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					                    State of Montana

   Telework Program Guide




                    State Human Resources Division
                     Department of Administration
                           Revised April 2008
This Guide is designed to provide assistance to state supervisors, managers and
employees considering telework. Alternative accessible formats of this Guide
will be provided on request. Persons who need an alternative format should
contact the State Human Resources Division, Department of Administration, 125
N. Roberts St., PO Box 200127, Helena, MT 59620-0127. Telephone 406-444-3871.
Those using a TTY may call through the Montana Relay Service at 711.
                                                     Table of Contents
Purpose .................................................................................................................................... 1
What Is Telework? ................................................................................................................... 1
Why Consider Telework Programs? ....................................................................................... 1
  Employer Benefits................................................................................................................ 1
  Employee Benefits ............................................................................................................... 2
  Employees with Disabilities ................................................................................................ 3
Telework Considerations and Guidelines .............................................................................. 4
  Telework Management ......................................................................................................... 4
  Telework Managers .............................................................................................................. 5
  Formal Telework Policy ....................................................................................................... 5
  Evaluation ............................................................................................................................. 6
  Telework Candidates ........................................................................................................... 6
  Collective Bargaining........................................................................................................... 7
  Communication .................................................................................................................... 7
  Organization Requirements................................................................................................. 8
  Job Requirements ................................................................................................................ 8
  Hours of Work ...................................................................................................................... 8
  Compensation and Benefits ................................................................................................ 9
  Dependent Care.................................................................................................................... 9
  Marketing Telework .............................................................................................................10
  Web-Based Resources .......................................................................................................10
Setting Up a Home Office .......................................................................................................12
  Security ................................................................................................................................12
  Products, documents, and records ...................................................................................13
  Insurance Coverage ............................................................................................................13
  Household Expenses ..........................................................................................................13
  Office Furniture ...................................................................................................................14
  Supplies ...............................................................................................................................14
  Travel Expenses ..................................................................................................................14
  Sharing Space at the Central Office...................................................................................14
Office Equipment and Services..............................................................................................14
  Telephone Services ............................................................................................................14
  Computer Hardware and Other Electronic Equipment .....................................................15
  Software ...............................................................................................................................16
  Services ...............................................................................................................................16
  Taxes....................................................................................................................................16
  Liability Insurance and Risk Management Issues ............................................................17
Appendix Sample Policies, Forms and Checklists for Telework Guide .............................18
  Sample Agency Telework Policy ........................................................................................19
  Model Telework Agreement ................................................................................................21
  Sample Supervisor’s Checklist for Teleworkers ...............................................................23
  Sample Teleworker Self-Assessment ................................................................................24
  Monthly Telework Feedback Form .....................................................................................26
  Sample Master Calendar for Teleworkers .........................................................................27
  Computer Equipment Placed in an Employee’s Home .....................................................28
  Sample Hardware/Software Inventory List ........................................................................29
  Sample Safety and Security Checklist ...............................................................................30
  State of Montana Ergonomic Assessment Survey Form .................................................31
  Telework Program Evaluation ............................................................................................35
                                      Purpose
The purpose of this guide is to introduce Telework as an alternative to working in the
traditional “office” environment. Telework is the practice of working at home or at a site
near the home instead of physically traveling to a central workplace. With the
increasing use of computers, the Internet and e-mail, many jobs can be done at
locations other than the office. The guide provides managers, agencies, and
employees with tools to evaluate whether telework is appropriate for their agency, for
specific jobs and specific employees, and provides guidance when developing a
telework program.

                              What Is Telework?
Telework is a flexible work arrangement where selected employees work one or more
days a week from their home or at a site near the home instead of physically traveling to
a central workplace.

               Why Consider Telework Programs?
Telework programs have been implemented in many businesses and agencies across
the country. Usually teleworkers do not work full-time at home or another site.
Spending part of the week in the office provides better interaction with co-workers and
supervisors that pays dividends in teamwork.

Employer Benefits
There are many good reasons why employers decide to implement a telework program.
There is pressure on organizations to do more work and get better results with fewer
resources. The rapid development of technology that allows fast and easy movement of
information makes telework efficient and effective. There is an increasing concern with
the environmental, social and personal costs of commuting, as well as employees’ need
to balance work and home lives as the number of two working-parent and single-parent
households rises.

Telework is just one type of workplace flexibility. Many employers with telework
programs also make available options such as job-sharing, part-time work, compressed
workweeks, and flextime. Providing a flexible workplace may be a good opportunity to
attract and retain top-quality workers who need more flexibility. State government has
allowed these options for many years because flexibility makes good business sense for
the employer and employees alike.

When establishing alternate work schedules, agencies must still assure coverage of
essential functions during regular work hours. For many these are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
but some agencies must cover functions 24 hours each day. Some employees must still

                                             1
be able to provide assistance to persons both inside and outside the department who
would expect to contact them during regular business hours.

Telework programs do not benefit all employers and are not appropriate for all
employees. While deciding whether to initiate a telework program, managers need to
be able to understand how telework will help the agency, as well as the employee.
There must be good business reasons to start a program. Some examples of business
reasons are:

   The need for more productive work hours from employees. With the reduction in
    commuting time, some employees are happy to work more hours during crunch
    periods, or find that more hours are available for productive work. Telework may
    provide increased productivity (this is hard to quantify, but some experts estimate a
    15%-25% increase). This may be especially important when employees are working
    on projects with important deadlines. For employees covered by the Fair Labor
    Standards Act, the overtime provisions will still apply while teleworking.
   Client support can be maintained or even improved because on-call staff no longer
    has to return to the office to respond to customer problems. The agency’s timeline,
    quality and level of interaction can still often be met by teleworkers.
   The number of trips to check in at the office can be reduced if workers are primarily
    assigned in the field.
   Telework requires employees to be better organized when their work has to be
    planned in advance.
   Studies show that telework may promote higher employee morale and job
    satisfaction, which increases the employer’s ability to attract and keep valued
    employees. It has been shown to improve recruitment and retention of employees.
   Telework may help increase access to new labor markets (part-time, semi-retired,
    residents of distant communities) and it may provide a larger labor pool for positions.
   Telework assists employees to work during unusual circumstances (office
    remodeling, blizzards, floods, earthquakes, fires). Many managers also report that it
    provides greater workplace flexibility and greater assignment flexibility.
   It may reduce office and parking rental space costs.
   It can decrease absenteeism.

Employee Benefits
For employees, telework may help balance their work and home life while reducing the
stress, cost and time spent commuting. They may feel better about themselves and
their job because they are given trust, responsibility and independence. Employees
often report they enjoy working more. In many situations, there are fewer non-urgent
distractions both for the telework and support staff still in the office and reduced
transition time when employees chat socially rather than about work.




                                             2
Telework eliminates some commuting time for employees, so employees can
sometimes work more hours or work more productively, rather than working late or
returning to the office after hours or on weekends. Teleworkers report improved
concentration and that they feel more relaxed at the start of the day than they do after a
stressful commute. Happier, more relaxed teleworkers may feel better about
themselves, their employer and their performance.

Some workers need daily, face-to-face contact with managers and customers. Others
miss working as a team with coworkers on projects, access to files and equipment, and
meetings. But many employees have tasks that can be done away from the office and
their productivity increases in a different environment.

Employees with Disabilities
Teleworkers with disabilities report greater independence, better health, and improved
morale. They may have the opportunity to be more creative and more productive, and
to do higher quality work. They may feel better about themselves and their job.

Telework allows employees with disabilities who may have a difficult time working a
straight eight-hour day to work when and where it makes sense. It eliminates lengthy
commutes, problems created when relying on others for rides to the office, makes
rehabilitation appointments close to home easier to attend, or eliminates the problems
an individual may have with lighting, odors, chemical exposure, immune deficiencies, or
chemical sensitivity to office environments. Workers often have more control over their
lives.

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is designed to remove barriers to
employment for people with disabilities. It specifies employment options as modified
work schedules, part-time work, and allocations of functions among employees. Is an
employer required to allow an employee to telework so long as the job is amenable to
telework? Case law concerning this issue is still contradictory. Some Courts have
found that telework is a reasonable accommodation if it is not an undue burden for the
employer or does not fundamentally alter the basic nature of the agency program.
Others have found that the employer has the right to decide whether or not to allow
telework, even when it would not be an undue burden or alter the basic nature of the
program.




                                            3
           Telework Considerations and Guidelines
Telework programs can overwhelm supervisors unless an appropriate amount of
planning is done. Many managers start small. They give approval for one or two
people to telework only one day a week for one month. They establish measurable
performance guidelines. They evaluate the results and only continue or expand the
program if they have positive results.

This section will list some of the issues and options managers and employees will want
to explore when considering a telework program. Not all issues will come up in your
situation and you will not want to adopt every option. These are presented to help guide
your process.

Telework Management
Technological concerns may be less of a challenge to a telework program than the
management issues. Trust, control, communication, and helping employees adjust may
be far more important than remote access issues. The decision to support telework
should be based on an analysis and redesign of work and jobs, not just on the grounds
that computer technology has made it possible to move some jobs out of the
workplace—if only part time. Telework seems to work best when some time is spent at
the office. On-call staff who may be able to provide their services from home present
different problems and solutions and are not necessarily included in this discussion.
Persons who telework 100% of the time are also not included.

To initiate a telework program, managers need to know how telework will help the
agency. Managing teleworkers can at least temporarily increase the workload of
managers who must still set milestones, deadlines and objectives, and make sure the
focus is on results. Managers must also determine up front how to define the success
of the telework effort. Program objectives must be ones that can be measured by
results. When possible, it is a good idea to assign the program to a coordinator who
has time to oversee the program.

TRUST is the key issue in any telework arrangement. Managers may feel that they
have a loss of control over their employees. Other management issues include:

      Telework practices necessitate more structure and attention by managers.
      Workers can feel isolated and out of touch.
      Employees may want to work different hours than management is willing to
       approve.
      Workers may feel less motivated outside the office environment; some
       employees tend to lose discipline outside the office and fall behind.
      Performance criteria should not be different for teleworkers than other employees
       who do the same work but do not telework.



                                           4
      Workers with small children or elderly parents at home often cannot combine that
       environment into an office environment.
      Separate space for the home office may be a problem.
      Maintenance of home-based office equipment may be a problem.
      Non-teleworking co-workers may feel that a benefit has been denied to them;
       these workers may have to be rewarded with other benefits. They may also
       suspect that the home workers aren’t producing and those in the office are
       picking up the slack.

Telework Managers
Managers also must be able to delegate responsibility and forego direct oversight.
Telework programs have a higher success rate if the manager:

      Trusts the employees to do their jobs without constant supervision.
      Has a results-oriented management style and establishes clear, measurable
       objectives and desired results.
      Is flexible, allowing new approaches and solutions, and is open to ideas from
       employees.
      Keeps an open, positive attitude toward telework.
      Provides timely and constructive feedback.
      Facilitates open communication among the members of the team, including the
       supervisor, teleworker, co-workers and support staff.

Formal Telework Policy

One way to minimize the likelihood of disparate treatment claims and assist in
defending against any potential claims of discrimination is to establish a solid, clearly
defined telework policy. The policy should include statements of non-discriminatory
selection criteria that include information about:

      The jobs that are eligible and the jobs that are not eligible.
      The types of people who can be most productive as a teleworker.
      Whether a flex schedule will be allowed.
      What the criteria for inclusion or exclusion will be.
      The maximum number of telework days per week that will be acceptable. One
       expert recommends that the maximum number of telework days should not
       exceed two per week without special consideration by management.
      The equipment and technology needed to complete the work and the policies
       regarding each.
      The fact that the communications frequency between manager and teleworker
       must be worked out.

                                             5
       The requirement that priorities and timetables must be communicated in writing.

       The agency’s right to establish periodic reviews of the telework arrangement and
        the right to bring it to an end at any time.
       How performance expectations and measurement change within the telework
        environment. Performance is usually evaluated on the basis of results, not a
        time card. Teleworkers should make their relationships with their offices project-
        specific rather than time specific. Pay and performance must be contingent upon
        the employee’s contribution as they are for all workers. The manager should not
        have two standards for performance—one for teleworkers and one for the office.
       How non-telework colleagues will be trained into the aspects of the new work
        environment. For example, meetings involving teleworkers must meet their
        home-office schedules, which may conflict with central office schedules.
        Workers may use conference calls or speaker phones for some meetings.

Examples of policies and checklists are included in the Appendix of this Guide.

Evaluation
After the program begins, managers need to start gathering information regarding the
work environment, attitudes toward telework, job performance, job satisfaction and
travel patterns in order to evaluate the success of the program. Written surveys, focus
groups and individual interviews are the basic tools used to evaluate and learn how to
improve.

Telework Candidates
Good candidates for telework are self-motivated and results-oriented, need minimal
supervision, and are able to plan and work on their own time. A person is likely to be a
successful teleworker if he or she is:

   Well-organized and self-disciplined.
   Results oriented.
   Wanting to telework.
   Familiar with job requirements.
   Adaptable.
   Self-motivated and responsible.
   An effective communicator.
   Able to work well independently.
   Currently successful in his or her job.
   Sensitive to impacts on co-workers and clients.
   Knowledgeable about the organization’s procedures and policies.


                                             6
Managers must identify appropriate telework jobs and tasks. Typical telework tasks are:

Analysis                           Dictating                   Reading
Auditing reports                   Editing                     Record keeping
Batch work                         Evaluations                 Research
Calculating                        Field visits                Sales
Computer programming               Graphics                    Sending/receiving e-mail
Contracts                          Planning                    Spreadsheet analysis
Data entry                         Preparing budgets           Typing/word processing
Design work                        Project management          Writing

Suitable teleworkers:

   Have enough tasks appropriate for telework.
   Can schedule face-to-face meetings in the office on non-telework days.
   Are able to meet client and co-worker needs when teleworking.
   Can schedule use of resources that must stay at the office (e.g., security-sensitive
    files, large equipment, shared resource materials).
   Are free to manage his or her workflow.
   Can benefit from quiet or uninterrupted time.

Collective Bargaining
Collective Bargaining Agreements cover wages, hours and working conditions for
employees. Agencies may have an obligation to bargain telework policies with
employees covered under collective bargaining agreements. Contact your department’s
labor relation’s specialist for assistance.

Communication

Effective communication is key to successful telework. Both voluntary and timely
communication is critical. The teleworker is primarily responsible for maintaining
effective communication and workflow among customers, co-workers, and the
supervisor or team leader. The supervisor or team leader will need to devise
procedures for effective communication. The procedures should allow telework to
appear invisible to outside customers.

Teleworkers must keep their supervisor informed of progress on assignments worked
on at home, including any problems they may experience while teleworking. Methods of
planning and monitoring the work of the teleworker include:

   E-mail to the supervisor outlining the telework work plan the day before telework
    followed by a list of accomplishments the day after a telework day.


                                             7
   Discussing plans for work the telework day(s) with supervisor, then debriefing the
    following day.
   Scheduled telephone “meetings” with the supervisor on the telework day.
   Some other arrangement specifically for the telework day designed at the beginning
    of the program.

Organization Requirements
Teleworkers need to plan the work for telework days in advance to complete time-
critical work that can only be done at the office and in order to take home everything
they need. They may want to take home more work than they think they can get done.

Unless calls and other messages are forwarded to the telework site, teleworkers may
have to wade through stacks of phone or co-worker messages and mail when they
return to the office. Some teleworkers may choose to have phone messages forwarded
to voice mail to avoid interruptions or another member of the household answering the
phone inappropriately. Managers and teleworkers should discuss and agree how calls
will be handled during telework days.

Job Requirements
Managers need to decide if they want employees to agree to comply with all existing job
requirements that are now are in effect in the office. For example, they need to decide
whether or not to require the same dress code for work at home. Things to consider
include:

   whether or not the employee will be meeting clients,
   the frequency of emergencies, and
   the need for employee to meet with the public.

The performance standards for employees working at home or another alternate work
place will be equivalent to the standards used when the employees are working at the
regular office. Nothing in the telework policy should waive or change standards of
performance or behavior in the workplace.

Hours of Work
There is no reason under FLSA or state labor laws that non-exempt employees cannot
telework. Non-exempt employees have to follow certain rules about length of the work
day and work week, overtime payments, breaks during the day, and other items. These
must be followed for non-exempt teleworkers as well as non-exempt office workers.

A regular schedule that includes telework hours should be established. Time normally
scheduled out of the office for personal needs will still need to be scheduled as
“approved leave.” Any unplanned absences could be considered “unapproved.” An

                                            8
example of an absence is taking time to talk with a plumber or another repair person in
the home.

Managers may want to establish the work hours that may be flexed. State the core
work hours, and then the flex-hours available to the workers. Discuss whether or not
overtime hours will be permitted and how the employee can request to work overtime.
Managers may also want to set a policy for work conducted during an emergency.

Employees are not considered to be working when commuting to and from work on
days the employee is working in the regular office or commuting to another telework
site.

Compensation and Benefits
In most situations, an employee’s salary, job responsibilities, work status and benefits
will not change because of telework, except as they might have changed had the
employee stayed in the office full-time. Employees will still be entitled to any state-wide
benefits changes that may be implemented.

Dependent Care
If dependent care was required for office work, it will usually be required for telework.
Telework should not be used as a regular substitute for full-time dependent care. The
state recognizes that one advantage of working at home is the opportunity to have more
time with dependents, but it is the teleworker’s responsibility to ensure that he or she is
fully able to complete work assignments on time.

Agencies need to define their expectations regarding caring for dependents on telework
days. Having a dependent in the home while telework may or may not affect an
employee’s ability to work.

Managers need to make it clear that teleworkers are expected to make arrangements
for someone to care for children or other dependents if needed. Managers may want to
enter into a formal agreement that the employee will not undertake to provide primary
care for a child less than 12 years of age during at-home working hours. If such
children will be in the home during the employee’s at-home working hours, some other
individual must be present to provide primary care for those children.

Managers may also want to have an agreement that the employee will also not
undertake to provide primary care for an adult, who would otherwise require the care of
a nurse or personal care assistant, while working at home.

In some situations, the manager may give approval, on a temporary basis, for a
teleworker to provide primary care for another family member.




                                             9
Marketing Telework
Supervisors find telework programs easier to implement when they have support from
agency management. It also helps to assign a telework coordinator with the time to
oversee the program.

Once a program has been designed, management can publicize the program to workers
and select teleworkers. All managers and employees will benefit from understanding
the program and its purpose. Teleworkers and their supervisors will need additional
training to implement a program successfully.

There are a variety of materials available for use from State Human Resources division
to assist Agencies in marketing and training.


Web-Based Resources

   Gil Gordon Associates provides a useful page on “Telecommuting, Teleworking,
    and Alternative Officing” http://www.gilgordon.com/
   The National Telecommuting Advisory Council is a non-profit organization
    devoted to promoting telecommuting. http://www.telecommute.org/

   International Telework Association http://www.workingfromanywhere.org/

   Telecommute Connecticut! is a statewide initiative providing free assistance to
    employers with the design, development and implementation of telecommuting as a
    worksite alternative http://www.telecommutect.com/

   The Telework Coalition is a free pilot program supported by the U.S. Department
    of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency that offers free training
    and consulting in some regions of the U.S. The Telework Coalition brings together
    a diverse array of organizations and companies with a common interest in
    promoting awareness and adoption of existing and emerging Telework and
    Telecommuting applications including telemedicine and distance learning, as well
    as addressing access to the broadband services needed to support these
    applications. The Telework Coalition will organize disparate constituencies and
    provide a platform neutral voice to call for State and Federal policies to both
    empower greater utilization of Telework applications and for immediate increases in
    the development and deployment of technologies to enhance their advancement.
    http://www.telcoa.org/




                                          10
   The National Transportation Demand Management and Telework
    Clearinghouse is located at the University of South Florida. It contains a variety of
    information as well as maintaining a listserv of employers using telework for
    consulting purposes http://www.nctr.usf.edu/clearinghouse/

   Society of Human Resources Management telecommuting toolkit provides a
    variety of information to include white papers, best practices, research and trends.
    http://www.shrm.org/




                                           11
                         Setting Up a Home Office
There are many decision points in allowing employees to set up a home office. A
teleworker needs to have an appropriate work environment that includes a safe,
comfortable workspace with the required level of security, and often a telephone with
answering machine or voice mail and a computer with e-mail.

Security

Employees need a safe workspace that can protect their equipment from theft, damage,
or misuse. In no case should an employee take confidential materials home except with
the approval of the manager.

Security of data and access to state computer systems must be respected as it is in the
office. All State of Montana information technology enterprise policies must be followed
by teleworkers accessing any of the state’s information technology resources. The use
of passwords will continue. Equipment must be in a secure place, away from potential
tampering or damage.

The same security requirements that apply to on-site workers apply to teleworkers.
Files and documents may need to be locked up when not in use. The telework
manager is responsible for ensuring such security.

As with all employees, supervisors are responsible for ensuring that all appropriate
agreements regarding confidentiality and security are signed by teleworkers. Remote
access to state computer systems may call for special security measures. Regardless of
whether teleworkers use either state-provided equipment or their own equipment to
perform their jobs from home, they must abide by state policies covering equipment and
information security. Management should review computer security instructions before
the start of a telework arrangement. They must review the information protection
safeguards the employee will implement to protect the equipment and any information
stored in it or kept at home. They should also verify that the system would have and use
an anti-virus software package to protect the equipment used in the home.

The basic principles include, but are not limited to:

   Information is a valuable state asset and must be protected from unauthorized,
    incorrect or accidental access, use, modification, destruction or disclosure.
   Employees will be held accountable for securing information by taking reasonable
    and prudent measures to safeguard information on a routine basis.
   Information will be protected by the employee in a manner consistent with its
    business value, in all forms (e.g., paper, verbal, video, computer) throughout its life
    cycle.




                                             12
Products, documents, and records
Products, documents, and records used or developed during telework shall remain the
property of the agency, and are subject to agency policies regarding confidentiality and
records retention requirements.

Products, documents, and records that are used, developed, or revised while
teleworking must be copied or restored to the agency’s computerized records.

Records and files temporarily stored on the teleworker’s personal computer need to be
stored in a way that will allow the agency easy access, while protecting the teleworker’s
personal files. Managers may want to require that all telework-related information be
located in a directory designated for telework and that this information be backed up on
a disk.

The agency may decide to provide an appropriate secure container, as needed, for
transportation and storing of confidential documents.

Insurance Coverage
The Department of Administration, Risk Management and Tort Defense Division, has
adopted a policy regarding property and liability insurance coverage for teleworkers.
The policy is available at their web site:

http://rmtd.mt.gov/aboutus/files/telecommuting_ins.pdf.

The policy states that the Division’s insurance is excess of the telecommuter’s
homeowner insurance. The division’s property insurance covers physical damage to
property owned by the state that is in the care, custody, and control of a telecommuter
provided that he or she is an authorized employee of the state (as defined in §2-9-101,
MCA). Agencies must pay a $1,000 deductible per occurrence.

The policy also states that the division’s liability insurance covers claims that arise from
negligent acts or omissions under the telecommuting agreement. The division’s
insurance does not apply to intentional acts, criminal acts, or other activities not
associated with the course and scope of employment. There is no agency deductible.


Household Expenses
Managers need to decide if any household expenses will be paid by the agency. Some
examples are utilities, such as heating, electricity, and phone charges. Expenses such
as travel expenses to and from the office on days when the employee comes into the
office, construction, renovations to the home, installing heating/air conditioning are not
usually approved.




                                             13
To be reimbursed for other business expenses that may arise, the employee should
seek management approval before incurring them.


Office Furniture
Managers need to decide if the agency will provide office furniture and who will have the
responsibility for maintaining it.

Supplies
The agency needs to specify other business expenses for which the agency has
authorized payment and reimbursement. (e.g. basic office supplies such as paper,
pens, staplers, paper clips, fax and computer paper). Managers will need to define how
the teleworkers will acquire the supplies they need for their site.

Teleworkers may request reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses. Managers should
arrange for prior approval for purchases and establish a procedure for requesting
reimbursement.

Travel Expenses
The employee is normally covered by a travel policy when traveling for an authorized,
job-related purpose on days the employee is working away from the regular office.
The state has a vehicle use policy that covers situations where an employee uses a
state car. If employees regularly use their own vehicles for work, the agency should
require the employees to purchase a business use endorsement from their personal
insurance carrier.

Sharing Space at the Central Office
A teleworker may be required to share space on days when working in the regular
office. Coordination of the shared space may be required.

                   Office Equipment and Services
Inventories of state office equipment and furniture loaned to employees should be kept
in a central file in the agency so they can be accessed as needed by management. As
agencies design telework program, this file should be designated and all managers
involved in telework programs notified of its location.

Telephone Services
Managers will need to decide if voice mail or an answering machine, telephones, e-mail
service, a fax and a scanner will be provided. Some agencies pay for the cost of
installation and monthly service on a telephone line to be installed for use during the

                                           14
program. These lines are generally not to be for personal use. Voice mail often makes
it easier for workers to retrieve messages. Sometimes a second phone line may be a
necessity for persons who need to be reachable at short notice.

Managers should also specify the requirements for business lines and address long
distance calling. Phone credit cards for long distance calls may be provided by the
agency. Cell phones should be considered for workers active in the field, such as
appraisers.

Computer Hardware and Other Electronic Equipment
Managers need to decide what kinds of equipment the agency will provide the
teleworker. In many cases, a computer, modem, software, calculators and other
equipment will be required for teleworkers to do their jobs. In other cases, a limited
number of laptop computers may be available for checkout when needed.

An employee’s supervisor will be responsible for determining whether to authorize state-
provided computer equipment and software for use in an employee’s home. If so, all of
these items remain the property of the state and must be returned upon termination of
the employee’s employment or if the program ends. Employees must agree either to
return them or to allow the state to arrange to pick them up.

When state-owned equipment or software is provided, managers need to inform the
teleworker how the equipment will be maintained and supported.

Managers need to decide if they will allow employees to use state-provided equipment
and software for personal use and determine whether they will allow non-employees to
use it. The agency will need to set boundaries for personal data stored on state-owned
equipment. A decision also needs to be made and made clear about whether
employee-owned software may be loaded on a state-owned computer.
The employee may, with their supervisor’s approval, elect to use computer equipment of
their own. If this option is chosen, the agency may require the employee to bring it into
the office for evaluation, configuration, and software installation. A minimum
configuration standard will be established by the agency as a condition of technical
services support of employee equipment. Any software installed by the state remains
property of the state and must be removed if the employee terminates employment or
the telework program is ended.

If employee-owned equipment is used, the agency needs to clarify whether:

   the employee retains all responsibility for the maintenance, insurance, repair,
    support and other cost of the equipment.
   agency files and information should be kept in separate directories, or better yet,
    separate, removable media, and clearly noted as agency or personal.




                                            15
   software which is not owned or licensed by the employee or the state may not be run
    if company data resides on the computer or the computer accesses a state
    information technology resource.
   the agency or state will acquire and install the appropriate anti-virus, communication,
    and application software.

Regardless of the agency’s decision about the above matters, all agency information
and network connections must be secured when not in use.

Remote access issues to state information technology resources must be identified and
resolved, including the necessary resources and materials. Systems security issues are
a primary concern in providing remote access. All employees using the state’s
information technology resources must read and agree to all policies and procedures in
place for the State of Montana information technology enterprise.

Software
While working at home, employees must conform to the agency software standards. If
employees use software provided by the state, the agency will usually have to pay an
additional fee.

If the teleworker wishes to access a state information technology resource, the
necessary software should be provided by the state. The telecommunications software
provided may be updated periodically. The teleworker should know this occurs and be
able to accommodate the update.

Services
Information technology staff will need to be trained to diagnose problems remotely to
assist a teleworker. If a problem cannot be remedied over the phone, the equipment
may need to be returned for repair in the office.
If the equipment malfunctions, the teleworker must notify his or her supervisor
immediately. If repairs will take some time, the teleworker may be asked to report to the
main office until the equipment is usable.

Taxes
Home offices are not automatically a tax write-off for employees. Employees need to be
notified that it will be their responsibility to determine any tax implications of maintaining
a home office area. The state will not provide tax guidance nor will the agency assume
any additional tax liabilities. Employees must be encouraged to consult with a qualified
tax professional to discuss tax implications.




                                             16
Risk Management Issues
The state is interested in the employee’s health and safety while working at home. For
this reason, the employee may be required to maintain a separate, designated work
area at home. Telework can create the same liabilities for employers as any office. The
proper combination of training (including ergonomic training), prevention, and inspection
can greatly minimize risks.

The employee must agree to maintain safe conditions in the at-home workspace, and to
practice the same safety habits in the designated at-home workplace as he or she
would in the office on the agency’s premises. Managers may want to have the potential
teleworker complete the “Safety and Security Checklist” in the Appendix prior to the
beginning of home telework. All items should then be reviewed and evaluated as being
satisfactory by the employee’s supervisor.

Home sites or alternate work sites should be inspected before approving the telework
arrangement. Any equipment should be placed where it is adequately supported and
there is no danger of it falling. It should be connected to a properly grounded electrical
outlet and all wires kept out of walkways. In some cases, smoke detectors may be
required. To ensure that safe working conditions exist, the agency may want to retain
the right to make on-site inspections at mutually agreed upon times.

During work hours, and while performing work functions in the designated “work area” of
the home, teleworkers are covered by the state’s worker’s compensation insurance.
Any accident occurring outside this area may be the responsibility of the teleworker. The
employee is responsible for avoiding work that is not normally part of the job when
working at the alternative work place (such as heavy lifting) and for taking normal
precautions to avoid accidents. Telework is not a substitute for dependent care.

Employees driving their own car while in a work travel status are covered by workers’
compensation insurance for their own bodily injuries. These employees are required to
provide liability insurance covering accidents that cause injury to property (such as their
car) or to other people and their property while conducting business for the state. Proof
of the insurance coverage should be required by an agency allowing the use of personal
vehicles for state business.




                                            17
              Appendix
Sample Policies, Forms and Checklists
        for Telework Guide




                 18
                       Sample Agency Telework Policy
Policy: It is the policy of __________to allow employees to telework when there are
opportunities for improved employee performance, reduced commuting miles, agency
savings, and other business reasons. Employees in the following positions are eligible
to telework: __________________________________________

The agency is adopting this policy to:
   (A) Define specific criteria and procedures for telecommuting;
   (B) Ensure that it is applied consistently;
   (C) Require management, in exercising its discretion, to consider an employee’s
       request to telework in relation to the agency’s operating and customer needs;
   (D) Communicate teleworking to employees as an available work option for specified
       positions.

Employees interested in telework are encouraged to review a copy of the Telework
Program Guide to learn more about telework programs, including the kinds of duties
that adapt well to telework and types of workers who are most productive as
teleworkers. Training to all staff on the telework program will be provided
__________________________________.

Employees will be selected for telework based on job suitability, the likelihood of
success as teleworkers, and the supervisor’s ability and willingness to manage telework
employees.

Products, documents, and records used or developed while teleworking shall remain the
property of the agency, and are subject to agency policies regarding confidentiality and
records retention requirements.

Employees will sign and abide by a telework agreement between the employee and the
supervisor. A model agreement, an addendum to this policy, may require modification
to fit individual teleworksite circumstances.
    (A) Telework shall be voluntary. Unless otherwise provided in the agreement, either
         the agency or the employee may discontinue the arrangement at any time,
         generally giving one week’s notice.
    (B) The agreement shall specify individual work schedules that are in compliance
         with FLSA regulations.

The teleworker’s conditions of employment shall remain the same as for non-telework
employees. Employee salary, benefits and employer-sponsored insurance coverage
shall not change as a result of telework.
   (A) Business visits, meetings with agency customers, or regularly scheduled
       meetings with co-workers shall not be held at the home worksite unless approved
       by the supervisor.
   (B) Telework employees shall not act as primary care giver for dependents nor
       perform other personal business during hours agreed upon as work hours,
       unless written the supervisor provides approval.

                                          19
The Department of Administration’s policies and procedures will be followed in cases of
computer equipment and software and modem connection to state computer security
systems.

Tele-worksite office supplies shall be provided by the agency. Equipment and software,
if provided by the agency for use at the teleworksite, shall be for the purposes of
conducting agency business.

Home worksite furniture and equipment shall normally be provided by the teleworker.
The employee shall maintain a clean, safe work space. In the case of injury occurring
during telework hours, the employee shall immediately report the injury to the
supervisor.

Teleworkers are advised to contact their insurance agent and a tax consultant for
information regarding home worksites. A homeowner or renter’s insurance policy must
be in place before the employee transfers any state property to the home. State
property should typically be covered up to a $2,000 limit or whatever the specific policy
provides for business equipment in the care, custody, and control of the homeowner
(state employee).

For information about telework and when implementing a program contact:
   (A) State Human Resources Division and Risk Management and Tort Defense
       Division regarding telework risk issues, insurance and telework agreements;
   (B) State Human Resources Division for training materials, technical assistance and
       evaluation tools.
   (C) Information Technology Services Division for information about policies, cost,
       equipment and controls as they relate to external access to the state’s computer
       system.

Definitions:
(1) Central worksite means the traditional office or work place.
(2) Tele-worksite means a worksite alternate to the central worksite. It may be in the
    employee’s home or in a building owned or leased by the state that is closer to the
    employee’s home than the central worksite.
(3) Telework means a flexible work arrangement where selected employees work one
    or more days a week from their home or at a site near the home instead of physically
    traveling to a central workplace.




                                           20
                                Model Telework Agreement
TELE-WORKSITE
Employee Name _____________________________________________________________________

Home (Specify location in home) _________________________________________________________

Other Location (Specify) _______________________________________________________________

Address_____________________________________________________________________________

Phone:(_______)_____________________________

CENTRAL WORKSITE
Will there be any sharing of or changes in work space when telework begins? Yes No

If yes, specify: ________________________________________________________________________

SCHEDULE
____Fixed: Telework days and hours are scheduled and will not be substituted without advance
             approval of the manager
       Telework days: Mon. Tue. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.
       Telework time: Start:__________Finish:_________Total Hours Per Day:___________
                           Lunch _________to___________
____Flexible Schedule
       Hours of Work Permitted:_______________________________________________________
The supervisor must approve use of sick leave, vacation, other time off, or other leave credits in advance.
Overtime to be worked must be approved in advance by the supervisor.

TASKS
Tasks for telework days:
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________

EQUIPMENT
The agency is not responsible for any private property used, lost, or damaged. The state may pursue
recovery from the employee for property that is deliberately or negligently damaged or destroyed while in
the employee’s care, custody, or control. The agency is responsible for the deductible on state property
unless otherwise specified in this agreement under OTHER ARRANGEMENTS. Employees are advised
to contact their insurance agent and a tax consultant for information regarding home worksites. In the
event of equipment failure, the employee may be assigned to another project and/or work location. The
employee shall surrender all state-owned equipment and data documents immediately upon request.

What equipment will be used?
ITEM                                   INVENTORY NO.          OWNER
________________________________ ___________________ ____________________________
________________________________ ___________________ ____________________________
________________________________ ___________________ ____________________________
________________________________ ___________________ ____________________________
________________________________ ___________________ ____________________________
 Will there be a modem connection to a state LAN or mainframe? Yes No
 Is there any other information technology security issue? Yes No



                                                    21
   If yes to either question above, has advice been obtained from DOA’s Information Technology
    Services Division? Yes No
   Has the “Safety and Security Checklist” been filled out by the employee and approved by the
    supervisor? Yes No
EXPENSES
The agency will pay for the following expenses:
Charges for business related telephone calls. Yes No
Maintenance and repairs to state-owned equipment. Yes No
Other:

Claims will be submitted with receipt, bill, or other verification of the expense.

The agency will not pay for the following expenses:
 Maintenance or repairs of privately owned equipment.
 Utility costs associated with the use of the computer or occupation of the home.
 Homeowners’ or Renters’ Liability insurance to cover the use of space in the home for work.
 Equipment supplies (these should be requisitioned through the main office.)
 Travel expenses associated with commuting to the central office.
COMMUNICATION
Will the following be utilized?
          Call forwarding? Yes No
          Answering machine or voice mail? Yes No
          Receptionist or co-workers take calls? Yes No
How will incoming calls to the central worksite be answered on telework days?_______________________________

The employee agrees to call the office to obtain messages at least ___________times a day.
         Call-in times:__________ ____________________________ _____________
The employee will promptly notify the supervisor when unable to perform work assignments due to equipment failure
or other unforeseen circumstances.

Other procedures: ______________________________________________________________________________

ARRANGEMENTS
Date telework to begin: _________________________________

Intervals for telework agreement review:____________________

The employee and supervisor plan to participate in telework training? Yes No
TERMINATION
Unless specified in OTHER ARRANGEMENTS, the agency and/or employee may discontinue this
arrangement at anytime generally giving one week’s notice.
OTHER ARRANGEMENTS
Additional conditions agreed upon by the employee and supervisor:
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________



I have read and understand both the telework policy of my organization and this agreement and agree to
abide by and operate in accordance with their terms and conditions. I agree that the sole purpose of this
agreement is to regulate telework and that it neither constitutes an employment contract nor an
amendment to any existing contract.

______________________________              _______________________________             ____________________
Employee                                           Supervisor                                  Date


                                                       22
              Sample Supervisor’s Checklist for Teleworkers
This checklist should be tailored to an individual agency’s needs and included as a
model in the agency’s telework policy. It should also be used to ensure your telework
employee is property oriented to the agency’s program prior to telework.

Name of Teleworker ____________________________

Name of Supervisor _____________________________

Date Completed ________________________________

 Employee has read the orientation documents and the telework policy.

 Employee has been provided with a schedule of core hours or guidelines for flexing
  work hours.

 Equipment issued by the agency is documented.

 Performance expectations have been discussed and are clearly understood.
  Assignments and due dates are documented.

 Requirements for adequate and safe office space at home have been reviewed with
  the employee, and the employee certifies that those requirements have been met.

 Requirements for care of equipment assigned to the employee have been discussed
  and are clearly understood.

 The employee is familiar with this agency’s requirements and techniques for
  computer information security.

 Phone and e-mail contact procedures have been clearly defined.

 The employee has read and signed the Telework Agreement prior to actual
  participation in the program.

 Other:




                                         23
                       Sample Teleworker Self-Assessment
A successful teleworker has particular traits, a job suitable for telework and a telework
office that’s conducive to work. Read each of the numbered sections below, and check
the box that most accurately describes you or your situation. Your self-assessment will
help you decide whether telework is right for you. See the bottom of page 2 for help in
evaluating your self-assessment.

1. Successful teleworkers develop regular routines and are able to set and meet their own
   deadlines. Are you self-motivated, self-disciplined and able to work independently; can you
   complete projects on-time with minimal supervision and feedback; and are you productive
   when no one is checking on you or watching you work?
   Always Usually Sometimes Not really

2. Do you have strong organizational and time-management skills; are you results-oriented;
   will you remain focused on your work while at home, and not be distracted by television,
   housework or visiting neighbors; do you manage your time and workload well, solve many of
   your own problems and find satisfaction in completing tasks on your own; are you
   comfortable setting priorities and deadlines; and do you keep your sights on results?
   Always Usually Sometimes Not really

3. Are you comfortable working alone and disciplined enough to leave work at quitting time;
   can you adjust to the relative isolation of working at home; will you miss the social
   interaction at the central office on your telework days; do you have the self-control to work
   neither too much nor too little; can you set a comfortable and productive pace while working
   at home?
   Yes No

4. Teleworkers should have a good understanding of the organization’s “culture.” Are you
   knowledgeable about your organization’s procedures and policies; have you been on the job
   long enough to know how to do your job in accordance with your organization’s procedures
   and policies; do you have well-established work, communication and social patterns at the
   central office?
   Yes No

5. Have you and your supervisor discussed whether co-workers would have additional work
   when you work at home and, if so, how the work would be handled; have you determined
   how to provide support to co-workers while working at home; do you have an effective
   working relationship with co-workers; and have you evaluated the effects of your telework
   days and those of your co-workers in maintaining adequate in-office communication?
   Yes No

6. Are you adaptable to changing routines and environments; have you demonstrated an ability
   to be flexible about work routines and environments; and are you willing to come into the
   central office on a regularly scheduled telework day if your supervisor, co-workers or
   customers need you there?
   Yes No

7. Are you an effective communicator and team player; do you communicate well with your
   supervisor and co-workers; are you able to express needs objectively and develop solutions;


                                               24
   and have you developed ways to communicate regularly with your supervisor and co-
   workers that you can use when you telework?
   Yes No

8. Current job performance is a strong indicator of your potential success as a teleworker.
   Consider how any problems or developmental needs evident in your last performance
   evaluation might affect your telework experience. Are you successful in your current
   position; do you know your job well; and do you have a track record of performance?
   Yes Not really

9. Do you have the right job for telework?
    Job responsibilities that can be arranged so that there is no difference in the level of
      service provided to the customer
    Minimal requirements for direct supervision or contact with the customer
    Low face-to face communication requirements with the ability to arrange days when
      communication can be handled by telephone or e-mail
    Minimal requirements for special equipment
    Ability to define tasks and work products with measurable work activities and objectives
    Ability to control and schedule work flow
    Tasks include those that could be done away from the central office such as:
      Analysis                       Field visits
      Auditing reports               Graphics
      Batch work                     Project management
      Calculating                    Reading
      Data entry                     Record keeping
      Design work                    Research
      Dictating                      Telephoning
      Drafting                       Word processing
      Editing                        Writing
      Evaluations

10. Do you have an appropriate home work environment?
     A safe, comfortable work space where it is easy to concentrate on work.
     The level of security required by the agency.
     The necessary office equipment and software that meet agency standards.
     A telephone, with a separate home office line if required, and an answering machine or
       voice mail.
     Household members who will understand you’re working and won’t disturb you.

Are you the right kind of worker? If your answers to Questions 1 through 8 are “Always” or
“Yes,” you’re the kind of employee likely to be successful at telework.
Do you have the right kind of job? You should be able to check every item under question 9.
Do you have the right home environment? You should be able to check every item under
Question 10.
               NOTE: The State of Oregon Office of Energy developed this survey.




                                              25
                        Monthly Telework Feedback Form
Name _______________________________                      Date_____________

Telework From: (Check one) Home Office __ Remote Office __ Annex Office__

Reason for Telework:


What is working well?

Concerns: (check all that apply)
       ____ Communications with Manager

        ____ Communication/Networking with peers

        ____ Preparation adequate for the work you do at home (e.g. having the right
             files and information, etc.)

        ____ Your own ability to work independently and to set and meet deadlines

        ____ Information Services (IS) Support

        ____ Ergonomics/Safety

        ____ Schedule

        ____ Policies

        ____ Equipment

        ____ Other:

Give details on any concerns listed above:



To enhance this experience, my suggestions would be:



Additional Comments:




                                             26
                   Sample Master Calendar for Teleworkers
TELEWORK SCHEDULE
Week of:

Teleworker Name:

Telephone Number:

Telework Days:           M    T    W      Th   F   Hours:



Teleworker Name:

Telephone Number:

Telework Days:           M    T    W      Th   F   Hours:



Teleworker Name:

Telephone Number:

Telework Days:           M    T    W      Th   F   Hours:



Teleworker Name:

Telephone Number:

Telework Days:           M    T    W      Th   F   Hours:



Teleworker Name:

Telephone Number:

Telework Days:           M    T    W      Th   F   Hours:




                                     27
         Computer Equipment Placed in an Employee’s Home

                                                      Date: _____________

Employee’s Name:



Address Located:



Computer Uses:




Date to Begin: ___________________________ Ending: ______________________

Terms:




Equipment:




                                   28
                  Sample Hardware/Software Inventory List
  Employee’s Name:______________________________ Date:_____________
  Employee’s Division/Agency: ______________________________________

                           Agency Provided Hardware

Hardware              Type            Serial #        Program      Version
PC
Monitor
Surge Protector
Printer
Other
Other
Other

                             Agency Provided Software

          Type          Serial #            Program             Version




                   Employee Provided Hardware and Software




  Employee Signature:______________________________ Date:___________
  IT Signature:____________________________________ Date:____________



                                       29
                       Sample Safety and Security Checklist

YES    NO     Security
___    ___    Are work materials and equipment in a secure place that can be protected from theft, damage or
              misuse?
___    ___    Are the security requirements in place to protect confidentiality and security of state information and
              computer systems?

              Electrical
____   ____   Are all machines properly grounded?
____   ____   Are portable hand tools grounded or double insulated?
____   ____   Are junction boxes closed?
____   ____   Is all electrical equipment in good working condition?
____   ____   Are all phone lines, electrical, and other cords kept out of the way?
____   ____   Is there evidence of fraying on any electrical cords?
____   ____   Is adequate amperage provided to the home and the work site?
____   ____   Are all circuit breakers and fuses in the electrical panel labeled for intended service?
____   ____   Are circuit breakers labeled clearly for open and closed positions?
____   ____   Is the computer equipment connected to a surge protector?

              Fire Protection
____   ____   Is a fire extinguisher readily available?
____   ____   Is it fully charged and operable?
____   ____   Are there smoke detectors in the work site?
____   ____   Is there a smoke detector within hearing distance of the work space?
____   ____   Are the batteries or other power supplies of the smoke detectors checked regularly?

              Liability
____   ____   Does the homeowner or renters’ insurance cover business use in the home?

              Housekeeping
___    ___    Is the work area clean and orderly?
____   ____   Are aisles and doorways free of obstructions?
____   ____   Are all spilled materials or liquids cleaned up immediately?
____   ____   Is combustible scrap, debris, and waste stored safely and removed from the worksite promptly?
____   ____   Are the file cabinets arranged so drawers do not open into walkways?
____   ____   Are carpets well secured to the floor, and free of frayed or worn seams?

              Means of Exit
____   ____   Are there enough exits to allow prompt escape?
____   ____   Do employees have easy access to exits?

              Materials Handling and Storage
____   ____   Is adequate clearance allowed in aisles where materials must be moved?
____   ____   Are tiered materials stacked, interlocked, locked, and limited in height to maintain stability?
____   ____   Are storage areas kept free of tripping, fire, explosion, and pest hazards?




Employee Signature:______________________________ Date:___________




                                                      30
                                   State of Montana
                           Ergonomic Assessment Survey Form

DATE:                                          COMPLETED BY:

DEPARTMENT:                                    TELEWORK SITE:

INSTRUCTIONS: This assessment was designed for use by state agencies to
identify Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD) risk factors in office settings. It is
recommended that the employee or a supervisor, at least quarterly, conduct an
ergonomic assessment for each workstation. Please respond to the criteria
statements below with a “Yes” or “No” answer. Where the answer is “No,”
recommendations to correct deficiencies are provided.


BACK
CRITERIA                  YES   NO          RECOMMENDATIONS                  COMMENTS

Chair height is                      Same as criteria.
adjustable (pneumatic
lift preferred).

Chair backrest                       Seat back is adjustable (vertical and
supports the inward                  horizontal preferred, but not
curvature of the                     mandatory). Seat is tilted back no
operator’s spine in the              more than 10”.
lumbar region.
                                     An “ergo pillow” placed in the lumbar
                                     region of the spine in the absence of
                                     an ergonomically adjustable backrest
                                     is recommended. A less costly
                                     alternative for a lumbar support
                                     includes a rolled up towel.
The chair is equipped                Same as criteria.
with 5 casters for
mobility and safety.

The chair has a swivel               Same as criteria.
seat to maximize
“swing space” and
minimize stress on the
back, shoulders, and
arms.




                                                 31
ARMS/WRISTS
      CRITERIA            YES   NO          RECOMMENDATIONS                   COMMENTS

Operator’s arms are                  Purchase a chair with adjustable
positioned                           armrests or in the absence of a
appropriately.                       quality chair, the operator’s arms are
                                     keyboard height and kept close to
                                     the body.

During keyboard use,                 Keyboard placed at elbow height
operator’s arms are at               with a slight incline. Raise the chair
a 90 degree angle and                seat. Lower the keyboard by:
the upper arm is                     1) use of an articulating arm;
almost vertical.                     2) special computer table; or
                                     3) adjustable keyboard holder.

Operator’s wrists are                A wrist rest might help relieve
nearly horizontal and                pressure on the wrist’s tendons and
are not bent upward or               nerves. The wrist should not rest on
downward at a sharp                  a sharp edge or surface. The rest
angle.                               should be cushioned with front edge
                                     slightly curved. It should be at least
                                     as high as the front of the keyboard,
                                     but not higher than the “home” row of
                                     keys.

LEGS/FEET
      CRITERIA            YES   NO          RECOMMENDATIONS                   COMMENTS

The operator’s feet are              Lower or raise chair, if adjustable.
flat on the floor or                 The angle between the thigh and
supported by a foot                  lower leg should be 90 degrees.
rest.

There is space                       Lower the chair, while at the same
between the back of                  time raising the feet, or use a lumbar
the operator’s knees                 support to sit farther forward.
and the front edge of                Temporary footrests can be an old
the chair.                           phone book, a box, or a shelf.

There is adequate                    Raise or lower the chair. Raise or
swing space between                  lower the desk.
the operator’s legs and
the underside of the
desk.




                                                 32
EYES
       CRITERIA           YES   NO          RECOMMENDATIONS                   COMMENTS

The screen is 13” to                 Same as criteria.
28” from the operator’s
eyes (ideal is 18” to
22”).

The screen is tilted                 Same as criteria.
back 10 to 20 degrees
(unless the angle
causes additional
glare).

The top of the monitor               Monitor position may be raised or
is no more than 25                   lowered by purchasing a height
degrees at or below                  adjustable monitor holder or
eye level.                           computer support arm. Less costly
                                     alternatives to raise the monitor
                                     include an old phone book, or a few
                                     taped together, computer printouts
                                     taped together, a wooden shelf, etc.
                                     Raise or lower the chair.

There is no glare on                 1) Tilt the screen or rotate monitor.
the screen face.                     2) Get a glare guard. Mesh guards
                                     are not recommended because they
                                     are hard to clean and make the
                                     characters fuzzy.

There are no mirror                  Minimize highly reflective work
images on the screen.                surfaces (i.e. white paper, white
                                     clothing, etc.) Reduce background
                                     light level by using lower watt bulbs,
                                     removing bulbs, or adjusting blinds
                                     or curtains. Move monitor away from
                                     windows or other sources of light.
                                     Avoid positioning monitor parallel to
                                     windows.

There is no light                    Tilt or rotate the monitor.
shining directly in
operator’s eyes.

Documents are located                Use a copy holder to reduce strain
at eye level and near                on eyes and neck.
the monitor.




                                                  33
SHOULDERS/NECK
       CRITERIA             YES   NO         RECOMMENDATIONS                  COMMENTS

Reaches are                            Rearrange layout of tools,
minimized.                             equipment, office supplies and
                                       resource material. Minimize
                                       needless reaching in yellow and red
                                       zones.

                                       Reduce the dimensions of the work
                                       surface.

                                       Utilize document holders or shoulder
                                       receivers for phones.

Monitor placed directly                Eliminate the placement of the
in front of the operator.              monitor at right angles to the
                                       operator. Reduces exposure to neck
                                       strain.

Seat back and chair                    Adjust position of chair so that
are adjustable and                     operator does not hunch head, neck
positioned                             or back forward or lean backward.
appropriately.




                                                  34
                               Telework Program Evaluation

TELEWORKER SURVEY

Name_____________________________________

INFORMATION
Time in current position: [ ] Under 1 year [ ] 1-5 years [ ] Over 5 years
Your telework day(s): [ ] Monday [ ] Tuesday [ ] Wednesday [ ] Thursday [ ] Friday
Telework message retrieval: [ ] I call in ] Office calls me [ ] Call forwarding [ ] Voice mail [ ] E-mail
Has telework resulted in any changes in your work style?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
How could the telework program be improved?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
EVALUATION
Please indicate with an “X” whether the fact you are teleworking has had a positive or negative effect on
each item listed below.
Check one number per line.            Very Very Positive Neutral         Negative
                                               1    2 3 4        5 6 7       8 9
1. Your relationship with co-workers          ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
2. Your co-workers’ workloads/job content ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
3. Your work unit’s performance               ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
4. Communications within your work unit       ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
5. Overall effect on your work unit           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
6. Relationship with your supervisor          ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
7. Communications with your supervisor        ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
8. Your supervisor’s workload                 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
9. Your supervisor’s ability to monitor &     ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
   evaluate your performance.
10. Establishing expectations & deadlines ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
11. Your job performance                      ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
12. The content of your job                   ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
13. Interactions with other work units        ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
14. Your personal job satisfaction            ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

Do you want to continue to telework? [ ] YES [ ] NO

Telework Program Evaluation
CO-WORKER SURVEY

Name__________________________________
INFORMATION
Has telework resulted in any changes in your work style?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________

How could the telework program be improved?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________




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