FREDERICK DOUGLASS ACADEMY VIII (19K452)

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					      FREDERICK DOUGLASS ACADEMY VIII (19K452)


                     2008-09
       SCHOOL COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL PLAN
                      (CEP)




SCHOOL:    FREDERICK DOUGLASS ACADEMY VIII (19K452)
                                    TH
ADDRESS: 1400 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, 4 FLOOR, BROOKLYN, NY 11239
TELEPHONE: (718) 642-4305
FAX:       (718) 642-4537
                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS



SECTION I: SCHOOL INFORMATION PAGE
SECTION II: SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM SIGNATURE PAGE
SECTION III: SCHOOL PROFILE
  Part A. Narrative Description
  Part B. School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot
SECTION IV: NEEDS ASSESSMENT
SECTION V: ANNUAL SCHOOL GOALS
SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN
REQUIRED APPENDICES TO THE CEP FOR 2008-2009
  APPENDIX 1: ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS) SUMMARY FORM
  APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLS)
  APPENDIX 3: LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION
  APPENDIX 4: NCLB REQUIREMENTS FOR TITLE I SCHOOLS
  APPENDIX 5: NCLB/SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS IN NEED OF IMPROVEMENT (SINI) AND
  SCHOOLS REQUIRING ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SRAP)
  APPENDIX 6: SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS UNDER REGISTRATION REVIEW (SURR)
  APPENDIX 7: SCHOOL-LEVEL REFLECTION AND RESPONSE TO SYSTEM-WIDE IMPLICATIONS OF
  FINDINGS FROM AUDITS OF THE WRITTEN, TESTED, AND TAUGHT CURRICULUM IN ELA AND
  MATHEMATICS
  APPENDIX 8: CONTRACTS FOR EXCELLENCE (C4E) SCHOOL-BASED EXPENDITURES FOR 2008-09
                                SECTION I: SCHOOL INFORMATION PAGE



SCHOOL NUMBER:      452                SCHOOL NAME:      Frederick Douglass Academy VIII


DISTRICT:    19                        SSO NAME/NETWORK #:        Knowledge Network


SCHOOL ADDRESS:      1400 Pennsylvania Ave


SCHOOL TELEPHONE:       718-642-4305              FAX:    718-642-4537

                                                                             Ymartin3@schools.
SCHOOL CONTACT PERSON:        Yolanda Martin              EMAIL ADDRESS:     nyc.gov


POSITION/TITLE                                 PRINT/TYPE NAME


SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM CHAIRPERSON             Damion Rozier


PRINCIPAL                                      Yolanda Martin


UFT CHAPTER LEADER                             Deray McKesson

PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION
PRESIDENT                                      Veronica Brandon

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
(Required for high schools)

COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
SUPERINTENDENT                                 Martin Weinstein
                            SECTION II: SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM SIGNATURE PAGE

Directions: There should be one School Leadership Team (SLT) for each school. As per the Chancellor’s
Regulations for School Leadership Teams, SLT membership must include an equal number of parents
and staff (students and CBO representatives are not counted when assessing the balance), and ensure
representation of all school constituencies. The signatures of SLT members on this page indicates their
participation in the development of the Comprehensive Educational Plan and confirmation that required
consultation has occurred in the aligning of funds to support educational programs (Refer to Chancellor’s
Regulations A-655 on SLT’s; available on the NYCDOE website at
http://schools.nyc.gov/Administration/ChancellorsRegulations/default.htm). Note: If for any reason an SLT
member does not wish to sign this plan, he/she may attach an explanation in lieu of his/her signature.

                                      Position/Constituency
              Name                                                                 Signature
                                      Represented
Yolanda Martin                        *Principal or Designee
                                      *UFT Chapter Chairperson or
Deray McKesson
                                      Designee
                                      *PA/PTA President or
Veronica Brandon
                                      Designated Co-President
                                      Title I Parent Representative
                                      (suggested, for Title I schools)
                                      DC 37 Representative, if
Kathleen Yearwood
                                      applicable
                                      Student Representative, if
                                      applicable

       • Core (mandatory) SLT members.
Signatures of the member of the School Leadership Team (SLT), as well as any applicable documentation,
are available for viewing at the school and are on file at the Office of School Improvement.
                                     SECTION III: SCHOOL PROFILE

Part A. Narrative Description
Directions: In no more than 500 words, provide contextual information about your school’s
community and its unique/important characteristics. Think of this as the kind of narrative description
you would use in an admissions directory or an introductory letter to new parents. You may wish to
include your school’s vision/mission statement and a description of strategic collaborations/
partnerships and/or special initiatives being implemented. You may copy and paste your narrative
description from other current resources where this information is already available for your school
(e.g., grant applications, High School Directory, etc.). Note: Demographic and accountability data for
your school will be addressed in Part B of this section.




Frederick Douglass Academy VIII (“FDA VIII”) is a middle school that opened in the fall of 2006 on the
fourth floor of PS 346. Currently the school has 227 students (referred to as scholars) in grades 6, 7
and 8. It is dedicated to preparing middle-school students for college while drawing from community
resources to support diverse extracurricular programs.

A fundamental feature of Frederick Douglass Academy VIII’s culture is that it is a replication public
school modeled after the original FDA in Harlem built on the foundations of strong academic
achievement, student accountability, and creating positive self image and attitudes for all scholars
(private school attitudes and achievement in a public school environment). A fundamental tenet of
the FDA VIII philosophy is that scholars must have standards to measure up to in order to get into
college. Scholars wear uniforms and agree to abide by the Scholar’s Creed and the 12 non-negotiable
rules. The school offers academic intervention services after school and accelerated academic
enrichment classes on Saturdays in mathematics. Additionally, this year we developed a specialized
high school course geared toward preparing our 8th grade scholars for the SHAT. Scholars also
receive instruction in French in the seventh grade, music, drama, art, and literature of different
cultures. The school’s high academic expectations are reflected by its recent induction into the
National Junior Honor Society. Additionally, the school recently implemented a pilot service learning
program in grade 7 to further prepare scholars to help transform the school to become Global
Learners, Global Thinkers, and Global Leaders.

There are collaborations with community based organizations to create academic enrichment
programs such as orchestra, band, arts and crafts, sports, and after-school homework help. For
parents and guardians, workshops on health, finances, and other issues give them ample
opportunities to learn more about avenues to better assist their children in their paths toward future
successes.

Our school’s progress is reflected in improved student outcomes in periodic assessments. As noted
in the most recent School Quality Review (SQR), “the school has developed good data systems to
keep check on the progress of most students. Scholars feel they have an integral part to play in
school life and make steady academic progress.”
SECTION III – Cont’d

Part B. School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot
Directions: A pre-populated version of the School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot
provided in template format below (Pages 6-8 of this section) is available for download on each
school’s NYCDOE webpage under “Statistics.” Schools are encouraged to download the pre-
populated version for insertion here in place of the blank format provided.

             SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS AND ACCOUNTABILITY SNAPSHOT
School Name: Frederick Douglass Academy VIII
District: 19        DBN #:    452            School BEDS Code #: 331900010452

                                                    DEMOGRAPHICS
Grades Served in                Pre-K          K       1      2          3          4         5            X      6 X       7
2008-09:                   X     8             9       10     11         12         Ungrad. Ele.                Ungrad. Sec.
Enrollment:                                                Attendance:
(As of October 31)                  2006       2007   2008 (As of June 30 – % of days        2006              2007    2008
Pre-K                                                      students attended)                              96.7       97.9
Kindergarten
Grade 1                                                            Student Mobility:
Grade 2                                                            (% of Enrollment as of June      2006    2007       2008
Grade 3                                                            30)                                     100%           97%
Grade 4
Grade 5                                                            Eligible for Free Lunch:
Grade 6                            75         74         81        (% of Enrollment as of October   2005       2006    2007
Grade 7                                       68         74        31)                                     74%        90%
Grade 8                                                  72
Grade 9                                                            Students in Temporary Housing:
Grade 10                                                           (Total Number as of June 30) 2006 2007              2008
Grade 11                                                                                                   1          1
Grade 12
Ungraded Elementary                                                Recent Immigrants:
Ungraded Secondary                                                 (Total Number as of October      2006       2007    2008
Total                              75         142        227       31)                                     2          0

Special Education Enrollment:                                      Suspensions:
(October 31)                        2006       2007       2008     (Online Occurrence Reporting
Number in Self-Contained                                           System [OORS] – Number as        2006       2007       2008
                                              0          0         of June 30)
Classes
No. in Collaborative Team
                                              0          10        Principal Suspensions            0      1           16
Teaching (CTT) Classes
Number all others                             1          3         Superintendent Suspensions       0      0           7
These students are included in the enrollment information above.
                                                                   Special High School Programs:
                                    DEMOGRAPHICS
English Language Learners (ELL) Enrollment: (Total Number)                                               2006      2007       2008
(October 31)                       2006       2007       2008        CTE Program Participants
# in Trans. Bilingual Classes     0          0          0            Early College HS Participants
# in Dual Lang. Programs          0          0          0
# receiving ESL services only     0          0          2            Number of Staff:
# ELLs with IEPs                                                     (As of October 31; includes all
                                  0          1          1                                                 2006     2007       2008
                                                                     full and part-time staff)
These students are included in the General and Special Education     Number of Teachers
enrollment information above.
                                                                                                         5        9          14

                                                                     Number of Administrators and
                                                                                                         1        1          2
Overage Students:                                                    Other Professionals
(# entering students overage                                         Number of Educational
                                   2006       2007       2008                                            0        0          0
for grade as of October 31)                                          Paraprofessionals
                                      0           0         6
                                                                     Teacher Qualifications:
Ethnicity and Gender:                                                (As of October 31)                   2006     2007      2008
(% of Enrollment as of                                               % fully licensed & permanently
                                   2006       2007       2008                                                     8%         14
October 31)                                                          assigned to this school
American Indian or Alaska                                            Percent more than two years
                                                  2         0                                                     0%         9%
Native                                                               teaching in this school
Black or African American                        84         196      Percent more than five years
                                                                                                                  37.5%      NA
Hispanic or Latino                               11         25       teaching anywhere
Asian or Native                                                      Percent Masters Degree or
                                                  1         3                                                                18%
Hawaiian/Other Pacific Isl.                                          higher
White                                             2         2        Percent core classes taught by               100%       76.9%
Multi-racial                                                         “highly qualified” teachers
                                                                     (NCLB/SED definition)
Male                                             40%
Female                                           60%

                                                  2008-09 TITLE I STATUS
X    Title I Schoolwide Program
                                                                 Title I Targeted Assistance                 Non-Title I
(SWP)
Years the School Received Title I
                                                        2005-06           X      2006-07      X        2007-08    X        2008-09
Part A Funding:

                      NCLB/SED SCHOOL-LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY SUMMARY
SURR School: Yes          No      If yes, area(s) of SURR identification:
Overall NCLB/SED                                                                 School in Need of Improvement
                                          X In Good Standing
Accountability Status (2007-08):                                                 (SINI) – Year 1
    School in Need of Improvement             NCLB Corrective Action –           NCLB Corrective Action – Year
    (SINI) – Year 2                           Year 1                             2/Planning for Restructuring (PFR)
                                              School Requiring Academic
    NCLB Restructured – Year ___
                                              Progress (SRAP) – Year ___
                           Elementary/Middle Level                      Secondary Level
                         NCLB/SED SCHOOL-LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY SUMMARY
Individual                   Elementary/Middle Level                  Secondary Level
Subject/Area Ratings ELA:               Good Standing                 ELA:
                             Math:      Good Standing                 Math:
                             Science:                                 Grad. Rate:
This school’s Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) determinations for each accountability measure:
                                        Elementary/Middle Level              Secondary Level
Student Groups                          ELA          Math        Science     ELA        Math                        Grad. Rate
All Students                            √            √                                                              NA
Ethnicity
American Indian or Alaska Native
Black or African American               √            √
Hispanic or Latino                      -            -
Asian or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific
Islander
White                                   -            -
Multiracial
Other Groups
Students with Disabilities              -            -
Limited English Proficient
Economically Disadvantaged              √            √
Student groups making AYP in each       √            √
subject
                                                 Key: AYP Status
√       Made AYP                                 X Did Not Make AYP X*           Did Not Make AYP Due to Participation Rate Only
√ SH    Made AYP Using Safe Harbor Target        - Insufficient Number of Students to Determine AYP Status
Note: NCLB/SED accountability reports are not available for District 75 schools.

                             CHILDREN FIRST ACCOUNTABILITY SUMMARY
Progress Report Results – 2007-08               Quality Review Results – 2007-08
Overall Letter Grade                 F          Overall Evaluation:                 Proficient
Overall Score                        23.9%      Quality Statement Scores:
Category Scores:                                Quality Statement 1: Gather Data    Proficient
School Environment                   10.2%      Quality Statement 2: Plan and Set   Well Developed
(Comprises 15% of the Overall Score)            Goals
School Performance                   13.7%      Quality Statement 3: Align          Well Developed
(Comprises 30% of the Overall Score)            Instructional Strategy to Goals
Student Progress                     0%         Quality Statement 4: Align Capacity Well Developed
(Comprises 55% of the Overall Score)            Building to Goals
Additional Credit                    0          Quality Statement 5: Monitor and    Proficient
                                                Revise
Note: Progress Report grades are not yet available for
District 75 schools.
                                                 SECTION IV: NEEDS ASSESSMENT

Directions: Conduct a comprehensive review of your school’s educational program informed by the
most current quantitative and qualitative data available regarding student performance trends and
other indicators of progress. Include in your needs assessment an analysis of information available
from New York State Education Department and New York City Department of Education
accountability and assessment resources, i.e., School Report Cards, Progress Reports, Quality
Review and Quality Review Self-Assessment documents, periodic assessments, ARIS, as well as
results of Inquiry Team action research, surveys, and school-based assessments. (Refer to your
school’s Demographics and Accountability Snapshot in Part B of Section III.) It may also be useful to
review the schools use of resources: last year’s school budget, schedule, facility use, class size, etc.

After conducting your review, summarize in this section the major findings and highlights of your
school’s strengths, accomplishments, and challenges. Consider the following questions:
     - What student performance trends can you identify?
     - What have been the greatest accomplishments over the last couple of years?
     - What are the most significant aids or barriers to the school’s continuous improvement?

Student Performance Trends
ELA
    •     Based on the data indicated in the school’s Progress reports, we need to increase the number of scholars making at least one
          year of progress in ELA, while the school’s proficiency level in ELA is over 71%, we still need to demonstrate growth in
          individual student progress
    •     Additionally as indicated on the school’s Progress Report, scholars need to demonstrate growth as measured by their ELA scale
          score
    •     Overall reading growth
    •     Vast improvement among scholars performing at low-levels
    •     Writing conventions improved
Science
    •     Improved standard mastery over course of year
    •     Within units, mastery improves from start to finish
Math
    •     Based on the data indicated in the school’s Progress report, while over 82% of the scholars demonstrate proficiency levels 3&4
          , students still need to make at least one year of progress as demonstrated in increased scale scores and performance level
    •     Overall mastery of number sense writing and computations
    •     Scholars proved themselves to be especially quick learners of math concepts
    •     Nearly all on grade level, high functioning


Greatest Accomplishments
    •     97.9% Scholar attendance
    •     71% of scholars performed at level 3 or level 4 in English
    •     82% of scholars performed at level 3 or level 4 in Math
    •     College tours outside of New York State (overnight and day trips)
    •     Scholars take responsibility for their own education
    •     6th Grade Scholars mastered the 6th grade standards and are working towards mastery of 7th and 8th grade standards
    •     Implementation of a Pilot Service Learning Program for Grade 7 scholars with the transition to Grade 6 scholars
    •     Implementation of a Specialized High School Prep program for grade 8 scholars
    •     Implementation of Individual Progress Portfolios System to track students progress and growth as learners in all content areas
          from grades 6 through 8


Significant aids or barriers to the school’s continuous improvement
Significant aids to the school’s continuous improvement include:
     •    Strong parent involvement and support
     •    Staff willingness to participate in various professional development activities
     •    Staff flexibility with the demands of a small school environment
     •    Good rapport with the host school administration and staff.
     •    Teachers ability to use track students performance in the content areas based on the standards and use the data to demonstrate
          mastery
Significant barriers to the school’s continuous improvement include:
     •    Due to teacher turnover rate maintaining teacher stability to support long term progress in certain content areas growth
     •    Lean staff forces us to weigh priorities more than schools with more manpower
     •    Securing strong teaching team members to support increased academic rigor and student progress
     •    Budgetary constraints to support the need for hiring additional key staff such as a dean to improve school culture
                                    SECTION V: ANNUAL SCHOOL GOALS

Directions: Based on the findings and implications from the comprehensive needs assessment
(Section IV), determine your school’s instructional goals for 2008-09 and list them in this section along
with a few phrases of description. The resulting list should include a limited number of goals (5 is a
good guideline), and the list as a whole should be a clear reflection of your priorities for the year.
Good goals should be SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-bound.
Notes: (1) In Section VI of this template, you will need to complete an “action plan” for each annual
goal listed in this section. (2) Schools designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that
received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must identify a goal and
complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement
identification. (3) When developed, Principal’s Performance Review (PPR) goals should presumably
be aligned to the school’s annual goals described in this section.
1) English Language Arts- Reduce the number of scholars performing at a proficiency level
    2, while increasing the number of scholars making 1.5 years of reading growth ( see action
    plan section VI)
    a) 6th Grade
         i) 80% of 6th grade Scholars will attain 2 years reading growth (as measured by quarterly
              running records).
         ii) We will decrease the number of scholars performing at a Level 2 and increase the number
              scholars performing at a Level 3 or better (as measured by the 2008-09 New York State
              reading Exam).
         iii) We will increase all 6th grade scholars writing ability in the content areas as measured by
              the National Writing Rubric

   b) 7th grade
      i) 80% of the 7th grade Scholars will attain 2 years reading growth (as measured by quarterly
           running records).
      ii) We will decrease the number of scholars performing at a performance level 2 and increase
           the number of 7th grade Scholars performing at a Level 3 or better on the 2008-09 New
           York State reading exam.
      iii) We will increase all 7th grade scholars writing ability in the content areas as measured by
           the National Writing Rubric
   c) 8th grade
      i) We will decrease the number of 8th grade Scholars performing at a performance level 2
           and increase the number of scholars performing at a Level 3 or better on the 2008-09 New
           York State reading exam.
      ii) 80% of scholars will master 65% of state standards (as measured by the Tracker System).
      iii) We will increase all grade 8th scholars writing ability in the content areas as measured by
           the National Writing Rubric

2) Mathematics- 87.7 % 0f 6th , 7th , & 8th grade students will attain mastery of the NYS
   Mathematics Content and Process Strands as measured by the % of students reaching
   proficiency levels 3&4 on the NYS Math Assessments (see action plan section VI)
   a) 6th grade math
      i) We will increase the number of 6th grade scholars performing at a Level 3 or better on the
           2008-09 New York State Mathematics Exam.
      ii) 80% of 6th grade scholars will master 75% of the 7th and 8th grade algebra standards (as
           measured by the Tracker System).
      iii) All 6th grade scholars will increase their ability to write in the content area

   b) 7th grade math
      i) We will decrease the number of scholars performing at a performance level 2 and increase
          the number of scholars performing at a Level 3 or better on the 2008-09 New York State
          Mathematics Exam.
       ii) 60% of 7th grade scholars taking the integrated algebra Regents will attain a score of 65 or
            better.
       iii) All 7th grade scholars will increase their ability to write in the content area

   c) 8th grade math
      i) We will decrease the number of 8th grade scholars performing at a level 2 and increase
          the percentage of students performing at level a Level 3 or better on the 2008-09 New
          York State Mathematics Exam.
      ii) All 8th grade scholars will increase their ability to write in the content area

3) To Improve teacher use of data to understand the needs of scholars to increase scholar’s
   achievement in all content areas ( see action plan section VI).
   a) Teachers will use ACUITY to create customized ELA and math assessments for scholars.
   b) Inasmuch as more than 90% of 6th graders and three-fourths of the 7th & 8th graders are at or
      above grade level in Math and more than two-thirds of 7th & 8th grade and more than three-
      fourths of 6th grade scholars are at or above grade level in ELA, our goal is that 75% of
      scholars will demonstrate a 2% monthly growth in their mastery of standards in all content
      areas (as per ACUITY).
   c) Teachers will provide all scholars with their performance data and use it to set personal goals
      towards their academic growth.
                                                             SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN

Directions: The action plan should be used as a tool to support effective implementation and to evaluate progress toward meeting goals. Use
the action plan template provided below to indicate key strategies and activities to be implemented for the 2008-09 school year to support
accomplishment of each annual goal identified in Section V. The action plan template should be duplicated as necessary. Reminder: Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification.


Subject/Area (where relevant):        Data

Annual Goal                                     Improve teacher use of data to understand the needs of scholars to increase scholars’
Goals should be SMART – Specific,               achievement.
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and
Time-bound.
Action Plan                                        A. Teachers will utilize ACUITY to create customize ELA and math assessments for Scholars for
Include: actions/strategies/activities the            use on monthly test days.
school will implement to accomplish the            B. Teachers will meet on a weekly basis to discuss the specific needs of scholars and to plan
goal; target population(s); responsible staff         differentiation of instruction to meet those needs during “lunch and learns,” after-school
members; and implementation timelines.                individual tutoring, and during morning tutoring sessions.
                                                   C. Test sophistication in all content areas to improve ELA and Math performance on the state
                                                      standardized exams.
                                                   D. Writing across all content areas
                                                   E. AIS during extended day for level 2 and 3 scholars targeted to skill improvement needs

Aligning Resources: Implications for               A. Title I allocated funds possession, professional development, in-service training, new teacher
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule               mentoring, time-on-task money
Include reference to the use of Contracts
for Excellence (C4E) allocations, where
applicable.

Indicators of Interim Progress and/or              A. Monthly Test
Accomplishment                                     B. Quarterly Progress Reports
Include: interval of periodic review;              C. Goal Setting in Cohort Meetings
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains          D. Acuity (interim assessments)
                                                   E. Running Records
                                                   F. Individual Progress Portfolio


DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                         SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN

Directions: The action plan should be used as a tool to support effective implementation and to evaluate progress toward meeting goals. Use
the action plan template provided below to indicate key strategies and activities to be implemented for the 2008-09 school year to support
accomplishment of each annual goal identified in Section V. The action plan template should be duplicated as necessary. Reminder: Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification.


Subject/Area (where relevant):     Math

Annual Goal                                  87.7 % of 6th, 7th, & 8th grade students will attain mastery of the NYS Mathematics
Goals should be SMART – Specific,            Content and Process Strands as measured by the % of students reaching Levels 3 & 4
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and       on the NYS Mathematics Assessment.
Time-bound.
                                                 •   Teachers will utilize the Mathematics core curriculum (IMPACT) materials to
                                                     support the NYS Mathematics Standards.
                                                 •   Students will use math tools and manipulatives to support concepts and skills
                                                     in Mathematics.


                                                 •   Teacher will attend Mathematics professional development offered by the
                                                     KNLSO and communicate with the LSO Content Support Specialist.
                                                 •   Teachers will attend City-wide professional development offered to support
                                                     core curriculum materials.
                                                 •   Content area teachers will meet on a weekly basis to plan lessons, review
                                                     student achievement, and address the school wide focus.
                                                 •  Unit Assessments
                                                 •  Produce 2 formal lab reports by Jan/June
                                                 •  Students will prepare a science fair project wither in a group, pair or individual
                                                    project that will be evaluated on a standard exit project rubric
                                                • Students will show progress from report card to report card (Oct, March, June)
                                                    an overall 5% increase in their report card.
                                            To improve student learning and performance through improved teaching practices
                                            which will involve challenging students with rigorous instruction; explicit teaching of
                                            both the Process and Content strands of the State Standards; engaging students in
                                            accountable talk; challenging students in higher level thinking; requiring students to

DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                write to explain solutions to problems, concepts, and procedures using a variety of
                                                teaching strategies to ensure the preferred learning styles of each students is covered;
                                                differentiating the instruction to meet all student’s need; establishing high expectation
                                                for students; encouraging all student to establish goals and to self evaluate.
Action Plan                                        1. Aligning the curriculum and teaching with the State Standards
Include: actions/strategies/activities the         2. The collection of data which will be used to inform teachers of their practice and
school will implement to accomplish the               assist with identifying student needs.
goal; target population(s); responsible staff      3. The collection of data which will be used to inform teachers of their practice and
members; and implementation timelines.                assist with identifying student needs.
                                                   4. The improvement of classroom environments
                                                   5. The development of a collaborative and supportive teaching faculty.
                                                   6. The development of a Learning Community culture in which students and
                                                      teachers embrace the concept of life long learning. Hence teachers will embrace
                                                      continuing formal and self directed professional development.
Aligning Resources: Implications for                      •   Lesson Plans and teaching to be aligned to the Workshop Model
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule                   •   How to teach Problem Solving Strategies and Communication
Include reference to the use of Contracts                 •   Build structure to ensure poor student behavior does not limit student
for Excellence (C4E) allocations, where                       progress
applicable.

Indicators of Interim Progress and/or              •   Develop a Strategic Math Plan
Accomplishment                                     •   Organize Teacher Action Plans for all the teachers
Include: interval of periodic review;              •   Student self assessment
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains          •   Data collection and analysis of the Unit Tests to inform practice
                                                   •   Differentiation of teaching
                                                   •   Student-teacher conferencing




DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                                  Section VI: Action Plan


Directions: The action plan should be used as a tool to support effective implementation and to evaluate progress toward meeting goals. Use the
action plan template provided below to indicate key strategies and activities to be implemented for the 2008-09 school year to support
accomplishment of each annual goal identified in Section V. The action plan template should be duplicated as necessary. Reminder: Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification.


 Subject/Area (where relevant):          English Language Arts




Annual Goal                                   Scholars performing below grade level (according to beginning of year diagnostics) will gain 1.5 years
Goals should be SMART – Specific, Measurable, reading growth and read 25 texts.
Achievable, Realistic, and Time-bound.
                                              Scholars performing at grade level (according to beginning of year diagnostics) will real 25 texts at mastery
                                              level (Y or Z).

                                                    All Scholars will master 80% of standards (grade-level performance indicators).

                                                    All Scholars will complete 3 pieces rated excellent on National Writing Rubric.

                                                    All scholars will publish one piece per month that demonstrates evidence of the writing process.

                                                    All scholars will improve their performance on Acuity Customized ELA Assessments

                                                    All Scholars will improve English Language Arts State Test raw score by 15 points.

                                                    Scholars will master 30% of Shakespeare Vocabulary List.



Action Plan                                         Actions/plans/strategies: daily implementation of the Workshop Model (to include minilessons, building
Include: actions/strategies/activities the school   stamina in independent reading and writing, partner and group learning, word work and conferring),
will implement to accomplish the goal; target       strategy-based instruction that focuses on accessing texts at the instructional reading level, and
population(s); responsible staff members; and       implementation of vocabulary and grammar instruction within the context of balanced literacy.
implementation timelines.



DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                  Target population: all scholars except as noted above.




                                                  Responsible staff members: ELA teachers and support staff as needed.




                                                  Implementation timelines: while the Workshop Model of instruction occurs on a daily basis, customized
                                                  class-based assessment schedules are determined by the ELA teacher and may take place on daily, weekly,
                                                  or monthly basis. Running records will be conducted on a quarterly basis and school-wide (ACUITY)
                                                  assessments will occur in October and June, additionally Acuity Customized Assessment will be
                                                  administered in January, March and May to monitor student’s progress. Other customized assessments
                                                  may also be developed in order to gauge standard mastery.




Aligning Resources: Implications for              Implications for budget: The Workshop Model relies heavily on giving students time to read and access to
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule           high-interest texts at their independent reading level that suits their choices and interests. This is the
Include reference to the use of Contracts for     largest budget item for literacy studies.
Excellence (C4E) allocations, where applicable.


                                                  Staffing/Training: Teachers will visit excellent school (in peer horizon, if possible) to observe the execution
                                                  of the Workshop Model in conjunction with high expectations and rigorous instruction. Teachers will be
                                                  trained around leveled libraries and guided group instruction in order to implement these techniques as
                                                  both intervention and enrichment strategies.




                                                  C4E allocations: Funds will support our ELA afterschool and Saturday Academy program . Additionally
                                                  funds will support increasing our guided reading and independent selections




DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
Indicators of Interim Progress and/or       Interval of period review: ACUITY assessments will take place on the prescribed schedule. Customized
Accomplishment                              assessments, used to measure standard mastery, will be given on at least a monthly basis and results will be
Include: interval of periodic review;       entered into a tracker for data analysis and instructional planning.
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains


                                            Instruments of measure: Fountas and Pinnell running records, ACUITY prescribed and customized
                                            assessments, other rigorous assessments (previous NYS ELA exams, California State exams, The Princeton
                                            Review, etc.), the National Writing Rubric (as disseminated by the Nevada Holistic Writing Rubric project
                                            or Teach for America), the NYS ELA exam and the Shakespeare List (available at
                                            https://secure.layingthefoundation.org/english/vocab/shakespearelist.asp).




                                            Projected gains: please refer to goals above.




DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                            SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN

Directions: The action plan should be used as a tool to support effective implementation and to evaluate progress toward meeting goals. Use
the action plan template provided below to indicate key strategies and activities to be implemented for the 2008-09 school year to support
accomplishment of each annual goal identified in Section V. The action plan template should be duplicated as necessary. Reminder: Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification.

                                      Science
Subject/Area (where relevant):

Annual Goal                                     90 % of the 6th, 7tthand 8th grade students will attain mastery of the topics aligned with
Goals should be SMART – Specific,               the NYC scope and sequences and the NYC Core Curriculum as measured by the end of
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and          the unit assessment. Grades of 75% and above at the end of year report and grade.
Time-bound.
Action Plan                                        •   Teachers will utilize the blended option as their science core curriculum materials
Include: actions/strategies/activities the             to support the 6th grade NYC Scope & Sequences and NYS Standards.
school will implement to accomplish the            •   Students will participate in hands-on inquiry based instruction on a minimum of
goal; target population(s); responsible staff          once per week and successfully complete lab activities aligned with the
members; and implementation timelines.                 instruction.
                                                   •   All students will attend at least one class trip in the Fall and one in the Spring.
Aligning Resources: Implications for               •   Teacher will attend monthly science professional development offered by the
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule                KNLSO and communicate with the content support person from the LSO
Include reference to the use of Contracts          •   Teachers will attend DOE professional development offered to support core
for Excellence (C4E) allocations, where                curriculum materials.
applicable.                                        •   Content area teachers will meet on a weekly basis to attend p. d., plan lessons,
                                                       review student achievement, and address the school wide focus.
Indicators of Interim Progress and/or              •   Chapter Assessment
Accomplishment                                     •   Unit Assessment based bi monthly on 8th grade NYS Science Assessment
Include: interval of periodic review;              •   Produce 2 formal lab reports by Jan/June
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains          •   Students will prepare a science fair project wither in a group, pair or individual
                                                       project that will be evaluated on a standard exit project rubric
                                                   •   Students will show progress from report card to report card (Oct, March, June) an
                                                       overall 5% increase in their report card.



DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                            SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN

Directions: The action plan should be used as a tool to support effective implementation and to evaluate progress toward meeting goals. Use
the action plan template provided below to indicate key strategies and activities to be implemented for the 2008-09 school year to support
accomplishment of each annual goal identified in Section V. The action plan template should be duplicated as necessary. Reminder: Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification.

                                      Social Studies
Subject/Area (where relevant):

Annual Goal                                     By June 2009, 75% of students in grades 6-8 will attain mastery of the NYS Performance
Goals should be SMART – Specific,               Learning Standards in Social Studies as measured by the 8th grade NY Performance
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and          Assessment and the end of the year exams in grades 6th and 7th.
Time-bound.
Action Plan                                        •   Instruction will be aligned to the NYC and NYS Scope and Sequences in Social
Include: actions/strategies/activities the             Studies.
school will implement to accomplish the            •   Students will attend two curriculum related trips per year. (Fall and Spring)
goal; target population(s); responsible staff      •   8th grade students will complete exit projects. (June, 2009)
members; and implementation timelines.

Aligning Resources: Implications for               •   Teachers will attend monthly Social Studies professional development offered by
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule                the KNLSO and communicate with the content specialist from the LSO.
Include reference to the use of Contracts          •   Teachers will attend DOE professional development offered to support core
for Excellence (C4E) allocations, where                curriculum materials.
applicable.                                        •   Content area teachers will meet during common planning 2x’s per week.
                                                   •   Dedicated Social Studies clusters.
Indicators of Interim Progress and/or              •   Chapter Assessments
Accomplishment                                     •   Monthly unit assessment based on the 8th grade NYC & NYS Social Studies Scope
Include: interval of periodic review;                  and Sequence.
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains          •   Exit Projects
                                                   •   Report Card Grades
                                                   •   8th grade NYS Social Studies Assessment
                                                   •   BOY mid-year & EOY Inventories
                                                   •   October 08; March 09; June 09



DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
  DATE/TIME         PARTICIPANTS   CONTENT     Topic/Focus/Purpose        Delivery Format     Facilitator
    When?             For Whom?     AREA           What?/Why                   How?           By Whom?




August, 2008       All Teachers    All Areas   Protocols                 Workshop/Breakout   Principal
                                               Staff Handbook                                Assistant
                                               Team Building Activity-                       Principal
                                               H&P                                           Staff Developer
                                               School Environment
                                               Lesson Planning/Goal
                                               Setting Balanced
                                               Literacy
                                               Balanced Mathematics
                                               Child Abuse Recognition
                                               NYS Learning
                                               Performance/
                                               Standards- All Content
                                               Areas Using Data to
                                               Drive Instruction
                                               Grading Policy




September 4,       CTT Teachers    All Areas   CTT/Co-Teaching           Workshop            KNLSO-
2008                                           Models                                        SETRIC
                                               Santa Cruz Professional
                                               Teaching Standards
                                               Chancellor’s Regulation
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                              A-420, A-421
                                              Lesson Planning
                                              Room Environment
                                              Protocols

September 11,      All Teachers   All Areas   Santa Cruz Professional   Workshop    KNLSO,-LIM
2008                                          Teaching Standards
September, 2008    All Teachers   All Areas   Testing                   Workshop    Principal,
                                              Authentic Assessment                  Assistant
                                              Smartboard Training                   Principal, Staff
                                                                                    Developer
October, 2008      All Teachers   All Areas   Grading Policy/Report      Workshop   Principal,
                                              Cards                                 Assistant
                                              Community Relations/PT                Principal
                                              Conferences                           Staff Developer
                                              Rubrics/Assessments
                                              Learning Objectives
                                              Bloom’s Taxonomy
                                              Quality Review Training
                                              Progress Reports
                                              Interactive Learning
                                              Models
                                              Integrating Technology
                                              into the Curriculum
                                              Inquiry Team Training
November, 2008     All Teachers   All Areas   Data Analysis              Workshop   Principal,
                                              Quality Review Training               Assistant
                                              Datafolios                            Principal
                                              Differentiated Instruction            Staff Developer
                                              Renzulli Training
                                              Learning Environment
                                              Survey
                                              Classroom Management
                                              School Improvement
                                              Plan
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                              Inquiry Team
December, 2008     All Teachers   All Areas   Testing Administration      Workshop              Principal,
                                              Using Data to Drive                               Assistant
                                              Instruction                                       Principal
                                              Data Analysis- Science                            Staff Developer
                                              Test Preparation
                                              Materials
January 2009       All Teachers   All Areas   Data Analysis               Workshop              Principal,
                                              Goal Setting                Individual Coaching   Assistant
                                              Reflections                 Session               Principal
                                              Portfolio Development       Common Planning       Staff Developer
                                              Analyzing Student Work      Meetings              Aussie Math
                                              Curriculum Development                            Consultant
                                              –Social Studies
                                              Test Administration
                                              Acuity Training
                                              HIV/AIDS Training
                                              Inquiry Team
February 2009      All Teachers   All Areas   Aligning Math Instruction   Workshop              Principal
                                              with the Pre-Post March     Common Planning       Assistant
                                              Indicators                  Meetings              Principal
                                              Workshop Model                                    Staff Developer
                                              Acuity Training                                   Aussie Math
                                              Portfolio Development                             Consultant

March 2009         All Teachers   All Areas   Guided Reading              Workshop              Principal
                                              Writer’s Workshop           Common Planning       Assistant
                                              Acuity Training             Meetings              Principal
                                              UBD Curriculum              Individual Coaching   Staff Developer
                                              Planning                    Sessions
                                              Goal Setting
                                              Classroom Management
April 2009         All Teachers   All Areas   UBD Curriculum              Workshop              Principal
                                              Planning                    Individual Coaching   Assistant
                                              Classroom Management        Sessions              Principal
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                                                                                               Staff Developer
May 2009             All Teachers          All Areas     Goal Setting                  Workshop                Principal
                                                         UBD Curriculum                Individual Coaching     Assistant
                                                         Planning                      Sessions                Principal
                                                         Exit Projects                                         Staff Developer

June 2009            All Teachers          All Areas     Understanding By              Workshop                Principal
                                                         Design                                                Assistant
                                                         Curriculum Planning                                   Principal
                                                         Using Data to Plan                                    Staff Developer
                                                         Instruction
                                                         Exit Projects
July 2009            All Teacher           All Areas     UBD Curriculum                Workshops               Principal
                                                         Planning                                              Assistant
                                                         Portfolio Development                                 Principal
                                                                                                               Staff Developer
August 2009          All Teachers          All Areas     UBD Curriculum                Workshops               Principal
                                                         Planning                                              Assistant
                                                         Data Analysis                                         Principal
                                                         Portfolio Development                                 Staff Developer


                                          REQUIRED APPENDICES TO THE CEP FOR 2008-2009


Directions: All schools must complete Appendices 1, 2, 3, 7 & 8. All Title I schools must complete Appendix 4. All schools identified under
NCLB or SED for School Improvement, including Title I Schools in Need of Improvement (SINI) – Year 1 and Year 2, Title I Corrective Action
(CA) Schools, NCLB Planning for Restructuring Schools, NCLB Restructured Schools, and Schools Requiring Academic Progress (SRAP),
must complete Appendix 5. All Schools Under Registration Review (SURR) must complete Appendix 6. Note: Please refer to the
accompanying CEP Guide for specific CEP submission instructions and timelines.

APPENDIX 1: ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS) SUMMARY FORM – SED REQUIREMENT FOR ALL SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS – NCLB/SED REQUIREMENT FOR ALL SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 3: LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION – CHANCELLOR’S REGULATIONS FOR ALL SCHOOLS

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
APPENDIX 4: NCLB REQUIREMENT FOR ALL TITLE I SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 5: NCLB/SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SINI AND SRAP SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 6: SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS UNDER REGISTRATION REVIEW (SURR)

APPENDIX 7: SCHOOL-LEVEL REFLECTION AND RESPONSE TO SYSTEMWIDE CURRICULUM AUDIT FINDINGS – REQUIREMENT
     FOR ALL SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 8: CONTRACTS FOR EXCELLENCE (CFE) SCHOOL-BASED EXPENDITURES FOR 2008-09 – SED REQUIREMENT FOR ALL
     SCHOOLS




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                        APPENDIX 1: ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS) SUMMARY FORM

                                      New York State Education Department (SED) requirement for all schools

Part A. Directions: On the chart below, indicate the total number of students receiving Academic Intervention Services (AIS) in each area listed, for each
applicable grade. AIS grade and subject requirements are as follows: K-3: reading and math; 4-12: reading, math, science, and social studies. Academic
Intervention Services include 2 components: additional instruction that supplements the general curriculum (regular classroom instruction); and/or student
support services needed to address barriers to improved academic performance such as services provided by a guidance counselor or social worker. Note:
Refer to the District Comprehensive Educational Plan (DCEP) for a description of district procedures for providing AIS.

                                                                                  At-risk Services:   At-risk Services:                          At-risk
                                                                                                                          At-risk Services:
              ELA           Mathematics          Science        Social Studies        Guidance             School                             Health-related
  Grade




                                                                                                                           Social Worker
                                                                                     Counselor         Psychologist                             Services
          # of Students    # of Students      # of Students      # of Students     # of Students       # of Students       # of Students      # of Students
          Receiving AIS    Receiving AIS      Receiving AIS      Receiving AIS     Receiving AIS       Receiving AIS       Receiving AIS      Receiving AIS
  K                                                N/A                N/A
  1                                                N/A                N/A
  2                                                N/A                N/A
  3                                                N/A                N/A
  4
  5
  6            15                7
  7            20                5                                                       9
  8            18                18                 2                  2                 18                                                         1
  9
  10
  11
  12

Identified groups of students who have been targeted for AIS, and the established criteria for identification:
    o Students in Grades K – 3 who are considered at-risk for not meeting State standards as determined by their performance on ECLAS 2 or other
         identified assessments, or who have been identified as potential holdovers.
    o Students in Grades 4 – 8 who are performing at Level 1 or Level 2 on New York State English language arts (ELA), mathematics, science, and social
         studies assessments.
    o Students in Grade 9 who performed at Level 1 or Level 2 on NYS Grade 8 ELA, mathematics, science, and social studies assessments.
    o Students in Grades 10 – 12 who scored below the approved passing grade on any Regents examination required for graduation in English language
         arts, mathematics, science, and social studies.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Part B. Description of Academic Intervention Services

                                     Description: Provide a brief description of each of the Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
Name of Academic Intervention        indicated in column one, including the type of program or strategy (e.g., Wilson, Great Leaps, etc.),
Services (AIS)                       method for delivery of service (e.g., small group, one-to-one, tutoring, etc.), and when the service is
                                     provided (i.e., during the school day, before or after school, Saturday, etc.).
ELA:                                 6th Grade English Language Arts
                                           A. Extended Day Instruction offered after-school 4 days a week;
                                           B. Small Group Instruction during and after class;
                                           C. One-to-one scholar reflective and planning conferencing during class;
                                           D. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Academy offered to all scholars including those performing at a proficiency level 1 & 2
                                           E. Guided group instruction in class every other week in reading and writing;
                                           F. Renzulli differentiated instructional program

                                     7th Grade English Language Arts
                                                     A. In-class conferencing in reading and writing every two weeks;
                                                     B. Extended Day Instruction offered after-school 4 days a week;
                                                     C. Guided group instruction in class every other week in reading and writing;
                                                     D. Small group instruction/remediation with 3 to 6 scholars targeting deficient skills;
                                                     E. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Academy offered to all scholars including those performing at proficiency level 1 & 2
                                                     F. Renzulli differentiated instructional program


                                          8th Grade English Language Arts
                                                     A. In-class conferencing in reading and writing every two weeks;
                                                     B. Extended Day Instruction offered 4 days a week
                                                     C. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Academy offered to all scholars including those performing at proficiency level 1 & 2
                                                     D. Small group instruction/remediation with 3 to 6 scholars targeting deficient skills;
                                                     E.    Guided group instruction in class every other week in reading and writing
                                                     F. Renzulli differentiated instructional program
Mathematics:                         6th Grade Mathematics
                                          A. Small group instruction/remediation with 3 to 6 scholars targeting deficient skills;
                                          B. Extended Day Instruction offered after-school 4 days a week;
                                          C. In-class conferencing with groups and individuals for goal setting and reflections;
                                          D. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Academy offered to all scholars especially those performing at proficiency level 1&2
                                          E. Renzulli differentiated instructional program

                                     7th Grade Mathematics
                                          A. Small Pull-Out group instruction/remediation throughout school day targeting deficient skills;
                                          B. Extended Day Instruction offered after-school 4 days a week;
                                          C. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Academy offered to advanced and students at risk
                                          D. In-class conferencing with groups and individuals for goal setting and reflections;
                                          E. Renzulli differentiated instructional program
                                     8th Grade Mathematics
                                          A. Small Pull –Out group instruction/remediation throughout the school day targeting deficient skills;
                                          B. Extended Day Instruction offered after-school 4 days a week;
                                          C. In-class conferencing with groups and individuals for goal setting and reflections;
                                          D. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Academy offered to those performing at proficiency level 1 & 2 and advance students
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Science:                           6th, 7th 8th , Grade Science
                                           A. In-class conferencing to identify plan for goal mastery;
                                           B. After school enrichment as needed; Tuesday & Thursday NYS Test Prep program ( grade 8)
                                           C. Extended day academic intervention as needed;
                                           D. Small group and tutoring during class as needed;
                                           E. Conferencing in class as needed.
                                           F. Renzulli differentiated instructional program
Social Studies:                    6th , , and 7th Grade Social Studies
                                           A. One-to-one instruction during class;
                                           B. Small group instruction during class; Tuesday & Thursday NYS Prep Program ( grade 8)
                                           C. Guided groups during class with targeted scholars;
                                           D. Web-Quest activities in class and at home;
                                           E. Reading Quest activities after-school;
                                           F. Individualized enrichment activities assigned in-class and reinforced in the classroom and in the home;

At-risk Services Provided by the   Guidance Counselor Services
Guidance Counselor:                    A. Individual and group conflict resolution sessions during school;
                                       B. Individual and group Anger Management sessions during school;
                                       C. Individual and group Counseling during and after school;
                                       G. Small group Peer Mediation Sessions during and after school;
                                       H. Individual and group Academic counseling during school;
                                       I. Whole Life curriculum.
At-risk Services Provided by the
School Psychologist:


At-risk Services Provided by the
Social Worker:


At-risk Health-related Services:




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                     APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLS)

                                                        NCLB/SED requirement for all schools

Part A: Language Allocation Policy (LAP) – Attach a copy of your school’s current year (2008-2009) LAP narrative to this CEP.


Part B: CR Part 154 (A-4) Bilingual/ESL Program Description

Type of Program: ___ Bilingual ___ ESL ___ Both                   Number of LEP (ELL) Students Served in 2007-08: ____________________
(No more than 2 pages)

I.     Instructional Program for ELLs (including brief description of program, # of classes per program, language(s) of instruction, instructional
       strategies, etc). Program planning and management description to include identification and placement of ESL/Bilingual certified teachers,
       utilization of appropriate instructional materials (English and other languages) and technology, school-based supervisory support, use of
       external organizations, compliance with ELL-related mandates, and use of data to improve instruction:
Frederick Douglass Academy VIII (FDAVIII) is a College Preparatory Middle School located in the East New York section of Brooklyn, NY. We
have two general education 6th grade classes and one grade 6 CTT class, three seventh grade general education classes and three eight grade general
education classes with a total student body population of 227, comprised of 2% White, 92% Black, and 7% Hispanic. The school recently acquired a
very small ELL population consisting of one scholar. With the new admission of one student who requires ESL services FDA V III has put the
following services will be provided:
     • Mandated English Second Language services
     • Support for parents via workshops and translation services
     • Professional development for teaching team members that specifically develops them to effectively service a population of English Language
        Learners

                                                                   See Attached LAP

       A. Curricular: Briefly describe the school’s literacy, mathematics and other content area programs and explain ELLs’ participation in those
       programs. Briefly describe supplemental programs for ELLs (i.e., AIS, Saturday Academies).
       Our Literacy program follows the Balanced Literacy

       B. Extracurricular: Briefly describe extracurricular activities available in your school, and the extent to which ELLs participate.

II.    Parent/community: Describe parent/community involvement activities planned to meaningfully involve parents in their children’s education
       and to inform them about the state standards and assessments.

III.   Project Jump Start: Describe the programs and activities to assist newly enrolled ELL/LEP students prior to the first day of school.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
IV.   Staff Development (2008-2009 activities—tentative dates and ELL-related topics): Describe how staff will participate in ongoing, long-term
      staff development with a strong emphasis on the State learning standards and high impact differentiated and academic language
      development strategies.

V.    Support services provided to LEP students: Describe other support structures that are in place in your school which are available to ELLs.

VI.   Name/type of native language assessments administered (bilingual programs only): Describe how you assess the level of native language
      development and proficiency of the ELLs who are in a bilingual program.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Part C: CR Part 154 – Number of Teachers and Support Personnel for 2007-08

School Building: _________FDA VIII-452_____________________ District _19___________________

List the FTEs in your school in the Bilingual Education and ESL programs in the appropriate column.


                           Number of Teachers
                              2007-2008                                                         Number of
                                                                                           Teaching Assistants or
             Appropriately                           Inappropriately                        Paraprofessionals***                  Total
              Certified*                               Certified or
                                                  Uncertified Teachers**

       Bilingual           ESL                  Bilingual          ESL                   Bilingual          ESL
       Program           Program                Program          Program                 Program          Program
                   0                 0                                                                                    0

* The number of teachers reported must represent the number of teachers holding an appropriate license for the subject area being taught
(i.e., language arts and content area.) Note: The Office of Bilingual Education and Foreign Language Studies will conduct a random review of
the 2006-2007 teacher reported data. Districts randomly selected will be asked to electronically submit to the Department, the name of the
teacher(s), social security number and type of license or certificate issued by the NYSED.

** Examples of this may include: teachers without an appropriate New York State teaching certificate or New York City license for the
subject area(s) being taught or without a valid NYS teaching certificate or NYC license.

*** Teaching Assistants and Paraprofessionals must be working under the direct supervision of a licensed teacher. Attach additional sheets if
necessary.

Part D: CR Part 154 – Sample Student Schedules

Include schedules for students on three different levels in the ESL program (one each for Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced English
Proficiency levels based on NYSESLAT/LAB-R). The schedules must account for all periods. Use attached Freestanding ESL Schedule
Template. If your school has a Bilingual/Dual Language program, also provide three sample schedules – one each for Beginning,
Intermediate and Advanced English Proficiency levels based on the NYSESLAT/LAB-R). The schedules must reflect ESL, Native Language
Arts and content area instruction through use of both languages. Use attached Bilingual Schedule Template.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
SAMPLE STUDENT SCHEDULE 2008-09 (ESL)
ESL Program Type:                ___ Free-Standing ___ Push-in                     _X__Pull-out
Indicate Proficiency Level:      _X__ Beginning     __ Intermediate                 ___Advanced

School District: _____19___________________                    School Building: _______K452____

     Period             Time                  Monday                      Tuesday              Wednesday                    Thursday              Friday
                  From:7:51 am         Subject (Specify) ELA/ESL   Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       1                               support

                  To: 8: 35 am
                  From:                Subject (Specify) ELA/ESL   Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       2                               support

                  To:
                  From:                Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       3
                  To:
                  From:10:21 am        Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)ELA/ESL   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       4                                                                                   support

                  To: 11:06 am
                  From: 11:08          Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)ELA/ESL   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       5                                                                                   support
                                                                                                                                ELA/ESL
                  To: 11:53                                                                                           support
                  From: 11:55 am       Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       6                                                                                                              ELA/ESL support
                  To: 12:38 am
                  From:                Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       7
                  To:
                  From:                Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       8
                  To:
                  From:                Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       9
                  To:
                  From:                Subject (Specify)           Subject (Specify)       Subject (Specify)          Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

      10
                  To:


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
SAMPLE STUDENT SCHEDULE 2008-09 (Bilingual)
Bilingual Program Type:         ___ TBE                ___ Dual Language
Indicate Proficiency Level:     ___ Beginning          ___Intermediate        ___Advanced

School District: ________________________               School Building: ___________

    Period               Time             Monday                 Tuesday          Wednesday             Thursday              Friday
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       1
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       2
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       3
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       4
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       5
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       6
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       7
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       8
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

       9
                To:
                From:              Subject (Specify)      Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)   Subject (Specify)

      10
                To:


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Part E: Title III: Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students – School Year 2008-2009

Form TIII – A (1)(a)

Grade Level(s)                      Number of Students to be Served:                    LEP           Non-LEP


Number of Teachers                         Other Staff (Specify)

School Building Instructional Program/Professional Development Overview

Title III, Part A LEP Program

Language Instruction Program – Language instruction education programs funded under Title III, Part A, of NCLB, must help LEP students attain
English proficiency while meeting State academic achievement standards. They may use both English and the student's native language and may
include the participation of English proficient students (i.e., Two Way Bilingual Education/Dual Language program.) Programs implemented under
Title III, Part A, may not supplant programs required under CR Part 154. In the space provided below, describe the school’s language instruction
program for limited English proficient (LEP) students. The description must include: type of program/activities; number of students to be served;
grade level(s); language(s) of instruction; rationale for the selection of program/activities; times per day/week; program duration; and service
provider and qualifications.




Professional Development Program – Describe the school’s professional development program for teachers and other staff responsible for the
delivery of instruction and services to limited English proficient students.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Form TIII – A (1)(b)

Title III LEP Program
School Building Budget Summary

Allocation:
Budget Category                             Budgeted   Explanation of Proposed Expenditure
                                            Amount
Professional staff, per session, per diem
(Note: schools must account for fringe
benefits)
Purchased services such as curriculum and
staff development contracts
Supplies and materials
Travel
Other
TOTAL




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                          APPENDIX 3: LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION

                                        Requirement under Chancellor’s Regulations – for all schools

Goal: To communicate whenever feasible with non-English speaking parents in their home language in order to support shared parent-
school accountability, parent access to information about their children’s educational options, and parents’ capacity to improve their
children’s achievement.

Part A: Needs Assessment Findings

1. Describe the data and methodologies used to assess your school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs to ensure that all
   parents are provided with appropriate and timely information in a language they can understand.

The data that we have used to assess our school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs to ensure that all parents are provided with
appropriate and timely information, has been through meeting with individual parents at our Parent Orientation meetings, phone
communication, and direct parent request for translation services.

2. Summarize the major findings of your school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs. Describe how the findings were
   reported to the school community.

We found that there are only two families in our student body, perhaps due to the location of our school, that are in need of translations into
Spanish. Once we determined this need, we utilized the expertise of a Native Spanish speaking teaching team member and parent volunteers to
provide oral translations to the two families during parent teacher conferences, phone conferences, and PTA meetings. We also distributed
documents that were translated into Spanish to these two families.



Part B: Strategies and Activities

1. Describe the written translation services the school will provide, and how they will meet identified needs indicated in Part A. Include
    procedures to ensure timely provision of translated documents to parents determined to be in need of language assistance services.
    Indicate whether written translation services will be provided by an outside vendor, or in-house by school staff or parent volunteers.
The school will provide written translations of bulletins, parent letters, and all other correspondences to the home through parent volunteers,
and teaching team members who are fluent in Spanish. In order to ensure the timely provision of translated documents to parents determined
to be in need of language assistance, our two Native Spanish Speaking parent volunteers will be readily available for this service.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
2. Describe the oral interpretation services the school will provide, and how they will meet identified needs indicated in Part A. Indicate
   whether oral interpretation services will be provided by an outside contractor, or in-house by school staff or parent volunteers.
The school will provide oral translations for parent teacher conferences during open school night, PTA meetings, and for phone
conferences/communications. These services will be provided by parent volunteers and our Native Spanish Speaking teaching team members.


3. Describe how the school will fulfill Section VII of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 regarding parental notification requirements for
   translation and interpretation services. Note: The full text of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 (Translations) is available via the following
   link: http://docs.nycenet.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-151/A-663%20Translation%203-27-06%20.pdf.

In our efforts to fulfill section VII of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 regarding parental notification requirements for translation and
interpretation services, the school has posted in the main office, the exact location of the parents bill of rights in both Spanish and English.
Parents are aware of the availability of translation services at the school through oral communication. Our Native Spanish speaking families,
have been, and will continue to be provided with translated written communications and translated oral communications via Native Spanish
Speaking teaching team members and parent volunteers.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                             APPENDIX 4: NCLB REQUIREMENTS FOR TITLE I SCHOOLS

                                                  All Title I schools must complete this appendix.

Directions:
- All Title I schools must address requirements in Part A and Part B of this appendix.
- Title I Schoolwide Program (SWP) schools must complete Part C of this appendix.
- Title I Targeted Assistance (TAS) schools must complete Part D of this appendix.


Part A: TITLE I ALLOCATIONS AND SET-ASIDES

1. Enter the anticipated Title I allocation for the school for 2008-2009_______$245, 947.00_____________

2. Enter the anticipated 1% allocation for Title I Parent Involvement Program________$2, 460.00_______

3. Enter the anticipated 5% Title I set-aside to insure that all teachers in core subject areas are highly qualified_____$12,148.00
4. Enter the percentage of High-Quality Teachers teaching in core academic subjects during the 2007-2008 school year________76.9%

5. If the percentage of high quality teachers during 2007-2008 is less than 100% describe activities and strategies the school is implementing
   in order to insure that the school will have 100% high quality teachers by the end of the coming school year. See attached Professional
   Development Plan


Part B: TITLE I SCHOOL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY & SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT

1. School Parental Involvement Policy – Attach a copy of the school’s Parent Involvement Policy.                   SEE BELOW

Explanation: In support of strengthening student academic achievement, each school that receives Title I, Part A funds must develop jointly
with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy that contains information required by
section 1118(a)(2) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The policy establishes the school’s expectations for parental
involvement and describes how the school will implement a number of specific parental involvement activities. It is strongly recommended
that schools, in consultation with parents, use a sample template as a framework for the information to be included in their parental involvement
policy. The template is available in the eight major languages on the NYCDOE website. Schools, in consultation with parents, are encouraged
to include other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective parental involvement and strengthen student
academic achievement. The school parent involvement policy must be provided and disseminated in the major languages spoken by the
majority of parents in the school. For additional information, please refer to the 2008-09 Title I Parent Involvement Guidelines available at the
NYCDOE website link provided above.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
2. School-Parent Compact - Attach a copy of the school’s Parent Involvement Policy.                             SEE BELOW

Explanation: Each school receiving funds under Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) must develop a written
school-parent compact jointly with parents for all children participating in Title I, Part A activities, services, and programs. That compact is part
of the school’s written parental involvement policy developed by the school and parents under section 1118(b) of the ESEA. The compact must
outline how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the
means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the State’s high standards. It is strongly
recommended that schools and parents use the sample template which is available in the eight major languages on the NYCDOE website as
a framework for the information to be included in the compact. Schools and parents, in consultation with students, are encouraged to include
other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective parental involvement and strengthen student academic
achievement. The school-parent compact must be provided and disseminated in the major languages spoken by the majority of parents in the
school. For additional information, please refer to the 2008-09 Title I Parent Involvement Guidelines available at the NYCDOE website link
provided above.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
     19k452                                                                                                “What’s possible for me is possible for you.”
     1400 Pennsylvania Avenue, 4th Floor
     Brooklyn, NY 11239
                                                           PARENT COMPACT 2008-2009
     The school and parents working cooperatively to provide for the successful education of children agree:
                     The School Agrees                                           The Parent/Guardian Agrees
To convene an annual meeting for Title I parents to inform them of the Title I        To become involved in developing, implementing, evaluating, and revising the
program and their right to be involved.                                               school-parent involvement policy.

To offer a flexible number of meetings at various times.                              To participate in or request technical assistance training that the local
                                                                                      education authority or school offers on child rearing practices and teaching and
To actively involve parents in planning, reviewing and improving the Title I          learning strategies.
programs and the parental involvement policy.

To provide parents with timely information about all programs. Title I Reading,       To work with his/her child/children on schoolwork; Encourage pupil’s grade 6 -
Title I Mathematics, ESL instruction, Professional Development for Staff and          8 to read independently at home.
Parents Literacy and Math Coaches.
                                                                                      To monitor his/her child’s/children’s:
To provide performance profiles and individual student assessment results for            • Attendance at school
each child and other pertinent individual information.                                   • Homework
                                                                                         • Television watching
To provide high quality curriculum and instruction by providing students with            • Internet usage
appropriate learning environments that foster learning through the use of best
teaching practices via the workshop model [Classrooms will have grade and             To share the responsibility for improved student achievement by visiting your
instructionally appropriate literacy, math, science, social studies, technology,      child’s school once a month.
arts and character education materials].
                                                                                      To communicate with his/her child’s/children’s teachers about their educational
To deal with communication issues between teachers and parents through:               needs.
    • Parent-teacher conferences tri- annually
    • Monthly reports to parents on their children’s progress                         To ask parents and parent groups to provide information to the school on the
    • Reasonable access to staff, observation of classroom activities [Parent         type of training or assistance they would like and/or need to help them be more
        School Visitation policy is in place]                                         effective in assisting their child/children in the educational process.
To assure that parents may participate in professional development activities if
the school determines that it is appropriate, i.e., literacy classes, and workshops
on reading strategies.
     ________________________________                           ___________________________________                               __________________
     Principal’s Signature                                   Parent/Guardian Signature                                  Date
     [NOTE: The NCLB law does not require school personnel and parents to sign the School-Parent Compact. However, if the school and parents feel signing
     the School-Parent Compact will be helpful, signatures may be encouraged.]
     UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Part C: TITLE I SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAM SCHOOLS

Directions: Describe how the school will implement the following components of a Schoolwide Program as required under NCLB. Note: If a
required component is already addressed elsewhere in this plan, you may refer to the page numbers where the response can be found.

1. A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that is based on information on the performance of children in relation to the State
   academic content and student academic achievement standards.
         More than 90% of 6th graders and three-fourths of 7th graders are at or above grade level in Math and more than two-thirds
         of 6th grade and three-fourths of 7th grade scholars are at or above grade level in ELA. We will meet the needs of our
         Scholars through the Academic Intervention Services plan listed on page 15 of this document.




2. Schoolwide reform strategies that:
      a) Provide opportunities for all children to meet the State's proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement.
      b) Use effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically-based research that:
             o Increase the amount and quality of learning time, such as extended school year, before- and after-school and summer
                 programs and opportunities.
             o Help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum.
             o Meet the educational needs of historically underserved populations.
             o Address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of low academic achieving children and those at
                 risk of not meeting the State academic content standards and are members of the target population of any program that is
                 included in the Schoolwide Program. These programs may include counseling, pupil services, mentoring services, college
                 and career awareness/preparation, and the integration of vocational and technical education programs.
             o Are consistent with and are designed to implement State and local improvement, if any.
      Refer to the Academic Intervention Services plan listed on page 16 of this document



3. Instruction by highly qualified staff.
       Insure that teachers are properly certified prior to commencement of service by working closely with the Human Resources
       Manager at the Brooklyn Integrated Services Center. Additionally, prospective teachers conduct demonstration lesson in the
       desired content areas to exhibit knowledge of the curriculum and effective instructional practices.


4. High-quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals (and, where appropriate, pupil services
   personnel, parents, and other staff) to enable all children in the Schoolwide Program to meet the State’s student academic standards.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
       In our recent Quality Review Report, we are described as “a strong learning community within the school.” As a learning
       community the school offers many professional development opportunities which are well attended by the staff. All new
       teachers are provided with a mentor that conducts classroom observations as well as has conversations to improve teaching
       and learning. The administration team and lead teachers conducts “lunch and learns” and schedules inter-visitation among
       colleagues to further support the needs of novice teachers. Other Professional Development activities include reviews of data
       trends, staff surveys, one-on-one conversations between administration and staff, and instructional walkthroughs and visits
       to peer schools to learn best practices. There are also many other opportunities for professional development; staff members
       attend various after school workshop sessions provided by Brooklyn Integrated Services, the Teachers’ Center of the United
       Federation of Teachers and our Learning Support Network. Further, we utilize the services of Professional Development
       Associates, an outside consultant firm that provides the staff with effective strategies to meet all scholars’ needs.


5. Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools.
       In addition to working with the Human Resources Manager at the Brooklyn Integrated Services Center, we will continue to
       develop our relationship with both the Teach For America Program (“TFA”) and the New York City Teaching Fellows Program
       (“NYCTF”). Currently, a significant percentage of our teaching staff are members of either the TFA or NYCTF Programs and
       through their successful experiences at our school we are able to continue to draw upon those programs for bright and
       energetic teachers.




6. Strategies to increase parental involvement through means such as family literacy services.

       Parents are provided with information regarding school wide decisions and activities during PTA meetings. The school has
       an open door policy which allows parents to come in and sit in classes often times accompanied by our Guidance Counselor
       to observe the learning process and to share critical feedback with administration. Also parents are involved in the school’s
       yearly banquet and are recognized for their outstanding contributions to the schools community. Many parents come in to
       volunteer in classrooms, the main office, auditorium, and cafeteria, wherever they are needed.

7. Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First,
   or a State-run preschool program, to local elementary school programs.
       n/a


8. Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments in order to provide information on, and to
   improve, the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
       Teachers are involved in the decision-making process to improve student achievement through their use of ACUITY and
       membership on the school’s inquiry team.



9. Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of the academic achievement
   standards are provided with effective, timely additional assistance. The additional assistance must include measures to ensure that
   students’ difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.
   Our Inquiry Team has effectively identified scholars and provided successful interventions services based on items skill analysis
   data and targeted instruction practices. We initially diagnosis skills that the scholars are deficient in and provide individualized
   instruction. Additionally, we provide accelerated academic enrichment classes on Saturdays for students to achieve advanced
   levels of academic achievement.

10. Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs, including programs supported under NCLB, i.e., violence
    prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job
    training. Please refer to the Title 1 Parent /involvement Plan ; Additional workshops include Breath with Ease Health Workshop, CPR,
    Breast Cancer Awareness, Healthy Homes, Conflict Resolution, Banking and Finance, Supporting your Child in math workshop


Part D: TITLE I TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS

Directions: Describe how the school will implement the following components of a Title I Targeted Assistance Program as required under
NCLB. Note: If a required component is already addressed elsewhere in this plan, you may refer to the page numbers where the response can
be found.

1. Use program resources to help participating children meet the State standards.


2. Ensure that planning for students served under this program is incorporated into existing school planning.


3. Use effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically based research that strengthens the core academic
   program of the school and that:
      a. Give primary consideration to providing extended learning time, such as, extended school year, before/after school, and summer
          programs and opportunities;
      b. Help provide an accelerated, high –quality curriculum, including applied learning; and
      c. Minimize removing children from the regular classroom during regular school hours;



UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
4. Coordinate with and support the regular educational program;


5. Provide instruction by highly qualified teachers;


6. Provide professional development opportunities for teachers, principals and paraprofessionals, including, if appropriate, pupil services
   personnel, parents, and other staff;


7. Provide strategies to increase parental involvement; and


8. Coordinate and integrate Federal, State and local services and programs.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
    APPENDIX 5: NCLB/SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS IN NEED OF IMPROVEMENT (SINI) AND SCHOOLS REQUIRING ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SRAP)

     This appendix must be completed by all Title I Schools in Need of Improvement (SINI) – Year 1 and Year 2, Title I Corrective Action (CA)
    Schools, NCLB Planning for Restructuring Schools (PFR), NCLB Restructured, Schools, Schools Requiring Academic Progress (SRAP), and
                                         SURR schools that have also been identified as SINI or SRAP.

    NCLB/SED Status:                                        SURR1 Phase/Group (If applicable):

Part A: For All School Improvement Schools (SINI and SRAP)

1. For each area of school improvement identification (indicated on your pre-populated School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot,
   downloadable from your school’s NYCDOE webpage under “Statistics”), describe the school’s findings of the specific academic issues that
   caused the school to be identified.

2. Describe the focused intervention(s) the school will implement to support improved achievement in the grade and subject areas for which
   the school was identified. Be sure to include strategies to address the needs of all disaggregated groups that failed to meet the AMO, Safe
   Harbor, and/or 95% participation rate requirement. Note: If this question was already addressed elsewhere in this plan, you may refer to the
   page numbers where the response can be found.

Part B: For Title I Schools that Have Been Identified for School Improvement (SINI)

1. As required by NCLB legislation, a school identified for school improvement must spend not less than 10 percent of its Title I funds for each
   fiscal year that the school is in school improvement status for professional development. The professional development must be high
   quality and address the academic area(s) identified.

      (a) Provide the following information: 2008-09 anticipated Title I allocation = $________; 10% of Title I allocation = $________.

      (b) Describe how the 10 percent of the Title I funds for professional development will be used to remove the school from school
      improvement.

2. Describe the teacher-mentoring program that will be incorporated as part of the school’s strategy for providing high-quality professional
   development.

3. Describe how the school will notify parents about the school’s identification for school improvement in an understandable and uniform format
   and to the extent practicable, in a language that the parents can understand.



1
    School Under Registration Review (SURR)
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                           APPENDIX 6: SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS UNDER REGISTRATION REVIEW (SURR).

                                              All SURR schools must complete this appendix.

 SURR Area(s) of Identification:


 SURR Group/Phase:                               Year of Identification:                         Deadline Year:

Part A: SURR Review Team Recommendations – On the chart below, indicate the categorized recommendations for improvement resulting
from the SED Registration Review Visit/Report and all external review and monitoring visits since the school was first identified as a SURR.
Indicate the specific actions the school has taken, or will take, to address each of the recommendations.


                                                          Review Team Categorized
      Type of Review or Monitoring Visit                                                             Actions the school has taken, or
                                                    Recommendations (e.g., Administrative
       (Include agency & dates of visits)                                                            plans to take, to address review
                                                 Leadership, Professional Development, Special
                                                                                                         team recommendations
                                                                Education, etc.)
                  APPENDIX 7: SCHOOL-LEVEL REFLECTION AND RESPONSE TO SYSTEM-WIDE IMPLICATIONS OF FINDINGS FROM
                          AUDITS OF THE WRITTEN, TESTED, AND TAUGHT CURRICULUM IN ELA AND MATHEMATICS

                                                    All schools must complete this appendix.

Background
From 2006 to 2008, the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and the New York State Education Department (NYSED)
commissioned an “audit of the written, tested, and taught curriculum” to fulfill an accountability requirement of the No Child Left Behind
(NCLB) Act for districts identified for “corrective action.” The focus of the audit was on the English language arts (ELA) and mathematics
curricula for all students, including students with disabilities (SWDs) and English language learners (ELLs). The audit examined the alignment
of curriculum, instruction, and assessment as well as other key areas—such as professional development and school and district supports—
through multiple lenses of data collection and analysis. The utilized process was a collaborative one, intended not to find fault but to generate
findings in concert with school and district constituency representatives to identify and overcome barriers to student success. As such, the
audit findings are not an end in themselves but will facilitate important conversations at (and between) the central, SSO, and school levels in
order to identify and address potential gaps in ELA and math curriculum and instructional programs and ensure alignment with the state
standards and assessments.

Directions: All schools are expected to reflect on the seven (7) key findings of the “audit of the written, tested, and taught curriculum” outlined
below, and respond to the applicable questions that follow each section.


CURRICULUM AUDIT FINDINGS

KEY FINDING 1: CURRICULUM
Overall: There was limited evidence found to indicate that the ELA and mathematics curricula in use are fully aligned to state standards.
Although New York City is a standards-based system, teachers do not have the tools they need to provide standards-based instruction to all
students at all levels, particularly ELLs. There is a lack of understanding across teachers, schools, and audited districts regarding what
students should understand and be able to do at each level in ELA and mathematics.

1A. English Language Arts

Background
A curriculum that is in alignment will present the content to be taught (as outlined by the state standards), with links to the following: an array
of resources from which teachers may choose in teaching this content; a pacing calendar and/or suggested timeframe for covering the
curriculum material; a description of expectations for both the teacher’s role and the student level of cognitive demand to be exhibited; and a
defined set of student outcomes—that is, what the student should know and be able to do as a result of having mastered this curriculum. The
New York State ELA Standards identify seven different areas of reading (decoding, word recognition, print awareness, fluency, background
knowledge and vocabulary, comprehension, and motivation to read) and five different areas of writing (spelling, handwriting, text production,
composition, motivation to write) that are addressed to different degrees across grade levels. Although listening and speaking are addressed
within the New York State ELA Standards, they are not further subdivided into topic areas. A written curriculum missing literacy competencies
or performance indicators at any grade level will impact the alignment of the curriculum to state standards. A written curriculum that does not
address the areas in reading identified by the state standards will also impact vertical and horizontal alignment within and between schools by
creating gaps in the Grades K–12 curriculum. Vertical alignment is defined as the literacy knowledge addressed at a grade level that builds
upon and extends learning from the previous grade level, whereas horizontal alignment refers to agreement between what is taught by
teachers addressing a common subject across a single grade level.

ELA Alignment Issues:

-   Gaps in the Written Curriculum. Data show that the written curriculum in use by many schools is not aligned with the state standards in
    terms of the range of topics covered and the depth of understanding required. All reviewed curricula had gaps relative to the New York
    State ELA standards. The fewest gaps were found at Grade 2, but the gaps increased as the grade levels increased. Interviewed staff in a
    number of the schools that were audited reported less consistent and effective curriculum and instruction at the secondary level. These
    data further indicated that curricula were not adequately articulated—less articulated in secondary than elementary schools.

-   Curriculum Maps. The curriculum alignment analyses noted that although a number of curriculum maps had been developed, the
    mapping has been done at a topical level only and does not drill down to an expected level of cognitive demand that will indicate to
    teachers what students should know and be able to do at each grade level. These curriculum maps addressed only content topics—not
    skills to be mastered, strategies to be utilized, or student outcomes to be attained.

-   Taught Curriculum. The Surveys of Enacted Curriculum (SEC)2 data also show that the taught curriculum is not aligned to the state
    standards. For example, in the reviewed high school-level ELA classes, auditors observed a great disparity between what is taught and
    the depth to which it should be taught. A similar lack of depth can be seen in elementary and middle grades as well (specifically Grades 2,
    4, 5, and 6) and Grade 8. As one might look at it, the taught ELA curriculum is quite broad but lacks depth in any one area. Although
    standards indicate that instruction should be focused on having students create written products and spoken presentations, SEC data
    show quite the opposite. There is very little emphasis on speaking and listening and only a moderately higher level of emphasis on writing.
    Critical reading also is supposed to have a much greater depth than is currently occurring in high school English classes.

-   ELA Materials. In a number of the audited schools, teachers interviewed indicate that they have sufficient amounts of curriculum materials
    available to them; however, the materials they have are not adequate to meet the needs of all learners, particularly English language
    learners, students with disabilities, and struggling readers. Further, the materials in use are reportedly often not relevant to the students’
    background knowledge, suggesting a need for more age appropriate and culturally relevant books and articles for student use.


2
  To examine whether instruction was aligned to the New York state standards and assessments, teachers in the district completed the Surveys of Enacted Curriculum
(SEC). Based on two decades of research funded by the National Science Foundation, the SEC are designed to facilitate the comparison of enacted (taught) curriculum to
standards (intended) and assessed curriculum (state tests), using teachers’ self-assessments. The data for each teacher consist of more than 500 responses. The
disciplinary topic by cognitive-level matrix is presented in graphic form, which creates a common language for comparison and a common metric to maintain comparison
objectivity.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
-   English Language Learners
    Multiple data sources indicate that there is a great deal of variation in the curriculum and instruction that ELL students receive, by grade
    level, by type of ELL program or general education program, and by district. For example, some of the best instruction observed by site
    visitors was found in ELL program classrooms at the elementary level, which contrasted sharply with the generally lower quality of ELL
    program instruction at the secondary level. The auditors found that planning for ELL education at the city and even district levels did not
    percolate down to the school and teacher levels. Consequently, planning for ELL education in the audited schools generally occurred at
    the level of individual teachers or ELL program staff, contributing to the variations in curriculum and instruction observed across ELL and
    general education programs. Further, there is a general lack of awareness of the New York State Learning Standards for ESL.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 1A:

1A.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.

FDA VIII will compare the findings with the findings from our school based Inquiry Team. Additionally, we will ensure that all ELA teachers
and teachers of ELL students receive quality professional development that supports the alignment of the standards, curriculum and
assessments.
1A.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable X      Not Applicable

1A.3: Based on your response to Question 1A.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?
While some of the findings are an adequate assessment of some challenges schools face, progress has been made to in prove students
performing at or above proficiency Levels 3 & 4

1A.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.
As a school community, we need to purchase a wider variety of leveled libraries to meet the needs of all learners. Additionally, we will
enhance our current AIS programs to meet the needs of our newly acquired ELL and special needs population.


1B. Mathematics

Background
New York State assessments measure conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and problem solving. In the New York State Learning
Standard for Mathematics, these are represented as process strands and content strands. These strands help to define what students should
know and be able to do as a result of their engagement in the study of mathematics. The critical nature of the process strands in the teaching
and learning of mathematics has been identified in the New York State Learning Standard for Mathematics, revised by NYS Board of Regents
on March 15, 2005: The process strands (Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proof, Communication, Connections, and Representation)
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
highlight ways of acquiring and using content knowledge. These process strands help to give meaning to mathematics and help students to
see mathematics as a discipline rather than a set of isolated skills. Student engagement in mathematical content is accomplished through
these process strands. Students will gain a better understanding of mathematics and have longer retention of mathematical knowledge as
they solve problems, reason mathematically, prove mathematical relationships, participate in mathematical discourse, make mathematical
connections, and model and represent mathematical ideas in a variety of ways. (University of the State of New York & New York State
Education Department, 2005, p. 2) When curriculum guides lack precise reference to the indicators for the process strands, then explicit
alignment of the curriculum to the process strands is left to the interpretation of the individual classroom teacher.

Specific Math Alignment Issues:

-   A review of key district documents for mathematics shows substantial evidence that the primary mathematics instructional materials for
    Grades K–8 (Everyday Mathematics [K–5] and Impact Mathematics [6–8]) are aligned with the New York state content strands except for
    some gaps that appear at the middle school level in the areas of measurement and geometry and number sense and operations. The
    instructional materials that were available at the high school level during the time of the audits (New York City Math A and B [8–12]) were
    aligned with the 1999 standards but not with the newer 2005 standards. Furthermore, these documents show that there is a very weak
    alignment to the New York state process strands for mathematics at all grade levels.

-   The SEC data for mathematics curriculum alignment (similar to Key Finding 1A for ELA), shows that there is a lack of depth in what is
    being taught in the mathematics classroom as compared to what is required by the state standards.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 1B:

1B.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


1B.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

1B.3: Based on your response to Question 1B.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?

1B.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



KEY FINDING 2: INSTRUCTION

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Overall: Multiple data sources indicate that direct instruction and individual seatwork are the predominant instructional strategies used by
teachers in audited districts; there is indication of limited use of best practices and research-based practices, including differentiated
instruction. A number of schools in audited districts further evidenced a lack of student engagement in classrooms, particularly at the
secondary level. These data also show that there is an intention to use research-based and best practices; yet according to the interviews,
SEC, and classroom observations, there is limited evidence of implementation and monitoring of such practices. Interview data indicate that in
audited districts, teachers indicate a need for more support focused on differentiation of instruction for all learners.

2A – ELA Instruction
Classroom observations in audited schools show that direct instruction was the dominant instructional orientation for ELA instruction in almost
62 percent of K–8 classrooms. (In direct instruction, the teacher may use lecture- or questioning-type format. It includes instances when the
teacher explains a concept, reads to students, or guides students in practicing a concept.) Direct instruction also was observed either
frequently or extensively in approximately 54 percent of the high school ELA classrooms visited. On a positive note, high academically
focused class time (an estimate of the time spent engaged in educationally relevant activities) was observed frequently or extensively in more
than 85 percent of K–8 classrooms visited, though this number fell slightly to just over 75 percent of classrooms at the high school level.
Student engagement in ELA classes also was observed to be high – observed frequently or extensively 71 percent of the time in Grades K–8,
but this percentage shrank to 49 percent at the high school level. Finally, independent seatwork (students working on self-paced worksheets
or individual assignments) was observed frequently or extensively in approximately 32 percent of the K–8 ELA classrooms visited and just
over 34 percent of classrooms in high school.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 2A:

2A.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


2A.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

2A.3: Based on your response to Question 2A.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


2A.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



2B – Mathematics Instruction

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Auditors noted that although high academically focused class time was observed either frequently or extensively in 80 percent of K–8
mathematics classes, it was observed at this level only in 45 percent of the high school mathematics classes. Further, a high level of student
engagement was observed either frequently or extensively in 52 percent of Grades K–8 and 35 percent of Grades 9–12 mathematics
classrooms. School Observation Protocol (SOM3) and SEC results also shed light on some of the instructional practices in the mathematics
classroom. The SOM noted that direct instruction in K-8 mathematics classes was frequently or extensively seen 75 percent of the time in
Grades K–8 (and 65 percent of the time in Grades 9–12). Student activities other than independent seatwork and hands-on learning in the
elementary grades were rarely if ever observed. Technology use in mathematics classes also was very low.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 2B:

2B.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


2B.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

         Applicable         Not Applicable

2B.3: Based on your response to Question 2B.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


2B.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



KEY FINDING 3: TEACHER EXPERIENCE AND STABILITY
In a number of audited schools, respondents stated that teacher turnover was high, with schools accommodating a relatively high percentage
of new and transfer teachers each year.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 3:

3.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.

3
  To examine instruction in the classrooms, the School Observation Measure (SOM) was used to capture classroom observation data for the district audit. The SOM was
developed by the Center for Research in Educational Policy at the University of Memphis. The SOM groups 24 research based classroom strategies into six categories: (1)
instructional orientation, (2) classroom organization, (3) instructional strategies, (4) student activities, (5) technology use, and (6) assessment. Two to seven key classroom
strategies are identified within each category for a total of 24 strategies that observers look for in the classroom. These 24 strategies were selected to address national
teaching standards.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
3.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

3.3: Based on your response to Question 3.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


3.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



KEY FINDING 4: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT—ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Interview data (from classroom teachers and principals) indicate that professional development opportunities regarding curriculum, instruction,
and monitoring progress for ELLs are being offered by the districts, however, they are not reaching a large audience. Many teachers
interviewed did not believe such professional development was available to them. A number of district administrators interviewed mentioned
the presence of QTEL (Quality Teaching for English Learners) training, but few classroom teachers seemed aware of this program. Although
city, district and some school-based policies (e.g., Language Allocation Policy) and plans for ELL instruction do exist, rarely were they
effectively communicated to teachers through professional development and other avenues.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 4:

4.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


4.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

4.3: Based on your response to Question 4.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


4.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
KEY FINDING 5: DATA USE AND MONITORING—ELL INSTRUCTION
Data from district and teacher interviews indicate that there is very little specific monitoring of ELLs’ academic progress or English language
development. Testing data, where they do exist (for example, the NYSESLAT yearly scores) either are not reported to all teachers involved in
instructing ELLs or are not provided in a timely manner useful for informing instruction. If and when testing data are provided, the data are not
disaggregated by proficiency level of ELL student, students’ time in the United States, or type of program in which the ELL is enrolled (i.e.,
ESL, TBE, Dual Language, or general education).

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 5:

5.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


5.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

5.3: Based on your response to Question 5.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


5.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



KEY FINDING 6: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT—SPECIAL EDUCATION
While the DOE and individual schools have made a substantial investment in professional development for special and general education
teachers, classroom observations, IEP reviews, and interviews indicate that many general education teachers, special education teachers,
and school administrators do not yet have sufficient understanding of or capacity to fully implement the range and types of instructional
approaches that will help to increase access to the general education curriculum and improve student performance. Further, many general
education teachers remain unfamiliar with the content of the IEPs of their students with disabilities, have a lack of familiarity with
accommodations and modifications that would help support the students with disabilities in their classrooms, and are not knowledgeable
regarding behavioral support plans for these students.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 6:
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
6.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.



6.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

6.3: Based on your response to Question 6.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


6.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



KEY FINDING 7: INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAMS (IEPS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES)
Although IEPs clearly specify testing accommodations and/or modifications for students with disabilities, they do not consistently specify
accommodations and/or modifications for the classroom environment (including instruction). Further, there appears to be lack of alignment
between the goals, objectives, and modified promotion criteria that are included in student IEPs and the content on which these students are
assessed on grade-level state tests. Finally, IEPs do not regularly include behavioral plans—including behavioral goals and objectives—even
for students with documented behavioral issues and concerns.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 7:

7.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


7.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

       Applicable       Not Applicable

7.3: Based on your response to Question 7.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
7.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                        CEP Appendix 8: Contracts for Excellence
  This electronic version of the CEP Appendix 8 allows you to submit details about your proposed 2008-09 Contracts
                                          spending within the six eligible program areas.

   1. This form must describe your preliminary plans to use the total amount of funds allocated to your school in the
                  Excellence allocation category in Galaxy. If you do not know this amount, please refer to Galaxy.

          2. The sum of the allocations you list in each program area must match the total amount allocated to you in G

  3. Please provide all of the information requested for each of the program strategies to which you've allocated fund
                                                            requirements.

                                           This survey must be completed by Tuesday July 15 at 6pm.
                                                                 Thank you!



Submit date: Jul 10, 2008               Email address: tthomas6@schools.nyc.gov
   Please provide the following information about your school. You must complete all of the fields on this page in or
   survey to be valid.
 School DBN                                                 19K452
 School Name                                                Frederick Douglass Academy VIII
 Total Amount of "Contracts for Excellence" Allocation in
                                                            $ 18,907
 Galaxy
 Principal Name                                             Mrs. Tamara Thomas
 Principal Email                                            tthomas6@schools.nyc.gov
 Principal Phone                                            7186424305



   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding to reduce class size?

  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n No
  i
  j


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding to increase student time on task?

  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  i
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n No
  j


   How much do you plan to allocate for each of the following program strategies?
 Before- and After-School Programs                          $ 14,707
 Summer School Programs                                     $ 4,200
 Dedicated Instructional Time
 Individualized Tutoring


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding to support new or expanded before- or after-school programs?
j
k
l
m
n Yes
i
l
m
n No
j
k


   Please describe the program.
Our Summer School Program is a one week long orientation for incoming students to become acclimated to the expectations in a Middle sc
amass baseline data and work on differentiating our instructional approaches for September. The before and after school programs include
Saturday Math and ELA Academy; after school group tutoring for low performing students in ELA and Math.



   Please indicate the student population(s) you intend to target via this initiative.

c
d
e
f
g English Language Learners
b
d
e
f
g Students with Disabilities
c
d
e
f
g Students in Poverty
b
c
c
d
e
f
g Students with Low Academic Achievement / at Risk of Not Graduating
b


   Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existin
   program/strategy?

l
m
n New implementation
j
k
j
k
l
m
n Program Expansion
i


   Please indicate how the program/strategy will be expanded for school year 2008-09 (e.g., increase in the number o
   program hours, increase in the number of students served, etc.)
We will be able to increase the number of students served by being able to provide financial reimbursement for more teachers. We will also
provide more resources to meet the needs of our diverse population of learners.



   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for new or expanded summer school programs?

k
l
m
n Yes
j
j
k
l
m
n No
i


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for new or expanded efforts to increase dedicated instructional ti
   instructional blocks for core academic subjects, additional instructional periods for areas of greatest student need
   Intervention (RTI) and/or intensive individual intervention, etc.)?

k
l
m
n Yes
j
k
l
m
n No
i
j


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for new or expanded efforts to offer individualized tutoring (provi
   qualified staff as a supplement to general curriculum instruction and targeted to students not meeting State stand

j
k
l
m
n Yes
i
k
l
m
n No
j


   Please describe the program.
Individualized tutoring for children in grades 6, 7, and 8 will take place after as well as before school. The tutoring will focus on the specific
for scholars as evidenced on their Acuity diagnostic and predictive assessments; class level assessments; and school wide monthly testin



   Please indicate the student population(s) you intend to target via this initiative.
  d
  e
  f
  g English Language Learners
  b
  c
  d
  e
  f
  g Students with Disabilities
  c
  d
  e
  f
  g Students in Poverty
  b
  c
  c
  d
  e
  f
  g Students with Low Academic Achievement / at Risk of Not Graduating
  b


     Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existin
     program/strategy?

  l
  m
  n New implementation
  j
  k
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n Program Expansion
  i


     Please indicate how the program/strategy will be expanded for school year 2008-09.
  As a result of having additional funding, we will now be able to have more than 1 teacher working with our children in this program after as
  school. This will in turn allow more children to have individualized tutoring to realize more growth on State and Citywide assessments. We w
  the program to cover up to 5 teacher tutors during our Saturday Academy Tutorial time.



     Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for teacher and principal quality initiatives?

  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n No
  i
  j


     Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for middle and high school restructuring efforts?

  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n No
  i
  j


     Does your school plan to allocate FY09 funding to implement a new full-day pre-kindergarten program, or to expan
     pre-kindergarten program at the school?

  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n No
  i
  j


     Does your school plan to allocate FY09 funding to expand and/or replicate a model instructional program for Engl
     Learners (ELLs)?

  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n No
  i
  j




CEP Appendix 8: Contracts for Excellence
19K452                                     What’s possible for me, is possible for you.”



November 23, 2008

                                                         Language Allocation Policy

Frederick Douglass Academy VIII middle school has a total population of 227 students with two students comprising our ELL population. We
are housed on the fourth floor of PS 346. Our LAP Team members consist of Yolanda Martin, Principal, Georgia Eddings, Assistant Principal,
Amy Haskell, Teacher, Fatimah Muhammad, Parent Coordinator, and Ms. Kimara Green, Guidance Counselor. Currently on staff, we do not
have a certified ESL teacher, therefore we are utilizing the services our host school’s(PS 346) ESL teacher to provide services to our ELL
population along with her beginner group . Additionally, our special needs teacher provides additional ELA literacy support. With the support
of our host school, we are able to provide a freestanding ESL program which uses a pull-out model. In the pull out model, our ELL students is
pulled out of her regular classes and provided individualized instruction by the special needs teacher to meet proficiency in the targeted
language. This method provides students with continuity of instruction and support for both the student and subject teacher. Our ELL
beginning students receive 450 minutes of ESL instruction per week. As previously indicated, our total ELL population consists of one student
and while that number represent less than 1% of our total population, we are committed to ensuring that they receive the support and services to
assist them in becoming proficient in the English language. Our ELL student comes to us with over 3 years of service.

FDA VIII’s LAP involves a clearly defined plan for English language development for our ELL students until they acquire academic
proficiency in the English language. Based upon data analysis from our LAB-R and/or NYSESLAT, we have 1 beginner ELL in grade six.
Our pull–out program will continue to provide our students with support, academic rigor and critical thinking skills that are necessary to have
our entire ELL population master the English language as well as the other content area subjects.
To further assist our ELL population in attaining English Proficiency, our pull-out program will continue to provide additional instructional
support utilizing ESL strategies and the new ELL standards. We will also continue to implement the Balanced Literacy prototype. In addition,
we will continue to utilize the data from the Acuity System, Grow Report, Items Skills Analysis Reports, ATS, and in-house assessments to
differentiate instruction for our ELL population. Furthermore, we will conduct professional development workshops for teachers of ELL
students to increase their knowledge of best practices for sustaining and accelerating the achievement of all ELL students. To further develop

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
and execute the LAP, the LAP team will meet to discuss and prepare next steps for the ELL population. Our ELL students are invited and
strongly encouraged to take part in our ELA and Mathematics extended day program and Saturday Academy. These after school programs will
provide students with additional academic support and small group instruction to assist students in reaching proficiency of the English language
as well as state standards. In addition, we will continue to utilize benchmark assessments to ascertain our ELL students’ development.
Furthermore, we have also concentrated on increasing curricular materials that would enable our ELL students to receive appropriate
instruction in all content areas. We will continue working in collaboration with our parent coordinator to conduct workshops for parents of
English Language Learners to further inform them of issues pertaining to the instruction of their child.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008