GRAMMAR - DOC by lonyoo

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									    GRAMMAR

          Conditionals http://www.smic.be/smic5022/exercisesgrammar.htm
          English tenses (table) http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/tenses_table.pdf
          Little/few http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/vocabulary/little-few
          Much/many http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/vocabulary/much-many
          Some/any http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/vocabulary/some-any
          Reported speech http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/reported-speech
          Passive
    http://wwwedu.ge.ch/cptic/prospective/projets/anglais/exercises/welcome.html#lowint


    Prepositions
          Questions ending with prepositions
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/apps/ifl/worldservice/quiznet/quizengine?ContentType=text/html;q
    uiz=125_questions_prepos
          Time prepositions
    http://www.englishpage.com/prepositions/time_prepositions_1.htm


    Tenses
           Present Simple vs Present Continuous
    http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentcontinuous.html
           Simple Past and Present Perfect
    http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/exercises/past_pres_perf.htm
     http://www.smic.be/smic5022/testtenses2.htm

    http://www.eclecticenglish.com/grammar/PresentPerfect1E.html

    http://www.eflnet.com/grammar/presperf1.php


    Vocabulary
         Make/do http://esl.about.com/cs/beginner/a/a_makedo.htm

    Tekstai klausymui, skaitymui su pratimais žodyno įtvirtinimui


           http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/06/070613_
    elvis_fan.shtml

         http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/05/070530_
    smoking.shtml

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/05/070509_
    putin_vday.shtml

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/04/070425_
    china_cars.shtml
          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/04/070411_
    army.shtml

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/03/070328_
    turkey_women.shtml

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/03/070307_
    crops.shtml

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/02/070214_
    japan_princess.shtml

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/newsenglish/witn/2007/01/070117_
    coffee_indonesia.shtml


    Smoking                              WORKSHEET A



    SARAH
    I’m delighted that smoking is going to be banned in the majority of enclosed public spaces in
    Britain from July this year. In fact, I can’t wait for the ban to arrive. I’m fed up with sitting in
    pubs with my eyes and throat hurting because of all the tobacco smoke in the air. As soon as I
    leave the pub I always find that my clothes and hair stink of cigarettes, so the first thing I do
    when I get home is have a shower.
    It’s not my problem if smokers want to destroy their own health, but I hate it when they start
    polluting my lungs as well! Passive smoking is a real problem, as lots of medical studies have
    shown that non-smokers who spend a long time in smoky environments have an increased risk
    of heart disease and lung cancer.
    It’s ridiculous when you hear smokers talking about the ban taking away their ‘rights’. If
    they’re in a pub and they feel the need for a cigarette, obviously they’ll still be able to go
    outside in the street and have one and what’s wrong with that? Sure, it will be a bit
    inconvenient for them, but maybe that will help them to quit.


    ROBERT
    I’m fed up with the government interfering in people’s personal matters, and the
    ridiculous ban on smoking is just one more example. Why can’t they respect freedom of
    choice? Instead of banning smoking completely, why can’t we just keep the system of
    having smoking and non-smoking areas in enclosed spaces? Or why don’t we just make
    sure that there is good ventilation in these places, so smokers and non-smokers can
    socialize together?
    I think smokers should try not to smoke too much when they’re around non-smokers,
    and I don’t mind not smoking when I’m at the cinema or the theatre, but that’s not
    enough for the anti-smoking people, is it? No, they want to carry on exaggerating about
    ‘passive smoking’. You know what their problem is? They just want to feel superior by
    accusing others of being ‘dirty’ and ‘unhealthy’. Well, I don’t think they have the right to
    choose my lifestyle for me – they should leave me alone and worry about something more
    important instead.
Smoking                              WORKSHEET B

A
Here are some simple definitions for words or expressions that appear in the text on Worksheet
A. Can you find the words or expressions they refer to?


1. _______________ (verb) spend time with friends or other people, in order to enjoy yourself
2. _______________ (noun) a thing or power that people deserve to have
3. _______________ (adjective) stupid; deserves to be laughed at
4. _______________ (noun) the dried leaves of a particular plant; what cigarettes are made
from
5. _______________ (adjective) filled with smoke
6. _______________ (verb) (informal) smell; smell very unpleasant
7. _______________ (verb) prohibit; make illegal
8. _______________ (noun) issue; situation
9. _______________ (verb) to involve yourself in a situation where you are not wanted
10. _______________ (noun) the way a person lives; the things a person usually does
11. the _______________ (noun) most; the large part
12. _______________ (noun) organs in our bodies that we use for breathing
13. _______ ________ (adjective) bored; annoyed
14. _______________ (adjective) surrounded by walls; not open
15. _______________ (noun) system for causing fresh air to move around an indoor area
16. _______________ (adjective) not acting to influence a situation; not in control
17. _______________ (verb) make something seem larger, more important, better or worse
than it really is
18. _______________ (adjective) extremely pleased
19. _______________ (verb) stop; give up
20. _______________ (adjective) better than other people or things
Smoking                             WORKSHEET C

B
Decide if the following statements about cigarettes and smoking are true (T) or false (F).
Then bet a minimum of 10 points up to a maximum of 50 on your choice.

                                                         T/F    Points Points Points
                                                                 bet    lost   won
 1    According to the World Health Organization,
      more than 15 billion cigarettes are smoked
      every day – an average of almost 2.5 cigarettes
      per human being.
 2    Human beings only started smoking tobacco
      about 250 years ago.
 3    In Britain, the age-group with the highest
      percentage of smokers is 20-24.
 4    Smoking is banned on some beaches in
      Sydney, Australia.
 5    About 50% of British adults smoke.
 6    According to the World Health Organization,
      around one in three of the cigarettes smoked in
         the world today are smoked in China.
    7    The majority of British smokers started
         smoking when they were teenagers.
    8    In the small Asian country of Bhutan, smoking
         is banned in all public places and it is also
         illegal to sell tobacco.
    9    In most of the world’s countries there are more
         male smokers than female smokers.
    10   After rising continuously for most of the 20th
         century, the global consumption of cigarettes
         has been falling since the mid-1990s.
                                                  Total points lost and won
                       Final total (subtract total points lost from total points won)



   Search at stricken Siberian mine
   Attempts to rescue three Russian coal miners trapped underground are continuing, after
   an explosion killed 107 people at a Siberian pit on Monday.
   One more body was recovered late on Tuesday at the Ulyanovskaya mine, and officials said
   the search for the three still missing was proving difficult.
   Some 93 people were rescued from the mine, devastated by a methane blast.
   Virtually the whole of the mine's management died in the explosion. A UK engineer was also
   among the dead.
   Rescuers described a scene of utter devastation, with collapsed and flooded mineshafts and
   bodies ripped apart.
   The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Moscow says it is Russia's worst mining disaster for a
   generation.
   It occurred at 1030 (0730 GMT) on Monday, at a depth of about 270m (885 feet).
   Russian mines suffered from the loss of state subsidies after the collapse of the Soviet Union in
   1991.
   However, the mine in question was only built a few years ago and had just had a new safety
   system installed.
   The mine is run by Yuzhkuzbassugol, an affiliate of Russian coal and steel firm Evraz Group
   SA. It lies in the Kuzbass coal area in Kemerovo region, nearly 3,000km (1,850 miles) east of
   Moscow.

    QUESTIONS:
1.      What happened at the Siberian mine?
2.      How many people were killed?
3.      Were there any foreign nationals among casualties?
4.      Were there any people rescued?
5.      When did it happen?
6.      How deep is the mine?
7.      When was the mine built?
8.      Was there a new safety system installed in the mine?
9.      Where is the mine?
10.     Who runs it?
11.     How far is the mine from Moscow?
FIND THE EQUIVALENTS IN LITHUANIAN.
Mine, subsidy, rescuer, disaster, management, devastation, blast, collapse, affiliate. (gelbėtojas,
vadovybė, sugriovimas, griūtis, šachta, finansavimas, nelaimė, sprogimas, filialas).
JOIN THE GIVEN WORDS INTO COLLOCATIONS
1.Rescue            a) safety system
2. die              b) subsidy
3. install           c) in the explosion
4. utter            d) people
5. state            e) devastation

Read the texts from the following sites:
Siberia mine blast kills many **
A methane explosion at a coal mine in a remote part of Siberia has killed at least 100 people.
<
http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/check/player/nol/newsid_6460000/newsid_6469100?redir
ect=6469187.stm&news=1&nbram=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1 >

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/check/player/nol/newsid_6460000/newsid_6469100?redir
ect=6469187.stm&news=1&nbram=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1


Obstacles
At a temporary morgue on the edge of the forest, distraught relatives gathered in the freezing
cold to identify the bodies.
The governor of Kemerovo province, Aman Tuleyev, said 20 members of the mine's
management team were among the dead, including the facility's chief engineer and chief
mechanic.
"Today we were to launch at this mine an English system to ensure the secure mine work
underground," he said.
Mr Tuleyev's spokesman Sergei Cheremnov said the search was "very difficult" as there was
"bad ventilation, flooding and a lot of destruction".
Officials said rescuers were working by hand, and divers had been sent into flooded parts.
Rescuers also reported smoke, pockets of gas and collapsed roofs.
There were thought to be about 200 miners working in the mine when the methane exploded.
"There was a bang and smoke then the rescuers came," survivor Alexei Loboda told Russian
TV.
"We switched on our safety kits and started going to the surface. Five of us came out. First they
helped me to walk then it was all normal and I came back to my senses."
Modern mine
Many of Russia's mines have poor safety standards and have not been updated since the fall of
communism.
A methane blast at a Kemerovo coal mine killed 21 miners in 2005.
But the Ulyanovskaya mine was opened only four-and-a-half years ago and Governor Tuleyev
said the mine had been fitted with modern equipment.
Emergencies Minister Sergei Shoigu was sent to the area by President Vladimir Putin to
oversee the rescue operation.
Mr Putin has declared Wednesday a day of mourning for victims of the mine disaster, as well
as of Tuesday's fire at an old people's home in the southern Krasnodar region and Saturday's
plane crash in Samara, central Russia.
April Fools’ Day                            WORKSHEET A

In Britain, as in many other countries, there is a special day in the year when people play
practical jokes on each other and when the media invents hoax news stories. This day is called
April Fools’ Day, and takes place on 1st April.
Some April Fools’ Day hoaxes have been very easy to spot. Examples include a television
report about a dinosaur in a London park, and a supermarket advertisement for ‘whistling
carrots’. The supermarket advert said that when people cooked the carrots, they would start
making a whistling sound as soon as they were ready to eat!
Even completely ridiculous hoaxes can fool people, however. One year, when the BBC said the
government was going to ‘modernise’ London’s famous Big Ben clock by making it digital,
lots of gullible people phoned the BBC to say they didn’t agree with the idea. The same thing
happened a few years later when the BBC invented a story about Britain suddenly having a
new national anthem, with all the words in German!
One of the most famous April Fools’ Day hoaxes was a BBC television programme in 1957
about ‘spaghetti trees’ in Switzerland. In the 1950s, most British people weren’t familiar with
‘foreign’ food such as pasta, so the programme made thousands of people think that spaghetti
really did grow on trees.
In the United States, April Fools’ Day hoaxes include a 1998 advert by Burger King for a
special ‘left-handed’ hamburger. The advert said that when a left-handed person bit into the
burger, any sauce that dripped out would always fall to the right, away from their hand.
Anyone who fell for that one must have felt quite embarrassed, but perhaps less embarrassed
than the people in Sweden who put stockings on their televisions on 1st April 1962. Why did
they do that? Because all Swedish televisions were black and white at the time, but an ‘expert’
had just appeared on a popular programme to say people could immediately see everything in
colour if they put a nylon stocking over their sets!

April Fools’ Day                            WORKSHEET B

A
Fill the gaps below to complete the crossword and reveal the animal a Tokyo zoo said it was
going to receive on 1st April 2005. The zoo told the Japanese public that the animal was 1.65m
tall and weighed 80kg. Strangely, however, it never arrived.

                                   1
                         2
                                   3
         4
                    5

                                   6
                    7
              8
                    9
                        10
                   11
                        12
1. People who are very _____________ often fall for April Fools’ jokes.
2. Burger King said the sauce in their ‘left-handed’ burgers would never _____________ onto
the hands of left-handed people.
3. Some people believed the BBC when it said Britain was going to have a new national
_____________ with German words.
4. The BBC once said the British government wanted to _____________ Big Ben by giving it
a digital readout.
5. In Sweden in 1962, all televisions were black and _____________.
6. Spaghetti is a kind of _____________.
7. The _____________ for ‘whistling carrots’ was a hoax.
8. The media _____________ lots of stories on April Fools’ Day.
9. An April Fools’ hoax took place on a TV _____________ in Sweden in 1962.
10. The British supermarket didn’t really have any carrots that made a _____________ when
they were ready to eat – it was a hoax.
11. The BBC is part of the British _____________.
12. The hoax news story about a _____________ was very easy to spot.

April Fools’ Day                             WORKSHEET C

B
Below are eight quotes on the subject of fools and fooling people, but they have been split into
three parts and mixed up. Can you put them back together again?


1     If you wish to avoid        of the time, some of the       old men know young
                                         people all of               men are fools.
2    Young men think old         let people think you are a      or not. You can’t fool
                                           fool than                      them.
3      Any fool can say               fool expects to be          break your mirror.
4    You can fool all of the    children. They know if you      wise can admit he is a
         people some                   really love them                    fool.
5          Who is                    he is wise, but only        the fool who follows
                                           someone                        him?
6   It is better to keep your         men are fools, but      to open it and remove all
        mouth closed and                                                 doubt.
7             Only a             seeing a fool, you must          happy all the time.
8       I really love pets.     more foolish? The fool, or      the time, but you can’t
           They’re like                                        fool all of the people all
                                                                      of the time.


National Anthems                                         WORKSHEET A

What do you think of your country’s national anthem? Maybe it fills you with national pride,
or perhaps, on the contrary, you dislike it for some reason. Maybe you are indifferent towards
it, or have never given it much thought.
What about the anthems of other countries? Not many people know the words of national
anthems other than their own, but you might know some of the tunes – for example that of the
1)___________ of France, or the Star-Spangled Banner of the United States.
Because there are more than 3) ___________ countries in the world there are naturally many
differences between national anthems. Most are quite short, only taking about one minute to
sing, but some are much longer. Some of the tunes are upbeat or rousing, while others sound
quite solemn.
One of the most unusual anthems is that of 5) ___________, because it contains words in five
of the country’s eleven official languages. The Spanish anthem, meanwhile, stands out for a
different reason – it doesn’t have any words at all.
Most of the oldest national anthems belong to 7) ___________ – for example the Marseillaise,
which celebrates the French Revolution, was composed in 1792, and Britain’s God Save the
Queen (previously 9) ___________) was written in 1745. Lots of other national anthems were
composed in the second half of the 20th century, including those of many European colonies
that achieved independence during that period.
Of the very few national anthems created by people who were famous outside their own
country, there is the German anthem, whose melody was composed by 11) ___________, and
that of India, whose words were written by the poet Rabindranath Tagore.
If your knowledge of your national anthem is a bit shaky, you are certainly not alone. For
example, if you have ever watched footballers and athletes singing their national anthems
during the World Cup and the Olympic Games, you have probably noticed that some of them
seem unsure of the 13) ___________.
One sportsperson who got into trouble because of this was the Italian Gerhard Plankensteiner
in the 2006 Winter Olympics. Just after he had won a bronze medal in the luge, he admitted to
a journalist that he didn’t know the words of the Italian national anthem. This didn’t go down
well with 15) ___________, who suggested he should apologize or even give back his medal.
It should be explained, however, that Plankensteiner wasn’t a typical member of the Italian
team – he is from an area in the far north of Italy, next to the border with Austria, and his first
language is German.


National Anthems                                          WORKSHEET B

What do you think of your country’s national anthem? Maybe it fills you with national pride,
or perhaps, on the contrary, you dislike it for some reason. Maybe you are indifferent towards
it, or have never given it much thought.
What about the anthems of other countries? Not many people know the words of national
anthems other than their own, but you might know some of the tunes – for example that of the
Marseillaise of France, or the 2)___________ of the United States.
Because there are more than 200 countries in the world there are naturally many differences
between national anthems. Most are quite short, only taking 4) ___________ to sing, but some
are much longer. Some of the tunes are upbeat or rousing, while others sound quite solemn.
One of the most unusual anthems is that of South Africa, because it contains words in five of
the country’s eleven official languages. The Spanish anthem, meanwhile, stands out for a
different reason – 6) ___________.
Most of the oldest national anthems belong to European countries – for example the
Marseillaise, which celebrates 8) ___________, was composed in 1792, and Britain’s God
Save the Queen (previously God Save the King) was written in 1745. Lots of other national
anthems were composed in the second half of the 20th century, including those of many
European colonies that achieved 10) ___________ during that period.
Of the very few national anthems created by people who were famous outside their own
country, there is the German anthem, whose melody was composed by the composer Joseph
Haydn, and that of India, whose words were written by 12) ___________.
   If your knowledge of your national anthem is a bit shaky, you are certainly not alone. For
   example, if you have ever watched footballers and athletes singing their national anthems
   during the World Cup and the Olympic Games, you have probably noticed that some of them
   seem unsure of the words.
   One sportsperson who got into trouble because of this was the Italian Gerhard Plankensteiner
   in 14) ___________. Just after he had won a bronze medal in the luge, he admitted to a
   journalist that he didn’t know the words of the Italian national anthem. This didn’t go down
   well with some Italian politicians, who suggested he should apologize or even give back his
   medal. It should be explained, however, that Plankensteiner wasn’t a typical member of the
   Italian team – he is from 16) ___________, next to the border with Austria, and his first
   language is German.


   Part A                                                                 GROUP A

   Write the questions:

1. What ______________________________________________________________?
3. How many_________________________________________________________?
5. Which _____________________________________________________________?
7. Who _____________________________________________________________?
9. What _____________________________________________________________?
11. Who ______________________________________________________________?
13. What _____________________________________________________________?
15. Who ______________________________________________________________?

   …………………………………………………………………………………………..

   Part A                                                                  GROUP B

   Write the questions:

2. What ______________________________________________________________?
4. How long ___________________________________________________________?
6. Why _______________________________________________________________?
8. What _____________________________________________________________?
10. What ____________________________________________________________?
12. Who ______________________________________________________________?
14. When _____________________________________________________________?
16. Where ____________________________________________________________?

   National Anthems                                         WORKSHEET C

   Part B

   What do you think of your country’s national anthem? Maybe it fills you with national (1) _ r
   _ _ e, or perhaps, on the contrary, you (2) d _ _ _ _ _ _ it for some reason. Maybe you are (3) _
   _ _ _ f f _ _ _ n _ towards it, or have never given it much thought.
(4) _ _ _ _ a _ _ _ t the anthems of other countries? Not many people know the words of
national anthems other than their own, but you might know some of the          (5) _ u _ _ s – for
example that of the Marseillaise of France, or the Star-Spangled Banner of the United States.
Because there are more than 200 countries in the world there are naturally many differences
between national anthems. Most are quite short, only (6) _ _ _ _ n g about one minute to sing,
but some are much longer. Some of the tunes are upbeat or rousing, while others (7) s _ _ _ _
quite (8) _ _ _ e m n.
One of the most unusual anthems is that of South Africa, because it contains words in five of
the country’s eleven official languages. The Spanish anthem, meanwhile,        (9) s t _ _ _ _ _ _
_ for a different reason – it doesn’t have any words at all.
Most of the oldest national anthems belong to European countries – for example the
Marseillaise, which (10) _ e l _ _ _ _ _ _ _ the French Revolution, was composed in 1792, and
Britain’s God Save the Queen (previously God Save the King) was written in 1745. Lots of
other national anthems were composed in the second half of the 20th century, including those of
many European colonies that (11) a c _ _ _ _ _ _ independence during that period.
Of the very few national anthems created by people who were famous outside their own
country, there is the German anthem, whose melody was composed by the (12) _ _ _ _ _ _ e
r Joseph Haydn, and that of India, whose words were               (13) _ _ _ _ _ _ n by the poet
Rabindranath Tagore.
If your knowledge of your national anthem is a bit shaky, you are certainly not alone. For
example, if you have ever watched (14) f _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ and athletes singing their national
anthems during the World Cup and the Olympic Games, you have probably noticed that some
of them seem unsure of the words.
One sportsperson who got into trouble because of this was the Italian Gerhard Plankensteiner
in the 2006 Winter Olympics. Just after he had won a bronze medal in the luge, he (15) a _ _ _
_ t _ d t _ a journalist that he didn’t know the words of the Italian national anthem. This
didn’t go down well with some Italian politicians, who suggested he should apologize or even
give back his medal. It should be explained, however, that Plankensteiner wasn’t a typical (16)
_ e m _ _ _ of the Italian team – he is from an area in the far north of Italy, next to the border
with Austria, and his first language is German.


Who am I?                                                     WORKSHEET A

…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I am very popular in lots of different countries.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I go to an unusual school.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
To play my favourite game I have to go up very high.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
My first language was English, but I now speak more than fifty others.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I wear glasses.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
If you turn the first half of my surname around, you get the opposite of ‘bottom’.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
From July 2007 there will be seven of me.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I am popular with people of different ages, but especially young people.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
The person who created me could be John Keith, but she isn’t.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I’m arriving for the last time in July 2007.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I am now a teenager.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
In my surname you should have tea twice.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
I have dark hair.
…………………………………………………………………………………………..


Harry Potter                                                         WORKSHEET B

In 1990, a British woman in her mid-twenties called Joanne Rowling was on a train in England
when she suddenly had an idea for a story she could write. She had enjoyed writing ever since
she was a young girl, but there was something about the main character in this story that
seemed especially exciting. He was a thin, black-haired boy who wore glasses. He was also a
wizard, but didn’t yet know about his magical powers. His name was Harry Potter.
Harry has since made Rowling (whose pen name is J.K. Rowling) the richest author in the
world. Her six books about his adventures have sold more than 300 million copies worldwide
and exist in more than 50 different languages. Most of the readers are children or young
teenagers, but the books are unusual in the way that they also appeal to adults.
Each of the six books covers about a year in Harry’s life as he grows from a boy into a
teenager. At the start of the first book we learn that he is an orphan who lives with his horrible
aunt and uncle, the Dursleys. On his eleventh birthday he discovers he is a wizard, and soon
afterwards goes off to study at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, which is where
most of the action in the six books takes place.
Hogwarts is part of a magical world that is invisible to people without magical powers, who are
known as ‘Muggles’. Harry is the hero of all the stories, though there are many other likeable
characters such as his friends Ron and Hermione, and the powerful wizard Albus Dumbledore.
The main villain is the evil wizard Lord Voldemort, who killed Harry’s parents.
The stories are full of things that appeal to imagination of readers of all ages. One of them is
the game of ‘Quidditch’, which Harry is very good at. It is a bit like football, although it takes
place in the sky and the players ride on broomsticks!
Rowling has said that the seventh Harry Potter book, which comes out in July this year, will be
the last. The sixth book sold almost 7 million copies worldwide in the first 24 hours after
publication, a world record, but the seventh will almost certainly be even more popular.



Harry Potter                                                         WORKSHEET C

A
Fill the gaps below to complete the crossword and the name of the first Harry Potter book,
which came out in 1997: Harry Potter and the __________’s Stone
                                    1
               2
                                         3
                                    4
                                    5
                                               6
                               7
                                               8
                                          9
                                         10
                              11


1.  Harry Potter is an ____________.
2.  J.K. Rowling says the ____________ Harry Potter book will be the last.
3.  Some of the characters in the Harry Potter stories are ____________.
4.  Not ____________ Harry Potter fans are children or young teenagers.
5.  The idea for the first Harry Potter ____________ suddenly came to J.K. Rowling when she
    was on a train.
6. Harry is a ____________ at Hogwarts.
7. Harry uses a ____________ to play Quidditch.
8. Harry has magical ____________.
9. Albus Dumbledore and Lord Voldemort are two of the ____________ in the Harry Potter
    books.
10. Muggles can’t ____________ the magical world.
11. The Dursleys are not very pleasant, they’re ____________.

     Harry Potter                                                       WORKSHEET D



     The short text below, written by a young Harry Potter fan, contains ten mistakes. Can you find
     and then correct them?


     The Harry Potter books are the best books I ever read. They are quite long, but I have read all
     them and my mum says she will buy me the next one when it come out. My favourite is first
     one, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. I think the autor must have a great image to be
     able to create all those caracters. I also like the Harry Potter films, and have got two of them in
     DVD. My favourite bits in the films are when Harry and the other students on Hogwarts plays
     the game of Quidditch, which looks like great fun.

     …………………………………………………………………………………………..

     Harry Potter                                           WORKSHEET E - ANSWERS
The Harry Potter books are the best books I have ever read. They are quite long, but I have
read all of them and my mum says she will buy me the next one when it come comes out. My
favourite is the first one, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. I think the autor author
must have a great image imagination to be able to create all those caracters characters. I also
like the Harry Potter films, and have got two of them in on DVD. My favourite bits in the films
are when Harry and the other students on at Hogwarts plays play the game of Quidditch,
which looks like great fun.


FAST FOOD


The world’s first McDonald’s franchise started 15th April 1955 in Illinois.

Brainstorm:

What do you know about fast food, both in its local and international forms?

What kinds of fast food are popular in Lithuania?


Read the text and fill in the gaps

Fast Food

When most people hear the words ‘fast food’ they probably think of cheap, hot food sold in a
place where they don’t have to wait more than a couple of minutes between (1) ____________
and taking their first bite, and where they can either ‘take away’ or ‘eat in’. They probably also
(2) ____________ food they can eat with their fingers, without any (3) ____________.
In Britain, as in many other countries, hamburgers are among the most popular kinds of fast
food, and the biggest chain of burger restaurants is McDonald’s. The first McDonald’s (4)
____________ in Britain in 1974, and now you can find them in many British cities. The
restaurants in Britain recently added salads, fruit and sandwiches to their traditional (5)
____________ of burgers, fries and soft drinks.
Kebabs, which usually consist of pieces of hot chicken or lamb in pitta bread with salad and
chilli sauce, are also very popular. They are a part of Middle Eastern (6) ____________, and
provide a good example of how ‘foreign’ (7) ____________ has become very popular in
Britain in the last 40 years or so.
Perhaps the best example of traditional ‘British’ fast food is fish and chips, which means deep-
fried white fish with chips that are much (8)____________ than the American-style fries you
find in most burger restaurants. The country has more than 11,000 fish and chip shops, and the
British (9) ____________ eats fish and chips more than 250 million times a year, which means
almost five times a year for (10) ____________ man, woman and child.
Many foreigners could find some things a bit strange in a fish and chip shop, for example the
fact that many customers put a lot of salt and vinegar on their fish and chips, or the ‘mushy
peas’ some people eat as an accompaniment. You could (11) ____________ mushy peas as a
hot, thick, light green, pea-flavoured paste, which perhaps doesn’t sound very nice. In fact,
they are one those kinds of food that generate strong opinions – most people either love them
or (12) ____________ them.
Fill the twelve gaps in the text above with the correct words from the box below. There are
four words that you will not need to use.

      cutlery                saying                 built                 cooker
        all                population               every                 arrived
       fatter               imagine                 food                 ordering
      cuisine                 hate                  menu                 describe


Related Websites

http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/chat/your_comments/newsid_3634000/3634794.stm
A BBC Newsround forum from 2004 that asks ‘How much junk food is too much?’, with lots
of responses from young teenagers. Appropriate for intermediate level.

http://www.seafish.org/plate/fishandchips.asp
A short text on fish and chips from the British Seafish website. Challenging for intermediate
level.

http://www.mushypeas.co.uk/default.asp
The website of one of Britain’s leading producers of mushy peas. Challenging linguistically,
but contains some good photographs!

http://www.thechillisource.org/html/mainmenu.php
The Chilli Source, a humorous British website in praise of kebabs. Challenging for
intermediate level.


Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Brainstorm:

Why do people become refugees?
What are the countries where refugees tend to seek asylum?
What is the current situation with refugees and asylum seeking in Lithuania?

Do you think the following statements are true or false?

1. According to the most recent United Nations estimate, there are more than 100 million
refugees in the world.

2. The number of refugees in the world more than doubled between 2001 and 2006.

3. According to the most recent United Nations estimate, if countries were listed in order of the
number of foreign refugees living within their borders, the United States would be in the top
ten.
4. Iran and Pakistan are also among the top ten ‘host’ countries for foreign refugees.

5. ‘Internally displaced people’ is the official term for people who have had to move away
from their homes because it is too dangerous to stay, but haven’t moved to a different country.

6. Most refugees from Afghanistan live in the United States or Canada.

7. ‘Asylum askers’ is the official term for people who arrive in another country and ask the
government for permission to stay on the basis that it is too dangerous for them to go back to
their own country.

8. Despite the recent violence in Iraq, only a few thousand refugees have left the country.

9. According to the United Nations, there are more foreign refugees living in Germany than the
United States, Britain or Australia.

10. The term ‘environmental refugees’ refers to people who move to another country because
they want to live in a warmer climate.

Refugees

A refugee is a person who has had to leave their country because it is too dangerous for them to
stay, usually because of war or persecution.
According to the most recent report by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees
(UNHCR) there were about 8.4 million refugees in the world in January 2006, which is about
30% fewer than the total calculated by the organization in 2001.
In addition, however, there are also many millions of ‘internally displaced people’, which
means people who have been forced to flee their homes, for the same reasons as refugees, but
have not entered another country.
The UNHCR 2006 report stated that Afghanistan was the country of origin of the largest
number of refugees, followed by Sudan, but more recent estimates suggest they might both
have been overtaken by Iraq. As for the countries with the largest numbers of refugees, the
report stated that the top five were Pakistan, Iran (these two having been the destinations for
most Afghan refugees), Germany, Tanzania and the United States, but it is possible that Syria
and Jordan have now entered the top five due to the hundreds of thousands of refugees they
have received from neighbouring Iraq.
The term ‘asylum seekers’ refers to people who have arrived in another country and asked the
government for permission to stay on the basis that it is too dangerous for them to return home.
Asylum seekers wait for the government to decide on their cases: if the government gives them
official refugee status they are allowed to stay, but if their claims for asylum are rejected they
are forced to go home.
The subject of asylum seekers has become controversial in some countries. In Britain, for
example, some sections of the media think too many asylum seekers are allowed to enter the
country, and say that some of them are not escaping from danger but just looking for a better
standard of living. Other British people, however, feel the country lets in too few asylum
seekers, and say that some of those whose asylum claims are rejected are genuine refugees.
As well as refugees who flee from war or persecution, there are also ‘environmental refugees’
who have been forced to cross borders because environmental conditions have made it difficult
for them to survive – for example if there is a drought, or if farmlands are gradually turning
into desert. Because of global warming, many people predict that in the next 30 years there will
be a huge increase in the number of people becoming environmental refugees, mostly in poor
countries that already have hot, dry climates.

Refugees

A refugee is a person who has had to leave their country because it is too dangerous for them to
stay, usually because of (1) _ _ r or (2) p _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ion.
According to the most recent (3) r _ _ _ _ _ by the United Nations High Commission for
Refugees (UNHCR) there were about 8.4 million refugees in the world in January 2006, which
is about 30% (4) f _ _ _ r than the total calculated by the organization in 2001.
In (5) a _ _ _ _ _ on however, there are also many millions of ‘internally displaced people’,
which means people who have been forced to (6) f _ _ _ their homes, for the same reasons as
refugees, but have not entered another country.
The UNHCR 2006 report stated that Afghanistan was the country of (7) o _ _ _ in of the
largest number of refugees, followed by Sudan, but more recent estimates suggest they might
both have been (8) ov _ _ _ _ _ _ n by Iraq. As for the countries with the largest numbers of
refugees, the report stated that the (9) _ _ p five were Pakistan, Iran (these two having been the
(10) d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ions for most Afghan refugees), Germany, Tanzania and the United States,
but it is possible that Syria and Jordan have now entered the top five due to the hundreds of
thousands of refugees they have received from (11) nei _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ng Iraq.
The term ‘asylum seekers’ refers to people who have arrived in another country and asked the
government for (12) p _ _ _ _ _ _ ion to stay on the basis that it is too dangerous for them to
return home. Asylum seekers wait for the government to decide on their cases: if the
government gives them official refugee (13) _ _ _ _ us they are allowed to stay, but if their
claims for asylum are rejected and they are (14) f _ _ _ _ _ to go home.
The subject of asylum seekers has become controversial in some countries. In Britain, for
example, some sections of the (15) m _ _ _ a think too many asylum seekers are allowed to
enter the country, and say that some of them are not escaping from danger but just looking for
a better (16) s _ _ _ _ _ rd of living. Other British people, however, feel the country lets in too
few asylum seekers, and say that some of those whose asylum claims are rejected are (17) ge _
_ _ _ e refugees.
As well as refugees who flee from war or persecution, there are also ‘environmental refugees’
who have been forced to (18) c _ _ _ s borders because environmental conditions have made it
difficult for them to survive – for example if there is a     (19) dr _ _ _ _ t, or if farmlands are
gradually turning into desert. Because of global warming, many people (20) _ _ _ _ _ ct that in
the next 30 years there will be a huge increase in the number of people becoming
environmental refugees, mostly in poor countries that already have hot, dry climates.

2. Related Websites

http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/home
Website of the United Nations High Commission for Refugees. Contains a lot of information.
Intermediate level and above. For figures from the January 2006 report that is referred to in the
worksheet see http://www.unhcr.org/basics/BASICS/3b028097c.html.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/6470425.stm
A recent BBC article (March 2007) on Iraqi refugees. Challenging for intermediate level.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/immigration/0,,1397447,00.html
An index of articles on immigration, asylum and refugees in the British newspaper The
Guardian. Accessible to upper-intermediate level.


The United States of America.
National Independence Day.


I. Brainstorm on the subject of the United States.

Exercise 1
Fill the gaps by choosing the correct word from the box below. There are fifteen words but
only twelve gaps.

    rich               write            singers           astronaut           sea
   dessert             use              species              has            million
   mammal             higher              area          independent          cities


The United States became an (1) ____________ country in the eighteenth century.

More than 400 (2) ____________ of (3) ____________ live in the United States.

The population of the United States in 1900 was approximately 76 (4) ____________, which is
less than 30% of what it is now.

The United States is the third biggest country in the world – only Russia and Canada cover a
larger (5) ____________.

Life expectancy in the United States is (6) ____________ than in most other countries.

New York has the biggest population of all the (7) ____________ in the United States.

Apple pie and baseball are not just a (8) ____________ and a sport: they are symbols of the
United States.

Most adults in the United States (9) ___________ the internet, and at least fifteen million of
them (10) ____________ an internet blog.

Neil Armstrong, a famous American (11) ____________, was the first person to set foot on the
moon.

Elvis Presley, Michael Jackson and Madonna are just three of the famous pop
(12) ____________ who were born in the United States.
Exercise 2
Can you match the numbers in the first column of the table with the items in the second
column?

70             The year the United States became independent from Britain.            (A)

78             The approximate number of species of bird that live in the United      (B)
               States.

301,000,000 The approximate area of the United States, in square kilometres.          (C)

1994           The percentage of people living in the United States who were          (D)
               born outside the country.

1776           The approximate population of the United States.                       (E)

9,600,000      The year the football World Cup took place in the United States.       (F)

1969           The year President George W Bush was born.                             (G)

4              The year the United States entered the Second World War.               (H)

11             The approximate percentage of Americans who use the internet.          (I)

1946           Average life expectancy in the United States.                          (J)

700            The number of cities in the United States with a population of         (K)
               more than 2 million.

1941           The year Neil Armstrong became the first man to set foot on the        (L)
               moon.

Exercise 3
Decide if the following statements about the United States are true (T) or false (F), then bet a
minimum of 10 points up to a maximum of 50 on your choice.

                                                          T/F    Points Points Points
                                                                  bet    lost   won
 1     Los Angeles has the second biggest population
       of all the cities in the United States.
 2     A British person could write the words
       ‘colour’ and ‘centre’, but an American would
       spell both of them differently.
 3     Average life expectancy in the United States is
       now about 30 years more than it was in 1900.
 4     George W. Bush became president of the
       United States in 2003.
 5     San Francisco, Toronto, Miami and Houston
       are all cities in the United States.
 6    There are three different colours on the flag of
      the United States: red, white and blue.
 7    The list of famous singers from the United
      States includes Madonna, Elvis Presley, Frank
      Sinatra, Bob Dylan and Kurt Cobain.
 8    There are approximately 500 species of insect
      in the United States.
 9    The New York Yankees are an American
      baseball team.
 10   The expression ‘OK’ came from the United
      States.
                                               Total points lost and won
                    Final total (subtract total points lost from total points won)


2. Related Websites

http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States
The United States entry in Simple English Wikipedia. Challenging for pre-intermediate level.

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html
Differences in vocabulary between American and British English, grouped into subject
categories. Pre-intermediate and above.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/country_profiles/1217752.stm
United States country profile from the BBC website. Challenging for intermediate level.

								
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