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					No 04: Nov '05            LEARNING
                          BULLETIN




Pioneering new approaches to learning
Providing practical, flexible, inventive and risk-taking support
                             Insight
                             Highlights
                             Funding opportunities
                             Other ways to bring learning alive
                                     INSIGHT

                             SAVE THE SCHOOL EXPERIMENT
                             A new report by NESTA, Real Science, argues that the UK needs more science
                             investigation and experiments in school classrooms. Our economic competitiveness
                             and capacity could be under threat without this – not to mention the motivation and
                             engagement of school children learning science. The report’s findings are endorsed by
                             a NESTA-commissioned ICM poll with over 500 secondary school teachers across the
                             UK. The vast majority consider science enquiry learning to be very important, with
                             87% agreeing that it can have a significant impact on pupils’ performance. However
                             two in three science teachers (64%) suggest that the biggest barrier to more science
                             enquiry work is a lack of time within current constraints. NESTA is working with many
                             partners across science and learning to advance science enquiry, and is looking to
                             forge new and innovative partnerships to achieve this.

                             Real Science: an executive summary
                             Real Science: the full report
                             Real Science: regional perspectives
                             TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF NESTA'S SCIENCE ENQUIRY LEARNING PROJECTS:

                             Nestonauts: building a ‘moonbase’ in the playground

                             Motivate: using interactive technologies and real world examples to explore maths and
                             science

                             Digital Science: using new media to engage young people with the social and ethical
                             issues in science
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                             HIGHLIGHTS
EXPERIENCE THE WORLD’S MOST BEAUTIFUL SCIENCE
Visualise – the beauty of science is a visually stunning new show from science made
simple. It combines live science experiments with graphics and music to create a
word–less experience which aims to change audiences’ attitudes to science and help
them to make their own connections to the science around them. The show launches
at the Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff on 6 December, at 2.00pm, and tickets cost
£4.50.

An adapted version of the show will be made available to schools and special needs
groups across the UK. Its high impact, non-verbal content makes it particularly useful
for non–English language speakers and people with a hearing impairment.

Tickets are available from www.wmc.org.uk, telephone 08700 40 2000.
                           DRIVING ENTERPRISE EDUCATION IN MERSEYSIDE
The Hotshots Entrepreneurs Academy is the brainchild of one of the North West’s most
inspiring entrepreneurs, Matt Johnson. His aim is to develop the business ‘know–how’
of young people across Merseyside, teaching them skills such as managing risk,
creative thinking and motivation. He also aims to give teachers the skills they need to
embed enterprise learning into the curriculum in Merseyside schools; particularly
opportune in the light of a new Government initiative which entitles 14–16–year–olds
to five days’ enterprise learning. Matt’s ultimate goal is to encourage a generation of
entrepreneurs who will boost the region’s economy and contribute to a more
innovative and creative UK culture.
                           DEBATES WITH A DIFFERENCE – NUCLEAR ENERGY
Three hundred 14-19-year-olds across the UK are being encouraged to participate in
the debate surrounding nuclear energy and nuclear waste. Their views will feed
directly into the Government’s current consultation on UK radio-active waste
management.

The debate, which takes place over two days, uses video-conferencing and includes
‘press conference’ style interactions with experts in the field. Resources are available
online for teachers across the UK who would like to stage their own ‘Debate with a
difference’.
COSMIC SPACE COMES TO PERTH AND MANCHESTER
                               Cosmic Space is a planetarium-type dome which merges
astronomy, arts, poetry and philosophy to inspire people about science and the natural
world around them.

The travelling show – hailed by visitors in Birmingham as ‘awe- inspiring’ and ‘utterly
fantastic’ – arrives at Perth Concert Hall from 26 November 2005 and the Oldham
Gallery from 14 January 2006.
NEW WAYS OF WORKING WITH YOUNG OFFENDERS
Dance United offers young offenders an alternative way to access the arts, engage
with learning and develop core skills. Through their Academy they provide
contemporary dance training, and are developing dance-led approaches to teaching
literacy and numeracy. Underpinning their approach is the idea of ‘learning by stealth’;
helping youngsters who may have negative or hostile attitudes to mainstream
education to learn by ‘doing’ rather than ‘talking’.

Young offenders develop life and social skills by helping to organise regular public
performances, taking part in activities such as dance administration, box office, stage
management, tour booking, lighting, sound, marketing, personnel management and
budgeting. Gifted dancers may go on to join the Youth Dance Group and the Youth
Dance Company; some may even pursue professional dance careers.
‘ADOPT AN AUTHOR’ PUBLISHES FINDINGS
The Adopt an Author project was supported by NESTA in 2003 to test a new model of
increasing pupils’ engagement with literacy. In the pilot scheme, children and popular
authors emailed each other over several weeks, supervised by teachers, and met face-
to-face at the Brighton Festival. This proved so successful that the scheme was rolled
out to five new regions; Belfast, Birmingham, Cambridge, the mid-Pennines and
Swansea.

The project has now been independently evaluated by Carol Fox and Avril Loveless of
Brighton University and the report, along with a promotional brochure, is available on
NESTA’s website, www.nesta.org.uk.
CAPTURING SCIENCE EXPERIMENTATION ON FILM
Films for Learning is an initiative developed by the Thomas Hardye School in
Dorchester. Teachers and pupils are working with professional filmmakers, Toolkit, to
make their own science teaching videos which can be shared with other schools. The
project was driven by an awareness that, while hands-on science experimentation in
the classroom stimulates learners’ engagement in science, it is not always practical or
affordable. Students are asked what activities helped their learning, and work with
teachers and Toolkit to find the best way of capturing that on video. Thomas Hardye
Schools is one of 20 high-performing schools chosen for the Leading Edge programme,
supported by the Department for Education and Skills.
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                                       FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

If reading about some of NESTA’s Learning projects has sparked an idea of your own,
why not get in touch? We commission projects and invite tenders from organisations
and people who can help us achieve our aims. If you have an innovative approach to
learning you’d like to discuss with us, email learning@nesta.org.uk.
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                                                OTHER WAYS TO BRING
                                                LEARNING ALIVE

   NESTA’s goal is to inspire and stimulate creative thinking and innovation in every
   area of science, technology and the arts. Our Learning programme is only one
   means to this end.

   We also manage the legacy of Planet Science, run NESTA Futurelab and support
   young people through our Ignite! Fellowship project.

   Planet Science
   A unique website designed to engage young people with science - as well as
   teachers and parents. The site contains free games, resources and ideas for
   everyone. www.planet-science.com.

   NESTA Futurelab
   Based in Bristol, NESTA Futurelab brings together the creative, technical and
   educational communities to pioneer new ways of using new technologies to
   transform the learning experience. For a showcase of their latest work and
   research go to www.nestafuturelab.org.

   Ignite!
   This project supports the personal development of exceptionally creative young
   people aged between 10 and 21 years old. Take a look at www.nesta.org.uk/ignite
                         for the latest thoughts on creativity in young people, and a range of activities and
                         games.
                         We intend this to be a quarterly bulletin sent to organisations and individuals
                         interested in innovation in learning and education.
                         If you do not want to continue receiving this bulletin, please send an e-mail to
                         'learningnews@nesta.org.uk' with the subject line 'NESTA Learning
                         bulletin/unsubscribe', and we shall remove you from our subscribers list before the
                         next edition.
                         If you have received the Bulletin from a friend and would like your own copy in
                         future, please send an e-mail to 'learningnews@nesta.org.uk' with the subject line
                         'NESTA Learning Bulletin/subscribe'.




NESTA was set up with an endowment from the national lottery. We invest the interest from this in UK
innovation and work to improve the climate for creativity across the UK.

				
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