents occurring at the pool must be recorded and considered by the Pool
Operator to ensure that safety arrangements remain relevant. Accidents must
be reported to the Health & Safety Team at County Hall following the
procedures outlined in the Health & Safety Policy.

In cases of an accident/incident a full investigation will need to be undertaken.
If the incident involves poor water quality schools must contact Contracts
Management. Swimming must not resume until the causes have been
determined and water quality is returned to acceptable levels.

The Health & Safety team must be notified of major injuries by quickest
practicable means (telephone). Accident report forms 1 and 2 (management
investigation report) must also be completed as soon as possible after an
incident. Please refer to the Policy on Accident Reporting contained in the
Health and Safety Policy Statement for further information.
The Incident/Accident Report Book is located: ……………………………………

Specialist Activities

Small Aquatic Toys

Guidance: The main hazard associated with small aquatic toys arises as a
result of their size permitting young children to put them in their mouths thus
causing a choking hazard. In addition they may float into deep water and an
enthusiastic child may attempt to follow with an increased risk of getting into
difficulties.

NOP: The control measures to minimise the risk are as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Small Inflatable Toys

Guidance: The main hazard with small inflatable toys is that they may float
into deep water and an enthusiastic child may attempt to follow with an
increased risk of getting into difficulties.

NOP: The control measures to minimise the risk are as follows:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Non-Inflatable Play Structures (e.g. floats, rafts)

Guidance: The hazards related to non-inflatable play structures relate to

      Their use in deep water by weak or non-swimmers increasing the risk
       of drowning.

      Their use too close to pool surrounds increasing the risk of injury due
       to impact with the pool surround, especially head injury, and the
       consequent risk of drowning.

      Entrapment below the structure causing disorientation.

      Reduced visibility of a casualty if the structure is big enough.

      The attractiveness of the play structures - their instability and
       unpredictability leading to upturning may lead to disorientation.

NOP: The control measures to minimise the risk are as follows:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
Inflatable Play Structures

Inflatables present a number of hazards and risks, all of which will need
careful assessment before use. It is recommended that should a school wish
to use an inflatable play structure that advice is sought before operation.

Snorkelling (Secondary school pupils)

In relation to school swimming sessions, the pupils must be able to swim 100
m and written consent from the parents must be obtained, together with an
assurance of fitness to participate.

The leader/instructor should be satisfied that adequate provision for
emergencies has been made prior to the pool training sessions. The instructor
should hold the qualifications outlined in the Off-Site Activities and
Educational Visits: Regulations and Guidelines.

Sub-Aqua (Secondary school pupils)

In relation to school swimming sessions, all pupils participating in this activity
must take the British Sub Aqua Standard of proficiency test before
participating and written consent must be obtained from the parents.

The instructor should be satisfied that adequate provision for emergencies
has been made prior to the pool training. The instructor must be satisfied that
pupils are fit to take part in the event. Any members of the group who have a
cold, infection or who are suffering from severe fatigue must not be allowed to
take part.

The instructor should hold the qualifications outlined in the Off-Site Activities
and Educational Visits: Regulations and Guidelines.

All equipment taken into the pool must be clean and free from foreign
material. On completion of sessions in both snorkelling and aqualung the
equipment must be thoroughly washed in fresh water.

Canoeing

In relation to school swimming sessions, all pupils participating in this activity
must be capable swimmers.

The instructor should hold the qualifications outlined in the Off-Site Activities
and Educational Visits: Regulations and Guidelines.           The number of
canoes/canoeists will obviously depend upon the size of the pool, however,
numbers should not exceed eight with one instructor.

Canoes should have rubber protection on bow and stern to prevent damage
or injury. Also, the edge of the pool should be protected to prevent damage
while canoes are "seal launched". Paddles should be protected for the same
reasons.

Canoes which are used on rivers or in the sea should not be used in
swimming pools unless properly cleansed and sterilised to avoid
contamination of the pool water.

After use, canoes and equipment should be washed off with fresh water.
                       Emergency Action Procedures

Guidance: In all emergency situations, or situations that require an action or
response that is not part of the normal operation of the swimming pool, it is
essential that all personnel (teachers, Lifeguards, children, parents etc)
understand who is responsible for taking charge of an incident and the role of
the rest of the team should an incident occur.

The following document refers to a Senior Lifeguard/Teacher as being the
person in charge of the operation. Exactly who fulfils this role, however, will
depend on a number of factors and will vary from school to school and from
one session to the next, but must be established in advance of the session
taking place, and must be communicated to all relevant parties.

Details concerning all personnel nominated to take this role must be
documented in the EAP.

Overcrowding

The NOP will state the maximum number of swimmers that can be safely
admitted into the pool. Should this number be exceeded, there is the potential
for additional risks to be introduced that may not be adequately controlled.

In the event that the number of swimmers exceeds the maximum the Senior
Lifeguard/Teacher must reduce the numbers accordingly by asking the
swimmer/s to leave the water. Further admission to the water must be
stopped.

Should the swimmer/s be asked to wait on poolside, the senior Lifeguard must
consider whether any measures need to be taken to ensure their safety when
they have access to the water (e.g. supervision by teacher etc).

Disorderly Behaviour

The NOP will assume a reasonable level of behaviour by swimmers, but
should behaviour become unreasonably disorderly or rules are being broken
then there is the potential for additional risks to be introduced that may not be
adequately controlled.

One of the key tasks of a Lifeguard/teacher in charge is to control the
behaviour of the swimmers by preventing the rules from being broken.
Disorderly behaviour or rule breaking is dangerous for three clear reasons.

    (i)    If rules are being broken, the swimmers are putting themselves at
           risk.

    (ii)   If rules are being broken the swimmers are putting others around
           them at risk.
    (iii)   If a Lifeguard is forced to concentrate their attention on a small
            number of rule breakers it is inevitable that the rest of the swimmers
            are not being provided with an adequate level of supervision which
            in itself is dangerous.

It may be necessary to issue a warning and an indication that if the poor
behaviour continues the swimmers will be liable to be ejected from the pool.

The school should include their procedures for behaviour and ensure that any
procedures re: disorderly behaviour are communicated to potential hirers.

Water Clarity

As stated in the NOP, unclear water is a safety hazard because it restricts the
visibility of casualties in the water and indicates that the water treatment is
inadequate.

Guidance: It is not possible to define the criteria that determines at what
point water clarity becomes a hazard as this will very much depend upon the
size, design, colour and depth of the swimming pool, the quality of the mains
water supply, the effectiveness of the water treatment system etc. Each Pool
Manager must assess these factors and advise accordingly.

NOP: Water clarity must be monitored constantly by the Lifeguard. Should
the clarity fall below an acceptable level, the Senior Lifeguard/Teacher must
clear either the whole pool of swimmers or the relevant area of the pool (e.g.
clarity in shallow water may be better than in deep water).

In the event that poor water clarity is related to concerns over water quality
(e.g. the level of disinfection), the pool must be cleared of swimmers
according to the EAP relating to water quality.

The signs of deteriorating water clarity are as follows:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The criteria for establishing unacceptable water clarity are:

…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Water Quality

Disinfection

NOP: In the event that the chemical dosing of the water falls outside the set
parameters, action will need to be taken to minimise or eliminate the risk to
swimmers of swimming in unsafe water.
The pool must be cleared of swimmers if:

The free chlorine level falls below: ………………………………………………

The free chlorine level rises above: ..………………………………………………

The bromine level falls below: …..…………………………………………………

The bromine level rises above: ….…………………………………………………

The pH level falls below: ..…………………………………………………………

The pH level rises above: …………………………..………………………………

Other criteria as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

As pools differ from school to school it is difficult to have a set procedure,
therefore headings have been included in the section below for schools to
develop their own procedures.

Criteria for Closing the Pool

       1.     Chlorine

       It will be necessary to consider closing the pool if:-

       2.     pH

       It will be necessary to consider closing the pool if:-

Faecal Release into Water

Guidance: When there is a release of faeces into the water, an appropriate
course of action must be decided very quickly. If there is a delay in the
decision or the decision is wrong, there is the risk of swimmers becoming ill.

Solid Stool

NOP: If the release is a solid stool, it/they should be retrieved quickly using a
scoop and the scoop disinfected thoroughly. As long as the water is being
treated correctly the residual disinfection will deal with any impurities,
although the Senior Lifeguard/Teacher should assess the situation to
determine whether the immediate area should be cleared of swimmers for a
period of time.

Runny Stool/Diarrhoea

Guidance: If the stool is runny, it is very likely to be infected. While there is
an immediate risk to health, the bugs should be inactivated within minutes by
disinfection.

NOP: In the event of runny stool/diarrhoea release into the water:

   1. The pool must be cleared of swimmers immediately
   2. Disinfectant levels are maintained at the top of the recommended
      range.
   3. The pool is vacuumed and swept.
   4. Using a coagulant, the water is filtered for 6 turnover cycles.
   5. The filter is back washed.
   6. The pool can then be reopened.

A small pool (for children) - empty and clean the pool, before refilling and
reopening.

Cryptosporidium and Giardia

Guidance: The diarrhoea may, however, be infected with Cryptosporidium
and Giardia – they are a problem for swimming pools because their infectious
stages are resistant to chlorine disinfectants. In the event that the faecal
release is infected in this way, the above procedure will not be adequate to
combat the risks presented.

The procedure to be adopted is detailed below, but is drastic and is one that a
Pool Manager will want to avoid if possible. It is important to establish,
therefore, whether the level of risk of the faecal release being infected in this
way warrants such action, and an indicator will be whether the swimmer
concerned has had diarrhea for some days.

NOP: Should there be sufficient evidence that the faecal release may be
infected with Cryptosporidium and Giardia, the following procedure must be
adopted:

   1. The pool must be cleared of swimmers immediately.
   2. Chlorine levels must be increased as quickly as possible at its
      maximum safe operating level.
   3. The pool water must circulate for at least 6 turnovers with the chlorine
      at this elevated level.
   4. A flocculant must be added to maximize the ability of the filters to trap
      the coagulated particles.
   5. The pool must be swept as a minimum on a regular basis, and ideally
      vacuumed.
   6. The filters must be thoroughly backwashed.
   7. The pool can then re-open.

Further information and guidance on preventative measures can be found in
Appendix 8.
Discovery of a Casualty in the Water/Serious Injury to Swimmer

Incidents will vary in terms of their nature and severity and therefore it is not
possible to prescribe a sequence of emergency action that covers all
eventualities. There are, however, key principles and critical information that
must be understood by all teachers, lifeguards and other personnel involved
in supervising a session in the swimming pool.

It is anticipated that for a typical swimming session operating in a school pool,
the level of resources available to assist will be limited to what has been
determined appropriate as assessed (as opposed, for example, to a public
swimming pool when there are likely to be additional ‘specialist’ resources
available in the building).

The three key elements of good emergency management are:

   1. The employment, by the personnel involved, of skills and knowledge
      acquired through formal qualification training, on-going ‘in-house’
      training, and on-going assessment.
   2. Good communication systems to alert personnel either in the pool
      environment or in the school in general should their assistance be
      necessary.
   3. Effective deployment of all available resources to ensure maximum
      productivity, good leadership and minimal duplication. This is
      especially important in the school environment when ‘specialist’
      resources may be limited.

Schools should include examples of types of injuries and procedures in place
to deal with these incidents.

Aquatic Emergency

********* will respond utilising rescue and first aid skills in accordance with,
and not beyond, formal training and qualification. Lifesaving Aids and First
Aid equipment, as available, will be used specific to their use. They will be
supported by a second responsible adult who will assist accordingly to
instructions provided by the lifesaver/lifeguard.

The safety of the remaining swimmers must be considered immediately as
they may be unsupervised. The pool must therefore be cleared of swimmers
and those swimmers taken to a place of safety by a 3rd responsible adult.

Out of Water Emergency

******** with suitable first aid skills will respond utilizing skills in accordance
with, and not beyond, formal training and qualification. First Aid equipment,
as available, will be used specific to their use.

******** will supervise the pool in the first instance. If required to assist, the
pool must be cleared of swimmers and those swimmers taken to a place of
safety by a 3rd responsible adult.

Under normal circumstances the Teacher in charge will take charge of an
aquatic or out of water emergency situation. If this is not practical (e.g.
because he/she is directly involved in a water based rescue) the role must be
adopted by another and passed to the Senior Lifeguard/Teacher when
possible.

First Aid Supplies

The following First Aid supplies, equipment and facilities are provided:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The above First Aid supplies, equipment and facilities are located as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Information relating to access to above as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Methods of Communication

To summon assistance, as required, the following methods of communication
must be applied when possible: (please delete any methods of
communication that are not relevant)

Emergency Whistle

    (i)    Should a Lifesaver/Lifeguard wish to alert other staff and swimmers
            in an emergency, three short blows.

    (ii)   To clear the pool of swimmers, one long blast.

Emergency Alarm

The Emergency Alarm is positioned as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The Emergency Alarm will sound in the following area/s and will alert the
following personnel:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

On hearing the Emergency Alarm, action will be taken as follows (e.g. will only
those who hear the alarm respond, or is there a means of alerting others?):
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
Telephone

The nearest telephone is positioned as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

The following numbers are available to be used to contact Emergency
Services and other valuable services (e.g. hospitals, health centres,
emergency doctor bleep etc):
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Important information to pass to Emergency Services
…………………………………………………………………………………..………

Walkie-Talkie/Radio

The following personnel carry a walkie-talkie:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

On hearing a message over the walkie-talkie, action will be taken as follows
(e.g. will only those who hear the alarm respond, or is there a means of
alerting others?):

Tannoy

A tannoy system is operated from:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

When operated, the tannoy covers the following areas:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Emergency Services Access

The access point for Emergency Services is located as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

Reference Information

All action taken by personnel in relation to lifesaving or first aid must be
carried out according to training and qualification. All supporting information
(e.g. training manuals) must be kept easily accessible should there be the
necessity to refer to or clarify any information. Likewise, the NOP and EAP
must be accessible.
The procedures detailing the way a Lifeguard or First Aider assesses and
treats a casualty are contained within the respective training manuals.

The Lifesaving and First Aid training manuals and pool NOP and EAP, and
any other relevant reference information is kept as follows:
…………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………

				
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