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2007 Business Plan

VIEWS: 23 PAGES: 74

									 Business Plan
         Fiscal Year 2007




City of Coral Springs, Florida
            July 19, 2006



            The Honorable City Commission
            City of Coral Springs
            9551 West Sample Road
            Coral Springs, FL 33065

            Dear City Commissioners:

            I am pleased to transmit the Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan for your review.

            In Fiscal Year 2006, we observed the 10th anniversary of our Business Planning model and we noted how
            this model has served our community so well over the past ten years; how it has helped us keep our tax rates
            low and our customer satisfaction ratings high; how it has enabled us to excel during the best of economic
            times and the worst of economic times. And then came Wilma!

            Weathering the Storm
            In the opening days of the new fiscal year, Hurricane Wilma plowed through Coral Springs, bringing levels of
            destruction previously unknown to our 43-year old community and testing our business model in a way we
            hope never to test it again.

            Our employees demonstrated their training and professionalism. They took action immediately after the
            hurricane winds subsided. We had contracts already in place for debris removal so that we were able to start
            the “push” mode immediately and the “clear” mode within 72 hours. We were also financially prepared by
            having emergency reserves sufficient to sustain a massive recovery operation.

            We cleared the majority of the 1 million cubic yards of storm debris by Thanksgiving, barely a month after
            the hurricane hit Coral Springs. Our community was able to enjoy a safe holiday season as a result.

            To the credit of our organization, we did not amend our Fiscal Year 2006 Business Plan to reflect the rede-
            ployment of vast resources from Business Plan initiatives to disaster recovery efforts. Instead, we worked
            harder and smarter to accomplish what we promised our residents in the Business Plan, complete our hur-
            ricane clean up efforts and institute new emergency initiatives to restore our beautiful community.

            The recovery continues. It continues in the need to replant and reforest our community. It continues in the
            need to address code violations and complaints in neighborhoods that never saw complaints before. It
            continues in the need to rebuild our reserves so that we can assure our community that if tested again, we’ll
            rise to the occasion again. And it continues in our commitment to turn adversity into opportunity—making
            Coral Springs an even better place to live, work and raise a family in the aftermath of Wilma.




City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                              1
    Moving Forward
    In the midst of all this challenge and change, recent elections have led to a new City Commission. After
    several days of Commission orientation, the new Commission rose to the challenge, and beyond. Successful
    Strategic Planning Workshops produced an abundance of new ideas and strategic directions that have made
    this Business Plan the most on-point and ambitious one to date.

    Listening to our customers and using the data that is part of our Strategic Planning Process led us to add a
    new strategic priority this year; Traffic, Mobility and Connectivity. The Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan contains
    a host of new initiatives that address this important new priority.

    We have the ways and the means to move forward, using the City Commission’s Strategic Plan as our guide-
    post. Our organization feels energized by our bold Business Plan for Fiscal Year 2007. Just a few of the many
    new initiatives to look forward to are:

    Affordable Housing
    Two initiatives address this important topic during Fiscal Year 2007. The City Commission recently approved
    the subordinated second mortgage program, funded by developers of new housing units. In another initia-
    tive, we’ll ask Charter School teachers to help design new faculty housing on City-owned property along
    Riverside Drive.

    Neighborhood Aesthetics
    The Strategic Plan made clear that this is a major issue for the City. Next year, we plan to add another Code
    Enforcement Officer position, this one concentrating on landscape and tree issues throughout the City.

    Bike Patrol
    The Bike Patrol will be back in Fiscal Year 2007, patroling places in our parks and commercial areas that are
    hard to reach. This has the added benefit of making our police officers more visible and accessible.

    Teen Programming
    Our teens have spoken: they want us to reorganize the Student Advisory Commission and the Teen Produc-
    tions Committee. This will bring a new focus on additional programming aimed at teens, as well as expand-
    ed publicizing of these events.

    Public Safety Improvement Bond
    We’ll issue the $13.5 million in voter-approved bonds this coming year, allowing a new Fire Station 80 and
    “hardening” of the glass exterior and various other improvements to the Public Safety Building. All this will
    be done while decreasing the Debt Service Millage rate.

    Building Division Customer Care
    The nearly doubling of workload in the Building Division due to emergency hurricane repairs has been a
    great challenge this year, but has also given rise to a new opportunity—to serve our customers better.

    Parkland Partnership for Northwest Area Fire and Rescue Service Improvements
    By partnering with our neighbor to the north, both cities will be able to afford fire and rescue service im-
    provements that neither can afford alone. By mid-year, we’ll add a new engine company and a new rescue
    unit and will greatly enhance our ability to reach emergencies in the northwest and north-central areas of
    our city.

    New City Hall
    Space planning will begin for a long-needed new City Hall. The City will sell or lease the land beneath both
    City Hall North and City Hall South to make way for Downtown development, and will build the new facility
    on Coral Springs Drive, next to the Public Safety complex.


2                                                                                           Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                 Green Building and Maintenance Standards
                 We’ll be planning our new facilities to meet “green” standards that conserve energy and protect the
                 environment wherever possible, as well as examining our current facilities for opportunities to incor-
                 porate “green” maintenance techniques.

                 Reforestation and Replanting
                 We’re prepared to lead the way to City-wide replanting by setting a good example on City property,
                 including City parks, facilities, medians and linear parks. In order to ensure that the new landscaping
                 thrives, we’re increasing our maintenance budget to care for the new plantings.

                 Decreasing Tax Rates
                 Coral Springs continues to maintain the lowest operating millage of Broward cities with populations
                 over 70,000. The total tax rate will decrease by $0.0376 mills due to a decrease in the debt service
                 millage, despite the issuance of $13.5 million of debt for public safety and emergency management
                 improvements. We’ve been able to accomplish this by adhering to financial strategies that continue to
                 produce long term savings.

                 While the increase in our property tax assessment was one of the lowest in the County, it amounted
                 to a healthy 15.3% increase in our property tax revenue. The amount over and above what it takes
                 to meet normal and extraordinary operating expense increases (e.g., insurance premiums, gas and
                 electric expenses, interest payments) will be spent wisely to restore our state of readiness to absorb
                 the financial impacts of another hurricane and to prevent future tax rate increases as the growth
                 in property values drops off in future years. Approximately $2 million will be used to replenish our
                 depleted emergency reserves during Fiscal Year 2007.

                 While no increase in fees and charges for City services and no increase in water utility rates are
                 proposed for Fiscal Year 2007, the Fire Assessment Fee for a single family home will increase by $8.00.
                 Necessitated by the addition of nine new firefighters, the increase has been lessened by using avail-
                 able operating revenues from the General Fund in the amount of $544,500.The transfer will effectively
                 reduce the required assessment increases across all land use classifications. For example, without this
                 subsidy from the General Fund, the Fire Assessment Fee increase for a single family home would have
                 been $15.66 rather than the proposed $8.00. The average taxpayer, given a 3% increase in their “Save
                 Our Homes” taxable value, will pay $26.33 more in property taxes and Fire Fund assessments this year
                 compared to last year.

                 This past year has proven the strength of our business model and the professionalism and commitment
                 of our organization to the health, safety and general welfare of our community. We achieved record
                 customer satisfaction ratings during a year when every facet of the organization was sorely tested.
                 We rose to the challenge and, with the support of the City Commission and our community, emerged
                 stronger and more optimistic than ever. Together, we’ll make Fiscal Year 2007 our best year yet!

                 Respectfully submitted,



                 Michael S. Levinson
                 City Manager




City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                             3
4   Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                                                                      The City of Coral Springs


Business Plan
Fiscal Year 2007

   We want to be the nation’s premier community in which to live, work and raise a family.

  City Commission                                    Senior Management Team
  Mayor Scott J. Brook                               Michael S. Levinson, City Manager
  Vice Mayor Roy Gold                                Ellen Liston, Deputy City Manager
  Commissioner Vincent M. Boccard                    Erdal Dönmez, Assistant City Manager
  Commissioner Claudette Bruck                       Sam Goren, City Attorney
  Commissioner Ted Mena
                                                     Jim Cerny, Director of Information Services
  Business Planning Team                             Rick Engle, Director of Parks & Recreation
  Ellen Liston, Deputy City Manager                  Duncan Foster, Chief of Police
  David Russek, Director of Financial Services       Susan Grant, Director of Human Resources
  Rita Radziwon, Senior Budget Analyst               Don Haupt, Fire Chief
  Chelsea Stahl, Performance Measurement Analyst     Susan Hess, Director of Community Development
  Forrest Lehman, Senior Financial Analyst           Kevin Knutson, Director of Communications & Marketing
  Bill Ackerman, City Controller                     Mike McGoun, Director of Aquatic Services
  Roxana Ross, Grant Writer                          Tom Messenheimer, Executive Director of Sportsplex
  Liliana Alvarez, Budget Assistant                  Rich Michaud, Director of Public Works
                                                     Peter Richardson, City Clerk
  Cover design by Christine Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer   David Russek, Director of Financial Services
                                                     Larry Staneart, Director of Development Services




                                                                                                    Adopted
                                                                                               July 19, 2006
City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                               5
     able
    T of Contents
    Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
          Creating the Business Plan .......................................................................................................................................................... 11
          Reading the Business Plan .......................................................................................................................................................... 11
    Market Environment ............................................................................................................................................................................ 12
          Hurricane Wilma ......................................................................................................................................................................... 12
          Economic Analysis ...................................................................................................................................................................... 12
          Land Development Trends .......................................................................................................................................................... 14
          Customer Expectations ............................................................................................................................................................... 16
          Emerging and Legislative Issues ................................................................................................................................................. 17
    Servi
    Service & Operations Strategy .............................................................................................................................................................. 19
          A Word About Existing Services and “Ongoing Initiatives”........................................................................................................... 19
          Our New Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 19
    Customer-Involved Government .......................................................................................................................................................... 20
          Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 20
          New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 21
                Customer Care Center ........................................................................................................................................................ 21
                Enhanced Permit Notification ............................................................................................................................................ 21
                Small Permit Pilot Project .................................................................................................................................................. 22
                Parkland Partnership—Northwest Response Time Improvements ................................................................................... 22
                Improved Business Communications ................................................................................................................................. 22
                Youth Mentoring Opportunities ......................................................................................................................................... 22
                Workforce Housing: Subordinated Second Mortgage Program .......................................................................................... 23
                New City Hall Building ....................................................................................................................................................... 23
                New Resident Outreach ..................................................................................................................................................... 23
                Community Branding ........................................................................................................................................................ 23
                Increased Fuel Storage and Availability ............................................................................................................................. 24
                Rehabilitation of Lift Stations 20A and 20B ....................................................................................................................... 24
                Restoration of Covered Bridge ........................................................................................................................................... 24
    Financial Health & Economic Development .......................................................................................................................................... 25
          Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 25
          New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 27
                Gas Saving Vehicles ........................................................................................................................................................... 27
                Water and Wastewater Cost Study ..................................................................................................................................... 27
                Fire Impact Fees................................................................................................................................................................. 27
    Excellence in Education ........................................................................................................................................................................ 28
          Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 28
          New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 29
                Linking At-Risk Youth to Career Based Education ............................................................................................................... 29
                Charter School “Advisor” Program ...................................................................................................................................... 29
                Workforce Housing: Affordable Housing for Teachers......................................................................................................... 29
    Neighborhood & Environmental Vitality ............................................................................................................................................. 30
          Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 30
          New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 31
                Neighborhood Aesthetics Improvement Program.............................................................................................................. 31
                 Administrative Citation Program ...................................................................................................................................... 31
                Reestablish Bike Patrol Unit ............................................................................................................................................... 32
                Zone 4 Action Plan II .......................................................................................................................................................... 32


6                                                                                                                                            Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
              City Water Conservation Practices ...................................................................................................................................... 33
              Green Design and Maintenance Policies ............................................................................................................................ 33
              Evening Parks Maintenance Improvements ....................................................................................................................... 33
              Entryway Signs Phase II ..................................................................................................................................................... 33
              Meadows & Dells Drainage Improvement.......................................................................................................................... 34
              Valve Exercising & Dead-End Water Main Flushing ............................................................................................................ 34
              Redevelopment Code Study—Phase II ............................................................................................................................. 35
              Post Wilma Tree Canopy Recovery ...................................................................................................................................... 35
Youth Development & Family Values .................................................................................................................................................... 36
       Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 36
       New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 37
              Teen Programming ............................................................................................................................................................ 37
              Web Site Resource for Parents ........................................................................................................................................... 37
              Parent Support Partnerships ............................................................................................................................................. 37
              Drowning Prevention Program .......................................................................................................................................... 37
Strength in Diversity ............................................................................................................................................................................ 38
       Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 38
       New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 39
              International Soccer Fest ................................................................................................................................................... 39
              World Fest ......................................................................................................................................................................... 39
              MLK Golf Tournament ........................................................................................................................................................ 39
Traffic, Mobility & Connectivity ............................................................................................................................................................ 40
       Ongoing Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................... 40
       New Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................ 41
              Street Indexing Signage .................................................................................................................................................... 41
              Downtown Pathways Phase I............................................................................................................................................. 42
              28th Street Pedestrian Crossing ......................................................................................................................................... 42
              Linear Parks ....................................................................................................................................................................... 42
              CRA Roadway Design ......................................................................................................................................................... 42
              Planning for One Cent Sales Tax ......................................................................................................................................... 43
              University Drive Extension ................................................................................................................................................. 43
Financial Strategy ................................................................................................................................................................................ 44
       Hurricane Wilma ......................................................................................................................................................................... 45
       Management of Debt and Equity ............................................................................................................................................... 46
       Fiscal Year 2007 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) .................................................................................................................. 47
       New City Hall .............................................................................................................................................................................. 47
       Pension Status ............................................................................................................................................................................ 48
       Five-Year Forecast ....................................................................................................................................................................... 48
       Water & Sewer Fund ................................................................................................................................................................... 49
       Fire Fund ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 49
       Results ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 49
Measuring Results................................................................................................................................................................................ 50
       Quarterly Performance Review ................................................................................................................................................... 50
       KIO Analysis and Current Initiative Update .................................................................................................................................. 50
       Composite Index ......................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Fiscal Years 2005 & 2006 KIO Summary ................................................................................................................................................ 54




  City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                                                             7
    Appendices .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
         Fiscal Year 2006 Initiatives ......................................................................................................................................................... 56
         Staffing Changes......................................................................................................................................................................... 58
         General Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................................................. 59
         Fire Fund Summary..................................................................................................................................................................... 62
         Water & Sewer Fund Summary ................................................................................................................................................... 63
         Health Fund Summary ................................................................................................................................................................ 64
         General Insurance Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................................. 65
         Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................. 66
         Conference Center Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................................. 66
         Coral Springs Center for the Arts Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................ 67
         Public Art Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................................................... 67
         Equipment Services Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 68
         Debt Service Fund Summary....................................................................................................................................................... 69
         Major Capital Projects by Department ........................................................................................................................................ 70
         Major Capital Projects by Location .............................................................................................................................................. 71




8                                                                                                                                            Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
 ables
T & Illustrations
Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
       City of Coral Springs’ Strategic Planning Process ......................................................................................................................... 11
Market Environment ............................................................................................................................................................................ 12
       Non-Residential Assessed Value as a Percent of Total Assessed Value .......................................................................................... 14
       Annual Increase in Non-Residential Assessed Value .................................................................................................................... 14
       Building Permit Trend Analysis ................................................................................................................................................... 15
Service & Operations Strategy .............................................................................................................................................................. 19
Customer-Involved Government Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) .......................................................................................................... 20
Financial Health & Economic Development Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) ......................................................................................... 25
Excellence in Education Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs)........................................................................................................................ 28
Neighborhood & Environmental Vitality Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) .............................................................................................. 30
Youth Development & Family Values Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) ................................................................................................... 36
Strength in Diversity Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) ............................................................................................................................ 38
Traffic, Mobility & Connectivity Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) ............................................................................................................ 40
       Transportation Improvement Plan—Short Range Improvements.............................................................................................. 41
       Long Range Transit/Transportation Plans.................................................................................................................................... 43
Financial Strategy ................................................................................................................................................................................ 44
       Annual Savings from the Financial Strategy................................................................................................................................ 44
       Comparing Operating Millage Rates: Cities Over 50,000 Population in Fiscal Year 2006 ............................................................. 44
       City’s Share of Hurricane Expenses by Funding Source ............................................................................................................... 45
       Growth Rate on Property Tax Revenue ........................................................................................................................................ 45
       Ad Valorem Taxes as a Percent of Total General Fund Revenues ................................................................................................... 45
       2007 Debt Service Millage Declines Despite $13.5 Million Public Safety Improvement Bonds .................................................... 46
       Sources and Uses of Funds for the Financial Strategy .................................................................................................................. 47
       Projected Sources and Uses of Funds for the New City Hall ......................................................................................................... 47
       Five-Year Forecast Deficits in General Fund (Assuming No Action is Taken) ................................................................................. 48
       Effect of Tax Rates on the Average Homeowner (Assessed Value of $204,714 with Homestead Exemption) ............................... 49
Measuring Results................................................................................................................................................................................ 50
       Composite Index ......................................................................................................................................................................... 51
       Residential Property Values ........................................................................................................................................................ 52
       Volunteers in Government .......................................................................................................................................................... 52
       Productivity ................................................................................................................................................................................ 52
       School Overcrowding .................................................................................................................................................................. 52
       Non-Residential Property Values ................................................................................................................................................ 52
       Customer Satisfaction ................................................................................................................................................................. 53
       Crime Rate .................................................................................................................................................................................. 53
       Accidents at Major Intersections ................................................................................................................................................. 53
       Athletic League Participants ....................................................................................................................................................... 53
       Employee Satisfaction ................................................................................................................................................................ 53
Fiscal Years 2005 & 2006 KIO Summary ................................................................................................................................................ 54
Appendices .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
       Current Initiatives ....................................................................................................................................................................... 56
       Net New Positions Per Fiscal Year ................................................................................................................................................ 58
       Staffing Changes......................................................................................................................................................................... 58
       Revenue and Expenditure Summary—All Funds ....................................................................................................................... 59
       Major Capital Projects by Department ........................................................................................................................................ 70
       Major Capital Projects by Location .............................................................................................................................................. 71



  City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                                                            9
10   Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Introduction
                                                         annually. It is presented in its complete form
Creating the Business Plan                               in the Strategic Planning Workbook each year
This Business Plan represents the first year in           and then updated and summarized here in the
                                                         Business Plan. We look at local demographic and      Fiscal Years
the three year strategic planning process. Our
                                                         economic market forces to identify emerging          2007•2008•2009
strategic planning results in a mission and a
set of strategic priorities that provide vision          issues and items of concern to our residents.        Strategic
and direction for the City. While it has evolved         Direct customer feedback is solicited through        Priorities
over the years, true to the spirit of continuous         surveys, focus groups, and town meetings, which
improvement, it is still the linchpin in linking         becomes the basis for the Commission’s strategic
our day-to-day activities with the mission that we       planning.
                                                                                                              Customer-Involved
aspire to achieve. We often say that it gives “feet”     Our Service & Operations Strategy is                 Government
to our priorities, directional statements, and Key       organized by strategic priority to document
Intended Outcomes, as well as establishing a             the steps we are taking to achieve the intended      Financial Health
structure for resource allocation.                       outcomes for each of the priority areas. Key         & Economic
With the strategic priorities set—and appropriate        Intended Outcomes, set by the Commission, are        Development
outcomes identified—the operations of the                 the measurable results we intend to achieve.
City are reviewed and redeployed to bring the                                                                 Excellence in
                                                         The Financial Strategy provides a summary
strategic vision to life. Specific initiatives are        of the tactics we are employing to maintain our      Education
developed in response to the priorities identified        strong financial condition and to anticipate future
in the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan is an                                                               Neighborhood &
                                                         challenges and opportunities.
outgrowth of the strategic priorities, capturing                                                              Environmental
the City’s vision in a specific, directed, and            To monitor the success of the Business Plan, we      Vitality
quantifiable form.                                        use a number of measurements, as detailed in the
                                                         Measuring Results section. The most important        Youth Development
Reading the Business Plan                                measure is the Composite Index, a carefully
                                                         balanced indicator of the City’s overall success
                                                                                                              & Family Values

The Market Environment section is the result             relative to past performance.                        Strength in Diversity
of an environmental scan performed prior to
                                                                                                              Traffic, Mobility &
the strategic planning process and updated
                                                                                                              Connectivity



                          City of Coral Springs’ Strategic Planning Process

                                         Citizen Input                         Data Analysis



                                                            Strategic Plan


                                                            Business Plan


                                                               Budgets


                                                          Output to Citizens


 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                   11
     Market Environment
     The City has been a leader in developing strong       and “rolling stock.” It will also be extremely
     Financial Management policies and adhering to         important to scrutinize new expenditures or
     them over time. This is representative of Wall        services that have long-term consequences. (See
     Street’s three major rating agencies recognizing      Financial Strategy section for details.)
     the City with their highest rating of “AAA.”
                                                           Economic Analysis
     Hurricane Wilma                                       The expansion of the U.S. economy is well
     One of the City’s major policies is to maintain a     underway. We are in the middle phase of an
     reserve of 60 days of budgeted expenditures in        economic expansion – neither boom nor bust.
     the General Fund to mitigate the consequences         Growth should cool down to a pace of about 3%-
     of a catastrophic event. This reserve was $14         3.5% during Fiscal Year 2007, from a current,
     million in Fiscal Year 2005.                          sizzling rate of 5.6%. Hopefully, slower growth
                                                           will relieve any remaining worries about future
     At the beginning of Fiscal Year 2006, this proved
                                                           inflation and interest rate hikes by the Federal
     to be most beneficial when Hurricane Wilma
                                                           Reserve (Fed). Seventeen increases of 25 basis
     blew into the City with Category 2 force winds
                                                           points (0.25%) each have occurred since June
     causing damage costing approximately $36.5
                                                           2004, when the federal funds rate hit a 46-year
     million. The City’s share of the expenses is
                                                           low of 1.00%. The federal funds targeted rate
     currently estimated to be over $11.25 million.
                                                           currently stands at 5.25%. The federal funds rate
     The remaining expense will be reimbursed by
                                                           is the interest rate banks charge each other for
     State and Federal agencies. Many cities were
                                                           overnight loans and is the first stage in the setting
     less fortunate and had to borrow funds for the
                                                           of interest rates across the board, both short term
     clean-up, thereby adding additional debt service
                                                           and long term. The Fed increases rates to slow
     expense to their operations. The City of Coral
                                                           down the expansion of the economy, avoiding
     Springs has avoided that cost.
                                                           the untenable situation where too much money is
     Our challenge is now two-fold: to replace our         chasing too few goods, resulting in undesirable
     emergency reserves and to rebuild and replant         price increases that can harm economic
     our beautiful community. The first, to rebuild         expansion.
     our emergency reserves, will take between three
                                                           Consumers continue to drive the economic
     and five years. As we continue through what
                                                           expansion in a positive direction as evidenced by
     forecasters predict will be a more hurricane-
                                                           resilient consumer confidence, rising personal
     active 15 to 18 years, this plan takes a high
                                                           income, and housing demand, although showing
     priority as we look to safeguard our future.
                                                           signs of cooling down. Consumers continue
     The second element of our challenge is to regain      to use the increased equity in their homes to
     the tree canopy and landscaping that was so           make more purchases and to pay off consumer
     much a part of this “Tree City USA.” This will        debt. Significant appreciation in existing homes
     also be a long-term undertaking. We anticipate        and the resulting increased equity has added
     that this replanting of trees will cost the city as   to personal wealth and further encouraged
     much as $2 million, and is not reimbursed by          spending.
     FEMA. (This is one of the reasons that the total
                                                           All eyes are focused on the rising price of oil,
     City cost of $11.25 million is so high.) You will
                                                           currently approximately $76 per barrel. Thus far,
     notice several initiatives in this Business Plan
                                                           improvements in the labor market and personal
     which address this need.
                                                           income/wealth have curtailed the dampening
     In general, our focus will be to continue a           effects of pricier oil. It is unclear to what extent
     strong emphasis on cost containment, generate         continued increases in oil prices would affect
     new revenue sources and increase productivity         consumer spending. The business sector will
     wherever possible. In addition, the City will         be watching consumer behavior very closely.
     continue its aggressive policy to restructure its     Potential demand drives investment and payroll
     debt when the market permits and continue to          decisions. Economists will be watching core
     apply “pay as you go” financing for technology         inflation data to determine if high energy costs


12                                                                          Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
 continue to work their way into other items,         the 4.25% increase in the Federal Funds rates.
 further reducing purchasing power, consumer          Economists warn, however, of emerging factors
 spending and gross domestic product.                 overseas, such as stronger growth projections and
                                                      tighter monetary policy that will sop up excess
 Economists will also be anxiously watching the       global liquidity, reducing foreign demand for
 yield curve to see if increases in the federal funds U.S. securities. The result is higher yields and
 rate will continue to make their way up the curve, therefore higher mortgage interest rates. If so,
 increasing long term rates, particularly the 10-     mortgage rates will climb even higher, continuing
 year treasury bond yields.                           to cool down housing activity and prices. Here in
                                                      Coral Springs, housing turnover has slowed down
 To date, increasing the federal funds rate has
                                                      from 10% to 6% during recent months. Current
 had a relatively small impact on raising long
                                                      “Save Our Homes” laws have also contributed to
 term bond yields. This lack of response is highly
                                                      this slow down by creating property tax “sticker
 unusual. The treasury yield curve has flattened
                                                      shock” for homesteaded property owners looking
 dramatically over the past year (meaning the
                                                      to move. The rate of increase in prices has also
 difference between short and long-term interest
                                                      cooled down. Downward price adjustments are
 rates has decreased) and is beginning to shift
                                                      occurring in some segments, particularly the
U.S. Treasury Interest Rate Yield
 upward at all maturities.
                                                      high-end housing stock and condominiums.
Curve Interest Rate Yield Curves
 U.S. Treasury                                                                          The Fed must be careful
                                                                                         to not overreact. Some
 5.5%                                                                                    experts argue that a 2%
       Current
                                                                                         increase in mortgage
                          5.28%                                                 5.17%
 5.0%                                  5.17%
                                                   5.10%      5.13%                      rates may send the
               5.00%
                                                                                4.76%    South Florida housing
 4.5%                                                          4.47%
                                                                                         market into a tailspin,
                                                                                         led by the collapse of the
 4.0%
                       One Year Ago                 4.14%                                condo sub-market. Many
                                                                                         experts caution that the
                                         3.74%
                                                                                         condo sub-market is most
 3.5%
                                                                                         vulnerable, given the
                            3.12%                                                        significant presence of
 3.0%
                                                                                         speculative buyers. They
                2.77%
                                                                                         predict that substantial
 2.5%                                                                                    price corrections, 20%
         3 Month      6 Month       2 Year     5 Year     10 Year       30 Year
                                                                                         or more, may be in order.
                                    4/11/2005   7/10/2006                                On a brighter note, the
                                                                     7/31/2006 12:17 PM  single family sub-market
                                                                                        52
 What is important here is that the 10-year                appears to remain on solid footing in South
 treasury bond yield drives mortgage rates. Thirty Florida. Controlled mortgage rate increases may
 year fixed rate mortgages are hovering around              merely slow down the rate of increase in these
 6.5%, which is the highest level since 2002. Until housing prices. As price increases slow down
 now, the “globalization of money” has kept the            and personal incomes continue to pick up, more
 lid on longer term treasury bond yields, despite          homes should become affordable to the average

  City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                      13
                                                    Annual Change in Non-Residential
                                                    Tax Base
     family home buyer,         Annual Increase in Non-Residential Assessed Value
     easing the affordable
     housing crisis in South     $180
     Florida. For Fiscal               Millions
                                                                              $156
                                                                                                                                                                   $166
                                 $160
     Year 2007, the City                                                                                                                                    $143
     of Coral Springs will       $140
                                                                     $129
                                                                                       $121
     receive a 15.3% increase $120
     in taxable property         $100               $94
                                                            $100
                                              $90                                                                                                    $92
     values, reflecting robust
                                  $80
     commercial/industrial             $61                                                      $61*
     development and a            $60

     significant number            $40
     of condominium               $20
     conversions. Future
                                   $0
     increases are predicted           FY      FY    FY      FY       FY        FY      FY       FY                                                   FY     FY     FY
     to be in the 6% - 7%             1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004                                                                        2005   2006   2007
     range as price increases                           *Personal Property decreased 0.7% in FY 2004
     slow down and housing                                                                                                                                     7/12/2006 5:00 PM   23
     turnover retreats to a 5% - 7% annual rate in this
     built-out community.                                                                     Land Development Trends
     Business construction spending should remain                                             Residential Properties
     strong as occupancy rates rise along with factory
                                                                                              As of 2006, few undeveloped single family
     utilization rates. This trend should cushion the
                                                                                              residential lots remain in the City of Coral
     blow from the decline in housing. For now, we
                                                                                              Springs. In addition, only a limited number of
     will keep our eyes on oil prices and interest rates.
                                                                                              multi-family sites remain once the 84 Heron
     If these two indicators continue to rise unabated,
                                                                                              Bay townhouses and 145 Kensington Square
     they may prove to be “spoilers” for continued
                                                                                              townhouses will be completed by Fiscal Year
     economic expansion. Time will tell.
                                                                                              2008. During Fiscal Year 2006, less than five
     The City’s occupancy rates remain very strong                                            single-family homes and approximately 90 multi-
     and reflect the robust economy. The residential                                           family units are expected to be complete.
     occupancy rate of 98% is a result, in part, of
                                                                                              With the annexation of Ramblewood East in
     the decreased rental housing stock due to condo
                                                                                              2005, the City has reached near maximum
     conversions. The retail, office and industrial
                                                                                              population under current zoning regulations.
     submarkets also show strong demand. All three
                                                                                              Our updated population as of April 1, 2006 was
     categories had occupancy rates of 95% or greater.
                                                                                              129,615 with 23,979 single-family homes and
                                                                                              21,514 multifamily units. All significant future
                                                                                              residential development will be the result of the
                                                                                              redevelopment of existing sites, increased density
            Non Residential Assessed Value                                                    per acre and/or mixed-use.
                                                                                                                                                 Under an emerging
     Non-Residential Assessed Value as a Percent of Total Assessed Value                                                                         trend of increased
                                                                                                                                                 density in targeted
              Billions                                                                            7.25           8.22           9.48
      $7                                    22.9%           23.8%
                                                                           23.6%
                                                                                   6.68                                                   25%    locations, the City
                                22.1%                                                     22.6%          22.1%
      $6
                   21.2%
                                                     5.59
                                                                    6.13                                                21.2%
                                                                                                                                       20.1%     of Coral Springs
                                        5.12                                                                                              20%
      $5       4.45
                            4.73                                                                                                                 has secured a vested
      $4                                                                                                                                  15%    right for 1,670 new
      $3
                                                                                                                                                 residential units
                                                                                                                                          10%
                                                                                            1.6            1.74           1.91                   in the Downtown
      $2                                         1.33         1.45           1.51
            0.94         1.04      1.17
                                                                                                                                          5%     district through
      $1
                                                                                                                                                 the Development
      $0                                                                                                                                  0%
                                                                                                                                                 of Regional
           FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007
                                                                                                                                                 Impact (DRI) and
                           Non Residential              Total              Non Residential as % of Total                                         Comprehensive
                                          Source: Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office                                                     Plan Amendment
                                                                                                                                                 processes. In
                                                                                                                                                 March 2006, the
                                                                                                                         7/14/2006 12:26 PM     34

14                                                                                                                               Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
City recommended 168 units of high density              Mixed-Use Properties
residential developments at the Coral Springs
County Club on Sample Road. Both Downtown               In 2006, the first mixed-use property in the City’s
and the Country Club residential projects will          history will be built with the 84 townhouses
be developed in conjunction with a partnership          and retail/commercial at Heron Bay. Mixed-use
between Amera Properties (Downtown master               is defined as residential combined with other
developer) and WCI Communities. Through the             uses such as office and/or retail. By code, B-2
“flex” unit program, Broward County Planning             Community Business zones may build up to
has established that Coral Springs can add more         33% of redevelopment as residential. The last
than 5,000 residential units.                           remaining under-developed property with B-2
                                                        zoning, Hawks Crossing at Wiles Road and 441,
Housing demand has remained strong, due                 will become a Super Target without any of the
in part to atypically low 30-year mortgage              allowed residential use.
rates and a fear of escalating home prices in
the future. Condo conversions have had a                Downtown Coral Springs, located at the four
large impact throughout Broward County and              corners of the Sample Road and University
certainly in Coral Springs. Over the past two           Drive intersection, is the City’s largest mixed-
years, conversions removed over 20% of the              use project. The Downtown Development of
large-scale apartment complexes from the rental         Regional Impact (DRI) encompasses 4.3 million
market and commercial tax rolls. The decrease           square feet of mixed-use development program
in taxable value was under $100,000,000.                including residential, commercial office, retail,
Conversely, over 3,000 units added to the tax           entertainment and other related uses. Amera
rolls in the condominium category, adding over          Properties has recently partnered with WCI
$400,000,000 in new tax assessment to the tax           Communities for the development of residential

  Building Permit Trend Analysis
rolls over a two-year period. While the inventory
of rental units is down, the swelling condo
                                                        projects in Downtown which may reach as
                                                        many as 1,670 units. Phase 1 (One Charter
                                                                                    Place) is currently
Building Permit Trend Analysis                                                      under construction
                                                                                    and is anticipated
                                                                                    to be completed in
20,000                                                                              November 2006.
                                                           Projected

15,000
                                                                                    Single-Use
                                                                                    Commercial and
10,000
                                                                                    Industrial Properties

 5,000                                                                                As reported in the
                                                                                      Fiscal Year 2006
                                                                                      Business Plan, Coral
      0
                                                                                      Springs continues to
          FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008                     head toward complete
                      Regular Condo Conversions Hurricane                             build-out on single-
                                                                                      use commercial and
                                                                                      industrial properties.
conversions have opened up a new avenue for                                             total of 1,145,000
                                                                   7/14/2006 12:23 PM A 30

affordable owner-occupied housing in the City of square feet of commercial space was permitted
Coral Springs.                                       in 2005 with an additional 710,000 square feet
                                                     projected for 2006. (The totals above should
In Fiscal Year 2005, there were 1,077 additions/     be reduced by the 574,000 square feet of two
alterations for residential properties that directly garages at Coral Springs Auto Mall and One
resulted in 3,956 building permits. Most of these    Charter Place.)
were related to condo conversions. This year
has seen a decrease in condo conversions, but a      Industrial land in the Corporate Park is also
surge in permits necessary for hurricane repairs.    nearly fully built with 38.17 acres of vacant land.
The impact on the Structural discipline in the       The City estimates that 207,579 square feet will
Building Division has been to nearly double their receive certificates of occupancy in Fiscal Year
workload within a few months.                        2007 and 302,650 square feet in Fiscal Year




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                15
     2008. Many of these
     projects are a combination
     of office and small truck
     warehouse space. The
     largest remaining property
     may be redeveloped
     between Fiscal Years
     2006-2008 with large
     truck and bulk storage
     warehouses totaling more
     than 600,000 square feet.
     Redevelopment of Coral
     Springs single-use
     properties is also active.
     The proposed Super
     Target at Wiles Road
     and 441 will demolish
     the Hawks Crossing
     shopping center to create
     a new 192,491 square
     foot retail development.
     One Charter Place adds
     99,000 square feet of
     office and retail space on
     the former Coral Springs
     Mall parking lot. Future
     single-use redevelopment
     opportunities also exist in
     the southern portions of
     the Corporate Park.

     Other Land
     Development Trends                                  LEED certification (Leadership in Energy and
                                                         Environmental Design).
     Smart Growth. Generally throughout the nation,
     the traditional auto-oriented land development      Hidden Density in Neighborhoods. As already
     pattern is being replaced with the umbrella term    experienced in California in the last ten years,
     “smart growth.” Smart growth in traditional         a hidden density will likely emerge as extended
     suburban cities is generally defined as a series     families live together in a single-family house
     of small districts of high to medium density        or apartment. This leads to impacts on schools,
     of mixed commercial and residential uses that       water use and on-street as well as off-street
     encourage walking to work or shopping within        parking.
     the district. These higher density districts are
     linked by efficient mass transit. Downtown           Big Box Grocery. According to the USDA,
     Coral Springs with its mixed-use redevelopment,     superstores (i.e., Wal-Mart, Target) and wholesale
     neighborhood transit center and downtown            clubs (i.e., Costco, BJs) have reduced the market
     pathways represents the second generation of        share of conventional supermarkets from 90%
     Coral Springs development.                          to 69% in the last twenty years. As Wal-Mart
                                                         built two superstores in Coral Springs and
     Sustainable “Green” Buildings. Many                 Target has one superstore coming, Winn Dixie
     communities such as Coconut Creek are               abandoned two locations. Publix is expanding
     adding “green” environmental goals to the           in Coral Springs, but the national trend is
     redevelopment process. Green includes               gradually reducing the 50-year suburban pattern
     improvements such as higher energy efficiency        of grocery stores anchoring small neighborhood
     in buildings, recycling of demolished building      shopping centers. Combined with the decline of
     parts and literal green roofs with grass or other   the shopping center drug store, the neighborhood
     drought resistant plants. The City’s DRI for        shopping center will face significant financial
     Downtown Coral Springs includes goals for           stress and eventual redevelopment.


16                                                                       Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                                                    You will note initiatives throughout this Business
Customer Expectations                               Plan that address all four of these important
The most important element of the strategic         citizen concerns.
planning process which precedes the Business
Plan is identifying and understanding customer      Emerging and Legislative Issues
requirements. We use several sources of data,
including:                                          The City’s legislative concerns, especially in the
                                                    long term, fall into two basic categories. First, is
Comprehensive Customer Surveys—Beginning            the issue of “home rule,” where the authority of
in 1994, we have used surveys to measure            the City’s elected officials is being usurped by
satisfaction and solicit opinions on a variety of   other, higher levels of government. The ability
services and policy issues.                         of the City to collectively bargain, govern and
                                                    regulate such issues as zoning and land usage
“Visioning Summits”—An intensive
                                                    is under constant threat. Second, unfunded
workshop for community stakeholders aimed
                                                    mandates are a significant financial threat to the
at determining the critical long-term issues
                                                    City. These mandates may appear in the form
facing the City. We’ve also held youth and senior
                                                    of requiring additional services or additional
summits to gain insight into generation-specific
                                                    benefits to employees, without a corresponding
issues.
                                                    funding source. Also, negative impacts occur
Neighborhood Meetings—“Slice of the                 when legislation and regulatory requirements are
Springs” meetings held throughout the City in an    changed that reduce the City’s revenue sources
open forum six times a year.                        with no provision for replacement funding.
Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and            Specific issues of concern are as follows:
Threats (“SWOT”) Analysis—Affinity analysis
                                                    • A study was funded by the legislature to
of issues identified from representatives of major
                                                      explore various property modifications that
stakeholder groups.
                                                      may significantly reduce the City’s property
Focus Groups—Facilitated meetings designed            tax revenue. Proposals to raise the homestead
to solicit input from stakeholders and experts on     exemption from $25,000 to $50,000, to contain
narrow topics selected for their strategic value.     local tax rates at the “rolled-back rate” and to
                                                      allow whole or partial portability of individual’s
Findings                                              current “save our homes” tax benefits abound
The top four issues identified from all sources        in Tallahassee. When fully implemented, the
were:                                                 increase in homestead exemption to $50,000
                                                      is likely to cost the City $2.3 million. The
• Traffic and speeding: Residents are                  rollback rate and whole or partial portability
  increasingly concerned with traffic; both            proposals also may result in critically lower
  traffic congestion on major thoroughfares and        tax revenues to the City, depending on how the
  speeding concerns on neighborhood streets.          legislation is worded.
• Code Enforcement: This continues to be the        • The undermining of local control of cable
  major theme at our “Slice of the Springs” town      television franchise agreements, with proposals
  meetings. Residents are concerned that we keep      to transfer revenues to state control. In this
  the high standards for property and landscaping     event, the state would assume the responsibility
  maintenance that have been such an essential        for distributing revenues to municipalities.
  part of our community identity.
                                                    • The siting of public utilities, such as cellular
• Aesthetics: Residents continue to want an           telephone towers, transportation facilities or
  aesthetically beautiful community. This means       advertising billboards. All of these have the
  in neighborhoods, in commercial areas, our          ability, when placed inappropriately, to reduce
  parks, and on our medians.                          the aesthetic quality of our neighborhoods and
                                                      detract from property values.
• Roofs (repair after hurricane): This is a new
  issue related to Hurricane Wilma. Residents       Issues which revolve around the unfunded
  were concerned about the difficulty in finding      mandate area are as follows:
  roofers and roof materials after the storm.
                                                    • The revenue stream from Sales Tax on Internet
  Residents are also concerned that neighbors
                                                      transactions is a revenue issue that will
  secure their damaged roofs before this year’s
                                                      only grow in size in the coming years. The
  storm season.


 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                            17
      streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement,
      which has been approved by more than forty
      states, provides a centralized administration
      of sales tax collection and distribution to local
      jurisdictions. Florida has yet to approve this
      agreement;
     • Over $14 billion in tax cuts have been signed
       into law in the last seven years at the state level.
       While real estate values and hurricane recovery
       have boosted tax receipts, any slowdown in these
       areas may have a negative impact on revenues
       collected by the state and shared with the City.
     These issues reflect the challenges from other
     levels of government and regulatory agencies
     that require constant attention of City staff and
     clear direction to staff through the Strategic and
     Business Plans.




18                                                            Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Service & Operations Strategy
This Business Plan covers the first year within a
three-year Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2007,                                    A Word About Existing Services
2008, and 2009. The usual two-year Strategic
Plan has been extended to span the three-year
                                                                                    and “Ongoing Initiatives”
term of the current City Commission. The seven                                      In some sections, we have highlighted initiatives
priorities identified by the City Commission for                                     that were in previous Business Plans that are
this strategic planning cycle set the agenda for                                    still being implemented in Fiscal Year 2007.
this Business Plan, namely:                                                         Generally, if an initiative is fully operational
                                                                                    and integrated into our service package, it won’t
             Customer-Involved Government
                                                                                    be mentioned. The emphasis is on multi-year
             Financial Health & Economic                                            implementation and the evolution of existing
             Development                                                            initiatives.

             Excellence in Education                                                Unless specifically identified as a reduction in
                                                                                    service, all current City services will continue to
             Neighborhood & Environmental Vitality                                  be provided in the same high quality and timely
             Youth Development & Family Values                                      manner our customers have come to expect.

             Strength in Diversity                                                  For more detail about the services we provide,
                                                                                    and the performance measures we use to manage
             Traffic, Mobility & Connectivity                                        those services, please reference the departmental
                                                                                    sections of the Annual Budget.
While the Strategic Plan sets out the vision, the
Business Plan outlines tangible plans for making
the vision a reality. In each of the priority areas,
                                                                                    Our New Initiatives
Department Directors have developed initiatives                                     Initiatives are chosen that will in some way assist
that will change the way the City operates                                          us in achieving our Key Intended Outcomes.
in order to address our seven priorities and                                        We include those that we feel are significant
implement the vision expressed in the Strategic                                     contributors to supporting our Strategic Priorities
Plan.                                                                               or that put additional demands on our resources.
                                                                                                              In this way, we identify
                                                                                                              the most significant
                                                                                                              actions we plan to take
                                                                                                              next year.
                                                                                                                    Wherever applicable,
                                                                                                                    operating expenditures
                                                                                                                    and capital expenditures
                                                                                                                    have been identified for
                                                                                                                    the first year only, while
                                                                                                                    capital expenditures
                                                                                                                    reflect the total cost of
                                                                                                                    the project, regardless of
                                                                                                                    the length of the project.
                                                                                                                    Capital carrying costs
                                                                                                                    are not included.




City Attorney Sam Goren, Commissioner Vincent M. Boccard, Vice Mayor Roy Gold, Mayor Scott J. Brook, Commissioner
Claudette Bruck, Commissioner Ted Mena, and City Manager Michael S. Levinson




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                  19
     Customer-Involved Government
     Ongoing Initiatives                                   Get Out the Vote (2005, 2006)
                                                           Lead Department: Human Resources
                                                           This ongoing initiative continues last year’s
     Opening of Public Safety Training Center
                                                           efforts to increase voter awareness and turnout.
     (2004, 2005, 2006)
                                                           Emphasis this year will be on youth education
     Lead Department: Fire & Police Departments            and information on the purpose and uses of bond
                                                           referendums.
     The opening of the New Public Safety Training
     Center is slated for Fall 2006. In addition to        Bus Shelters (2005, 2006)
     planning for physical plant operations in this
                                                           Lead Department: Public Works
     year’s budget, resources for training programs
     have been identified and budgeted. The City            During Fiscal Year 2006, 16 “open air” bus
     plans 11 classes to train new firefighters and five      shelters were installed along University Drive,
     classes for EMS training. In addition, the new        Sample Road, and Royal Palm Boulevard. There
     training center will become the hub for in-service    are 30 shelters within the City (including two
     training for all our Police and Fire professionals.   that are owned and maintained by Wal-Mart).
                                                           The new design has been well received in the
                                                           community. For Fiscal Year 2007, the City will
                                                           purchase and install an additional ten shelters
                                                           at high volume stops along the heavily traveled
                                                           roadways within the City.




                                                               FY 2007          FY 2008         FY 2009
      Key Intended Outcomes                                     Goal             Goal            Goal
      Number of citizen volunteer hours                        31,000           31,000          31,000
      Percent voter turnout per election (excluding             40%                              50%
                                                                                 N/A
      primaries and special elections)                       (Governor)                       (President)
      Overall rating of the City in terms of
                                                                 93%             93%             94%
      communicating with residents (Resident Survey)
      Overall rating of the City in terms of
                                                                 78%             79%             79%
      communicating with businesses (Business Survey)
      Customer service rating by residents (Resident
                                                                 93%             93%             93%
      Survey)
      Customer service rating by businesses (Business
                                                                90%              91%             92%
      Survey)
      Number of mentors trained                                   50              50              50
      Overall quality rating for City services and
                                                                 93%             93%             94%
      programs (Resident Survey)
      Overall quality rating for City services by
                                                                 91%             92%             93%
      business owners (Business Survey)
      Employee satisfaction rating (Human Resources
                                                                 93%             93%             93%
      Survey)




20                                                                        Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
            The Coral Springs Building Department will add features to be more customer friendly, productive and efficient.




New Initiatives                                                                             Enhanced Permit Notification
                                                                             Lead Department: Building
              Customer Care Center                                           Operating Expenses: $5,000
Lead Department: Building                                                    Capital Outlay: $25,000
Operating Expenses: $105,900                                                 Currently, property owners and contractors are
                                                                             notified of the status of their permit application
The goal of the Customer Care Center is to                                   via telephone. It is anticipated that the Building
provide increased customer satisfaction and                                  Division will need to make over 50,000 such
a consistent service-oriented experience.                                    notifications next year. Improvements in the
Residents, property owners, commercial                                       notification process will focus on allowing
businesses and citizens with questions about                                 recipients to specify their preferred means of
permitting, plan review and inspections will have                            notification (i.e., e-mail, telephone, direct mail),
phone access to a Customer Care Representative.                              and on drastically reducing the manual effort
In addition to answering general permitting                                  of Building Division staff in making these
information, the Customer Care Center will relay                             notifications.
any specific inquiries to the proper office. Based
on call volumes, if callers are placed on hold, a
continuous “loop” recording of current building
information will be heard until the call is picked-
up. The Customer Care Center will serve as a
single point-of-entry to the Building Division
to improve communications with customers,
schedule and troubleshoot inspection requests,
provide status of submitted plans, and give web
site and engineering information.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                    21
                Small Permit Pilot Project                      Improved Business Communications
     Lead Department: Building                            Lead Department: Communications & Marketing
     Operating Expenses: $50,000                          Operating Expenses: Existing
     This initiative implements a pilot program to        In the Fiscal Year 2006 Business Satisfaction
     expedite selected single process permits. It is      Survey, business owners in Coral Springs
     planned to begin in late Fiscal Year 2007, once      asked that they receive communications from
     the current heavy workload from hurricane            the City via direct mail or e-mail. We will be
     recovery projects normalizes. At that time, the      producing an annual newsletter to all businesses
     City will begin this program to expedite the         for inclusion in the occupational license mailing
     permit process, utilizing both existing staff and    and we will start a business eNews mailing list.
     part-time or contract staff.                         In addition, we will continue to devote a page to
                                                          Coral Springs businesses in the Coral Springs
                                                          magazine.




      Parkland Partnership—Northwest Response                     Youth Mentoring Opportunities
                  Time Improvements                       Lead Department: Police
     Lead Department: Fire                                Operating Expenses: Existing
     Operating Expenses: $350,000                         In the last three years, more than two hundred
     Capital Outlay: $211,760                             mentors have been trained to work with youth in
                                                          Coral Springs schools. Nine more training classes
     The Cities of Coral Springs and Parkland have        are scheduled for 2006/2007. This year’s focus
     a unique opportunity to improve emergency            will be on recruiting mentors for after-school and
     response times in service areas in northwest         evening hours, to involve more adults who are
     Coral Springs and west Parkland by joining           not available during regular business hours.
     together to add another pumper company and a
     rescue unit. Both units will be based in Parkland,
     but will service both cities. This partnership
     will add the resources that both cities need,
     yet neither could afford alone. Coral Springs
     has applied for a grant from the Department of
     Homeland Security to help defray the start-up
     costs of this project.




22                                                                        Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
   Workforce Housing: Subordinated Second                        New Resident Outreach
             Mortgage Program                        Lead Department: Communications & Marketing
Lead Department: Community Development               Operating Expenses: $4,000
Operating Expenses: Existing                         In order to familiarize new residents with the
Through the new affordable housing ordinance,        City’s services and facilities, as well as other
Coral Springs will expand its efforts to assist      government programs in their area, we will
very low, low and moderate income families in        produce a new resident’s package that will
Coral Springs to secure a home in the city. The      be delivered by their local patrol officer. The
funding for any City housing program will come       package will include a welcome letter from the
from the contributions of residential developers.    City Commission, the A to Z Guide, Codes &
As the contributions will be made at the time of     Courtesies, the Tree Ownership Guide, the most
Certificate of Occupancy, funding may start in        recent edition of Coral Springs magazine and
mid 2008.                                            safety information from the Police Department.
                                                     Seasonal publications, such as the Summer Fun
The subordinated second mortgage program             Guide, will be included as appropriate. Packages
provides gap financing up to 25% of a home’s          will also be available at City offices.
purchase price with a priority to teachers and
medical professionals working in Coral Springs.      By making early contact, we will give our new
                                                     residents an easy resource on the opportunities
In Fiscal Year 2007, the City staff will research,   and the responsibilities of homeownership in
develop and submit to the City Commission a          Coral Springs.
set of policies and procedures to implement the
subordinated second mortgage program. The City
is expected to choose a lender to administer the                  Community Branding
second mortgage program by the fourth quarter
                                                     Lead Department: Communications & Marketing
of Fiscal Year 2007.
                                                     Operating Expenses: Existing

             New City Hall Building                  A steering committee, made up of community
                                                     stakeholders and City staff, will research,
Lead Department: Development Services                establish, and disseminate a unique and
Capital Outlay: $22,400,000                          strategic identity for the City of Coral Springs.
                                                     Creating this identity will help communicate
City Hall has been in the same space for 40 years    the experience of our community to potential
and while the City has grown, space for City staff   residents and businesses. The emphasis will
has not. This initiative will start the planning     be on positioning the City as a national leader
process for a new City Hall to be built near the     in performance based and results oriented
new Public Safety Building. The planning of the      management, as well as highlighting specific
New City Hall, which is in preliminary stages,       qualities that make living in Coral Springs
will be reviewed for sustainable “green” design      meaningful to our citizenry. Using focus groups
and construction. This method of building and        and a marketing partnership, the committee
construction increases the efficient use of energy,   will develop a platform and guidelines to make
water and materials. Green design also reduces       communications about the City, regardless of
the building’s impact on human health and            the source, consistent in message and flavor.
the environment through better siting, design,       The committee will also seek ways to promote
construction operation and maintenance.              awareness of the City nationwide.
The new City Hall will be designed to
accommodate City departments from both
City Hall and City Hall South, allowing more
convenient access to multiple departments for
our customers. It will also allow more space
for Commission Chambers, replacing the long
inadequate current facility.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                          23
          Increased Fuel Storage and Availability                     Restoration of Covered Bridge
     Lead Department: Development Services/ Public           Lead Department: Human Resources/Public
     Works                                                   Works
     Capital Outlay: $592,000                                Capital Outlay: $60,000
     Due to Florida Department of Environmental              The bridge was constructed in 1964 to
     Protection (DEP) requirements, the single-walled        attract visitors to new real estate and housing
     diesel tanks at the Police Department will have         developments in the City. In 2004, the bridge
     to be replaced before 2009. The City is using           received the distinction of being recognized as a
     this opportunity to replace the tanks with larger       Florida Heritage Site by the Florida Department
     capacity units for greater fuel availability during     of State.
     a hurricane. The design work for this project will
     begin in Fiscal Year 2007.                              The Covered Bridge has become weathered as a
                                                             result of age, been damaged due to dump trucks
     Other projects intended to increase fuel                colliding with its underside, and requires roof
     availability include the addition of three diesel       repairs as a result of Hurricane Wilma. The
     fueling stations to be created by adding pump           “Bull of the Woods” logo and the “Peach Sweet
     facilities at the Water Plant, Westside and adding      Snuff” mural on the wooden surface side of the
     a new tank at Mullins Park. These modifications          bridge are peeling, splitting and are in dire need
     will allow for more adequate diesel fuel supply         of repainting. Much of the wood damage is due
     to the city’s fleet of diesel trucks, equipment          to pressure treated wood not being used at initial
     and generators. The benefits will be numerous.           construction.
     Increased fuel availability at multiple locations
     will allow diesel vehicles to be in service longer,     An architectural study was conducted Fiscal
     and improves vehicle and equipment availability         Year 2004 and updated in Fiscal Year 2006
     during times of crisis (such as a hurricane). The       and a report made to the Historical Advisory
     additional fueling facilities will be necessary         Committee. The Committee, Robert Walters
     to supply the fleet during the time when the             Architects, and staff will collaborate to formulate
     diesel tank at the Public Safety building is being      an action plan to restore the bridge. Funding by
     replaced.                                               the City, grants and sponsorships will be used to
                                                             give the bridge a makeover.

       Rehabilitation of Lift Stations 20A and 20B
     Lead Department: Public Works
     Capital Outlay: $1,577,000
     The City’s Utility has two lift stations located on
     the grounds of the Country Club of Coral Springs
     Golf Course. These facilities, known as 20A and
     20B have long been in need of rehabilitation.
     The developer for the Country Club has begun
     design on improvements to the Golf Course along
     with the construction of 168 new residential
     units. These changes further necessitate the lift
     station rehabilitation project, which must be
     implemented in coordination with the Country
     Club Golf Course development plans.
     One lift station will require a capacity increase to
     meet the demands of the new resident population.
     During Fiscal Year 2006, staff has been meeting
     with the developers to coordinate efforts. The
     project is expected to advertise for bids in the fall
     of 2006.




24                                                                           Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Financial Health & Economic Development
                                                                                 Mullins Park Access Improvement (2005)
Ongoing Initiatives
                                                                                 Lead Department: Development Services
Water & Sewer System Master Plan Update
(2006)                                                                           This ongoing initiative is improving the access to
                                                                                 Mullins Park and redesigning/expanding parking
Lead Department: Public Works                                                    areas there. The need for these improvements
The completion of the Fiscal Year 2006 Business                                  was identified in the Master Plan for Recreation
Plan initiative produced a report that addressed                                 and Public Safety Facilities at Mullins Park,
the current status of the City’s Water and                                       completed in 2006. This project will eventually
Wastewater Utility. The Master Plan addresses                                    provide a better accesss/egress to Mullins Park
issues facing the utility during the next ten                                    from Coral Springs Drive and a better connection
years and beyond. It examines the regulations                                    between the Coral Springs Gymnasium and
presently affecting the Utility; assesses the                                    the rest of the park. This project will run
future demands on the infrastructure given the                                   concurrently with the level of development of the
known redevelopment; provides an overview                                        new City Hall and the Public Safety Facility and
of the Water Plant and the treatment process;                                    will extend into 2008 and 2009.
recommends needed capital improvements to                                        Downtown Coral Springs (2005, 2006)
the system; and proposes a financial plan. The
report provides a ranking for the improvements                                   Lead Department: City Manager’s Office
listing them by regulatory requirements (Critical
                                                                                 Fiscal Year 2006 has witnessed much activity
Requirements, Programmatic, and all other
                                                                                 in Downtown Coral Springs. The Phase I
Utility System Needs.)
                                                                                 development, also known as One Charter Place,
The Fiscal Year 2007 program contains nearly                                     broke ground in August 2005 and is anticipated
$6 million in improvements ranging from the                                      to be completed in the first quarter of Fiscal
rehabilitation of the two lift stations in the                                   Year 2007. One Charter Place is approximately
Country Club Development to the site selection                                   99,000 square feet of mixed-use development
for six new raw water wells. The plan projects the                               with uses including commercial office, financial,
future demands on the water supply will require                                  retail, and a multi-purpose parking garage with
an additional two million gallons of water per                                   475 spaces. The $26 million project is developed
day (MGD). The source of this water presents a                                   on 3.8 acres of City-owned land that was sold
challenge for the City of Coral Springs Utility.                                 by the City to the master developer through the
This year’s planning will center on the most                                     Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA)
efficient method of acquiring this future raw                                     for $2,287,000. The Phase I development also
water source.                                                                    includes construction of four exclusive turn lanes

                                                                                                      FY 2007                    FY 2008                     FY 2009
        Key Intended Outcomes
                                                                                                       Goal                       Goal                        Goal
        Bond Ratings                                                                                  “AAA”                      “AAA”                       “AAA”
        Residents’ value rating (Resident Survey)                                                       73%                         72%                        72%
        Add a minimum of $2 M annually to the City’s
        financial reserves until a goal of 17% of budgeted                                               $2 M                       $2 M                        $2 M
        expenditures is reached
        Commercial square footage development initiated                                                                                                     400,000
                                                                                                           *                          *
        within the Downtown CRA                                                                                                                              sq ft *
        Percent plan reviews completed within 15 days                                                   95%                         95%                        95%
        Non-residential value as percent of total taxable
                                                                                                        20%                         20%                        20%
        value
        Percentage increase in operating millage rate                                                    0%                          0%                         0%
       *The three year goal of 400,000 square feet is subject to further refinement based upon revisions to be made in the CRA plan in connection with the recently enacted state
       eminent domain laws.

 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                                    25
                                   and reengineering of traffic signalization for
                                   the traffic lights at the Sample and University
                                   intersection at an estimated cost of $600,000.
                                   Fiscal Year 2006 also marked the first payment
                                   by Broward County of $2,211,078 to the CRA
                                   for the Downtown Coral Springs Phase I project
                                   pursuant to the tri-party Interlocal Cooperation
                                   Agreement. The County payment to the CRA
                                   is earmarked to fund the public infrastructure
                                   projects for the future developments in
                                   Downtown. The CRA is expected to announce
                                   the blue print for the subsequent phase
                                   developments during Fiscal Year 2007.




     A sculpture from our Public Art Program is on display at the intersection of Sample Road and University Drive, where One Charter Place is being constructed.




26                                                                                                                                                    Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
New Initiatives                                                       Fire Impact Fees
                                                      Lead Department: Fire

               Gas Saving Vehicles                    Operating Expenses: Existing

Lead Department: Public Works                         Impact fees are charges imposed against new
                                                      development to fund capital costs of facilities
Capital Outlay: $44,000                               and equipment made necessary by that growth.
Rising fuel prices make a significant financial         The purpose of the charge is to impose upon
impact on City government operations, and             newcomers, rather than existing residents, the
staff has been investigating possible fuel saving     increased costs associated with providing new
measures.                                             development with fire protection services.

A cost comparison between the City’s ½ ton            As redevelopment occurs in the City, we may
pick-up trucks and hybrid cars shows the pick-        see more high rise structures which require
up trucks average 13 miles per gallon while the       specialized fire equipment. The City will hire
hybrid cars average 39 miles per gallon. A cost       a consultant to prepare a study to determine
analysis based on average annual usage shows          appropriate impact fees.
that replacing one City pickup with a hybrid car
can save $835 annually.
Although pick-up trucks are convenient for
some purposes, not all departments have need
for vehicles with pick-up truck capabilities. For
Fiscal Year 2007, two City pick-up trucks will
be replaced by hybrid cars, funded through the
City’s Fleet Replacement Program. If the fuel
cost savings are realized as anticipated, our Fleet
Replacement program will continue to utilize
hybrid cars where possible.




       Water and Wastewater Cost Study
Lead Department: Public Works
Capital Outlay: $60,000
The City is developing a request for proposal
to secure a cost study of the existing rates
associated with the provision of water and
wastewater utility services and recommend
adjustments as necessary. The study ensures
that the appropriate water/wastewater rate
structure will recover the full cost of operations,
to comply with covenant requirements of the
Bond resolutions for outstanding debt. The rates
must be sufficient to provide reserves to meet
anticipated capital improvement needs, reflect
the true cost of providing service, and promote
the water conservation goals of the City and the
South Florida Water Management District. The
City has not had a rate increase in 14 years, but
one will likely be needed in Fiscal Year 2008 to
fund needed improvements.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                         27
     Excellence in Education
                                                          Charter School Art and Music Wing (2006)
     Ongoing Initiatives
                                                          Lead Department: Development Services
                                                          The original feasibility plan for the Charter
     Teen Safe Driving Program (2006)                     School always referred to the proceeds from the
     Lead Department: Police                              sale or lease of land at the corner of the Charter
                                                          School site as the funding source for an Art and
     Because of our large population of teenagers,        Music Wing. Now that One Charter Place is
     we experience a number of underage vehicle           underway, $1.5 million from the sale of land has
     crashes and fatalities due to speeding, not using    been transferred to the Charter School, and work
     seat belts, and impaired driving. The Police         on the new wing has commenced. The Art and
     Department offers educational and parent             Music Wing will consist of a band room, vocal
     notification programs to try to prevent risky         room and 300+ seat auditorium. We anticipate
     behavior that teens sometimes demonstrate            completion by August 2008. Fund-raising and
     behind the wheel.                                    surplus funds from the Charter School will
                                                          contribute the remaining funds needed for this
                                                          project.




                                                              FY 2007          FY 2008           FY 2009
      Key Intended Outcomes
                                                               Goal             Goal              Goal
      Percent overcrowding (normalized)                        108%             108%             108%
      Number of students attending courses offered by
                                                               1,000            1,000            1,000
      partnering institutes of higher education
      Achieve gains in math/reading mean scale score at
                                                                0.6%             0.8%             0.6%
      the Charter School




28                                                                        Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
New Initiatives
     Linking At-Risk Youth to Career Based
                   Education
Lead Department: Human Resources
Operating Expenses: Existing
City staff will develop an inventory of local
education programs designed to prepare high
school students for specific careers (culinary
arts, automotive repair, building trades, etc.)
or which use alternative instructional design
appropriate for “hands-on” learners. Staff will
also work with the guidance departments of the
local high schools to assist in communicating
appropriate options available to parents and
students. The City will also seek the assistance
of the Education Committee of the Chamber of
Commerce in this effort.


       Charter School “Advisor” Program
Lead Department: City Manager’s Office
Operating Expenses: Existing
This program pairs Charter School students with
faculty advisors who interact with the students
in a one-on-one format to improve the student’s
school performance. The advisor and student
meet several times a year to discuss progress
and goals. This program is expanding a pilot
project started last year at the Charter School. It    The Coral Springs Charter School Band performs.
allows the Charter School to make the most of its
personal, small-school emphasis.                        Workforce Housing: Affordable Housing for
                                                                       Teachers
                                                      Lead Department: Community Development
                                                      Operating Expenses: $20,000
                                                      The City owns six multi-family zoned lots on
                                                      Riverside Drive, north of Sample Road, totaling
                                                      one acre. This land could accommodate between
                                                      16 and 20 rental units. In Fiscal Year 2007, the
                                                      City will study and plan for development of
                                                      the land as rental housing for teachers. (The
                                                      affordable housing ordinance currently prioritizes
                                                      assistance for teachers at Coral Springs Charter
                                                      School and then other public school teachers.)
                                                      By the summer of 2007, the City will have
                                                      completed a schematic design with focus groups
                                                      of Charter School teachers. Future steps include
                                                      contracting with a non-profit partner to build and
                                                      to manage the rental housing.



 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                            29
     Neighborhood & Environmental Vitality
                                                             name versus activity or use. The intent is to
     Ongoing Initiatives                                     enhance the identification opportunities for
                                                             businesses while maintaining high quality
                                                             signage, which continues to make Coral Springs
     Security in the Parks II (2006)                         unique.
     Lead Department: Police
     This program to equip city parks with parking lot       Public Art Program (2004, 2005. 2006)
     security cameras linked to the Police Department
     communications center has helped to reduce              Lead Department: Community Development
     vehicle burglaries, identity theft, and other crime     Since the Public Art Trust Fund was established
     in the parks. Crimes are captured on digital video      in Fiscal Year 2005, the Public Art Program
     and investigators review the video to identify the      has made great strides in enhancing the City’s
     subjects and vehicles used.                             heritage, diversity and character through public
     Security cameras have been installed in Betti           artworks integrated in the City’s architecture,
     Stradling Park and in Fiscal Year 2007, Cypress         infrastructure and landscape. In 2007, the
     Park will get them also.                                Community Development Department will
                                                             install artworks which were commissioned in
                                                             2006 for the City Gym and for the intersection
                                                             of University Drive and Riverside Drive to mark
     Sign Code Changes II (2006)
                                                             the entrance to the City. In Fiscal Year 2007,
     Lead Department: Community Development                  artworks will be purchased for Sample Road, the
                                                             Downtown Pathways, North Community Park
     The goal of Phase II of this initiative is to           and Cypress Park. Lighting and landscaping will
     continue to provide for a review of the current         be improved for existing art. These installations
     sign ordinance, and to allow for new technology         will complete 50% of the Public Art Master Plan.
     and innovation in the creation of signage.
                                                             Target locations for future installations will
     Continued review with staff and the consultant          include Downtown Coral Springs, City entrance
     review have led to joint meetings with Chamber          ways, community parks, and public facilities.
     of Commerce and other interested commercial             In addition, an artist will design a new civic
     and industrial owners so that amendments to the         image for the City as a sculpture on the Sawgrass
     sign ordinance are anticipated to be finalized in        Expressway. With funding received from a
     the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2007. The changes       Broward County Cultural Council Grant in 2006,
     to the sign ordinance include such items as real        the Downtown Pathways project will start to
     estate signs, permanent wall signs, number of           materialize with paths, trees and artwork.
     signs allowed, multi-story signs in commercial
     locations and signage identifying incorporated


                                                                 FY 2007          FY 2008         FY 2009
      Key Intended Outcomes
                                                                  Goal             Goal            Goal
      Number of cooperative projects and the number
                                                               12 projects      12 projects      12 projects
      of different partners (public, private and intracity
                                                               8 partners       8 partners       8 partners
      depts.) focused on enhancing the environment
      City Crime Rate (crimes per 100,000 residents)              2,980            2,970           2,950
      Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary
      compliance prior to administrative/judicial                  70%             70%              70%
      process
      Number of formal and informal neighborhood
                                                                    20              20               20
      partnerships each year
      Number of trees planted within the City                     3,000            3,000           2,000

30                                                                           Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
New Initiatives                                                                  Administrative Citation Program
                                                                          Lead Department: Code Enforcement

      Neighborhood Aesthetics Improvement                                 Operating Expenses: $24,500
                   Program                                                As we continue to rebuild and recover from
                                                                          Hurricane Wilma, the need for expanding
Lead Department: Code Enforcement
                                                                          code enforcement coverage and productivity is
Operating Expenses: $60,000                                               more important today than ever before in the
                                                                          City’s history and is a priority with the City
Capital Outlay: $26,850                                                   Commission.
The need for an increase in code enforcement                              The Administrative Citation Program will
presence, especially since Hurricane Wilma                                allow the City to utilize the Special Magistrate
ravaged many areas of the City, is a priority for                         Hearing process instead of relying on the
this year.                                                                Broward County Court system for citations.
This initiative will increase the presence of Code                        This will result in a more effective, efficient and
Enforcement Officers in City neighborhoods in                              expedited way of handling code enforcement
two ways. First, an additional Code Enforcement                           cases. The Administrative Citation program
Officer with landscape expertise will be added to                          will increase the City’s code enforcement
staff. Since Hurricane Wilma, code enforcement                            coverage by allowing our code officers to
has struggled with the magnitude of code                                  generate up to 2,400 additional cases per year.
violations relating to dead, dying or missing trees
and other landscaping. The new position will
start in the southern portion of the City, where we
have received the majority of citizen complaints.
Second, some of the non-code related duties of
the weekend code officers will be taken over
by a Public Works maintenance worker. As a
result, code officers will be able to perform more
inspections and give more concentrated coverage
to City neighborhoods.




A mottle duck family enjoys the canals in a Coral Springs neighborhood.


  City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                               31
       The Police Department Bike Patrol Unit will provide better coverage of City parks and commercial areas.




                  Reestablish Bike Patrol Unit                                                                   Zone 4 Action Plan II
     Lead Department: Police                                                           Lead Department: Police

     Operating Expenses: $25,800                                                       Operating Expenses: $200,000

     The Bike Patrol Unit will be reestablished                                        Zone 4 is one of the five Police Department
     within the Police Department to provide better                                    zones, and stretches from east to west along
     Police coverage of City parks, commercial areas                                   the entire breadth of the City between Sample
     and the Zone 4 corridor.                                                          Road and Wiles Road. Some of the oldest
                                                                                       neighborhoods and highest density can be
     The Bike Patrol Unit was disbanded after the                                      found along this corridor, and the annexation of
     terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, when                                     Ramblewood East increased the service demand
     school security became a priority. Although                                       in this zone.
     additional funding was added to place School
     Resource Officers (SROs) in every school on a                                      Two patrol officers were added to this zone last
     permanent basis, it was not possible to put the                                   year, and to ensure adequate patrol coverage
     Bike Patrol back in to service until vacancies                                    two more patrol officers are planned for Fiscal
     caused by a large number of retirements were                                      Year 2007. This will help address the significant
     filled. Now that most of our vacancies have                                        increases in calls for service in Zone 4.
     been filled, this unit will return.
                                                                                       Two substations are maintained in this area
     In the past, the Bike Patrol proved very                                          to allow officers to spend more time within
     effective. They will be visible to the public and                                 the community. An additional field office in
     can gain access to hard-to-reach sections of the                                  Ramblewood East will serve as home base for the
     parks and neighborhoods.                                                          newly reestablished Bike Patrol Unit.



32                                                                                                                Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
       City Water Conservation Practices                Evening Parks Maintenance Improvements
Lead Department: Public Works/                        Lead Department: Parks & Recreation
Communications & Marketing
                                                      Operating Expenses: $54,000
Operating Expenses: Existing
                                                      The objective of this initiative is to improve
South Florida’s continued growth is projected         the overall maintenance and also the quality of
to place a strain on the existing water supply.       our evening coverage throughout our Parks and
The prevention of the wasteful use of water has       Environmentally Sensitive Land (ESL) sites by
the potential to extend the life of the Biscayne      adding an evening supervisor.
Aquifer, save money for the consumer, and
help protect the environment against excessive        We have thousands of visitors to our parks each
wastewater discharges to the ocean.                   night, making it a busy time frame for parks
                                                      staff. Currently, we rely on maintenance workers
Staff will embark on a campaign to provide            to provide customer service and maintenance in
“water conservation tips” through its publications    the evening hours. The supervisor will provide
and outreach mechanisms. One of the measures          the maintenance staff support on dealing with
that will be monitored closely during this            customer concerns so that they can concentrate
initiative is the gallons of water consumed per       on providing a higher level of maintenance.
capita. The current per capita usage is about         The supervisor will also be able to give new
123 gallons per day. The City must also set a         assignments in the evenings if an emergency
good example in using this precious resource          arises or a safety issue is identified. This will
wisely. Internally, the City will seek and            assure that safety issues receive prompt attention
implement recommendations from the Broward            and quick resolution.
County Mobile Irrigation Lab, a program that
examines the efficiency of irrigation systems in
Community Parks.                                                  Entryway Signs Phase II
                                                      Lead Department: Parks & Recreation
    Green Design and Maintenance Policies             Capital Outlay: $150,000
Lead Department: Development Services                 To enhance the visibility and beauty of Coral
Operating Expenses: $5,000                            Springs from the Sawgrass Expressway, we
                                                      will initiate a project to install irrigation and
Green design is the practice of increasing the        landscaping on all City entrances coming off the
efficiency with which buildings and their sites        Sawgrass Expressway, at Atlantic Boulevard,
use and harvest energy, water, and materials.         Sample Road, Coral Ridge Drive, and University
Green design techniques also aim to reduce            Drive. In addition, there are twelve smaller entry
a building’s impact on human health and the           signs around the City.
environment, through better siting, design,
construction, operation and maintenance.              The City will enter into agreements with the
                                                      State for the right to upgrade and maintain the
Satisfying LEED (Leadership in Energy and             property adjacent to the Sawgrass Expressway
Environmental Design) standards was part of           ramps. Irrigation installation will involve
the City’s approved DRI for the Downtown              “jack and bore” work to go across the roadway
redevelopment, so policies for implementation         for electric and water, and we will also need
are required.                                         to install wells and pumps for all four sites,
                                                      accounting for more than half of the expenses.
City staff will research green design utilizing in-   Landscaping will include trees, shrubs, and
house lectures, tours of LEED certified buildings,     sod. This will meet all D.O.T. standards for
green building maintenance techniques and             site triangles, height requirements, and set
attendance at Green Building conferences or           backs from roadway, limiting the amount of
workshops. The likely outcome of this research        landscaping that can be installed. The Sawgrass
process will be the adoption of simple policy         entry ways are dependent upon the completion
statements accepting the LEED certification for        of the Sawgrass widening project. As a result,
public and possibly private buildings.                actual landscaping improvements are not likely to
                                                      be in the ground until Fiscal Year 2008. However,
                                                      our twelve smaller entry signs should be replaced
                                                      during Fiscal Year 2007.


 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                            33
        Meadows & Dells Drainage Improvement               Valve Exercising & Dead-End Water Main
     Lead Department: Public Works                                         Flushing
     CDBG Outlay: $230,000                              Lead Department: Public Works

     In November 2005, the City Engineer, Chen and      Operating Expenses: $100,000
     Associates completed a Storm Water Master Plan
                                                        The Florida Administrative Code requires that
     for the Meadows and Dells neighborhood. The
                                                        Utilities establish a program to exercise water
     study examined the adequacy and condition of
                                                        main valves and open and flush water mains
     the existing drainage system, identified areas of
                                                        located at its terminus within a cul de sac. The
     flooding, recommended drainage improvements,
                                                        exercising (opening and closing) of water main
     divided the work into phases and determined
                                                        valves is important to ensure that in times of line
     the cost for the work. This study divided the
                                                        breakage, the closest valve to the break will be
     neighborhood into 15 basins. The Fiscal Year
                                                        functional and can be closed in order to minimize
     2007 program seeks to improve drainage in Basin
                                                        the loss of water to customers. The City’s Utility
     One, which is located south of 44th Court, along
                                                        has 4,000 valves that will be scheduled in the
     80th Avenue, and a portion of 43rd Street. The
                                                        exercise program.
     project will improve the existing swale drainage
     by installing piping and catch basins to channel   The flushing of water mains located at the end
     storm water to the canal system.                   of the water distribution system is necessary to
                                                        maintain water quality. The City has over 300
                                                        cul de sacs where flushing will be implemented
                                                        under this program. The implementation of this
                                                        work will be done through the combined efforts
                                                        of the City and contractors. The work program
                                                        will include the use of hand held GPS units to
                                                        mark and log the location of each valve and dead-
                                                        end main.




34                                                                      Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
    Redevelopment Code Study—Phase II                       Post Wilma Tree Canopy Recovery
Lead Department: Community Development               Lead Department: Community Development
Operating Expenses: $25,000                          Operating Expenses: $5,000
The Land Development Code (LDC) is the               Tree Trust Fund: $250,000
instrument established that guides physical
development in the City. Redevelopment of            Grant Funding: $42,500
existing structures, a complicated process, is not   Due to the significant canopy loss caused by
addressed in the LDC.                                Hurricane Wilma, a number of tree related
Since the City is now at residential build-out,      projects need to be planned and implemented to
most of our future development will be in the        restore the tree canopy effectively, quickly and
form of redevelopment. The first redevelopment        cost efficiently. The Tree Trust Fund will provide
initiative is taking place in Downtown Coral         $250,000 of the cost of this initiative.
Springs. An overlay zoning district is under         First, a GIS based tree inventory system will be
design as Phase I of this initiative.                created to catalog as many as 50% of trees on
Phase II of the Redevelopment Code Study             public property (excluding ESL sites) and any
will encompass assessment of the current LDC         street trees planted as a result of the street tree
by a consultant. The consultant will make            replacement.
recommendations on how to provide quality            Second, the deadline for the Street Tree Subsidy
redevelopment with emphasis on parking               Program will be extended to April 2007 to give
requirements, permitted, prohibited and              homeowners sufficient time to replace missing
conditional uses, setback, building heights and      trees. Also, Homeowner Associations will be
concurrency management.                              eligible for subsidy under the program up to
                                                     a specific limit. Staff will review the eligible
                                                     tree list to determine if new information about
                                                     hurricane tree performance will allow additional
                                                     species.
                                                     Third, Code Enforcement will start compliance
                                                     inspections for street trees at the beginning of the
                                                     next rainy season.
                                                     Finally, changes to the Tree Ordinance will be
                                                     made as deemed necessary in order to better
                                                     prepare the City for future hurricanes as well
                                                     as providing better tree protection during
                                                     development projects.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                             35
     Youth Development & Family Values
                                                                              Teen Citizen Police Academy (2006)
     Ongoing Initiatives
                                                                              Lead Department: Police
                                                                              An extension of our Citizen Police Academy,
     Special Populations Programs (2005, 2006)                                the Teen Citizen Police Academy (TCPA)
     Lead Department: Parks & Recreation                                      affords Coral Springs teens an opportunity to
                                                                              learn about the role and functions of the Coral
     The Parks & Recreation Department offers                                 Springs Police Department. While fostering
     programs for Special Populations, such as                                better communication between youth and police
     bowling, a weekly evening social, a Saturday                             through education, the TCPA seeks to give young
     morning activities program, and a Summer                                 people considering a career in law enforcement
     Recreation Program. We also offer an after-                              an invaluable introduction to the latest in public
     school and School Day Off program through                                safety programs and technology.
     a partnership with the YMCA, where the City
     provides the facilities and the YMCA provides                            While this program began as an initiative in
     the staff.                                                               Fiscal Year 2006, Hurricane Wilma delayed
                                                                              registration opportunities for teens and made
                                                                              it impossible to hold the classes in the summer
                                                                              when teens are not in school. Registration will
                                                                              take place during the winter of 2006/2007, and
                                                                              classes will be held in the summer of 2007.




     The City has many learn-to-swim programs for both children and adults.



                                                                                   FY 2007         FY 2008          FY 2009
      Key Intended Outcomes                                                         Goal            Goal             Goal
      Number of youths involved in City sponsored
                                                                                   2,000            2,000            2,000
      leadership opportunities
      Number of teen volunteer hours                                               11,000           11,000          11,000
      Number of middle school after-school programs
                                                                                     13               14              15
      offered annually


36                                                                                            Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
New Initiatives                                                Parent Support Partnerships
                                                     Lead Department: Parks & Recreation

               Teen Programming                      Operating Expenses: Existing

Lead Department: Parks & Recreation                  City staff will partner with parent groups such as
                                                     Parents Without Partners and Broward County
Operating Expenses: Existing                         PTA to educate residents about the programs
This initiative will combine new programming         available to parents. We will also seek to bring
for teens and a communications campaign to           more of the activities sponsored by these non-
make residents aware of opportunities for teens.     profits to our City and our facilities.

New programming ideas will be solicited from
our two teen advisory groups, the Student                     Drowning Prevention Program
Advisory Commission and the Teen Productions
Committee. Utilizing surveys of the teens,           Lead Department: Fire/EMS
feedback from the middle and high schools and        Operating Expenses: $4,997
input from our teen committee members, our
goal is to get teens more involved in deciding       Grant Funding: $29,990
what programs they would like to have.
                                                     Due to the increasing number of Emergency
Based on feedback, we will offer additional          Medical Service calls within the City involving
classes and programs for teens. We will promote      drowning and near drowning, the Coral Springs
more youth oriented programs and activities          Fire Department has applied for and received a
through the use of the City web site, advertising,   grant from the Florida Department of Health.
Coral Springs magazine, CityTV and Coral             This grant, along with a $5,000 contribution
Springs public schools. If the teens determine the   from the Coral Springs Medical Center, will fund
need for a Youth Empowerment Summit, one will        a drowning prevention education program for
be planned.                                          families within our community to educate them
                                                     on pool safety.
                                                     Childhood drowning is the number one cause of
         Web Site Resource for Parents               death among children in Florida. With the recent
Lead Department: Police                              damage from hurricanes, some child safety
                                                     guards which used to provide protection to the
Operating Expenses: Existing                         more than 16,000 pools located with the Coral
The City’s official web site will offer a new area    Springs City limits are missing or damaged. This
for parents as a pilot program. This area will       program will remind residents of the dangers of
feature straight talk and honest advice from a       open water and teach water safety techniques.
Coral Springs Police Officer. A variety of timely     The Coral Springs Fire Department will partner
topics that concern parents will be featured, such   with the Coral Springs Medical Center to
as internet safety, bullying, single parenting,      produce brochures, community presentations
teenage tantrums, privacy, and drugs. Parents        and public service announcements in multiple
will also be able to submit their questions and      languages. This program has had significant
comments via e-mail to be shared on the web          success in the past in reducing the number of
site, www.coralsprings.org.                          drowning incidents in our area. Broward County
                                                     has expressed interest in using the Coral Springs
                                                     program as a model for a county-wide program.
                                                     In addition to the education for caregivers offered
                                                     by this program, the City offers many learn-to-
                                                     swim classes, with reduced fees for residents
                                                     where there is need.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                            37
     Strength in Diversity
                                                            Heritage Panels (2005, 2006)
     Ongoing Initiatives
                                                            Lead Department: Human Resources
                                                            In 2007, staff, with the assistance of the Multi-
     Family Success Center (2005, 2006)                     Cultural Committee, will continue organizing
     Lead Department: Human Resources                       Heritage Panel presentations with the remaining
                                                            City Boards and Advisory Committees, while
     The Northwest Regional Family Success                  also expanding the program to our Civic Groups
     Center moved into its permanent home at the            and other organized groups in the community.
     former Broward County Library in June 2005.
     The Center provides services to individuals
     and families through collaborations with               Study Circles (2006)
     other Human Services Departments in the
     County, government agencies, and non-profit             Lead Department: Human Resources
     organizations. Services provided include rent,
                                                            A study circle is a small, diverse group of eight
     mortgage, and utility assistance, individual,
                                                            to twelve participants that meets regularly over
     family, and group therapy, integrated intake,
                                                            a period of weeks or months to address a critical
     assessment and case management, life skills
                                                            public issue in a democratic and collaborative
     classes, bus passes and food vouchers.
                                                            way. The purpose of study circles is to consider
                                                            issues from many points of view and uncover
                                                            areas of agreement and common concern. Study
     ESOL Classes (2005, 2006)                              circle programs may lead to a wide range of
     Lead Department: Human Resources                       action and change efforts.

     Staff has identified and is publicizing English         Essential to this process is the training and
     for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)                 identification of qualified facilitators. Therefore,
     classes available in the community. Classes are        the City will contract with an appropriate
     currently available at Coral Springs Community         organization to train facilitators. The City
     School, Taravella Community School, Northwest          Commission will identify up to three issues to be
     Regional Library, and the Family Success Center.       studied during Fiscal Year 2007.
     Class days, times, and contact phone numbers are
     published in the summer 2006 edition of Coral
     Springs as well as on the City’s web site.




                                                                FY 2007          FY 2008          FY 2009
     Key Intended Outcomes
                                                                 Goal             Goal             Goal
     Minority residents who feel that the City is a great
                                                                  82%              82%             82%
     place to live (Resident Survey)
     Citizen rating of City Government for respecting
                                                                  92%              92%             92%
     religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey)




38                                                                          Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
New Initiatives                                                            MLK Golf Tournament
                                                      Lead Department: Human Resources

            International Soccer Fest                 Operating Expenses: Existing

Lead Department: Sportsplex                           The Martin Luther King (MLK) Committee
                                                      will sponsor a golf tournament to raise money
Operating Expenses: Existing                          for their annual scholarship program. This
This event, now scheduled for Summer 2007, will       money will be used to fulfill match requirements
be headed up by the Coral Springs International       for Community Chest funding of the MLK
Partnerships, Inc., with the assistance of the City   scholarship program.
staff, and the Coral Springs Soccer Commission.
Originally planned for November 2005, this event
was postponed due to Hurricane Wilma.
The International Soccer Fest will involve
approximately 32 teams from the United States
and other countries.


                   World Fest
Lead Department: Human Resources
Operating Expenses: Existing
“World Fest” will be celebrated by the Multi-
Cultural Advisory Committee in February 2007.
It is intended to be a one or two day festival
celebrating the major cultures from around the
world, especially highlighting the cultures that
make up the community of Coral Springs. The
festival will be funded from the committee’s
existing budget, and will be supplemented by
sponsorships from the community.




                                                      World Fest includes performers from many cultures.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                            39
     Traffic, Mobility & Connectivity
     Ongoing Initiatives
     Traffic Management (2005, 2006)
     Lead Department: Community Development
     The Transportation Improvement Map shows
     the numerous efforts being planned and/or
     underway to ensure that acceptable levels
     of service are maintained in Coral Springs.
     Residents continue to express concerns regarding
     the traffic conditions on the roadway network.
     A Traffic Management Team continues to
     address local roadway operational issues, and to
     coordinate with Broward County and the Florida
     Department of Transportation for planned future
     traffic improvements within the City. To support
     Phase I of the Downtown Coral Springs project,
     exclusive right-turn lanes on the Sample Road
     eastbound approach and the University Drive
     northbound approach are being constructed. New
     signal mast arms will be installed by Broward
     County as part of the intersection improvements
     in 2008.




                                                               FY 2007         FY 2008        FY 2009
     Key Intended Outcomes                                      Goal            Goal           Goal
     Achieve a 10% reduction of speed and/or a 15%
                                                              10% speed      10% speed       10% speed
     reduction of volume after the initial installation of
                                                             15% volume     15% volume      15% volume
     traffic calming measures

     Number of accidents at 16 major intersections              165             165             165

     Number of riders on intracity bus routes                 110,000         115,000        125,000*
     *contingent on penny sales tax




40                                                                        Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                                                                       Transportation Improvement Plan
                                                                                        Short Range Improvements
                                              SAWGRASS                                          1               EXPRESSWAY
                                                                                                                    DRIVE
                                                                       WESTVIEW
                                                                                                      9




                                                                                                                                                                                        STATE ROAD 7 (US 441)
                                  WILES                                                                       ROAD




                                                                                                                                                                                                                ¯
                                                                                                                                                                          6         4




                                                                                                                                                             RD
EXPRESSWAY




                                                                                                     9




                                                                                                DRIVE




                                                                                                                                                         ISLAND
                                                                                                                                      DRIVE
                                                                           9                                                                                 7
                                                                   DRIVE
                          DRIVE




                                                                                                                                                      ROCK
                                                                                                                                                                      9       2 9
                 9                9
                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                    9                 3         ROAD

                                                                                                    2
   1
                                                                                                                                              1.Sawgrass Expressway (est. completion Summer 2007)
                                                                                                 UNIVERSITY
                                                                                                                                                Widen 6 - 8 lanes and construction of sound walls
                                                                                                8
                                                                   SPRINGS




                                                                                                                                                Phase I Coral Ridge Dr. to Florida Turnpike
                                                                                                                                                Phase II Coral Ridge Dr. to Atlantic Blvd.
                     ROYAL                                                   PALM                                        BLVD         9       2.Resurfacing, Restoration and Rehabilitation (2007)
                              4                                                                         3       9
                                                                        4                                                         4             University Dr. - Sample Rd. to southern City limits
                           RIDGE




                                                                                                                                                Sample Rd. - Rock Island Rd. to SR7
SAWGRASS




                                                                                                                                              3.University Dr./Royal Palm Blvd./Sample Rd. Additional
                                                                                                                                                turn lanes,mast arms and "SMART" technology
                                                                                                                            IDE




                                                                                                                                              4.Illuminated street signs
                                                                                                                           RS




                                                                                                                                                Wiles Rd./Creekside Dr.,
                                                                                                                            E
                                                                                                                         RIV




                                                                                                                                                Royal Palm Blvd./Riverside Dr.,
                                                   7
                                                           CORAL




                                                                                                                                                Royal Palm Blvd./Coral Springs Dr.,
                                                                                                                                                Royal Palm Blvd./Coral Ridge Dr.
                                      RAL




                                                                                                                                              5.Mast arms Riverside Dr./ Atlantic Blvd.
                                                                       ATLANTIC
                                                                                                                                              6.Widen 4 to 6 lanes Wiles Rd. - Rock Island Rd. to SR7
                                       CO




                                                                   9                                  BLV
                                                                                                          D
                                                                                            9                                                 7.City Roadway Resurfacing Program 2007 and 2008
                                                       7                                                             5                        8.N.W. 28th St. pedestrian improvement
                                                                                                DRIVE
                                                                                            9                                                 9.Additional bus shelter locations
                                            RIVERSID
                                                       E




                                                                                                During Fiscal Year 2005 the City Commission
         New Initiatives                                                                        approved Phase I of the sign code amendments.
                                                                                                The City Commission also approved the
                                                                                                concept of the street indexing signage program
                        Street Indexing Signage                                                 and directed staff to provide a comprehensive
         Lead Department: Community Development                                                 evaluation of possible sign locations. They also
                                                                                                requested that a sample of this sign be installed
         Capital Outlay: $158,000                                                               prior to the manufacturing of additional signs.
         This project will aid motorists in finding their                                        This will be a pilot project beginning in Fiscal
         way around the City’s main commercial areas                                            Year 2007 with the design, engineering, and
         by providing a street indexing signage system.                                         regulatory approvals, as well as bidding out and
         Signage will be erected over certain existing                                          awarding the contract for the pilot. These initial
         sidewalks along University Drive, Sample Road                                          tasks will ultimately enable actual manufacturing
         and Wiles Road at mid-block and block openings.                                        and installation of the proposed signs over the
                                                                                                following three years.




             City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                                                         41
               Downtown Pathways Phase I                                      Linear Parks
     Lead Department: Community Development                Lead Department: Parks & Recreation
     Capital Outlay: $56,750                               Operating Expenses: $20,000
     CDBG Outlay: $109,000                                 Capital Outlay: $211,210
     The Downtown Pathways project will create new         As a result of Hurricane Wilma, the City-
     safe and comfortable dual-purpose pathways            maintained linear parks sustained extensive
     (walk/bike) linking the new Downtown, the             damage. We lost hundreds of trees and shrubs
     Medical Center, schools, churches, government         throughout these areas. Many homeowners were
     offices, library and facilities at Mullins Park. The   left without landscaping on public property
     pathways follow the primary roads and the water       between their homes and roads such as Atlantic
     features of lakes, wetlands and canals.               Boulevard, Riverside Drive and Ramblewood
                                                           Drive.
     Phase I of this project involves the design of a
     primary pathway between the Coral Springs             This initiative will, over the next several years,
     Charter School and City Gymnasium and design          restore this landscaping and create greenways
     of a secondary pathway linking City Hall and          by adding irrigation, trees and shrubs and also
     Center for the Arts.                                  making repairs where required to the bike
                                                           paths. Our proposal calls for a four year project
     The design services will include the specific          to create a uniform, aesthetically pleasing and
     location of pathways, trees and other landscaping,    well-maintained linear park system. In addition,
     boardwalks, bench and bus stops, and pedestrian       a part-time parks maintenance worker will
     lighting. The design will be utilized in future       be added to irrigate the new plantings on the
     construction projects by the City and private         medians and linear parks.
     property owners in the next five years.

                                                                         CRA Roadway Design
             28th Street Pedestrian Crossing
                                                           Lead Department: Community Development
     Lead Department: Community Development
                                                           CRA Outlay: $75,000
     Capital Outlay: $20,000
                                                           With the construction of the new Downtown,
     Since the development of “The Walk” and               NW 31st Court, Coral Hills Drive, and NW
     redevelopment of the Coral Springs Trade Center,      33rd Street will see a dramatic increase in all
     the pedestrian traffic has increased dramatically      forms of transportation. These streets and their
     on an unmarked section between Starbucks              intersections with NW 29th Street, the Medical
     and Barnes & Noble on NW 28th Street. This            Center entrance, NW 95th Avenue, Sample Road,
     increase in pedestrian traffic has created conflicts    and University Drive need to be studied before
     between pedestrian and vehicular traffic. A            the final layout of the southwest quadrant of the
     traffic study done by Kittelson Associates,            Downtown. The Downtown Design Guidelines
     Inc., indicates there are over 300 pedestrians        only address the Downtown-side of the roads and
     crossing during the peak hour. The traffic             do not consider the intersection problems, future
     study recommends a textured crosswalk with            transit center and NW 33 Street.
     in-street lighting along with additional signage
     and overhead lighting as a way to make the            The design study should include an engineering
     pedestrian traffic at that location more obvious       survey and design solutions for the capacity
     to drivers. This configuration was reviewed and        needs of cars, pedestrians, bikes, buses and
     approved by the City Commission and Broward           emergency vehicles. Coordination with the
     County Traffic Engineering. Amera Properties           Medical Center for the transit center and future
     will share in the cost of constructing these          reorientation of the Medical Center is required.
     improvements.




42                                                                         Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
        Planning for One Cent Sales Tax                     University Drive Extension
Lead Department: City Manager’s Office             Lead Department: Community Development
Operating Expenses: Existing                      Operating Expenses: Existing
Broward County voters will be asked in            City staff will continue to work with the
November if they want to raise the sales tax by   Metropolitan Planning Organization to advocate
a penny to expand mass transit and ease traffic    for the expansion and widening of University
congestion over the next 25 years.                Drive.
If passed, this measure could have a profound
effect on transportation issues in the City.
Initial estimates are that Coral Springs would
benefit from approximately $1.9 million in new
improvements. Staff will work on a plan of
how best to utilize these funds if they become
available.




      Traffic Map- Long




                                                                                                   7/14/2006 1:41 PM   44



 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                        43
                      Financial Strategy
                                                         FY 2006 Operating Millage Rate
                      The Financial Strategy
                                                         Comparison
                      this year has been more
                                                      Comparing Operating Millage Rates:
                      difficult, yet the results       Cities Over 70,000 Population in Fiscal Year 2006
                                                       $8.0000
                      more notable than ever.
                                                       $7.0000
                      In a year where we will




                                                                 $6.9163

                                                                              $6.7611

                                                                                         $6.6200
                                                       $6.0000
                      have spent $11.25 million




                                                                                                    $6.2499

                                                                                                               $6.2100

                                                                                                                         $6.0200

                                                                                                                                      $5.9949
                      on hurricane recovery,
                                                       $5.0000




                                                                                                                                                         $5.1000

                                                                                                                                                                   $5.0924

                                                                                                                                                                                    $4.5990

                                                                                                                                                                                              $4.5889
                      severely straining our
                                                       $4.0000




                                                                                                                                                                                                            $4.0380

                                                                                                                                                                                                                             $3.8715
                      General Fund Financial           $3.0000


                      Policy reserves, we are          $2.0000


                      able to accomplish the           $1.0000


                      following:                       $0.0000




                                                                                                                                                          Davie




                                                                                                                                                                                               Plantation



                                                                                                                                                                                                             Pompano Beach
                                                                                                     Tamarac




                                                                                                                                                                   Ft Lauderdale
                                                                                                                         Lauderhill
                                                                               Margate




                                                                                                               Sunrise




                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Coral Springs
                                                                  Hollywood




                                                                                                                                       Deerfield Beach
                                                                                          Miramar




                                                                                                                                                                                   Pembroke
                                                                                                                                                                                     Pines
                      • Keep the millage rate
                        at the same rate of
 Our tax rate           $3.8715— the lowest
                        of all cities in Broward
 would be $4.86         County with populations over 70,000.                                                                                  the
                                                                                                    How is this possible? The answer lies in7/18/2006 2:18 PM                                                                                 7


 mills rather than                                                                                  long-term financial planning that is a particular
 our actual $3.87     • Reduce the Debt Service millage rate by                                     strength of this organization.
 mills had we not       15%— while adding the cost of the new $13.5
                        million Public Safety Improvement Bonds!                   One important component of our long-term
 employed these                                                                    planning is utilizing all identified surpluses in
 financial planning    • Replenish $2 million of our hurricane-ravaged              all funds to pay for the following year’s needed
 tools for the past     reserves.                                                  capital items. Each year, we carefully comb all
 10 years.                                                                         of our funds to determine any surpluses. Instead
                      • Equity finance $6.9 million of our capital needs.
                                                                                   of leaving those funds idle, or worse, spending
                                                                                   them on ongoing operating expenses, we invest
                                                                                   them in needed capital. With this investment, we
                                                                                                        avoid the issuance of debt
                      Annual Savings from the Financial Strategy                                        and therefore ongoing debt
                                                     Genral    Water &       Other         Total        service obligation.
                                                      Fund    Sewer Fund    Funds                       Another key component
                      Debt Refunding & Retirements
                                                                                                        of our long-term planning
                             Prior Years           $1,122,000    $459,000                 $1,581,000
                                                                                                        is managing existing debt
                      Debt Defeasance                                                                   through refunding, retirement
                                                                                                        and defeasance of our debt.
                             Prior Years            2,693,000                             $2,693,000    This astute debt management
                                                                                                        saves us $4.3 million each
                      Cost Avoidance Measures
                                                                                                        year in debt service costs.
                             Variable Rate
                                  Prior Years         798,000                               $798,000    Yet another component is
                                  Fiscal Year 2007    368,000                              $368,000     the depreciation program
                             Equity Financing                                                           we employ to fund our
                                  Prior Years       1,940,000                341,000      $2,281,000
                                                                                                        vehicles and computers. This
                                  Fiscal Year 2007    310,000                               $310,000
                                                                                                        “pay-as-you-go” approach
                                                                                                        saves us over $740,000 a
                      Water & Sewer ’05-’10                       142,500                   $142,500
                                                                                                        year in avoided debt service
                                                                                                        costs. All told, the annual
                      Pay-as-you-go Financing                                                           savings from our long-term
                      Equipment & Computers                                                             financial strategy are now
                              Prior Years                                    606,500       $606,500
                                                                                                        over $8.9 million.
                              Fiscal Year 2007                               139,000        $139,000
                      Total Annual Savings         $7,231,000    $601,500 $1,086,500      $8,919,000

44                                                                                                                                      Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                                                       Growth Rate in Property Tax
This $8.9 million translates to almost $1.00
                                                       Revenue
                                                       Growth Rate on Property Tax Revenue
mills in savings in our tax rate. That is, our tax
rate would be $4.86 mills rather than our actual       25%
$3.87 mills had we not employed these financial
strategies for the past 10 years.                                                                                      Projected
                                                       20%


Hurricane Wilma                                        15%

The total cost of the City’s recovery from             10%
Hurricane Wilma is approximately $36.5 million.
Of this amount, the City’s share is approximately       5%
$11.25 million. With contingency funds, reserves
and other funding sources (see chart below) the         0%
City has met this financial challenge without                    FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY   FY
having to issue costly debt, raise taxes or levy a             1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

hurricane cleanup surcharge. It should be noted
that these numbers are subject to change until
all costs are verified, paid and reimbursement is
                                                       Revenue Picture
                                                                                                                              7/14/2006 3:29 PM     8


received from FEMA, the State and the City’s
insurance carrier. It could take as long as three      Overall revenues, excluding property tax
years to settle up with FEMA.                          revenue, are anticipated to increase by 6.4%
                                                       over the previous year’s budgeted figures. These
                                                       are mostly demand driven revenues, such as
City’s Share of Hurricane                              utility taxes, franchise fees, intergovernmental
Expenses by Funding Source                             revenues, licenses, permits and charges for
                                                       services.
Financial Policy Reserves                 $9,520,000
                                                       The significant increases are projected to take
Insurance Proceeds                           790,000
                                                       place in electric franchise fees (24.4%) and
Contingency                                  490,000
                                                       building permits (17.1%). The increase in the
Tree Trust Fund                              250,000
                                                       electric franchise fees is driven by the cost of
Resource Recovery                            200,000
                                                       fuel and the cost of hurricane damage passed
Total                                    $11,250,000
                                                       on to the customer. The rise in building permits
                                                       is also related to repairs and renovations due to
                                                       hurricane damage. These are anomalies in our
In the mean time another hurricane season is
                                                       business cycle and will not occur year after year
upon us. Weather forecasters predict that in
                                                       as a dependable trend.
the next 15 to 18 years storm activity will be
unusually active. For this reason it is extremely      Another important revenue source is electric
important to build back the City’s emergency           utility service taxes. Unlike electric franchise
reserves as quickly as possible.                               Ad Valorem Taxes as a Percentage of
That is why an important part of the “Sources                  General Fund Revenue
and Uses for the Financial Strategy” is to             Ad Valorem Taxes as a Percent of Total General Fund Revenues
replenish $2 million of our Emergency Reserves
in this upcoming budget. Over a three to five year
period, we are confident that we will be able to          45%
                                                                                                                                         42.5%
fully replenish our reserves.
                                                         40%
The City has in place strong financial policies                                                                 37.7%
that have created reserves for computer and
                                                         35%
fleet replacements, and for the retirement of a
$38 million Guaranteed Investment Contract in                                                              Budget          Projected

2011. The fact that these reserves still exist is an     30%

indication of financial strength and flexibility in               26.2%
the face of significant hardship.                         25%


                                                         20%
                                                              FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY
                                                             1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

                                                                                                                               7/17/2006 11:04 AM       29

 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                               45
     fees, which are based on total receipts, the            Over the past two years, the Federal Reserve
     service tax is based on consumption. As we              has increased the Federal funds rate 17 times,
     continue to experience higher costs for electricity,    bringing the targeted rate from a low of 1% to
     we anticipate that it will have a negative effect on    5.25% and has indicated that it will continue to
     electric utility taxes receipts due to conservation     do so over the next quarter or two if warranted to
     efforts on the part of consumers.                       control inflation.
     Property tax revenue is anticipated to increase         In view of this policy, it is of utmost importance
     by 15.3% this year. We predict Fiscal Year 2007         that the City evaluates its present portfolio of
     to be the last year of double digit increases.          debt and establish a plan of action to reposition
     Buildout compounded by a price correction in the        itself accordingly. One action would be to
     residential market will cause future increases to       restructure variable rate financing into a
     steadily drop to the 6% range.                          fixed-rate. Given the FED’s indications that
                                                             additional rate increases are forthcoming, staff is
     Management of Debt and Equity                           anticipating the restructuring of the $7.3 million
                                                             2002B series into a fixed-rate environment.
     We are recommending that we decrease the
                                                             Present market conditions indicate a new
     Debt Service millage from $0.2510 to $0.2134,
                                                             Revenue bond issue would have a True
     a decrease of 15%. This is inclusive of the voter
                                                             Interest Cost (TIC) of approximately 4.30%.
     approved $13.5 million General Obligation
                                                             Implementing this strategy will contain the
     bonds to be issued this year for Public Safety
                                                             interest rate increases that we have been
     Improvements. The new bond issue was planned
                                                             experiencing in our debt service costs.
     for this year to take advantage of the retiring
     of previous bonds (Series 2003B) that reduced           The revenue bonds can be issued through the
     our debt service costs by $1 million for Fiscal         Florida Intergovernmental Finance Commission
     Year 2007. With the retiring of older bonds, the        (FIFC) or through the City. Going through the
     issuance of the new $13.5 million bonds and             FIFC could provide some economies of scale
     the application of $600,000 from Debt Service           by aggregating other FIFC members financing
     fund balances, it is possible to balance this fund      needs. The alternative will be determined when
     with the recommended 15% decrease. This will            the FIFC makes a final accounting of the amount
     be possible without increasing the debt service         of financing to be accomplished. This will occur
     millage in future years, absent additional voter        within the next thirty days.
     approved debt.
                                                             The $38.5 million Series 2001A is a fixed-rate
     A steadfast policy the City has always employed         instrument that was swapped into a variable rate
     in its Business Plan is to aggressively watch the       position. It matures in May 2011 but can be called
     market for opportunities to leverage its “AAA”          in May of 2008 by the counter party, J.P. Morgan.
     bond rating. We also seek opportunities to take         If it is called before maturity it would revert back
     advantage of declining interest rates and utilizing     to the fixed rate of 4.67512% until it matures. In
     excess funds to equity-fund our capital needs.          its variable rate form, the series still generates a
                                                             savings of approximately $368,000 annually.

                       Debt Service Millage Rate Trend
                 2007 Debt Service Millage Declines Despite
                 $13.5 Million Public Safety Improvement Bonds
                       0.6
                             $0.5228
                       0.5
                                       $0.4131
                       0.4                         $0.3924                15% Decrease
               Mills




                       0.3
                                                                $0.2510
                                                                            $0.2134
                       0.2                                                  $0.0486        New Bond
                                                                             $0.1648       Existing debt
                       0.1

                        0
                             FY 2003   FY 2004     FY 2005      FY 2006     FY 2007



46                                                                           Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                                                                                 7/19/2006 12:18 PM    9
Sources and Uses of Funds                             An additional source of funding that is not
                                                      an ongoing source of revenue are the monies
for the Financial Strategy                            received from the County Resource Recovery
                                                      Board. This year the City received $900,000 in
Sources of Funds:
                                                      excess reserves and $334,000 in Redistributed
General Fund
                                                      bond proceeds. Each year any amount exceeding
 Reserves                              $3,667,000
 FY 2007 Budget                         1,633,000     a cap of $50 million in reserves is shared among
                                       $5,300,000     the member cities based on their tonnage
                                                      contribution. The redistributed bond proceeds
                                                      are a share of the savings achieved through the
Insurance Fund                          2,912,500
Fire Fund                                 500,000     refinancing of the County debt on the facility
                                                      which is distributed to each member in a like
Resource Recovery Distributions:                      manner (approximately 9%).
 Redistribution Bond Proceeds            300,000      This year, all but $200,000 of these sources was
 Excess Reserves                         500,000      applied towards equity financing the current
                                                      years’ Capital Improvement Program. The
Total Sources                          $9,512,500
                                                      remaining $200,000 will be used to cover a
                                                      portion of the costs of Hurricane Wilma. To
Uses of Funds:                                        estimate this source of funding is difficult,
Capital Improvement Program                           however staff is projecting an amount of
  General Fund                         $5,659,716     $800,000 for total revenue from the Resource
  Fire Fund                             1,115,284     Recovery Board. We expect these payments to
  Equipment Services Fund                 192,000     decrease substantially by Fiscal Year 2008.
Total Capital Improvement Program      $6,967,000
                                                      Limiting the use of one-time revenues for one-
Replenish Financial Policy Reserves    $2,001,000     time expenditures ensures that we are not falling
Fire Fund Operations Subsidy              544,500     into the trap of adding non-recurring revenues to
                                                      support ongoing operations. This could quickly
Total Uses                             $9,512,500     turn a balanced budget into a deficit situation.
                                                      Thus, all one-time revenue sources are used only
                                                      for one-time capital projects in our financing
                                                      plan.
Fiscal Year 2007 Capital
                                                      New City Hall
Improvement Program (CIP)                             The City’s six year Capital Improvement Plan
The total CIP for Fiscal Year 2007 is $31.2           also includes funding for a new City Hall to be
million. It derives its funding from various          constructed on the property presently occupied
types of Grants, Operating Funds, Impact Fees,        by the BMX Track on Coral Springs Drive. An
Public Art Fund, Tree Trust Fund, Repair and          amount of $400,000 is provided in the Fiscal Year
Replacement Funds, Revenue and General                2007 budget for the preliminary space planning
Obligation bonds and equity. For Fiscal Year          and engineering. The
2007, the City will continue to fund its General      estimated funding for
Fund, Fire Fund, Equipment Services Fund              the construction of the Projected Sources and
capital needs as presented in the “Sources and        facility is forecasted in Uses of Funds for the New City Hall
Uses of Funds for the Financial Strategy” table.      Fiscal Year 2008 at
You will note the commitment of $2 million to         a total cost of $22        Sources of Funds:
rebuilding our Financial Policy reserves. This is     million. This includes     City Property Sale Proceeds                   $6,500,000
the first part of our plan to replenish our reserves   an estimated $2            Franchise Revenue Bonds                       15,500,000
within a three to five year period, as stated          million for Furniture,     General Fund Operating                           400,000
earlier.                                              Fixtures and               Total Sources                                $22,400,000
                                                      Equipment.
After applying all of the various funding
elements, the remaining balance of $6.9 million                                  Uses of Funds:
                                                      This amount will be
will be funded with equity derived from                                          Final Design, Management, and Construction
                                                      partially funded by
undesignated surplus funds. Using this option         the sale of property                                                    $20,400,000
will avoid additional debt service expense of         (approximately six         Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment                2,000,000
approximately $2.7 million in interest expense        acres) that City Hall      Total Uses                                   $22,400,000
over a fifteen year period.                            presently occupies,

 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                      47
     both the north and south parcels. The estimated                 of our expenditure increases are fixed and
     selling price of the property is $6.5 million,                  predictable, the main variables are the rate of
     though this figure is yet to be determined.                      increase in existing revenues and new programs
     The remaining $15.5 million of costs will be                    or projects planned over the forecast period.
     funded through a Franchise Revenue Bond issue                   Typically, future years show a deficit of revenues
     amortized over a thirty-year period. Please refer               over expenditures. The purpose of this financial
     to the table “Projected Sources and Uses of Funds               exercise is to adequately prepare for future
     for the New City Hall.”                                         challenges, so it is always conservative in
                                                                     outlook. As we map out our financial and
     Pension Status                                                  operating strategies, we use the model to
                                                                     determine the potential impact of decisions.
     The Public Safety Pension Funds continue to                     Using this tool helps keep us focused on long-
     show investment appreciation over the last                      term solutions, rather than short-term “fixes,”
     three years. This is a vast improvement over the                which could lead to negative financial impacts in
     preceding three years. The Police pension fund                  future years.
     has shown gains of $6 million over the past three
                                                                     The Five-Year Forecast figures prominently in
     years, resulting in an increase of the funding
                                                                     reviews of our financial condition and has been
     level of the plan by 2.5% to 79.2% overall. This
                                                                     praised by the Wall Street rating agencies as a
     positive trend assists the City in restoring the
                                                                     practice that helps the City anticipate and prepare
     funding level back within reach of the City’s
                                                                     for future financial and economic challenges.
     financial policy of 85%.
                                                                     It is important to note that the City’s budget
     The Funds actuary employs a three-year
                                                                     has always been balanced, and in fact we have
     smoothing technique on the gains/losses to
                                                                     managed to create an operating surplus every
     mitigate the financial impact of any single year
                                                                     year. Operating surpluses have been used to
     on the funds position. Thus the City’s required
                                                                     equity fund new capital needs, as well as more
     contribution need not fluctuate greatly.
                                                                     aggressively retire debt. The result has been
     In Fiscal Year 2007, the City will contribute                   a total cumulative savings (cost avoidance) of
     $4.2 million to the Police Pension Fund from the                $8.9 million in Fiscal Year 2007. The Five-Year
     General Fund, up from a budget of $4 million in                 Forecast allows us to size up the challenge each
     Fiscal Year 2006.                                               year in order to maintain our long-term financial
                                                                     stability.
     The Firefighter Pension Fund continues to show
     improvement. Its investment yield was 11.98%         Changes occur on a daily basis. In the end,
     in Fiscal Year 2005 as compared to 2.57% in the      however, resources will be allocated accordingly
     preceding year. The funding level of the plan        to meet the demands of our customers with a
     has increased 224% since its inception in Fiscal     balanced budget.
     Year 2002 from 16.8% to 54.4%. The significant
     increase in the funding percentage of the plan
     is largely due to the transitioning of the Fire
                                                      Five-Year Forecast Deficits in
     Department from a volunteer department to a Five-Year Forecast Revised 9-7-06
     paid full-time career department. The City’s     General Fund (Assuming No Action is Taken)
     contribution for Fiscal Year 2007 will be $1.5
     million as determined by the actuary, up from           FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012
                                                        $0
     the budgeted $1 million this Fiscal Year.
                                                                                         $0.00




                                                                   -$1
                                                                               -$2.21




                                                                                                                  -$2.29




     Five-Year Forecast                                            -$2
                                                                                                        -$3.34




                                                                                                                                  -$3.76

                                                                                                                                           -$3.90




                                                                   -$3
     The Five-Year Forecast is a tool that we use
                                                        Millions




                                                                                                                                                           -$4.56




                                                                   -$4
     to determine what level of risk we face over
                                                                                                                                                                     -$5.24


                                                                                                                                                                                    -$5.76




     the next few years in our ability to pay for the              -$5
                                                                                                                                                                                               -$5.96




     services we provide if we take no positive
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        -$6.69




                                                                   -$6
     action to increase revenues or decrease cost.                 -$7

     Revenues are projected at conservative                        -$8
                                                                                                                                 Sep-05                 Sep-06
     levels over the period and are compared to
                                                              Note: The Five-Year Forecast is a tool used for planning purposes and illustrates the
     estimated cost increases in payroll, operating
                                                         This chart is for planning purposes and illustrates the potential shortfalls the General Fund could face if no positive action is taken. By Florida law, the proposed budget will be balanced. Financial
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               9/7/2006 3:23 PM
                                                                                    Strategies will be formulated to address future year shortfalls and will be included in the Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan to be presented in July.                          28
                                                              potential shortfalls the General Fund could face if no positive action is taken. By Florida
     expenditures, and capital outlay. Since many             law, the proposed budget will be balanced. Financial Strategies will be formulated to
                                                              address future year shortfalls.


48                                                                                                                         Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                                                     If we are successful in receiving the grant
Water & Sewer Fund                                   funding, the Fire Fund will reimburse the
A recently completed 10-year Utility Master          General Fund a like amount.
Plan has been incorporated into the City’s Fiscal
Year 2007 Business Plan. It is contemplated that     Results
a combined financing of the first three years of
the Plan will be accomplished through a Water/       Our goal has not changed. We still intend to
Wastewater Revenue Bond (to be issued in Fiscal      minimize tax impacts on our residents without
Year 2007) in the amount of $17.1 million. This      jeopardizing our long-range financial stability.
approach is more fiscally sound than doing            Toward that end, we will:
a bond issue for each year, due to the cost of       • Reduce the Debt Service Millage Rate by 15%,
issuance incurred for each issue.                      to $0.2134 mills;
The debt service associated with the new bond        • Keep the Operating Millage Rate at $3.8715
issue will be “wrapped around” the Fund’s              and;
existing debt service obligation to produce cost
savings and a level debt service for the Utility     • Add $2 million to financial policy reserves and;
Fund. Though an increase in Water & Sewer
                                                     • Subsidize the Fire Assessment Fee by $544,500
Rates is not planned for Fiscal Year 2007, it
                                                       allowing only an $8.00 increase for single
will likely be necessary in the following year to
                                                       family homes.
service the debt associated with the Plan.
                                                     This means that if a homeowner’s property
Fire Fund                                            assessment is not increased by the Assessor’s
                                                     Office, our average homeowner will actually save
The City’s Fire service will add twenty-two new      $6.76, thanks to the decrease in the debt service
firefighter positions to its ranks. Twenty of these    millage rate. The increase of $8.00 in the Fire
positions are related to the Parkland contracted     Assessment Fee will bring a net impact of $1.24.
services agreement in which the City will add        If, however, the Assessor’s Office increases
another Rescue and Fire truck to the service area.   the assessment by 3%, the impact would be an
The City will share in the expense by funding        increase of $18.33 in taxes paid, plus the $8.00
seven of these positions and Parkland will           Fire Assessment Fee increase or $26.33.
fund 13 of the firefighters. The remaining two
positions will enhance the City’s fire services.      The Solid Waste Special Assessment will
                                                     increase from $216.84 to $226.32, in accordance
The 20 positions will be brought on in mid- year     with the City’s contract with Waste Management.
(April 1) therefore the funding has been budgeted
for half of the total cost in Fiscal Year 2007.
In calculating the new Fire Special Assessment       Effect On The Average Homeowner
fee to support the City’s share of the increased     Effect of Tax Rates operating millage •15%
                                                     • No decrease in on the Average Homeownerdecrease in debt millage
costs would require an increase in the                              •$8.00 increase Homestead Exemption)
                                                     (Assessed Value of $204,714 within single-family fire fee
Assessment fee of 18.73% or $15.66 for a single
family residence. To mitigate some of the              $1,200                          Operating   Debt        Fire
increase this year the General fund will subsidize     $1,100
the Fire fund to reduce the increase in the                           $824.49                  $825.73                   $850.82
                                                       $1,000
assessment to $8.00 annually or 9.57%. This will
                                                        $900
require an amount of $544,500 of funding from
                                                        $800          $83.62                   $91.62                    $91.62
the General fund.                                                     $45.11                   $38.35                    $39.66
                                                        $700
In addition, the City has applied for a grant           $600
from the Department of Homeland Security                                                                                 $719.54
                                                        $500           $695.76                $695.76
called “SAFER” to partially fund 20 of the new          $400
positions. This grant is similar to the “COPS”          $300
                                                                                            Net Tax = $6.76           Net Tax = $18.33
                                                                                              Decrease                    Increase
grant the City received several years ago to            $200
cover the cost of new police hires. The SAFER           $100
                                                                                            Fire Fee = $8.00          Fire Fee = $8.00
                                                                                                Increase                  Increase
grant is for new firefighter positions and pays              $0
on a percentage basis. Since the 20 positions                         FY 2006                 FY 2007                    FY 2007
will be hired as of April 2007, this could mean a                    Average Coral           Assuming No              Assuming a 3.0%
                                                                  Springs home “Save          Increase In               Increase In
maximum of $316,710 for the Fire Fund.                             Our Homes” Value         Assessed Value            Assessed Value
                                                                       $204,714                                          $210,855
                                                                                                                                     7/18/2006 8:46 AM

 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                          49
     Measuring Results
     Quarterly Performance Review                         Six (8%) goals were not achieved by year-end and
                                                          one (1%), the number of volunteer firefighters,
     Overview                                             was no longer applicable because the volunteer
                                                          program was discontinued and replaced by a
     The City has developed a performance                 reserve program.
     measurement and management system to align
     department services and programs with the City
     Commission’s six strategic priorities identified      KIO Analysis and Current
     in the Fiscal Year 2005 and 2006 Strategic
     Plan. The system enables departments to              Initiative Update
     systematically measure results and make timely       Thirty-one Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) have
     adjustments when results fall short of expected      been established, all of which support at least
     performance levels. Three components make up         one of the six strategic priorities. Performance
     the system: a quarterly performance reporting        goals for each KIO were developed as part of the
     program, a composite index that measures the         City Commission’s adopted Fiscal Year 2005 and
     overall financial and service operation position,     2006 Strategic Plan.
     and the State of the City Report. These elements
     play an important part in the City’s overall         Of the original 31 KIOs, 2 were suspended due
     Business Plan, and help keep the organization on     to the aftermath of Hurricane Wilma. Because
     target.                                              of the extensive damage throughout the City, the
                                                          number of building permits submitted spiked
     Findings as of Fiscal Year-End 2006                  following Wilma. Staff has been struggling to
     A total of 85 performance measures have been         keep up with the demand, thus the cycle time
     established to measure results achieved through      measuring the percent of plan reviews completed
     services and programs provided by the City’s         within 15 days has been adversely affected. In
     12 operating and support departments. Five of        addition to damaging homes and businesses,
     the 85 performance measures double as Key            Hurricane Wilma also destroyed thousands of
     Intended Outcomes (KIOs) and are discussed in        trees throughout the City, many of them located
     the KIO Analysis. Of the remaining 80 measures,      in our parks. Both of our ESL sites were closed
     59 (74%) met or exceeded their goal and 9 (11%)      for several months while tree removal and clean
     achieved results that were within 95% of their       up occurred, which caused a significant drop
     goals.                                               in the number of visitors participating in tours
                                                          of the sites. The City met or exceeded 27 of the
     Hurricane Wilma, which struck in October             remaining 29 KIOs. Of note:
     2005, negatively impacted more than a dozen
     performance measures, though only five were           • Voter turnout for the November 2004 election
     not able to correct by year-end. Hurricane Wilma       was 53.32%, which was much higher than
     caused extensive damage throughout the area.           expected, and 10.6% for the municipal election
     Electricity was out for more than two weeks in         in March 2006.
     some areas, almost all traffic signals were out of    • The overall rating of the City in terms of
     order, roads were impassable because of debris,        communicating with residents was 89% in
     and many homes and businesses were damaged.            Fiscal Year 2005 and increased to 92% in
     All City employees were assigned emergency             Fiscal Year 2006.
     duties, causing a halt in normal work activity for
     at least two weeks. Police and Fire/EMS ensured      • The overall quality rating by residents remained
     public safety after the storm; Public Works            consistently high at 95% for Fiscal Years 2005
     organized debris removal and repaired City             and 2006.
     property damage; and Development Services
                                                          • Residents’ satisfaction with customer service
     remains busy, helping residents navigate through
                                                            dropped slightly from 97% to 95%, yet it
     the rebuilding process and reconcile Code
                                                            exceeded the goal of 92%.
     Enforcement issues.
                                                          • Employee satisfaction rated 95% in Fiscal Year
                                                            2006 and 94% in Fiscal Year 2005.

50                                                                        Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
• Seventy-four percent of residents found taxes         • During Fiscal Years 2005 and 2006 the non-
   to be acceptable in Fiscal Year 2006, down             residential value made up 22.1% and 21.2%,
   slightly from 77% in Fiscal Year 2005.                 respectively, of the total taxable value. The
                                                          goal was 23%. Non-residential taxable value
• All three credit rating agencies reaffirmed              increased by a remarkable $143.4 million in
  the City’s “AAA” rating, which is especially            Fiscal Year 2006. This compares to a $91.8
  significant so soon after Hurricane Wilma,               million increase in Fiscal Year 2005 and a
  proving we overcame major fiscal challenges              $60.5 million increase in Fiscal Year 2004.
  caused by the storm.                                    However, these significant increases in non-
• With the exception of a court ordered rate              residential property value were outpaced by
  increase in Fiscal Year 2000, the operating             even greater increases in residential property
  millage rate has remained stable for 13 years           value.
  and is the lowest as compared to other large          • For Fiscal Years 2005 and 2006, the Coral
  cities in the County.                                    Springs Charter School achieved a combined
• School overcrowding continues to decrease.               gain of 1% in math and reading mean scale
   Coral Springs schools were at 112% of capacity          scores, falling just short of the 2% goal for the
   in Fiscal Year 2005 and dropped to 104% of              two-year period.
   capacity in Fiscal Year 2006.                        All of the KIO results are summarized in the
• More than 1,200 students over two years               chart on page54.
  participated in college and professional classes      Forty-four new initiatives were chosen for Fiscal
  offered at satellite facilities within the City.      Year 2006. Thirty-one initiatives have been
• The number of projects and partners focused on        completed and the remainder are continuing into
  enhancing the environment surpassed the two-          Fiscal Year 2007 The status and summary is on
  year goal with the completion of 31 projects          page 56.
  assisted by 25 partners.                              Sources: Financial Services—Management & Budget Office, Fiscal Year 2006
                                                        Fourth Quarter Performance Measurement Report
• The City’s crime rate in Fiscal Year 2006
  (calendar year 2005) was 2,259.3 per 100,000
  residents, the lowest in at least 10 years with
  a decrease of 17.28%, after a record 11.48%
                                                        Composite Index
  decrease from Fiscal Year 2004 to Fiscal Year         The Composite Index comprises ten indicators,
  2005.                                                 carefully chosen to give an overall snapshot of
                                                        our financial and operating results. The Fiscal
• Over 3,000 youths were involved in City               Year 2005 Composite Index score increased by
  sponsored leadership opportunities during             more than five points, and is projected to trend
  Fiscal Years 2005 and 2006, exceeding the             upward for Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007. A chart
  two-year goal of 2,000.                               and description for each indicator is presented on
• Teen volunteer hours continue to be high, with        the following two pages.
   almost 29,000 donated to the City over two
   years.                                                                           Composite Index
                                                       Composite Index
• City bus ridership exceeded expectations with
  222,030 riders over two yeas.
                                                      175
                                                                                                                                                        156.8 155.4
• The majority of minority residents (91% for                                                                                             145.6 151.4
                                                      150                                                           136.7 141.1 140.9
  Fiscal Year 2005 and 82% for Fiscal Year                                                                  126.5
                                                                                                    120.7
  2006) reported that they feel the City is a great   125
                                                                    105.2 105.1
                                                                                    112.8 114.2

  place to live. The rating over the years has              100.0
                                                                                                                                                                Projected




                                                      100
  increased from 74% in Fiscal Year 1999.
                                                       75
• Ninety-four percent in Fiscal Year 2006, and
  95% in Fiscal Year 2005, of residents surveyed       50
  support City Government for respecting
                                                       25
  religious and ethnic diversity.
                                                        0
Only two goals were not met during the two-year              FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY     FY     FY     FY     FY     FY
cycle.                                                      1994    1995    1996    1997    1998    1999    2000    2001    2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                 51
            Residential Property Value
   Residential Property Values                                                                                                          Good
$8.0
         Billions
                                                                                                                   $7.6
                                                                                                                                       Source:
                                                                                                                                                                       Residential Taxable Assessed Value is projected to
$7.0                                                                                                                                   Broward
                                                                                                       $6.5
                                                                                                                                       County
$6.0
                                                                                       $5.2
                                                                                               $5.7                                    Property
                                                                                                                                       Appraiser’s      Residential taxable assessed property values have
$5.0                                                                           $4.7
                                                                                                                                       Office
                                                                                                                                                        steadily increased every year since Fiscal Year




                                                                                                                      Projected
                                                                       $4.3
                                                               $4.0
$4.0
                                      $3.3
                                               $3.6    $3.7                                                                                             1994. Residential taxable assessed values are
                               $3.1
$3.0
       $2.5     $2.6
                        $2.8                                                                                                           (Property
                                                                                                                                       values
                                                                                                                                                        projected to reach $7.6 billion in Fiscal Year 2007,
$2.0                                                                                                                                   reflect
                                                                                                                                       calendar         triple the assessed value in Fiscal Year 1994.
$1.0                                                                                                                                   year rather
                                                                                                                                       than fiscal
                                                                                                                                       year.)
$0.0
        FY
       1994
                FY
               1995
                        FY
                       1996
                                FY
                               1997
                                        FY
                                       1998
                                                FY
                                               1999
                                                        FY
                                                       2000
                                                                FY
                                                               2001
                                                                        FY
                                                                       2002
                                                                                FY
                                                                               2003
                                                                                        FY
                                                                                       2004
                                                                                                FY
                                                                                               2005
                                                                                                        FY
                                                                                                       2006
                                                                                                                    FY
                                                                                                                   2007                                              School Overcrowding
                                                                                                                                                        School Overcrowding                                                                                                Good
                                                                                                                                                       150%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  % Capacity Student Stations Source:
                                                                                                                                                              128% 127%
                         Overcrowding has continually decreased for Coral 125%                                                                                                123%
                                                                                                                                                                                     117%
                                                                                                                                                                                            122% 119% 122% 122% 123%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Broward
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              County School
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               113% 114% 112%
                         Springs schools. The decrease may be attributed                                                                                                                                                                         104%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       108% Board and
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Florida
                                                                            100%
                         to the opening of Coral Glades High School and
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Inventory of
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              School

                         classroom additions at schools throughout the City. 75%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Housing




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Projected
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              (F.I.S.H.)

                         Enrollment and capacity numbers are provided by 50%                                                                                                                                                                                               (Percentages
                         the Broward County School District.                                                                                                                                                                                                               reflect
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           academic
                                                                                                                                                       25%                                                                                                                 year rather
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           than fiscal
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           year.)
                                                                                                                                                        0%


           Volunteers in Government
                                                                                                                                                               FY      FY      FY     FY     FY     FY      FY   FY      FY     FY     FY     FY      FY     FY
                                                                                                                                                              1994    1995    1996   1997   1998   1999    2000 2001    2002   2003   2004   2005    2006   2007

  Volunteers in Government                                                                                                                Good
500                                                                                                      479
                                                                                        458     463                        450

400
                                                                410
                                                                        431
                                                                                404                                                                     The number of Volunteers in Government reached
                                                                                                                                        Source: List
                                                                                                                                                        an all-time high of 479 for Fiscal Year 2006.
300
                                                        303                                                                             of Boards
                                                                                                                                                        Members of our committees and boards are counted
                                                                                                                           Projected




                                       276      266                                                                                     and
                                265
                223
                        237                                                                                                             Committees
                                                                                                                                        maintained      as volunteers for this indicator.
200     179                                                                                                                             by City
                                                                                                                                        Clerk’s
                                                                                                                                        Office
100



   0
        FY
       1994
                FY
               1995
                        FY
                       1996
                                FY
                               1997
                                       FY
                                      1998
                                                FY
                                               1999
                                                        FY
                                                       2000
                                                                FY
                                                               2001
                                                                        FY
                                                                       2002
                                                                                FY
                                                                               2003
                                                                                         FY
                                                                                        2004
                                                                                                 FY
                                                                                                2005
                                                                                                         FY
                                                                                                        2006
                                                                                                                      FY
                                                                                                                     2007                                  Non-residential Property Percentage
                                                                                                                                                         Non-Residential Property Values     Good
                          Non-residential property values account for                                                                                  30%
                                                                                                                                                              As a % of Total Property Values
                          one-fifth of all property values in Coral Springs.                                                                            25%                                                                  23.6%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Source:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Broward
                                                                                                                                                                                                                22.9% 23.8%
                          Though all property values have increased over                                                                                                                                                          22.6% 22.1%                   County
                                                                                                                                                              21.8%                                       22.1%
                                                                                                                                                                                                21.2%                                               21.2%
                                                                                                                                                                      21.0%
                                                                                                                                                                              20.0% 19.8% 20.5%                                                           20.1% Property
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Appraiser’s
                          the years, residential property values (see first                                                                             20%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Office

                          chart) have increased at a greater rate than non-                                                                            15%

                          residential. Non-residential includes commercial/
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Projected




                                                                                                                                                       10%                                                                                                                 (Property
                          industrial sites, as well as agricultural,                                                                                                                                                                                                       values reflect
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           calendar year
                          institutional, government and miscellaneous real                                                                              5%                                                                                                                 rather than
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           fiscal year.)
                          estate.                                                                                                                       0%

                               Employee Productivity                                                                                                           FY
                                                                                                                                                              1994
                                                                                                                                                                       FY
                                                                                                                                                                      1995
                                                                                                                                                                               FY
                                                                                                                                                                              1996
                                                                                                                                                                                      FY
                                                                                                                                                                                     1997
                                                                                                                                                                                             FY
                                                                                                                                                                                            1998
                                                                                                                                                                                                    FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                   1999
                                                                                                                                                                                                           FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                          2000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2001
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2002
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2003
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      2004
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             2005
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2006
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             FY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            2007

  Productivity                                                                                                                            Good
12.0
       10.91                                                     Employees Per Million Dollars of Revenue
               10.07   9.87
10.0                           9.25   9.08
                                              8.78

 8.0
                                                      7.96    7.61
                                                                      7.25    7.17
                                                                                      6.94
                                                                                                                                  Source:               In Fiscal Year 2005, it will take fewer than 6.57
                                                                                              6.57             6.52               Financial

 6.0
                                                                                                      6.39
                                                                                                                                  Services
                                                                                                                                  Annual
                                                                                                                                                        employees to generate one million dollars of
                                                                                                                                  Budget.               revenue, down from 6.94 in Fiscal Year 2004, and
                                                                                                               Projected




                                                                                                                                                        down from 10.91 in Fiscal Year 1994.
 4.0                                                                                                                              (Calculation
                                                                                                                                  includes full-
                                                                                                                                  time
 2.0                                                                                                                              employees all
                                                                                                                                  funds divided
                                                                                                                                  by Net
                                                                                                                                  Revenues)
 0.0
        FY      FY      FY      FY     FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY      FY
       1994    1995    1996    1997   1998    1999    2000    2001    2002    2003    2004    2005    2006    2007



52                                                                                                                                                                                                               Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
          Customer Satisfaction Survey
    Customer Satisfaction                                                                                                                                       Good
  100%                                                                                                                  95%     95%
                                                                     93%                         93%       93%                                     93%
                                                                                                                                                                                  A record 95% of residents surveyed rated the
                                                    90%                                 92%
               89%      88%       89%      89%               91%              90%

   80%                                                                                                                                                                            City as excellent or good in customer satisfaction
                                                                                                                                                                                  for Fiscal Years 2005 and 2006 according to the




                                                                                                                                                   Projected
                                                                                                                                                                                  Annual Citizen Survey conducted by Center for
   60%
                                                                                                                                                                Source:
                                                                                                                                                                2005

   40%
                                                                                                                                                                Resident
                                                                                                                                                                Survey
                                                                                                                                                                                  Research & Public Policy. A rating of at least 93%
                                                                                                                                                                conducted
                                                                                                                                                                by The
                                                                                                                                                                                  is expected for Fiscal Year 2007.
   20%                                                                                                                                                          Center for
                                                                                                                                                                Research
                                                                                                                                                                and Public
                                                                                                                                                                Policy
    0%
                FY
               1994
                         FY
                        1995
                                   FY
                                  1996
                                            FY
                                           1997
                                                     FY
                                                    1998
                                                             FY
                                                            1999
                                                                      FY   FY
                                                                     2000 2001
                                                                                         FY
                                                                                        2002
                                                                                                  FY
                                                                                                 2003
                                                                                                            FY
                                                                                                           2004
                                                                                                                     FY
                                                                                                                    2005
                                                                                                                                 FY
                                                                                                                                2006
                                                                                                                                                    FY
                                                                                                                                                   2007                                     Athletic League Participants
                                                                                                                                                                             Athletic League Participants                                                                                   Good
                              The decrease of athletic league participants in         14,000                                                                                                                                                              12,636
                              Fiscal Year 2005 was influenced by the issuance of                                                                                                                                                         11,757
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 12,500
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   11,624
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         11,150
                              a new fee for non-residents. The decrease during        12,000                                                                                                                            10,855 10,959
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  10,151 10,100

                              Fiscal Year 2006 is due to an increase in the number 10,000                                                                                                               8,270
                                                                                                                                                                                          7,773 7,577           7,800
                              of independent teams— from 5 to 30 for winter            8,000

                              baseball. Players on independent team members are 6,000




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Projected
                              not counted in this measure, though they utilize City                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Source:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      City of
                              facilities and pay fees. Some of the activities offered 4,000                                                                                                                                                                                                           Coral
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Springs
                              are basketball, soccer, football, baseball, roller       2,000                                                                                                                                                                                                          Parks &
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Recreation
                                                                                                                                                                                    N/A
                              hockey, lacrosse, cheerleading and BMX bike racing.
                                            Crime Rate                                     0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Department

                                                                                                                                                                                    FY   FY       FY   FY        FY   FY         FY   FY          FY   FY           FY   FY        FY   FY
    Crime Rate                                                                                                                                                  Good
                                                                                                                                                                                   1994 1995     1996 1997      1998 1999       2000 2001        2002 2003         2004 2005      2006 2007


6,000
                               5167.7
                                                                             Incidents of major crimes per 100,000 population                                  Source: City
                     5093.3

5,000
            4796.7                      4885.7

                                                 4390.9
                                                                                                                                                               of Coral
                                                                                                                                                               Springs
                                                                                                                                                                                  The crime rate per 100,000 residents decreased
                                                          3987.6
                                                                                                                                                               Police
                                                                                                                                                               Department
                                                                                                                                                                                  17.28% for Fiscal Year 2006 as compared to Fiscal
4,000                                                              3506.9    3390.1
                                                                                               3193.5
                                                                                                         3085.5
                                                                                                                                                               Uniform
                                                                                                                                                               Crime Report
                                                                                                                                                                                  Year 2005. A reduction in the number of property
                                                                                                                                                                                  crimes contributed to the overall decrease in crime.
                                                                                      3001.2                                                2900.0
                                                                                                                   2731.4
3,000

                                                                                                                                                                                  The crime rate is projected to increase slightly
                                                                                                                              2259.3
                                                                                                                                               Projected




2,000
                                                                                                                                                               (Crime figures
                                                                                                                                                               are calculated
                                                                                                                                                                                  during Fiscal Year 2007.
1,000                                                                                                                                                          utilizing
                                                                                                                                                               calendar year
                                                                                                                                                               rather than

                                                                                                                                                                                                    Employee Satisfaction
   0                                                                                                                                                           fiscal year.)
             FY       FY        FY       FY       FY       FY       FY       FY        FY        FY       FY        FY         FY           FY
            1994     1995      1996     1997     1998     1999     2000     2001      2002      2003     2004      2005       2006         2007
                                                                                                                                                                             Employee Satisfaction                                                                                          Good
                                                                                                                                                                        100%
                                                                                                                                                                                                        93%                              95%      95% 93%                  94%    95%    93%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                90%      92%    91%                                 91%
                                                                                                                                                                                                 89%
                                                                                                                                                                                   81%    82%
                                                                                                                                                                          80%                                                                                                                         Source: City
                             All employees are surveyed annually by the Human                                                                                                                                                                                                                         of Coral
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Springs
                             Resources Department to determine the overall                                                                                                60%                                                                                                                         Human
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Resources
                             job satisfaction. The employee satisfaction rating
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Projected
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Department

                             increased slightly for Fiscal Year 2006, and is
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Employee
                                                                                                                                                                          40%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Survey

                             projected to remain stable for Fiscal Year 2007.
                                                                                                                                                                          20%




         Accidents at Major Intersections
                                                                                                                                                                             0%
                                                                                                                                                                                    FY     FY     FY     FY      FY       FY     FY   FY          FY        FY       FY     FY     FY     FY
                                                                                                                                                                                   1994   1995   1996   1997    1998     1999   2000 2001        2002      2003     2004   2005   2006   2007
    Accidents at Major Intersections                                                                                                                            Good
   250

             205                203
                                                                                                                                                                                  The number of accidents at 16 major intersections
   200                                                                                                                                                                            is tracked and analyzed to reveal trends and to
                                                  170      169
                       158               165
                                                                   147
                                                                                               160
                                                                                                                                     145
                                                                                                                                                           Source:
                                                                                                                                                           City of
                                                                                                                                                                                  identify which methods are effective at reducing
   150                                                                                138
                                                                            130                         131       132
                                                                                                                          122                              Coral
                                                                                                                                                           Springs
                                                                                                                                                                                  the number of crashes. Overall, this measure has
                                                                                                                                                           Police
                                                                                                                                                                                  been trending downward since Fiscal Year 1994. It
                                                                                                                                       Projected




   100
                                                                                                                                                           Department
                                                                                                                                                           Traffic
                                                                                                                                                           Division               is projected that the number of accidents at major
    50
                                                                                                                                                                                  intersections will not exceed 145 during the next
        0
                                                                                                                                                                                  fiscal year.
              FY       FY        FY      FY       FY       FY       FY       FY        FY       FY       FY      FY        FY      FY
             1994     1995      1996    1997     1998     1999     2000     2001      2002     2003     2004    2005      2006    2007



        City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                53
                                    Fiscal Years 2005 & 2006 K IO Summary
Strategic Planning Cycle Fiscal Years 2005 and 2006
Key Intended Outcomes
                                                                                                            FYs 2005&06       FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2006       FY 2006       FY 2006        FY 2006        FYs 2005 & 06
                                                                                                            2-Year-Goal      Year End     1st Qtr       2nd Qtr       3rd Qtr        4th Qtr       Year End       2-Year-Actual
Customer-Involved Government (7)
       Number of volunteer hours donated to the City of Coral Springs
 1                                                                                                   ��c          60,000        31,711       6,091         4,922         6,620         16,052         33,685         65,396
       (30,000 each year; 60,000 two years)                                                                                                                                                                                     �
 2     Percent of voter turnout                                                                      ��a            15%        53.32%          N/A         10.6%            —              —           10.6%        31.96%      �
 3     Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with residents (City Survey)             ��a            90%           89%          N/A          92%             —              —            92%               90%   �
 4     Number of mentors trained                                                                     ��a            150             29              8         38            43             43            132              161   �
 5     Overall quality rating for City services and programs (City Survey)                           �a             92%           95%          N/A          95%             —              —            95%               95%   �
 6     Overall satisfaction rating of City Employees (HR Survey)                                     ��a            92%           94%          N/A           N/A           N/A           95%            95%               95%   �
 7     Quality rating for City employees customer service (City Survey)                              ��a            92%           97%          N/A          95%             —              —            95%               96%   �


Financial Health & Economic Development (7)
 1   �Maintain   City bond ratings Moody Aaa, Fitch AAA, S&P AAA                                     ��a      Moody Aaa      Moody Aaa Moody Aaa Moody Aaa Moody Aaa Moody Aaa                     Moody Aaa Moody Aaa
                                                                                                               Fitch AAA      Fitch AAA Fitch AAA Fitch AAA Fitch AAA Fitch AAA                     Fitch AAA Fitch AAA         �
                                                                                                                S&P AAA        S&P AAA  S&P AAA   S&P AAA   S&P AAA   S&P AAA                        S&P AAA   S&P AAA
 2     Commercial square footage development initiated within the Downtown CRA                       ��a         140,000       210,000              0             0             0              0              0     210,000     �
 3     Percent of plan reviews completed within 15 days                                              ��a            95%         97.8%       98.2%          91.5%         48.9%         84.9%           74.8%              84%   H
 4     Non-residential value as a percent of total taxable value*                                    �a             23%         22.1%          N/A         21.2%            —              —           21.2%         21.6%      �
 5     Residents' value rating (City Survey)                                                         ��a            70%           77%          N/A          74%             —              —            74%               75%   �
 6     Percentage increase of operating millage rate                                                 ��a                0%         0%          0%             —             —              —             0%               0%    �
 7     Estimated rate of return for the City in economic development incentives                      �c            $225         268.41         N/A           N/A           N/A       $225 est       $225 est       $225 est     �

Excellence in Education (3)
 1   �Percent    of school overcrowding in public schools                                            ��a          125%           112%          N/A         104%             —              —           104%           108%      �
 2   �Number     of students participating in partnering institutes of higher education              ��a            250            586         136           171            94           230             631          1,217     �
 3   �Achieve    2% gains in reading/math mean scale score at the Charter School**                   ��a                2%        0.4%         N/A          0.6%            —              —            0.6%              1%    �

Neighborhood & Environmental Vitality (8)
 1     Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year                             �c                 60          31              8         10                6          10             34               65   �
       (30 each year; 60 two years)
 2     Number of cooperative projects and the number of different partners                                      12 proj         14 proj      2 proj        1 proj       10 proj         4 proj        17 proj       31 proj
       (public, private and intra-city depts.) focused on enhancing the environment
                                                                                                      ��c
                                                                                                                 8 part                      2 part                                                                 25 part
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                �
                                                                                                                                13 part                    1 part       10 part         1 part        12 part
 3     City crime rate (crimes/100,000 residents—Calendar Year)                                      ��a         3100.0       2,731.40         N/A           N/A        2,259.3            —         2,259.30         2,495     �
 4     Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to admin./judicial process      ��a            65%           80%         84%           88%           81%            76%            82%               81%   �
 5     Number of visitors participating in tours of 2 ESL sites (excluding Earth Fest)               ��a    200 per year           130              0         32            12             24             68               99   H
 6     Achieve overall reduction of 15% for the 85th percentile of speeds on traffic calmed roads    �c             15%           16%          N/A           N/A           N/A         14.3%           14.3%         15.2%      �
 7     Number of accidents at 16 major intersections                                                 ��a    155 per year           132          40            21            28             33            122              127   �
 8     Number of riders in intracity bus routes                                                      �c          210,000       111,436     23,555        29,374        28,484         29,181        110,594         222,030     �

Youth Development & Family Values (3)
 1     Number of youths involved in City sponsored leadership opportunities (1,000 per yr)           �c            2,000         2,092         195           977           540             23           1,735         3,827     �
       Number of teen volunteer hours donated to the City of Coral Springs
 2                                                                                                   ��c          20,000        14,398       1,443           788         1,100         11,244         14,576         28,973
       (10,000 each year; 20,000 two years)                                                                                                                                                                                     �
 3     Number of Middle School After-School Programs offered annually                                ��a     10 per year            12          12            12            12             14             14               14   �


Unity in the Community (3)
 1   �Minority   residents who feel that the City is a great place to live (City Survey)             ��a            80%           91%          N/A          82%             —              —            82%               86%   �
 2   �Citizen   rating of City Government for respecting religious and ethnic diversity (City Survey) ��a           90%           95%          N/A          94%             —              —            94%               94%   �
 3   �Percentage    of minority applicants per recruitment                                           ��a            35%           49%         43%           49%           53%            52%            50%               49%   �
                                                                                                       a = annual
                                                                                                       c = cumulative
     Notes:                                                                                                                                                                         Fiscal Years 2005 & 2006 Results
       *While the City does not expect to meet the two-year goal of "23% non-residential as percent of                                                                               Met or Exceeded Goal   27   �
       total taxable value", the City has seen impressive growth in the non-residential tax base. The                                                                                Hurricane Wilma Impact 2     H
       increase for the 2005 tax year was $143.4 million, following a $91.8 million increase in 2004.                                                                                Goal Not Met           2     �
       Growth in the residential tax base has overshadowed non-residential growth.                                                                                                   Total Measures                  31
       **Coral Springs Charter School was the only high school in the City to earn an "A" grade.




54                                                                                                                                                                    Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Appendices

Appendices
     Fiscal Year 2006 Initiatives .......................................................................................................................................................... 56
     Staffing Changes......................................................................................................................................................................... 58
     General Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................................................. 59
     Fire Fund Summary..................................................................................................................................................................... 62
     Water & Sewer Fund Summary ................................................................................................................................................... 63
     Health Fund Summary ................................................................................................................................................................ 64
     General Insurance Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................................. 65
     Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................. 66
     Conference Center Fund Summary .............................................................................................................................................. 66
     Coral Springs Center for the Arts Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................ 67
     Public Art Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................................................... 67
     Equipment Services Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 68
     Debt Service Fund Summary....................................................................................................................................................... 69
     Major Capital Projects by Department ........................................................................................................................................ 70
     Major Capital Projects by Location .............................................................................................................................................. 71




  City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                                                                  55
                            Fiscal Year 2006 Initiatives
Customer-Involved Government
Bond Referendum             COMPLETED The Public Safety Bond Referendum passed by a resounding 82.5%.
Education Program
Part-Time Police Officers    COMPLETED Policy is complete. Hired one officer. Will be an ongoing program.
City-wide Volunteer          Continuing     Work on this event has been put on hold due to hurricane restoration.
Celebration
Reserve Firefighters         COMPLETED Training of the new Reserve Firefighters began on January 30, 2006 and they began shift
                                      work in March.
Ethics Training,            COMPLETED Completed research relative to ethics best practices. Staff will prepare applicable training
Benchmarking                          materials such as videos, etc.
Historical Museum           COMPLETED Created an exhibit on the life of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Hosted a luncheon with city
                                      pioneers, and meetings with veteran teachers from our schools to document what teaching
                                      was like in the early days of Coral Springs. This will be an ongoing project.
Quality Improvements—       COMPLETED Directors met with consultant four times since December. With staff participation,
Process Improvement                   the directors prioritized processes, mapped them, and utilized strategies for process
Training                              improvements. This initiative will be continued next fiscal year.

Financial Health & Economic Development
Post Office Relocation        Continuing     The City and AMERA have met with new post office staff; progress is slow.
Alley Improvements          COMPLETED Project is complete. Two alleys were restored.
Knowledge Network                     ActiveStrategy software is planned for trial implementation this fall. The intranet is being
                             Continuing
                                      redesigned.
Opening of Public Safety    COMPLETED Construction on the Training Center, which was delayed by Hurricane Wilma, is complete.
Training Center
Regional Fire               COMPLETED Automatic aid is in effect for Margate, Coconut Creek, Parkland and Coral Springs. Each city
Communications                        has a mirror image of the other’s dispatch system. The program has been implemented in the
                                      southeast section of the City with Margate and is being implemented in the northeast section
                                      with Coconut Creek/Margate.
Fire Apparatus              COMPLETED The new pumpers have been ordered and will be delivered at the end of January 2007.
Replacement Program
Police Field Reporting       Continuing     Process improvement focus group is working through the recommendations.
Construction Management      Continuing     The City has 9 projects that are now part of the Construction Management initiative. These
                                            projects are in various stages of design or construction with a budget of approximately $9.5
                                            million dollars.
Water & Sewer System        COMPLETED The Master Plan was presented to the City Manager’s staff during the review of the FY
Master Plan Update                    07 budget. The plan shows $90 million in improvements over the next ten years with
                                      approximately $6 million budgeted for next year.
Utility Interconnect with   COMPLETED Work is substantially complete. Awaiting test results from Broward County Health
Margate                               Department before interconnect can be placed in operation.

Excellence in Education
Charter School Art &         Continuing     Demolition at the construction site is complete and bids have been received for construction.
Music Wing
Charter School Academic     COMPLETED New Student Information System has been rolled out, enabling parents to take a larger role in
Achievement Program                   their child’s academic progress. Instructional focus process is using Sterling principles and
                                      disaggregated data to close learning gaps.
University Partnership II   COMPLETED Barry University and Broward Community College (BCC) accommodated 631 enrollees at
                                      City facilities. Barry held 4 classes and BCC held 32 classes since October.
Teen Safe Driving Program   COMPLETED Almost 1,000 letters for citations and 221 letters for warning were mailed to parents since
                                      October. Informational brochures accompanied the letters to the parents.




56                                                                                                   Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Neighborhood & Environmental Vitality
Zone 4 Action Plan            COMPLETED Ramblewood East agreement approved by the City Commission and the offices are
                                          completed. The Bike Unit and other specialty units will be utilizing this space to enhance
                                          officer visibility.
Condo Conversions             COMPLETED A new application requires converting properties to submit condo docs to the City prior to the
                                          conversion process.
Broken Woods                   Continuing Pedestrian paths in and around the Downtown are being designed to include Broken Woods.
Redevelopment                             As the Downtown zoning district and the Downtown Pathway project reach final design
                                          phases, the owners will be contacted and their input solicited.
National Wildlife             COMPLETED Application approved by National Wildlife Federation. City staff is now working closely with
Certification                            NWF to monitor the progress.
Traffic Management              Continuing     Held Transportation Workshop on May 30, 2006. Reps from FDOT, Broward County,
                                              Kittelson and staff discussed transit, congestion connectivity, traffic calming & construction
                                              improvements. TMT team developing 10 new traffic-calming plans.
10th Anniversary Slice of     COMPLETED Conducted all six meetings. Received extremely positive feedback on the new format.
the Springs
Land Development Code          Continuing     Staff has completed review with AMERA Urban Developers and is currently drafting the
Update for Redevelopment                      guidelines for the overlay district. Will continue to be reviewed in terms of impact on the
                                              surrounding area. The Landscape Ordinance was approved by the Commission.
Improvements to ESL           COMPLETED Hurricane Wilma clean up is complete and all sites are open for tours.
Preserves
Entryway Signs                 Continuing     The City Commission has reviewed the conceptual sign designs and we are having the
                                              designer finalize the plans. Should have a sample sign by the end of December.
Business Communications        Continuing     Communications & Marketing is designing a recurring page in the Coral Springs magazine
                                              dedicated to the challenges and responsibilities of running a business in the City.

Sign Code Changes Phase II COMPLETED After special meetings with the Chamber and a public workshop, the P/Z board approved
                                     staff’s recommendation.

Youth Development & Family Values
Athletic Field                COMPLETED The Artificial Turf Fields are completed and are getting heavy use. New lighting system
Improvements                            installed at North Community Park.
Protection from Sex           COMPLETED The system for Predator/Offender tracking is in place. One predator and 34 offenders
Predators                               currently reside in the City.
Inter-generational            COMPLETED Classes are continuing with great success. Provided 3 laptop computers at Sartory Senior
Computer Classes                        Center for people to use.
Rape Aggression Defense       COMPLETED Held 5 RAD Classes with a total of 96 attendees.
(RAD) Classes
Teen Citizen Police            Continuing     Development of the program has been completed and approved. Targeted date for application
Academy                                       process postponed until next summer (2007).
Youth Offenders Juvenile      COMPLETED Five youth offenders were enrolled in the program.
Deferred Prosecution
Program
Security in the Parks II      COMPLETED Cameras have been successfully installed at Betti Stradling. Began installation at Cypress
                                        Park.
Coral Glades Stadium          COMPLETED Construction is complete.
Comprehensive One-Stop        COMPLETED Non-profit meeting held on January 31. Information from each agency was summarized and
Shop                                    distributed to all in attendance.

Unity in the Community
International Soccer Fest      Continuing     This event was postponed until next year due to lack of commitments from international
                                              teams and a lack of funding. Planning for next year’s event will begin in the spring.
Slide & Glide Accessibility   COMPLETED The playground equipment is completely installed. Received $150,000 from County to assist
Project                                 with the playground, thus Shade Covers will be ordered and should be ready by end of year.

Study Circles                 COMPLETED CIGC Committee trained in facilitation skills in June. Commission selected youth
                                        involvement and activities as first topic.




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                             57
     Staffing Changes
     General Fund
                    Additions:
                    Senior Permit Service Representatives (Contractual-Building)                                             2
                    Law Enforcement Officers (Police Patrol)                                                                  2
                    Firefighter/Paramedics (Start Date 04-01-07)                                                              3
                    Parks & Recreation Coordinator (ESL)                                                                     1
                    Code Enforcement Officer                                                                                  1
                    Subtotal                                                                                                                      9

                    Deletions:
                    Office Assistant Part-time (Police Patrol)                                                               -1
                    Subtotal                                                                                                                     -1
     Net New Positions                                                                                                                                                 8
     Fire Fund*
                    Additions:
                    Firefighter/Paramedics (4 Start Date 04-01-07)                                                                                 6
     Net New Positions                                                                                                                                                 6
     Water & Sewer Fund
                    Additions:
                    Office Assistant (Administration)                                                                                              1
     Net New Positions                                                                                                                                                 1

     Total Net New Positions                                                                                                                                         15

                                 Net New Positions in Fiscal Year
     *Excludes Fire Staff for City of Parkland, Florida




     Net New Positions Per Fiscal Year
     50
                                                                                                                                  Excludes Fire Staff for
                                                                                                               44
                          40                                                                                                      City of Parkland, Florida
     40


                                                                                      29
     30



     20                                                       17
                                                                                                                          16                                  15
                                                  14                     13
                                      12
               8                                                                                                                                  7
     10                                                                                             8
                                                                                                                                      5


      0
             FY          FY          FY          FY          FY          FY           FY          FY          FY          FY          FY          FY          FY
            1995        1996        1997        1998        1999        2000         2001        2002        2003        2004        2005        2006        2007

     Note: Chart shows increase in Fiscal Year 2007 primarily due to addition of 11 Public Safety positions. In Fiscal Year 2003, Public Safety employees were added as a
     result of September 11th. Paid firefighters were added in Fiscal Year 2001 in the Fire Department’s move to a paid carreer staff instead of volunteers. EMS startup
     began in Fiscal Year 1996. (Chart excludes all fire staff positions added to City of Parkland.)


58                                                                                                                      Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
General F und Summary
                               Statement of Revenues and Expenditures
                                            General Fund
                                                                     FY 2006       FY 2007             $              %
                                         FY 2004       FY 2005       Adopted       Adopted        Change From     Change From
                                          Actual        Actual        Budget       Budget           FY 2006         FY 2006
Revenues
General Operating

   Ad Valorem Taxes                      $24,633,008   $27,055,409   $30,243,419    $34,883,030     $4,639,611        15.34%
   Solid Waste Assessment                    817,322       816,127       843,435        885,607         42,172         5.00%

Franchise Fees:
   Electricity                             6,183,409     6,507,760     5,950,000      7,400,000      1,450,000        24.37%
   Solid Waste                             1,192,555     1,266,898     1,280,000      1,332,740         52,740         4.12%
   Towing                                     18,365        19,322        16,000         16,560            560         3.50%
Subtotal - Franchise Fees                  7,394,329     7,793,980     7,246,000      8,749,300      1,503,300        20.75%

Utility Service Taxes:
    Electricity                            6,845,896     7,129,381     7,050,000      7,050,000              0          0.00%
    Water                                  1,393,050     1,359,096     1,480,300      1,509,906         29,606          2.00%
    PEG Revenues                              34,702        37,338        87,375         57,000        (30,375)       -34.76%
    Propane/Natural Gas                      131,017       146,420       135,437        139,500          4,063          3.00%
Subtotal - Utility Taxes                   8,404,666     8,672,235     8,753,112      8,756,406          3,294          0.04%

State Intergovernmental Revenues:
    Communications Services Tax            5,874,328     5,778,167     5,750,000      5,750,000              0         0.00%
    Shared Revenues                        2,851,997     3,627,638     3,500,000      4,050,000        550,000        15.71%
    Alcoholic Beverages                       43,344        43,111        39,765         40,958          1,193         3.00%
    Sales Tax                              7,189,765     7,582,756     7,550,000      8,200,000        650,000         8.61%
    Municipal Rebate                          35,335        36,148        36,038         37,119          1,081         3.00%
Subtotal State Intergovernmental          15,994,769    17,067,820    16,875,803     18,078,077      1,202,274         7.12%

   Miscellaneous Grants                       45,000           909        80,000              0        (80,000)      -100.00%
   Community Bus Program Revenues            145,200       144,884       145,200        153,104          7,904          5.44%
   Local Option Gas Tax                    2,208,707     2,228,310     2,475,000      2,190,375       (284,625)       -11.50%
   Public Safety E911                        181,538       214,390       167,323        200,000         32,677         19.53%
   Resource Recovery Distribution            407,928       320,401             0              0              0             n/a
   One Cent Gas Tax                          149,393       148,212       109,294        110,387          1,093          1.00%
Subtotal Other Intergovernmental           3,137,767     3,057,106     2,976,817      2,653,866       (322,951)       -10.85%
Subtotal Intergovernmental                19,132,536    20,124,926    19,852,620     20,731,943        879,323          4.43%

Licenses and Permits:
   Building Permits                        1,647,994     2,232,753     2,050,000      2,400,000        350,000        17.07%
   Rebillable Overtime                        45,231        61,938        38,000         26,500        (11,500)      -30.26%
   Engineering Permits                        47,323        18,912        43,432         41,500         (1,932)       -4.45%
   Waste Hauling Permits                       2,222        17,814         1,600         12,000         10,400       650.00%
Subtotal Permits                           1,742,770     2,331,417     2,133,032      2,480,000        346,968        16.27%

   Occupational Licenses                   1,192,737     1,392,506     1,261,750      1,300,000         38,250         3.03%
Subtotal Licenses & Permits                2,935,507     3,723,923     3,394,782      3,780,000        385,218        11.35%

Charges For Services:
Recreation
   Athletics
     Cypress Park                            34,638        36,830        36,000         35,215            (785)        -2.18%
     Mullins Park                           309,533       320,213       368,865        356,129         (12,736)        -3.45%
     North Community Park (Park 31/35)       30,738        35,175        31,416         32,830           1,414          4.50%
     Neighborhood Parks                      48,651        53,289        52,890         51,919            (971)        -1.84%




  10/12/2006 at 12:56 PM                                                                     Adopted General Fund 10-12-06

City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                             59
                                  General Fund Summary (continued)
                                       Statement of Revenues and Expenditures
                                                    General Fund
                                                                            FY 2006       FY 2007             $              %
                                                FY 2004       FY 2005       Adopted       Adopted        Change From     Change From
                                                 Actual        Actual        Budget       Budget           FY 2006         FY 2006
        Recreation
          Activity Center                           47,734        60,887        49,819         52,061           2,242          4.50%
          Recreation Services                       21,097        21,864        27,000         21,568          (5,432)       -20.12%
          Summer Recreation                        628,129       638,526       650,000        650,000               0          0.00%
          Transportation                             2,720         3,080         3,000          3,135             135          4.50%
          Gymnasium                                291,748       276,256       302,123        291,944         (10,179)        -3.37%
        Aquatics
          Cypress Pool                             153,373        142,901      156,100        156,100               0          0.00%
          Mullins Pool                              22,441         42,903       53,000         55,750           2,750          5.19%
          Aquatics Complex                         930,163      1,106,458      913,460        960,900          47,440          5.19%
        Sportsplex                                 130,636        180,140      196,488        200,707           4,219          2.15%
        Tennis
          Tennis Center                             239,630       262,579       260,160        260,347            187          0.07%
          Cypress Tennis                            119,962       149,148       133,000        137,770          4,770          3.59%
     Subtotal Recreation                          3,011,191     3,330,249     3,233,321      3,266,375         33,054          1.02%

     Charges for Service - Other Funds:
        Engineering Charges                               0       212,624             0              0              0            n/a
        CRA Charges                                       0             0        22,400         23,408          1,008         4.50%
        Water & Sewer Fund                        1,539,689     1,363,939     1,422,972      1,479,555         56,583         3.98%
        Fire Fund                                    57,338       394,031       297,032        375,000         77,968        26.25%
     Subtotal - Chg/Svc - Other Funds             1,597,027     1,970,594     1,742,404      1,877,963        135,559         7.78%

     Charges for Service - Other:
        General Government                       $1,060,141     1,039,898     1,081,743      1,200,000        118,257         10.93%
        Public Safety                               785,083       788,903     1,033,749        871,632       (162,117)       -15.68%
        EMS Transport Fees                        1,399,484     1,976,930     1,842,880      2,200,000        357,120         19.38%
        EMS Interfacility Transportation             57,643        74,108        52,000         93,684         41,684         80.16%
        EMS Contract                                256,244        57,648        10,000              0        (10,000)      -100.00%
        EMS Training                                 53,788       125,381       243,300        180,000        (63,300)       -26.02%
     Subtotal - Chg/Svc - Other                   3,612,383     4,062,868     4,263,672      4,545,316        281,644          6.61%
     Subtotal - Charges For Services              8,220,601     9,363,711     9,239,397      9,689,654        450,257          4.87%

     Fines and Forfeitures
        Court Fines                               1,179,437     1,094,053     1,034,800      1,065,844         31,044          3.00%
        Police Education                                  0             0        16,872         17,378            506          3.00%
        Other Police Fines                          193,533       168,237       192,400        194,324          1,924          1.00%
        Other Miscellaneous                             175       376,056         6,683          6,683              0          0.00%
     Subtotal                                     1,373,145     1,638,346     1,250,755      1,284,229         33,474          2.68%

        Interest                                    676,850     1,041,877       680,000        700,000         20,000          2.94%
        Rents & Royalties                           692,828       722,322       800,000        840,000         40,000          5.00%
        Charter School Lease                      1,200,000     1,200,000     1,200,000      1,300,000        100,000          8.33%

     Other Income:
        Auction                                     10,033             0        15,918         16,236             318         2.00%
        Recycling Material Revenue                 425,679       516,684       409,730        475,000          65,270        15.93%
        SAFER Grant                                      0             0             0         55,890          55,890            n/a
        Other Miscellaneous                         24,735       130,363       115,214        118,094           2,880         2.50%
     Subtotal                                      460,447       647,047       540,862        665,220         124,358        22.99%

     Total General Operating                     75,941,239    82,799,903    84,044,382     92,265,389      8,221,007          9.78%

     Other
        Capital Reserve                                  0             0       324,000              0        (324,000)      -100.00%
        Transfer from ESL Trust Fund                87,880        91,395        95,051         98,853           3,802          4.00%
        Transfer from Fire Fund                          0       285,386             0        228,060         228,060             n/a
        Transfer from CDBG Fund                          0             0       103,430        103,430               0          0.00%
     Total Other                                    87,880       376,781       522,481        430,343         (92,138)       -17.63%

     Grand Total - Revenues                     $76,029,119   $83,176,684   $84,566,863    $92,695,732     $8,128,869          9.61%




       10/12/2006 at 12:56 PM                                                                       Adopted General Fund 10-12-06




60                                                                                            Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
General Fund Summary (continued)
          Statement of Revenues and Expenditures
                                                General Fund
                                                                      FY 2006        FY 2007             $              %
                                          FY 2004       FY 2005       Adopted        Adopted        Change From     Change From
                                           Actual        Actual        Budget        Budget           FY 2006         FY 2006
Expenditures:
Departmental
   City Commission                           $226,254      $240,498      $272,993        $295,613         22,620         8.29%
   City Manager                             1,904,184     1,869,983     2,298,856       2,361,259         62,403         2.71%
   Human Resources                          1,208,605     1,271,517     1,515,430       1,634,427        118,997         7.85%
   Financial Services                       2,654,871     2,678,636     2,903,087       2,935,287         32,200         1.11%
   Information Services                     1,770,460     2,000,997     2,334,772       2,460,041        125,269         5.37%
   City Attorney                              931,704       796,370       889,548         873,403        (16,145)       -1.81%
   Development Services/Engineering           136,461       181,187       483,182         457,680        (25,502)       -5.28%
   Community Development                      817,671     1,044,852     1,334,536       1,406,685         72,149         5.41%
   Police                                  30,708,586    31,744,325    34,467,668      36,173,486      1,705,818         4.95%
   Code Enforcement                           842,871     1,025,312     1,136,906       1,279,839        142,933        12.57%
   Emergency Medical Services               5,557,026     6,093,475     6,584,257       7,382,928        798,671        12.13%
   Building                                 2,347,133     2,312,941     2,667,952       3,077,255        409,303        15.34%
   Public Works                             4,046,436     4,195,454     4,054,361       4,576,364        522,003        12.88%
   Parks & Recreation                       7,691,929     7,929,876     8,845,600       9,342,606        497,006         5.62%
   Aquatics                                 1,758,172     1,961,729     2,124,797       2,286,460        161,663         7.61%
   Sportsplex & Tennis                      1,188,953     1,457,208     1,605,311       1,681,719         76,408         4.76%
Total Departmental                         63,791,316    66,804,360    73,519,256      78,225,052      4,705,796         6.40%

Non-Departmental
   C.I.P.                                     327,784       182,430       324,000         400,000         76,000        23.46%
   Non-Departmental                         1,079,496     1,162,470     1,262,656       1,231,756        (30,900)       -2.45%
   Contingency                                 36,348        92,118       385,000         456,290         71,290        18.52%
   Economic Conditions Contingency                  0             0       225,000         234,000          9,000         4.00%
   Rebuilding Reserve (Wilma)                       0             0             0       1,088,500      1,088,500            n/a
   GIC Contribution                         3,009,093     2,984,000     3,200,000       2,984,000       (216,000)       -6.75%
   West Atlantic Branch Library                     0       142,302       295,000         303,850          8,850         3.00%
   Charter School (Lease Expense)             299,431       380,650       337,250         435,043         97,793        29.00%
   Market Adjustments                               0             0             0         460,000        460,000            n/a
   Property/Casualty                          663,768       745,686       750,384       1,187,366        436,982        58.23%
   Fire Fund Govt. Assessment                  83,009        91,950       112,799         144,757         31,958        28.33%
Subtotal - Non-Departmental                 5,498,930     5,781,606     6,892,089       8,925,562      2,033,473        29.50%

Interfund Transfers:
    Fire Fund Nonprofit Subsidy               481,807       544,668       463,953         602,847        138,894        29.94%
    Fire Fund Operating Subsidy                     0             0             0         544,500        544,500            n/a
    Center for the Performing Arts Fund       595,000       595,000       495,000         495,000              0         0.00%
    Capital Projects                                0        16,429             0               0              0            n/a
    Museum of Fine Art                         61,948        63,000        63,000          63,000              0         0.00%
Subtotal - Interfund Transfers              1,138,755     1,219,097     1,021,953       1,705,347        683,394        66.87%

Capital Financing
   FIFC Loan - '01                            719,055       955,714     1,228,917       1,516,447        287,530        23.40%
   FIFC Loan - '02B                           667,252       702,584       274,452         695,028        420,576       153.24%
Subtotal - Capital Financing                1,386,307     1,658,298     1,503,369       2,211,475        708,106        47.10%

Bond Debt Service:
   Rev Bonds - '94                            392,858       392,239             0               0              0             n/a
   Rev Bonds - '96                            261,122       261,122             0               0              0             n/a
   Rev Bonds - '98                            561,186       557,186             0               0              0             n/a
   Rev Bonds - '99                            135,588       135,588             0               0              0             n/a
   Rev Bonds - '04 (Refunding)                      0             0     1,630,196       1,628,296         (1,900)        -0.12%
Subtotal - Debt Service                     1,350,754     1,346,135     1,630,196       1,628,296         (1,900)        -0.12%

Total Non-Departmental                      9,374,746    10,005,136    11,047,607      14,470,680      3,423,073        30.98%

Grand Total - Expenditures                $73,166,062   $76,809,497   $84,566,863     $92,695,732     $8,128,869         9.61%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures         $2,863,058    $6,367,187             $0             $0            $0             n/a

Positions                                      647.66        649.66        653.16          661.16           8.00         1.22%




 City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                    61
  10/12/2006 at 12:56 PM                                                                       Adopted General Fund 10-12-06
              Fire Fund Summary
                       Statement of Revenues and Expenditures
                                      Fire Fund
                                                                            FY 2006       FY 2007            $          %
                                               FY 2004       FY 2005        Adopted       Adopted       Change From Change From
                                                Actual        Actual         Budget       Budget          FY 2006     FY 2006
     Revenues:
     Non-Ad Valorem Special Assessment         $4,955,876    $5,464,788     $5,572,920     $5,965,180     $392,260        7.04%
     Partial Year Assessment                       46,470        40,323         30,000         15,000      (15,000)     -50.00%

     Intergovernmental
        Base Contract (Broward County)            101,085        96,962         10,000              0       (10,000)   -100.00%
        Contract (Parkland)                     1,292,090     2,004,462      2,094,204      3,068,564       974,360      46.53%
        Government Assessment                      83,009        91,950        112,799        144,757        31,958      28.33%
        Nonprofit Subsidy                         481,807       544,668        463,953        602,847       138,894      29.94%
     Sub-Total Intergovernmental                1,957,991     2,738,042      2,680,956      3,816,168     1,135,212      42.34%

     Charges for Services:
       Fire Inspection Services                   401,203       462,643        528,479        570,552       42,073       7.96%
       Fire Re-Inspection Fees                      5,800        22,592          8,641         17,000        8,359      96.74%
       Haz Mat Recovery Cost                            0             0          5,306          5,412          106       2.00%
       Training Tuition Fees                      525,427       688,640        982,500      1,063,230       80,730       8.22%
       Training Miscellaneous Fees                 74,333        52,840         80,000         99,860       19,860      24.83%
       State Education Incentive Fund              14,640        12,862         12,157         24,640       12,483     102.68%
       Grants                                       4,000             0              0              0            0          n/a
       Off Duty Fire Rescue Service                22,060        32,914         35,700         36,414          714       2.00%
       Plan Review Fees                            45,042       309,400        150,000        200,000       50,000      33.33%
     Sub-Total Charges for Services             1,092,505     1,581,891      1,802,783      2,017,108      214,325      11.89%

     Fines and Forfeitures:
        Fire Inspection Fines                       4,858       17,758          12,389         45,272       32,883     265.42%
        Miscellaneous Fines                            58            0               0              0            0          n/a
        False Alarm Recovery                        3,900        6,200           7,577          8,500          923      12.18%
     Sub-Total Fines and Forfeitures                8,816       23,958          19,966         53,772       33,806     169.32%

     Other:
       Interest Income                           106,449         87,057       133,091        111,679        (21,412)    -16.09%
       Miscellaneous Revenue                       2,978          7,021        12,298         12,543            245       1.99%
       Doubtful Accounts                         (92,543)       (23,247)            0              0              0          n/a
     Sub-Total Other                              16,884         70,831       145,389        124,222        (21,167)    -14.56%

     Interfund Transfers
       Overhead from Parkland                            0             0              0       24,073        24,073          n/a
       Reserves                                          0             0              0      544,500       544,500          n/a
     Sub-Total Interfund Transfers                       0             0              0      568,573       568,573       0.00%

     Grand Total - Revenues                    $8,078,542    $9,919,833    $10,252,014    $12,560,023    $2,308,009     22.51%

     Expenditures:
     Total Departmental                         6,877,924     8,397,202      9,488,677     11,477,175     1,988,498     20.96%
                                                                                                                            n/a
     Non-Departmental
       C.I.P.                                     13,273        36,304              0              0             0          n/a
       Contingency                                     0             0         70,327         73,843         3,516       5.00%
       Assessment Collection Costs                 4,991         5,020          7,041          7,041             0       0.00%
       Indirect Costs                             57,338       394,031        297,032        375,000        77,968      26.25%
       GIC Contribution                           61,379        61,379         61,379         61,379             0       0.00%
       Economic Conditions                             0             0              0         70,000        70,000          n/a
       Computer Replacement Program                1,296        23,366         30,600         58,900        28,300      92.48%
     Sub-Total - Non-Departmental                138,277       520,100        466,379        646,163       179,784      38.55%
                                                                                                                            n/a
     Interfund Transfers:
       Property Casualty Transfer                 24,584        27,618          27,792       166,648       138,856     499.63%
     Sub-Total - Interfund Transfers              24,584        27,618          27,792       166,648       138,856     499.63%

     Capital Financing:
       FIFC Loan-'01 ($1,206,459/4.25/15yrs)      45,242        45,242         45,242         51,275          6,033     13.33%
       FIFC Loan-'02B ($825,000/4.25%/15yrs)      96,065        91,064         91,064         85,902         (5,162)    -5.67%
     Sub-Total - Capital Financing               141,307       136,306        136,306        137,177            871      0.64%

     Bond Debt Service:
       Revenue Bond '94                           50,739        50,739              0              0              0         n/a
       Revenue Bond-'96                           68,758        68,758              0              0              0         n/a
       Revenue Bond-'99                           13,363        13,363              0              0              0         n/a
       Revenue Bond-'04 (Refunding)                    0             0        132,860        132,860              0      0.00%
     Sub-Total - Debt Service                    132,860       132,860        132,860        132,860             (0)     0.00%

     Total Non-Departmental                      437,028       816,884        763,337       1,082,848      319,511      41.86%

     Grand Total - Expenditures                $7,314,952    $9,214,086    $10,252,014    $12,560,023    $2,308,009     22.51%

     Revenues in Excess of Expenditures         $763,590      $705,747              $0             $0           $0          n/a
     Positions                                     80.34         83.34           87.34         106.34           19      21.75%


62                                                                                                          Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
                      Summary
Water & Sewer FundRevenues and Expenses
         Statement of
                                             Water and Sewer Fund
                                                                          FY 2006        FY 2007             $              %
                                              FY 2004       FY 2005       Adopted        Adopted        Change From     Change From
                                               Actual        Actual        Budget        Budget           FY 2006         FY 2006

Revenues
Operating Revenues
Water                                          $6,317,181    $6,476,003    $6,395,000      $6,554,875       $159,875          2.50%
Wastewater                                      7,946,297     8,058,575     7,987,000       8,186,675        199,675          2.50%
Meter Sales                                       113,983        22,853        50,000          50,000              0          0.00%
Charges for Service                                56,188        51,173        92,514          75,000        (17,514)       -18.93%

Total Operating Revenue                        14,433,649    14,608,604    14,524,514      14,866,550        342,036         2.35%

Non-Operating Revenues
Interest Income - Operating                       39,716        89,519        85,000         100,000          15,000        17.65%

Grand - Total Revenues                        $14,473,365   $14,698,123   $14,609,514     $14,966,550       $357,036         2.44%

Expenses
Departmental
 Administration                                 $281,333      $291,557      $355,805         $462,429       $106,624        29.97%
 Water Distribution                               685,806       697,165       790,524         839,018         48,494         6.13%
 Wastewater Collection                            879,801       939,626       933,074       1,046,326        113,252        12.14%
 Water Treatment                                1,966,096     2,039,456     2,251,056       2,559,222        308,166        13.69%
 Wastewater Treatment                           3,656,996     3,988,225     3,858,635       4,122,979        264,344         6.85%

Total Departmental                              7,470,032     7,956,029     8,189,094       9,029,974        840,880        10.27%

Non-Operating
 Capital                                          268,062       246,074       260,000          60,000       (200,000)       -76.92%
 Non-Departmental                               1,721,251     1,776,331     1,741,621       1,733,650         (7,971)        -0.46%
 Business Development                             135,000       160,000       175,000         150,000        (25,000)       -14.29%
 Property/Casualty                                540,848       607,596       611,424         729,085        117,661         19.24%
 Computer Replacement-Depreciation                  3,627        12,999        13,600          13,450           (150)        -1.10%
 Rev Bonds - '07 ($17,100,000/20 yrs/4.5%)              0             0             0         385,541        385,541             n/a
 W/S Debt Service 1998 & 2002 Series            2,798,190       220,408     2,787,025       2,789,850          2,825          0.10%
 Transfer To Renewal and Replacement              948,750       800,000       831,750          75,000       (756,750)       -90.98%

Total Non-Operating                             6,415,728     3,823,408     6,420,420       5,936,576       (483,844)        -7.54%

Grand Total - Expenses                        $13,885,760   $11,779,437   $14,609,514     $14,966,550       $357,036         2.44%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses                  $587,605     $2,918,686             $0             $0             $0            n/a

Positions                                           37.00         37.00         35.50           36.50           1.00         2.82%




City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                     63
                               Health Fund Summary
                                  Statement of Revenues and Expenses
                                             Health Fund
                                                                      FY 2006        FY 2007               $              %
                                          FY 2004       FY 2005       Adopted        Adopted          Change From     Change From
                                           Actual        Actual        Budget        Budget             FY 2006         FY 2006

Revenues
   Transfer - General Fund                $4,928,519    $5,306,056     $6,091,547      $6,821,891         $730,344         11.99%
              Water and Sewer Fund           275,747       295,852        332,095         374,771           42,676         12.85%
              Fire Fund                      526,003       660,241        817,049       1,023,535          206,486         25.27%
              General Insurance Fund          13,319        12,279         14,032          15,768            1,736         12.37%
              Equipment Services             114,895       123,272        149,677         168,185           18,508         12.37%
   Interest Income                            51,623        32,735         35,000          36,750            1,750          5.00%
   Recoveries - Retirees                     239,308       320,880        295,000         340,000           45,000         15.25%
                COBRA                         38,585        13,524         20,000          15,000           (5,000)       -25.00%
                Employees                    401,126       426,048        455,000         496,680           41,680          9.16%

Total Revenues                            $6,589,125    $7,190,887     $8,209,400      $9,292,580       $1,083,180        13.19%


Expenses
   Health Plan                            $6,251,269    $7,085,644     $7,847,400      $8,905,161       $1,057,761        13.48%
   Long Term Disability                      186,169       174,092        204,000         222,683           18,683         9.16%
   Life Insurance                            159,244       156,000        158,000         164,736            6,736         4.26%

Total Expenses                            $6,596,682    $7,415,736     $8,209,400      $9,292,580       $1,083,180        13.19%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses               ($7,557)    ($224,849)             $0              $0              $0            n/a

Positions                                       1.50          1.50           1.50              1.50           0.00          0.0%




64                                                                                        Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
General Insurance Fund Summary
                              Statement of Revenues and Expenditures
                                        General Insurance
                                                                   FY 2006        FY 2007               $              %
                                        FY 2004       FY 2005      Adopted        Adopted          Change From     Change From
                                         Actual        Actual       Budget        Budget             FY 2006         FY 2006

Revenues
 Transfer - General Fund                $1,354,109    $1,464,688    $1,480,305      $1,987,016         $506,711        34.23%
            Water and Sewer Fund           580,088       648,336       650,855         772,673          121,818        18.72%
            Fire Fund                       97,420       116,080       124,803         285,907          161,104       129.09%
            Health Fund                      1,379         1,379         1,765           1,783               18         1.02%
            Equipment Services              15,908        16,517        17,772          19,020            1,248         7.02%
 Interest Income                           155,323       133,794       120,000         126,000            6,000         5.00%
 Recoveries - Motor Vehicle                 20,794        21,025         6,200           6,510              310         5.00%
              Property Damage               19,026        23,179        14,000          14,700              700         5.00%
              Workers' Comp                 10,761         2,515         1,500           1,975              475        31.67%

Total Revenues                          $2,254,808    $2,427,513    $2,417,200      $3,215,584         $798,384        33.03%

Expenses
 Workers' Compensation                  $1,157,118     $936,655      $941,100       $1,025,500          $84,400          8.97%
 Property/Motor Vehicle                  1,302,521     1,240,342     1,193,100       2,007,084          813,984         68.22%
 Casualty/General Liability               (577,953)      121,486       283,000         183,000         (100,000)       -35.34%

Total Expenses                          $1,881,686    $2,298,483    $2,417,200      $3,215,584         $798,384        33.03%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses            $373,122      $129,030             $0              $0             $0             n/a

Positions                                     1.50          1.50          1.50              1.50           0.00          0.0%




City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                   65
                                                            School
                                 Coral Springs Charter Expenses Fund
                                  Statement of Revenues and
                                 Summary School Fund
                                         Charter
                                                                        FY 2006        FY 2007             $               %
                                          FY 2004        FY 2005        Adopted        Adopted        Change From      Change From
                                           Actual         Actual         Budget        Budget           FY 2006          FY 2006
Revenues
Intergovernmental                         $9,527,526     $10,124,848    $10,194,080     $11,119,911       $925,831           9.08%
Other Revenue/ Miscellaneous                       0               0         32,000          37,000          5,000          15.63%
Appropriation of Fund Balance                      0               0         54,300          38,000        (16,300)        -30.02%

Total Revenues                            $9,527,526     $10,124,848    $10,280,380     $11,194,911       $914,531          8.90%

Expenditures
Operating Expenses (CS USA)               $7,728,280      $8,261,957     $8,803,680      $9,894,911     $1,091,231          12.40%
Transfer to General Fund-Lease             1,200,000       1,200,000      1,200,000       1,300,000        100,000           8.33%
Capital                                      133,792         386,343        276,700               0       (276,700)       -100.00%

Total Expenditures                        $9,062,072      $9,848,300    $10,280,380     $11,194,911       $914,531          8.90%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures          $465,454       $276,548               $0             $0             $0             n/a




                                 Conference Center Fund Summary
                                  Statement of Revenues and Expenses
                                        Conference Center Fund
                                                                        FY 2006        FY 2007             $               %
                                          FY 2004        FY 2005        Adopted        Adopted        Change From      Change From
                                           Actual         Actual         Budget        Budget           FY 2006          FY 2006

Revenues
   Facility Lease Payment                           $0             $0      $180,000        $180,000              $0          0.00%
   Interfund Transfer-CIP                            0              0       250,000               0        (250,000)      -100.00%

Total Revenues                                      $0             $0      $430,000        $180,000      ($250,000)        -58.14%

Expenditures
   Capital                                          $0             $0      $250,000              $0      ($250,000)       -100.00%
   Future Capital                                    0              0       180,000         180,000              0           0.00%

Total Expenditures                                  $0             $0      $430,000        $180,000      ($250,000)        -58.14%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures                  $0             $0             $0             $0             $0             n/a




66                                                                                          Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Coral Springs Center for the Arts Fund
Summary Statement of Revenues and Expenses
                Center for the Arts Fund
                                                                        FY 2006        FY 2007             $                %
                                          FY 2004        FY 2005        Adopted        Adopted        change from       change from
                                           Actual         Actual         Budget        Budget           FY 2006           FY 2006

Revenues
   PFM Shared Revenues                      $206,148             $0       $245,000        $245,000              $0            0.00%
   Interfund Transfers--Museum Subsidy        61,948         63,000         63,000          63,000               0            0.00%
   Interfund Transfers--CIP                   58,535         53,625              0               0               0               n/a
   Interfund Transfers--Theater Subsidy      595,000        595,000        495,000         495,000               0            0.00%

Total Revenues                              $921,631       $711,625       $803,000        $803,000              $0            0.00%

Expenses
Theater
   Expenses                                  $40,668         $7,340        $65,000         $65,000              $0            0.00%
   PFM Operating Subsidy                     595,000        512,438        495,000         495,000               0            0.00%
Subtotal                                     635,668        519,778        560,000         560,000               0            0.00%
Museum
   Museum Operating Subsidy                   61,948         63,000         63,000          63,000                  0         0.00%
Non-Departmental
   Capital                                   200,289        144,736        180,000         180,000                  0         0.00%
Subtotal                                     200,289        144,736        180,000         180,000                  0         0.00%

Total Expenses                              $897,905       $727,514       $803,000        $803,000              $0            0.00%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses               $23,726       ($15,889)              $0             $0             $0              n/a




Public Art Fund Summary
                                  Statement of Revenues and Expenses
                                            Public Art Fund
                                                                        FY 2006        FY 2007             $                %
                                          FY 2004        FY 2005        Adopted        Adopted        Change From       Change From
                                           Actual         Actual         Budget        Budget           FY 2006           FY 2006

Revenues
   Public Art Fees                                  $0             $0      $143,000       $241,500         $98,500           68.88%
Total Revenues                                      $0             $0      $143,000       $241,500         $98,500           68.88%

Expenditures
   Capital                                          $0             $0      $143,000       $241,500         $98,500           68.88%
Total Expenditures                                  $0             $0      $143,000       $241,500         $98,500           68.88%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures                  $0             $0             $0             $0             $0               n/a




City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                        67
                             Equipment Services Fund Summary
                                                               FY 2006        FY 2007             $              %
                                     FY 2004      FY 2005      Adopted        Adopted        Change From     Change From
                                      Actual       Actual       Budget        Budget           FY 2006         FY 2006
Revenues
 Fuel/Maintenance Transfer-
    General Fund                     $1,574,365   $1,666,851    $1,807,390      $2,330,881       $523,491         28.96%
    Water and Sewer Fund                153,100      152,370       166,620         181,935         15,315          9.19%
    Fire Fund                           162,540      166,220       213,990         245,854         31,864         14.89%
 Parkland Fuel/Maintenance Charge             0            0        52,420          42,000        (10,420)       -19.88%
 Vehicle Charge Back Transfer-
    General Fund                      1,858,931    1,945,633     1,895,435       2,146,744        251,309         13.26%
    Water and Sewer Fund                210,279      218,944       201,238         178,265        (22,973)       -11.42%
    Fire Fund                           330,790      335,423       528,327         431,241        (97,086)       -18.38%
 Interest                               126,321      126,363       140,000         160,000         20,000         14.29%
 Other                                   69,062      136,916        25,000          25,000              0          0.00%
 Fund Balance/Ford Warranty               5,218        5,791       251,580         251,580              0          0.00%
 Approp. Fund Balance/Debt Service            0            0             0          70,441         70,441             n/a
 Approp. Fund Balance                 1,938,652    1,918,000     1,482,300       2,640,580      1,158,280         78.14%

Total Revenues                       $6,429,258   $6,672,511    $6,764,300      $8,704,521     $1,940,221        28.68%


Expenses
 Personal                             $681,188     $676,368      $758,886         $801,057        $42,171         5.56%
 Benefits                               225,192      239,334       282,165         306,504         24,339         8.63%
 Other Expenses                         912,239    1,103,610     1,486,375       2,037,689        551,314        37.09%
 Capital                                  1,195        3,657        15,000          50,000         35,000       233.33%
 Charge Back Expense                  2,400,000    2,500,000     2,625,000       2,756,250        131,250         5.00%
 FIFC Loan-01                            62,154       62,154        62,154          70,441          8,287        13.33%
 Equipment Purchases                  1,938,652    1,918,000     1,482,300       2,640,580      1,158,280        78.14%
 Parkland Fuel/Maintenance Expense            0        9,875        52,420          42,000        (10,420)      -19.88%

Total Expenses                       $6,220,620   $6,512,998    $6,764,300      $8,704,521     $1,940,221        28.68%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses         $208,638     $159,513             $0             $0             $0            n/a

Positions                                 15.00        15.00         16.00           16.00           0.00           0.0%




68                                                                                 Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Debt Service Fund Summary
                          Statement of Revenue and Expenditures
                                    Debt Service Fund
                                                                                              FY 2006        FY 2007            $           %
                                                              FY 2004         FY 2005         Adopted        Adopted        Change from Change from
                                                               Actual          Actual          Budget        Budget          FY 2006     FY 2006

Revenues
  Ad Valorem Taxes                                           $2,630,997      $2,743,518      $1,960,764      $1,922,779       ($37,985)      -1.94%
  Transfer from General Fund                                  2,737,061       3,004,433       3,133,565       3,839,771        706,206       22.54%
  Transfer from Fire Fund                                       409,629         269,166         269,166         270,037            871        0.32%
  Transfer from Equipment Services Fund                          62,154          62,154          62,154          70,441          8,287       13.33%
  Interfund Transfer - Reserves                                       0               0         477,300         600,000        122,700       25.71%
  Interest Income                                               147,351         193,160           8,366           9,629          1,263       15.10%
Total Revenues                                               $5,987,192      $6,272,431      $5,911,315      $6,712,657       $801,342       13.56%

* Interest income fluctuates yearly based on how much cash is reserved, including the 10% debt commitment.


Expenditures
  General Obligation Bond-2003B(Refunding)                   $1,409,300      $1,402,800      $1,421,050              $0     ($1,421,050)   -100.00%
  General Obligation Bond-2003A(Refunding)                      366,805         314,278         352,055         349,155          (2,900)     -0.82%
  General Obligation Bond-2005A (Refunding)                     624,218          31,478         153,471         608,063         454,592     296.21%
  General Obligation Bond-2005B (Refunding)                     572,935          14,900         519,854         527,354           7,500       1.44%
  General Obligation Bond-2006 - Public Safety                        0               0               0       1,045,836       1,045,836          n/a
Total General Obligation Bond                                 2,973,258       1,763,456       2,446,430       2,530,408          83,978       3.43%

  Franchise Revenue Bond-1994                                    444,297              0               0               0               0          n/a
  Franchise Revenue Bond-1996(2002 Defease)                      329,880              0               0               0               0          n/a
  Franchise Revenue Bond-1998 (Ref. 1995)                        561,636              0               0               0               0          n/a
  Franchise Revenue Bond-1999                                    149,376              0               0               0               0          n/a
  Franchise Revenue Bond-2004 (Refunding)                              0      1,704,063       1,763,056       1,761,156          (1,900)     -0.11%
Total Franchise Revenue Bond                                  1,485,189       1,704,063       1,763,056       1,761,156          (1,900)     -0.11%

  FIFC Loan-2001A                                               341,227         808,407       1,336,313       1,638,163        301,850       22.59%
  FIFC Loan-2002B                                               694,169         737,665         365,516         780,930        415,414      113.65%
Total Variable Rate                                           1,035,396       1,546,072       1,701,829       2,419,093        717,264       42.15%

Other
  Issuance Costs                                                   8,017         168,041                0        2,000           2,000           n/a
Total Other                                                        8,017         168,041                0        2,000           2,000           n/a

Total Expenditures                                            $5,501,860      $5,181,632      $5,911,315     $6,712,657       $801,342       13.56%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures                              $485,332      $1,090,799                $0             $0           $0        0.00%




City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                         69
Major Capital Projects by Department
                                                 Proposed FY2007
                                             Major Capital Improvements
                                                   By Department
 Department                                         Description                                            Amount
 All Hazards Preparedness (Public Works)            Generator for Mullins Gymnasium                         270,000
 All Hazards Preparedness (Police)                  Portable Traffic Control Signals                        220,000
 All Hazards Preparedness (Equipment Services)      Additional Diesel Fueling Stations                      192,000

 Center for the Arts                                 Carpeting/FF&E                                         130,000

 Development Services                                Public Safety Imp/Mullins Master Plan                13,500,000
 Development Services                                New City Hall                                           400,000
 Development Services                                Traffic Calming                                         200,000
 Development Services                                CDBG Planning & Admin/Plan Prep/Reporting               186,059
 Development Services                                Street Indexing Signage                                 158,000
 Development Services                                Housing Rehabilitation                                  110,235

 Emergency Medical Services (EMS)                    Rescue Unit and Equipment                              196,960

 Equipment Services                                  Equipment Replacement Items                           2,942,290

 Fire Fund                                           Training Simulator Tower                               500,000
 Fire Fund                                           Fire Station Renovation 71                             227,725
 Fire Fund                                           Tactical Rescue Training Equipment                     122,700
 Fire Fund                                           Equipment for new Fire Pumpers                         114,036

 Parks & Recreation                                  BMX Track Relocation                                    250,000
 Parks & Recreation                                  Neighborhood Park Renovations                           100,000
 Parks & Recreation                                  Entranceway Beautification                              150,000
 Parks & Recreation                                  Linear Parks                                            175,000
 Parks & Recreation                                  Light Fixture Replacement Program                       100,000
 Parks & Recreation                                  Mullins Park Renovations                                100,000

 Police                                              Replacement of Underground Fuel Tanks                   400,000

 Public Art Fund                                     Community Park Artwork                                  105,000

 Public Works                                        N.W. 20th St. Drainage & Sidewalk Upgrades              100,000
 Public Works                                        Air Conditioning System Rep & Maintenance               150,000
 Public Works                                        Meadows and Dells Drainage Improvements                 230,000
 Public Works                                        Roof Repair Maintenance/Replacement                     211,000
 Public Works                                        Closed Landfill Security                                175,100

 Transportation                                      Road Resurfacing Program                                835,400
 Transportation                                      Alley Refurbishment Program                             185,500
 Transportation                                      Guard Rail Installation & Management                    136,500
 Transportation                                      Downtown Pathways Phase I (CDBG)                        109,000

 Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection            Rehab of Lift Stations 20A and 20B                     1,577,000
 Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection            Filter Valves and Actuators                              455,000
 Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection            Accelators 1 & 2                                         247,000
 Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection            Water Interconnect with Margate                          229,000

 Water Treatment                                     Replacement of Water Plant Generator                   1,500,000
 Water Treatment                                     Raw Water Supply Metering @ WTP                          414,000
 Water Treatment                                     Existing Well Capacity and Rehab Program                 298,000
 Water Treatment                                     Raw Water Supply Metering @ Well Sites                   296,000
 Water Treatment                                     Replacement of Forest Hills Well Generator               250,000
 Water Treatment                                     Site Selection for Six New Raw Water Wells               165,000
 Water Treatment                                     Ammoniator Replacement                                   138,000
 Water Treatment                                     Replacement of Lime Silos/Feeders                        100,000




70                                                                                                Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
Major Capital Projects by Location
                                                                City Wide Impact
           A/C Maintenance & Replacement             Traffic Calming                                     Portable Traffic Control Signals
           BMX Track Relocation                      Road Resurfacing Program                          Site Selection for New Raw Water Wells
           Neighborhood Parks Renovation             Alley Refurbish Program                           Light Fixture Replacement Program
           Planning and Administration CDBG          Accelators 1 & 2                                  Community Park Artwork
           Alley Refurbishment Program               Housing Rehabilitation                            Linear Parks
           Guard Rail Installation & Management      Filter Valves & Actuators                         Existing Well Capacity and Rehab
           Raw Water Supply Metering at Well Sites   Additional Diesel Fueling Stations                Equipment for New Fire Pumpers
           Equipment Replacement Items               Tactical Rescue Training Equipment                Street Indexing Signage
           Rescue Unit and Equipment                 Roof Repair/Maintenance                           Water Interconnect with Margate
           Closed Landfill Security                   Downtown Pathways Phase I


                                                       Entranceway                        Replace Water Plant Generator &
                                                       Beautification                            Lime Silos/Feeders
                      Center for the Arts
                           FF&E                                                                                  Raw Water Supply Metering
                                                                                                                and Ammoniator Replacements
       Fire Station 71
        Renovations



              Training
           Simulator Tower                                                                                                         Meadows & Dells
                                                                                                                                      Drainage
                                                                                                                                    Improvements
        Entranceway
        Beautification


                                                                                                                  Mullins Park Renovations
       New City Hall
                                                                                                                Generator for Mullins
                                                                                                                    Gymnasium
 Police Replacement of
Underground Fuel Tanks
                                                                                                          Forest Hills Park
                                                                                                             Generator




  Entranceway                                                                                           Public Safety Improvements
  Beautification                                                                                            Mullins Master Plan




                                       Rehab of Lift Stations               NW 20th St. Drainage
                                           20A & 20B                        & Sidewalk Upgrades

  City of Coral Springs, Florida                                                                                                                71
72   Fiscal Year 2007 Business Plan
City of Coral Springs, Florida
           9551 West Sample Road
         Coral Springs, Florida 33065
      www.coralsprings.org • 954-344-1000

								
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