Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

How Do You Say What You Want To Say by amberp

VIEWS: 208 PAGES: 37

									 How Do You Say
What You Want To
      Say?

  ULA Annual Conference
        May 2006
   Institutional
  Communication
     C. Jeffrey Belliston, Chair
General Information Services Brigham
          Young University
Institutional
Communication
   Definition: Communication undertaken in the
    performance of, or furtherance of, one’s job
    responsibilities.
   Touch on five areas
    –   Importance
    –   Applicability
    –   Principles
    –   Hurdles
    –   Tools
   Good (but only representative) summary of issues
    is Parsley, Andy. “Road map for employee
    engagement.” Management Services, Spring 2006,
    10-11. (Items in quotes from this article.)
Importance
   Poor communication frequently cited as number
    one, or at least a major, problem in organizations.
   Another way of saying the same thing: lack of good
    organization and/or dissemination of information
   Personal work experiences of most people bear this
    out
   Good communication  employee engagement 
    organizational performance by helping to create
    happy, loyal customers (patrons)
Applicability

   Applies to all libraries regardless of
    size
   No one knows everything
   We must inform and be informed by
    others
Principles
   1 – Effective communication is everyone’s
    responsibility.
   2 – Assuming things about communication
    leads to problems.
    – Common assumptions include Everybody already
      knows. and They don’t need to know.
   3 – Timely communication is the best
    communication.
    – If necessary, give emotions time to cool before
      generating institutional communication whether
      verbal or written.
Principles (cont.)

   4 – Strive to give the right amount of
    detail.
   5 – The larger the organization, the
    greater the challenge in creating
    effective institutional communication.
Hurdles
   1 – People (especially managers) “don’t see
    communication as part of their day job.”
   2 – People “have not developed their
    communication skills” which rely on
    “unnatural” technological tools.
    – Consist, conscious effort and practice are
      required
    – Technological tools may not feel as “unnatural”
      to younger librarians
   3 – “Communication channels are absent,
    inappropriate, or over-subscribed”
Tools
   Feet (go see someone in person when
    appropriate)
   Meetings (which allow for a true exchange
    of information among a larger group)
   Phone (no visual cues but still have voice
    cues and is interactive)
   Voicemail (completely one-sided but
    effective for verbally giving information to
    one or more people)
    – Change voicemail greeting often
Tools (cont.)
   E-mail & Organizational Listservs (writing
    isn’t the same as speaking)
    – Allows for a written conversation in an exchange
      of e-mails
    – Can be forwarded (good and bad)
    – Can be preserved (good and bad
   Intranet (place for posting of useful
    information such as meeting agendas and
    minutes)
   Instant messaging or IM (potential
    usefulness but no personal experience)
Conclusion

   Reemphasize
    – 1st Principle – Communication is
      everyone’s responsibility.
   With consistent, conscious effort we
    can improve to the betterment of our
    libraries and patrons.
      Feedback
       Diana Skousen
      Library Director
Summit County Library System
        What is feedback?

   Verbal or nonverbal
   Communicates perceptions and
    feelings about another person’s
    behavior
      Why is it important?

   Learn new behaviors
   Assess our impact on others
   Learn to “keep on course”
   See ourselves as others see us
          Key ingredients

   Caring
   Trusting
   Acceptance
   Openness
   Concern for the needs of others
    Feedback is a learned skill that can
      be developed through use of 9
                guidelines

   Consider the needs of others.
   Describe behavior only; do not attempt to interpret.
   Focus on behavior that can be changed.
   Be specific.
   Wait for feedback to be solicited.
   Be nonjudgmental.
   Give feedback immediately after the behavior.
   Allow the freedom to change or not to change.
   Express feelings directly.
#1

Consider the needs of
       others.
#2

Describe behavior only;
  do not attempt to
       interpret.
#3

Focus on behavior that
   can be changed.
#4

     Be specific.
#5

Wait for feedback to be
       solicited.
#6

 Be nonjudgmental.
#7

   Give feedback
immediately after the
     behavior.
#8

Allow the freedom to
   change or not to
       change.
#9

 Express feelings
    directly.
           Remember:

Feedback should be
 Descriptive

 Nonjudgmental

 Specific

 Offer freedom of choice
Effective Listening
       Leslie Schow
     Branch Manager
     Herriman Library
           Dangerous
           Assumptions
         About Listening
      Assumption                       Reality
   Speakers control            Listeners control the
    communication                dialogue

   We can listen when we       Listening harder
    really have to               doesn’t mean listening
                                 better

   When we start talking,      It takes time to engage
    others start listening       listeners
           Developing
        Listening Skills
   Stop talking
   Imagine the other person’s point of view
   Look, act, and be interested
   Watch body language
   Don’t interrupt
   Listen between the lines
   Speak only affirmatively while listening
   Rephrase what you hear
   Stop talking
   Group
Communication

Britt Fagerheim,
Reference Librarian,
Utah State University
Group Communication
Skills

   Communication skills for working in
    groups or teams.
   Teams = Sharing ideas and experience
    = discussions
   Good discussion skills are key to a
    productive team.
   How are groups skills different than
    individual communication skills?
Communication in a
Group

   Speak loudly enough.
   Keep focused on key points.
   Explain jargon.
   Avoid sarcasm or put-downs.
   Show how your idea ties into the
    current topic.
Communication in a
Group

   Actively contribute your ideas and
    suggestions to the discussion.
   Make eye contact with everyone in the
    group.
   Be clear about the messages or points
    you want to make.
   Try making a simple drawing or visual
    aid to explain or make your point.
Communication in a
Group

   Give specific reasons for your
    opinions. Be prepared to support your
    ideas with examples, data, etc.
   Ask others to explain the reasons
    behind their opinions.
   Listen closely to what others are
    saying.
   Ask other people for their opinions –
    help to get everyone involved.
Communication in a
Group

   Help to manage your team’s
    discussions – don’t contribute to
    leading the discussion off topic.
   Pull together thoughts and ideas
   Provide ideas for how the group can
    work better, resolve issues.
Communication in a
Group

   Help the group check for agreement
    and consensus.
   Try to find areas of agreement for
    conflicting points of view – be a
    positive force in the group.
   Source: The Team Memory Jogger: A
    Pocket Guide for Team Members. Madison,
    WI: Joiner Associations, Inc., 1995.
Meeting protocol

   From Mindtools http://www.mindtools.com
   Involve the group in creating an agenda for
    the meeting
   Encourage active participation
   Try to keep the meeting at a comfortable
    pace
   Summarize discussions and
    recommendations throughout the meeting
   Circulate minutes to all participants

								
To top